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propitious

propitious

propitious Sentence Examples

  • The moment was propitious, and his efforts met with success.

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  • When Elizabeth ascended the throne, Dee was asked by Lord Dudley to name a propitious day for the coronation.

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  • One was propitious to marriage, another to entrance upon school-life, a third to the first ploughing, a fourth to laying the foundation of a house.

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  • The timing was propitious, as black clouds had begun to roll up the valley and gather above them, the advance guard of a summer shower.

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  • was a good horseman, and had circumstances been more propitious he might have left his mark in the sporting annals of the country.

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  • But circumstances were not then propitious, and the party had to return to Nan-king.

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  • The first-fruits of a crop were usually dedicated to the gods to prevent them from being angry; and new canoes, fishing-nets, &c., were dedicated by prayers and offerings, in order that the gods might be propitious to their owners in their use.

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  • Of 1748 he says, " This year, the twelfth of my age, I shall note as the most propitious to the growth of my intellectual stature."

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  • St Basil, for example, says: "I accept also the holy apostles, prophets and martyrs, and I call upon them for their intercession to God, that by them, that is by their mediation, the good God may be propitious to me, and that I may be granted redemption for my offences" (Epist.

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  • When the latter desired to double the number of the equestrian centuries, Navius opposed him, declaring that it must not be done unless the omens were propitious, and, as a proof of his powers of divination, cut through a whetstone with a razor.

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  • His success depends not alone on skill and judgment, for some seasons, or days even, are found more propitious than others.

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  • (J) to mean happy or propitious, possibly an allusion to the fertility of the tribe's territory (with which cf.

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  • At the same time a song was sung, in which the god was entreated to be propitious in the coming year.

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  • The time, therefore, as far as the Roman Catholics themselves were concerned, was not a propitious one for introducing the moderate concessions which alone James had promised: James, too, on his side, found that religious toleration, though clearly sound in principle, was difficult in practice.

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  • At these goats were sacrificed to him with libations of wine and milk, and he was implored to be propitious to fields and flocks.

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  • An atmosphere is thus created which is highly propitious for the intriguers and political horse traders grouped around Journal du Peuple.

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  • propitious sign, since it indicated no expectation of any attempt at a rescue.

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  • The timing of this second campaign did not seem propitious.

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  • This circumstance is probably explained by the greater care and attention bestowed both on the cultivation of the vine and on the manufacture of the wine in northern countries than in those where the climate is more propitious.

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  • The timing was propitious, as black clouds had begun to roll up the valley and gather above them, the advance guard of a summer shower.

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  • These are very propitious circumstances for a third party, of which Canada has at least two.

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  • Men must have prospected almost fanatically to find so propitious a site.

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  • propitious circumstances for a third party, of which Canada has at least two.

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  • propitious moment to finally get to work to prevent an arms race in outer space.

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  • propitious time for treating various ailments in any part of the body.

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  • propitious selection.

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  • propitious period, rising against a euro that still had to prove itself.

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  • The moment was propitious, and his efforts met with success.

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  • If matters are propitious to the development of these buds, then a tuft of twigs is formed and no burr; but if the incipient twigs are also destroyed at an early stage, new buds are again formed, and in larger numbers than before, and the continued repetition of these processes leads to a sort of conglomerate woody mass of fused bud-bases, not dead, but unable to grow Out, and thus each contributing a crowded portion of woody material as it slowly grows.

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  • Of 1748 he says, " This year, the twelfth of my age, I shall note as the most propitious to the growth of my intellectual stature."

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  • Subsequent writers add that Christ, looking at him with a benign countenance, said: "I shall be propitious to you"; while others add the significant words, "at Rome."

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  • St Basil, for example, says: "I accept also the holy apostles, prophets and martyrs, and I call upon them for their intercession to God, that by them, that is by their mediation, the good God may be propitious to me, and that I may be granted redemption for my offences" (Epist.

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  • This circumstance is probably explained by the greater care and attention bestowed both on the cultivation of the vine and on the manufacture of the wine in northern countries than in those where the climate is more propitious.

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  • When the latter desired to double the number of the equestrian centuries, Navius opposed him, declaring that it must not be done unless the omens were propitious, and, as a proof of his powers of divination, cut through a whetstone with a razor.

    0
    0
  • One was propitious to marriage, another to entrance upon school-life, a third to the first ploughing, a fourth to laying the foundation of a house.

    0
    0
  • When Elizabeth ascended the throne, Dee was asked by Lord Dudley to name a propitious day for the coronation.

    0
    0
  • His success depends not alone on skill and judgment, for some seasons, or days even, are found more propitious than others.

    0
    0
  • At these goats were sacrificed to him with libations of wine and milk, and he was implored to be propitious to fields and flocks.

    0
    0
  • The first-fruits of a crop were usually dedicated to the gods to prevent them from being angry; and new canoes, fishing-nets, &c., were dedicated by prayers and offerings, in order that the gods might be propitious to their owners in their use.

    0
    0
  • (J) to mean happy or propitious, possibly an allusion to the fertility of the tribe's territory (with which cf.

    0
    0
  • The time, therefore, as far as the Roman Catholics themselves were concerned, was not a propitious one for introducing the moderate concessions which alone James had promised: James, too, on his side, found that religious toleration, though clearly sound in principle, was difficult in practice.

    0
    0
  • At the same time a song was sung, in which the god was entreated to be propitious in the coming year.

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    0
  • But circumstances were not then propitious, and the party had to return to Nan-king.

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  • was a good horseman, and had circumstances been more propitious he might have left his mark in the sporting annals of the country.

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