Propagation sentence example

propagation
  • Propagation facilities are being greatly improved, and there are stringent laws for the protection of immature fish.
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  • John was sent out by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, and hoped to labour as a missionary among the Indians, but though he had many interesting conversations with them the mission was found to be impracticable.
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  • His only published works are two sermons, one preached before the Lords (London, 1794), the other before the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (London, 1797).
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  • His prize subjects were, the capstan, the propagation of light, and the magnet.
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  • Propagation is by the formation of new corms from the parent corm, and by seeds.
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  • The motion of a particle of air is, as represented in these illustrations, to and fro in the direction of propagation, i.e.
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  • That which we term the Record of the Past comprises the " taboos,' the customs, the traditions, the beliefs, the knowledge which are handed on by one generation to another independently of organic propagation.
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  • No attempt should ever be made to raise large crops of tobacco from imported seed, but only a small crop, and the seed of the selected plants should be used for future propagation.
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  • The manifold plate is then heavily punched from one side, so that the opposite face protrudes in broken blisters, which are then hammered down until each becomes a centre of wave propagation.
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  • If we take one of these spheres a distance from the source very great as compared with a single wave-length, and draw a radius to a point on the sphere, then for some little way round that point the sphere may be regarded as a plane perpendicular to the radius or the line of propagation.
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  • Every particle in the plane will have the same displacement and the same velocity, and these will be perpendicular to the plane and parallel to the line of propagation.
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  • They found that the velocity of propagation of different musical sounds was the same.
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  • He suggests that the propagation of earthquake disturbances is probably affected by the curvature of the surface of the globe, which may act like a whispering gallery.
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  • Hence sound rays, in passing from one medium into another, are bent in towards the normal, or the reverse, according as the velocity of propagation in the former exceeds or falls short of that in the latter.
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  • The vibrations of certain sources of sound may be represented, at least as a first approximation, as consisting of stationary waves, and from a consideration of the rate of propagation of waves along these sources we can deduce their frequency when we know their length.
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  • We shall find the velocity of propagation, just as in previous cases, from the consideration of transfer of momentum.
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  • The velocity of propagation of a torsional disturbance along a wire of circular section may be found by the transfer of momentum method, remembering that we must now replace linear momentum by angular momentum.
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  • If, instead of considering one point in a succession of instants, we consider a succession of points along the line of propagation at the same instant, we evidently have waves of amplitude varying from 2a down to o, and then up to 2a again in distance U/(ni - n2).
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  • The only aether which has survived is that which was invented by Huygens to explain the propagation of light.
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  • The analytical equations which represent the propagation of light in free aether, and also in aether modified by the presence of matter, were originally developed on the analogy of the equations of propagation of elastic effects in solid media.
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  • In the present case the total dielectric contribution to this current works out to be the change per unit time in the electric separation in the molecules of the element of volume, as it moves uniformly with the matter, all other effects being compensated molecularly without affecting the propagation.
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  • If v varies with respect to locality, or if there is a velocity of convection (p,q,r) variable with respect to direction and position, and analytical expression of the relation (ii) assumes a more complex form; we thus derive the most general equations of electrodynamic propagation for matter treated as continuous, anyhow distributed and moving in any manner.
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  • Real-time dynamic system for monitoring ionospheric propagation conditions over europe.
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  • The topics covered range from antennas, through radiowave propagation, optics and radar, to communications signal processing and networks.
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  • With all the important work he accomplished in physics - the enunciation of Boyle's law, the discovery of the part taken by air in the propagation of sound, and investigations on the expansive force of freezing water, on specific gravities and refractive powers, on crystals, on electricity, on colour, on hydrostatics, &c. - chemistry was his peculiar and favourite study.
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  • In some of the genera parthenogenetic propagation is carried to such an extent that of the familiar Cypris it is said, " until quite lately males in this genus were unknown; and up to the present time no male has been found in the British Islands " (Brady and Norman, 1896).
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  • This Society, instituted to this special end, namely, to offer spiritual consolation for the advancement of souls in life and Christian doctrine, for the propagation of the faith by public preaching and the ministry of the word of God, spiritual exercises and works of charity and, especially, by the instruction .of children and ignorant people in Christianity, and by the spiritual, consolation of the faithful in Christ in hearing confessions...."
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  • In this original scheme it is clearly marked out "that this entire Society and all its members fight for God under the faithful obedience of the most sacred lord, the pope, and the other Roman pontiffs his successors"; and Ignatius makes particular mention th4t each member should "be bound by a special vow," beyond that formal obligation under which all Christians are of obeying the pope, "so that whatsoever the present and other Roman pontiffs for the time being shall ordain, pertaining to the advancement of souls and the propagation of the faith, to whatever provinces he shall resolve to send us, we are straightway bound to obey, as far as in us lies, without any tergiversation or excuse, whether he send us among the Turks or to any other unbelievers in being, even to those parts called India, or to any heretics or schismatics or likewise to any believers."
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  • Marriage and sexual propagation are considered either as absolute Evil or as altogether worthless, and carnal pleasure is frequently looked upon as forbidden.
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  • It can be shown mathematically that the velocity of propagation will be greatly increased if the frequency of the light-wave is slightly greater, and greatly diminished if it is slightly less than the natural frequency of the molecules; also that these effects become less and less marked as the difference in the two frequencies increases.
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  • The fundamental assumption is that the medium contains positively and negatively charged ions or electrons which are acted on by the periodic electric forces which occur in wave propagation on Maxwell's theory.
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  • Moreover, though each natural substance is corruptible (40apr6v), species is eternal (&t&ov), because there was always some individual of it to continue its original essence (expressed by the imperfect tense in TO TI Etvae), which is ungenerated and incorruptible; the natural world therefore is eternal; and nature is for ever aiming at an eternal propagation, by efficient acting on matter, of essence as end.
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  • It would therefore seem to be more appropriate to replace 1 - K- 1 by (2 - I)1112, where j s is the refractive index; but this expression involves the wave propagation for periods coinciding with free periods of the molecules.
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  • He was one of the founders of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.
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  • Though these writings are mostly the same in origin as are known from the older lists of apocryphal books, they underwent in this case a certain modification at the hands of their Bogomil editors, so as to be used for the propagation of their own specific doctrines.
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  • St Basil's influence, and the greater suitability of his institute to European ideas, ensured the propagation of Basilian monachism; and Sozomen says that in Cappadocia and the neighbouring provinces there were no hermits but only cenobites.
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  • The philosopher Thomas Harriot (1560-1621), one of his colleagues, laboured for the conversion of the natives, amongst whom the first baptism is recorded to have taken place on the 13th of August 1587.9 Raleigh himself presented as a parting gift to the Virginian Company the sum of loo " for the propagation of the Christian religion " in that settlement.
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  • During the Protectorate, in 1649, an ordinance was passed for " the promoting and propagating of the gospel of Jesus Christ in New England " by the erection of a corporation, to be called by the name of the President and Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England, to receive and dispose of moneys for the purpose, and a general collection was ordered to be made in all the parishes of England and Wales; and Cromwell himself devised a scheme for setting up a council for the Protestant religion, which should rival the Roman Propaganda, and consist of seven councillors and four secretaries for different provinces.'
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  • For now the corporation was styled " The Propagation of the Gospel in New England and the parts adjacent in America," and its object was defined to be " not only to seek the outward welfare and prosperity of those colonies, but more especially to endeavour the good and salvation of their immortal souls, and the publishing the most glorious gospel of Christ among them."
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  • He contributed to the expense of printing and publishing at Oxford the four Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles in the Malay language, and at his death left 5400 for the propagation of the gospel in heathen lands.
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  • Both the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the Church Missionary Society were at that time suffering from a general coldness which, in the case of the latter society, had led in that very year to the committee reporting " a failing treasury and a scanty supply of men."
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  • The Central African Mission (1858), indeed, is not for the most part manned by graduates, though it is led by them; but the Cambridge Mission at Delhi (1878), the Oxford Mission at Calcutta (1880), and the Dublin Missions in Chota Nagpur (Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 1891) and the Fuh-Kien Province of China (Church Missionary Society, 1887) consist of university men.
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  • Another influence upon university men and others who have taken holy orders is that of the Younger Clergy Union of the Church Missionary Society (1885) and the Junior Clergy Association of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1891).
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  • The Society for Promoting Female Education in the East (now absorbed by others, chiefly by the Church Missionary Society) was founded in 1834; the Scottish Ladies' Association for the Advancement of Female Education in India (which subsequently became two associations, for more general work, in connexion with the Established and Free Churches of Scotland respectively) in 1837; the Indian Female Normal School Society (now the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission) in 1861 (taking over an association dating from 1852); the Wesleyan Ladies' Auxiliary in 1859; the Women's Association of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, and the Baptist Zenana Mission, in 1867; The London Society's Female Branch, in 1875; the Church of England Zenana Society (an offshoot from the Indian Female Society) in 1880.
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  • It soon appeared, however, that neither the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel nor the Church Missionary Society was willing to be absorbed; and it was urged by some that in a great comprehensive national Church, comprising persons of widely different views, more zeal was likely to be thrown into voluntary than into official enterprises.
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  • The Baptist Society celebrated its centenary in 1892; the London Missionary Society (Congregational) did the same in 1895; the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge kept its bicentenary in 1898; the Church Missionary Society its centenary in 1899; the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel its bicentenary in 1900-1901; and the British and Foreign Bible Society its centenary in 1904.
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  • The revival was not a little due to the foundation in 18 22, by a few earnest but (as they called themselves) " humble and obscure " Catholics at Lyons, of a new voluntary society, called the Institution for the Propagation of the Faith.
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  • The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel came in 1819, mainly for colonists, the Church Missionary Society in 1837.
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  • West Africa was first visited by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 1752.
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  • The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1864), the Norwegian Missionary Society (1866), and the Friends' Foreign Missionary Association joined in the work, the prosperity of which received a severe check by the French annexation in 1896.
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  • The Anglican Church is not so strong in China as in some other fields; the American Episcopalians were first in the field in 1835, followed by the Church Missionary Society (in 1844), which has had stirring success in Fu-Kien, and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 1874.
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  • In the Straits Settlement the foundations of modern missionary effort were laid by the London Missionary Society pioneers who were waiting to get into China; they were succeeded by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1856), English Presbyterians (1875), Methodist Episcopalians (1884), who have a fine Anglo-Chinese College at Singapore, and the Church of England Zenana Society (1900).
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  • In Dutch Borneo the Rhenish Society is slowly making headway among the Dyaks; in British Borneo the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1848) and the Methodist Episcopalians occupy the field.
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  • The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel has an important mission in British Guiana.
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  • In some instances buds form on the roots, and may be used for purposes of propagation, as in the Japan quince, the globe thistle, the sea holly, some sea lavenders, Bocconia, Acanthus, &c. Of the tendency in buds to assume an independent existence gardeners avail themselves in the operations of striking " cuttings," and making " layers " and " pipings," as also in budding and grafting.
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  • For evergreens August or September, and for greenhouse and stove-plants the spring and summer months, are the times most suitable for propagation by cuttings.
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  • Those most suitable for the purpose of the gardener are carefully selected for propagation, while others not so desirable are destroyed; and thus after a few generations a fixed variety, race or strain superior to the original form is obtained.
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  • When used for propagation, the tubers are cut up into what are called " sets," every portion having an eye attached being capable of forming an independent plant.
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  • The cut portions of bulky sets should be suffered to lie a short time before being planted, in order to dry the surface and prevent rotting; this should not, however, be done with such tropical subjects as caladiums, the tubers of which are often cut up into very small fragments for propagation, and of course require to be manipulated in a properly heated propagating pit.
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  • The shoots when used for propagation must be transplanted with all the roots attached to them, care being taken not to injure the parent plant.
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  • Stem suckers are such as proceed from the base of the stem, as is often seen in the case of the currant and lilac. They should be removed in any case; when required for propagation they should be taken with all the roots attached to them, and they should be as thoroughly disbudded below ground as possible, or they are liable to continue the habit of suckering.
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  • For propagation the bulbiferous portion is pegged down on the surface of a pot of suitable soil; if kept close in a moist atmosphere, the little buds will soon strike root and form independent plants.
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  • For the propagation by grafts of stove and greenhouse plants the process adopted is whip-grafting or a modification of it.
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  • Root-grafting is sometimes resorted to where extensive increase is an object, or where stem-grafting or other means of propagation are not available.
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  • The most important use to which this mode of propagation is put is, however, the increase of roses, and of the various plums used as stocks for working the choicer stone fruits.
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  • The flower-gardener should have a small nursery, or reserve garden, for the propagation of the finer plants, to be transferred into the borders as often as is required.
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  • Continue the propagation of herbaceous plants, taking off the layers of carnations, picotees, pansies and chrysanthemums, by the end of the month; choice carnations and picotees may be potted and wintered in cold frames if the season is wet and ungenial.
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  • Plants from cuttings struck last month may now be shifted, and the propagation of all plants that are likely to be wanted should be continued.
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  • The steps in the propagation of the Benedictine rule are traced in the article Benedictines.
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  • The velocity of propagation of temperature waves will be the same under similar conditions in two substances which possess the same diffusivity, although they may differ in conductivity.
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  • As in the case of steady-flow methods, by far the simplest example to consider is that of the linear flow of heat in an infinite solid, which is most nearly realized in nature in the propagation of temperature waves in the surface of the soil.
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  • This can be measured graphically without any knowledge of the law of variation of the surface temperature, or of the laws of propagation of heat waves.
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  • For instance, the velocity of propagation of a wave having a period of a day is nearly twenty times as great as that of a wave with a period of one year; but on the other hand the penetration of the diurnal wave is nearly twenty times less, and the shorter waves die out more rapidly.
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  • In treating mathematically the propagation of other kinds of waves, it is necessary to analyse them into their simple-harmonic components, which may be treated as being propagated independently.
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  • Angstrom's Method consists in observing the propagation of heat waves in a bar, and is probably the most accurate method for 4 4 thehi 's ' 'so ' d 60 measuring the diffusivity of a metal, since the conditions may be widely varied and the correction for external loss of heat can be made comparatively small.
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  • If h = o, a = b = (urnc/k), as in the case of propagation of waves in the soil.
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  • Propagation is from seed only.
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  • That impression, however, is not correct, for in reality the demonstrations of these longer Meccan suras appear to have been peculiarly influential for the propagation of Islam.
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  • Propagation takes place by eggs, which are oval, quite white, with a very hard and strong shell.
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  • The idea of this originated with Bishop Montgomery, secretary to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, and was endorsed by a resolution of the United Boards of Mission in 1903.
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  • So Morris decided to become an architect, and for the better propagation of the views of the new brotherhood a magazine was at the same time projected, which was to make a speciality of social articles, besides poems and short stories.
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  • From 1880 to 1883 he was vice-principal of the theological college at Cuddesdon, and, when in 1884 Pusey House was founded at Oxford as a home for Dr Pusey's library and a centre for the propagation of his principles, he was appointed principal, a position which he held until 1893.
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  • The transmission is not by imitation, but by propagation.
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  • Attention has been concentrated on rats, and some observers seem disposed to lay upon them the whole blame for the propagation and spread of plague, which is held to be essentially a rat-borne disease.
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  • The phenomena attendant on the passage of electricity through solids, through liquids and through gases, are described in the article Electric conduction, and also Electrolysis, and the propagation of electrical vibrations in Electric Waves.
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  • The phenomena connected with the propagation of electric signals by underground insulated wires had already engaged the attention of Faraday in 1854, who pointed out the Leyden-jar-like action of an insulated subterranean wire.
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  • Coupling together these ideas he was finally enabled to prove that the propagation of electric and magnetic force takes place through space with a certain velocity determined by the dielectric constant and the magnetic permeability of the medium.
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  • Maxwell showed in this paper that the velocity of propagation of an electromagnetic impulse through space could also be determined by certain experimental methods which consisted in measuring the same electric quantity, capacity, resistance or potential in two ways.
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  • Maxwell suggested new methods for the determination of this ratio of the electrostatic to the electromagnetic units, and by experiments of great ingenuity was able to show that this ratio, which is also that of the velocity of the propagation of an electromagnetic impulse through space, is identical with that of light.
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  • These effects, as Hertz showed, indicated the establishment of stationary electric waves in space and the propagation of electric and magnetic force through space with a finite velocity.
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  • In January 1813 there was formed in Boston "The Baptist Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in India and other Foreign Parts."
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  • From the first the attempt to rouse the denomination to organized effort for the propagation of the gospel met with much opposition, agents of the Convention being looked upon by the less intelligent pastors and churches as highly-paid and irresponsible collectors of money to be used they knew not how, or for purposes of which they disapproved.
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  • Propagation is also readily effected by seeds for raising new varieties.
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  • Near the city is one of the five fish-hatcheries maintained by the state; it is largely devoted to the propagation of trout and other small fish.
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  • He studied the phenomena of electrical oscillations from 1869 to 1871, and in the latter year he announced that the velocity of the propagation of electromagnetic induction was about 314,000 metres per second.
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  • Marcion took up his residence permanently in Rome, but still undertook journeys for the propagation of his opinions.
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  • The determining cause of the formation of the tubers is not certainly known, but Professor Bernard has suggested that it is the presence of a fungus, Fusarium solani, which, growing in the underground shoots, irritates them and causes the swelling; the result is that an efficient method of propagation is secured independently of the seed.
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  • The second, and more familiar, type of pisciculture is that known as fish-hatching, with which must be associated the various methods of artificial propagation.
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  • The earlier advocates of artificial propagation and fish-hatching seem to have been under the impression that the thousands of fry resulting from a single act of artificial propagation meant a corresponding increase in the numbers of edible fish when once they had been deposited in suitable waters; and also that artificial fertilization ensured a greater proportion of fertilized eggs than the natural process.
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  • He also calculated the effect of surface-tension on the propagation of waves on the surface of a liquid, and determined the minimum velocity of a wave, and the velocity of the wind when it is just sufficient to disturb the surface of still water.
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  • Now it is shown in hydrodynamics that she velocity of propagation of waves in deep water is that acquired by a heavy body falling through half the radius of the circle whose circumference is the wave-length, or _ f_X _ ga 27rT 'I ' v2- 2r 2r pn This velocity is a minimum when X=2.7r gp' and the minimum value is v= 4 - p g For waves whose length from crest to crest is greater than X, the principal force concerned in the motion is that of gravitation.
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  • The waves produced by the body will travel forwards faster than the body till they reach a distance from it at which the relative velocity of the body and the fluid is equal to the velocity of propagation corresponding to the wave-length.
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  • For propagation of the tree, the seeds may be sown either when fresh, or, if preserved'in sand or earth, in spring.
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  • At Elbeuf on the Seine above Rouen there was formerly a hatchery for the artificial propagation of shad.
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  • He took a great interest in colonial missions, especially among the American Indians, and it is to his exertions that the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel owes its existence.
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  • His son, Lucien De La Rive, born at Geneva on the 3rd of April 1834, published papers on various mathematical and physical subjects, and with Edouard Sarasin carried out investigations on the propagation of electric waves.
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  • And when at the middle of the century the other great mendicant orders of Carmelites and Austin Friars, and also Servites arose their propagation showed that the possibilities of the mendicant movement had not been exhausted by the Dominicans and Franciscans.
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  • The space within is filled with radiations corresponding to this temperature, and these attain a certain equilibrium which permits the energy of radiation to be spoken of as a whole, as a scalar quantity, without express reference to the propagation or interference of the waves of which it is composed.
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  • While he was engaged in physiological researches, he composed a dissertation on the nature and propagation of sound, and an answer to a prize question concerning the masting of ships, to which the French Academy of Sciences adjudged the second rank in the year 5727.
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  • He was much interested in the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.
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  • The propagation of the faith in accordance with Hamza's initiation was undertaken by Ismael ibn Mahommed Tamimi, Mahommed ibn Wahab, Abul-Khair Selama ibn Abd al-Wahal ibn Samurri, and Moktana Baha ud-Din, the last of whom became known by his writings from Constantinople to the borders of India.
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  • While a number of ferns can be multiplied vegetatively, by buds formed on the leaves and in other ways, the regular mode of propagation is by sowing the spores shed from the ripe sporangia.
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  • In 1863 the Church of England began work in the island through the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the Church Missionary Society.
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  • Fourier for the propagation of heat; and if, in Fourier's solution of any problem of heat-conduction, we change the word "temperature" to "potential" and write "electric current" instead of "flux of heat," we have the solution of a corresponding problem of electric conduction.
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  • A stream of light coming directly from a natural source has no relation to space except that concerned in its direction of propagation, round which its properties are alike on all sides.
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  • The lateral characteristics of a polarized stream lead at once to the conclusion that the stream may be represented by a vector, and since this vector must indicate the direction in which the light travels as well as the plane of polarization, it is natural to infer that it is transverse to the direction of propagation.
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  • Apart from their importance from the economic standpoint, Aphides are chiefly remarkable for the phenomena connected with the propagation of the species.
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  • For them, it wasn't a method of propagation, either.
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  • Initiation, propagation, termination... The reaction of hydrogen and chlorine is a typical photochemical chain reaction involving radicals.
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  • Illustrated bilingual manual on propagation of threatened conifers in Vietnam.
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  • We design distorted diffraction gratings that simulate the effects of long propagation distances in a short instrument.
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  • The weather on 10 September was not favorable for anomalous propagation.
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  • Or, could it be that men see feminism as nothing more than the propagation of gender equality?
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  • The wavelength associated with the vector resultant of these three orthogonal propagation constants is just the free space wavelength lambda.
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  • This reduces stress on the plant and therefore reduces lost growing time and greatly reduces the risk of losing plants after propagation.
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  • For oblique propagation waves become linearly polarized at the crossover frequency.
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  • The project will combine analytical studies and numerical modeling tools for simulating wave propagation in fractured porous rock.
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  • Has there been subsequent vegetative propagation of material derived from seed?
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  • Clonal propagation -- asexual reproduction, including vegetative spread, producing a clone of the parent plant.
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  • Weather section states no anomalous propagation or northern light.
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  • Of particular interest is the modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation through heterogeneous media.
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  • In 1899, Fitzgerald asked him about electromagnetic wave propagation around a sphere, which Marconi's experiments showed to occur.
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  • Impedance transformation and matching, microwave networks, cavity resonators, antennas and propagation are also covered.
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  • Communists are not sanguine pacifists or neutral on the propagation of such deeply reactionary ideas in our society.
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  • Numerical studies like this can help to understand wave propagation phenomena observed on field recordings in volcano seismology.
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  • The effects of oblique propagation and a magnetic field shear are taken into account.
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  • The first is Bob Puttock's calculation for working out the changes in wave-guide propagation through the droop snoot of Concorde.
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  • We use 2D finite-difference modeling methods to compute the propagation of seismic waves in simplified volcanic structures.
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  • We investigate the propagation of well-defined vector modes along strongly guiding rectangular waveguides.
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  • The slower propagation of light in gas or water than in air or vacuum may be attributed to a greater density, or to a less rigidity, in the former case; or we may adopt the more complicated supposition that both these quantities vary, subject only to the condition which restricts the ratio of velocities to equality with the known refractive index.
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  • In any case the discovery is to some extent his own, for his proof of the law is founded upon the theory that light is the propagation of the aether in straight lines from the sun or luminous body to the eye (see Light).
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  • Here Drs Lowe and Sambon made the decisive experiments which proved that the propagation of malaria was due to the mosquito Anopheles claviger.
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  • Continuing his inquiries for the next year or two, he was able to discover the progressive propagation of electromagnetic action through space, to measure the length and velocity of electromagnetic waves, and to show that in the transverse nature of their vibration and their susceptibility to reflection, refraction and polarization they are in complete correspondence with the waves of light and heat.
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  • Moreover, as the velocity of propagation is a function of the frequency, there is distortion of the complex waves.
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  • It is plain that Blyth saw, and perhaps he was the first to see it, that geographical distribution was not unimportant in suggesting the affinities and differences of natural groups (pp. 258, 259); and, undeterred by the precepts and practice of the hitherto dominant English school of Ornithologists, he declared that " anatomy, when aided by every character which the manner of propagation, the progressive changes, and other physiological data supply, is the only sure basis of classification."
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  • Let 0 be any point in the medium situated at a distance from the point 0 1 which is large in comparison with the length of a wave; let O/O=r, and let this line make an angle 0 with the direction of propagation of the incident light, or the axis of x, and 4, with the direction of vibration, or axis of z.
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  • The introduction ctf the lamina (supposed to be devoid of inertia) will make no difference to the propagation of plane parallel sonorous waves through the position which it occupies.
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  • The origin, nature, and propagation of neoplasms of all kinds, especially of those which are malignant, are engaging much attention.
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  • The doctrine of heredity in disease thus took a larger aspect; the view of morbid series was no longer bounded even by the life of the individual; and the propagation of taints, and of morbid varieties of man, from generation to generation proved to be no mere repetition of fixed features but, even more frequently, to be modes of development or of dissolution betraying themselves often in widely dissimilar forms, in series often extending over many lives, the terms of which at first sight had seemed wholly disparate.
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  • The study of epidemic and endemic diseases generally has brought to light an array of facts which very strongly suggest that an intimate association exists between the soil and the appearance and propagation of certain diseases; but although experiments and observations allow this view to be looked upon as well established, still the precise role played by the soil in an aetiological respect is by no means so well understood as to make it possible to separate the factors and dogmatize on their effects.
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  • As already mentioned, all efforts to assimilate optical propagation to transmission of waves in an ordinary solid medium have failed; and though the idea of regions of intrinsic strain, as for example in unannealed glass, is familiar in physics, yet on account of the absence of mobility of the strain no attempt had been made to employ them to illustrate the electric fields of atomic charges.
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  • In Mauritius and the Seychelles the Church Missionary Society and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel are at work, especially among the coolies on the sugar plantations.
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  • But Omar did all he could to prevent the degradation of the Holy War, which, instead of being the ultimate expedient for the propagation of Islam, if all other means had failed, had often degenerated into mere pillaging expeditions against peaceful nations.
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  • In this paper, we propose propagation and routing algorithms for a fully decentralized, self-organizing network.
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  • The action potential can therefore jump large distances from node to node (1mm), a process that is called saltatory propagation.
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  • Conditions of onset of the self-induced transparency (SIT) regime of propagation are investigated.
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  • Senescence produces ' genetic death ', in that the senescent cell is incapable of further propagation.
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  • The study shows the visualization of shock wave propagation in an underwater explosion scenario.
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  • The first is Bob Puttock 's calculation for working out the changes in wave-guide propagation through the droop snoot of Concorde.
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  • The velocity of propagation of Rayleigh waves is smaller than that of body waves.
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  • Most meridional propagation velocities from high to low latitudes are less than 600 m/s.
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  • A well-informed owner helps prevent the propagation of breed specific defects and ultimately creates a long term healthier canine population.
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  • Propagation may be effected by division or by seeds which, in favorable seasons, are plentiful.
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  • Its propagation is too easy, for in many soils it is said to split up into offsets instead of growing to a flowering size.
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  • As to propagation, there is scarcely any need to enlarge upon that, as bulbs are imported so plentifully; and it is only necessary to separate the young bulbs and replant them in good soil.
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  • These youthful examples are infinitely superior to worn-out lifted stock, and yield quantities of vigorous cuttings for February and March propagation.
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  • The one I have found so useful is less than 1 foot high and of easy propagation and culture in ordinary soil.
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  • For its propagation seeds is the best way, as from division the plants do not seem to come so well.
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  • The Gardeners Network includes advice, information, and propagation techniques for pinks.
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  • For more about this wonderful group of plants, visit Hellebores, a website created by a hellebore aficionado that includes a large gallery of photos, history, cultivation and propagation information and more.
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  • In all cases of wave motion the wave-length is connected with the velocity of propagation of the radiation by the relation v=nX, where n is the frequency of the oscillations and X is the wave-length.
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  • Starting from an observation of Marconi's, a number of interesting facts have been accumulated on the absorbing effect of sunlight on the propagation of long Hertzian waves through space, and on the disturbing effects of atmospheric electricity as well as upon the influence of earth curvature and obstacles of various kinds interposed in the line between the sending and transmitting stations.4 Electric wave telegraphy has revolutionized our means of communication from place to place on the surface of the earth, making it possible to communicate instantly and certainly between places separated by several thousand miles, whilst The Electrician, 1904, 5 2, p. 407, or German Pat.
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  • When Gotama the Buddha, himself a Kosalan by birth, determined on the use, for the propagation of his religious reforms, of the living tongue of the people, he and his followers naturally made full use of the advantages already gained by the form of speech current through the wide extent of his own country.
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  • His powerful scientific imagination enabled him to realize that all the points of a wavefront originate partial waves, the aggregate effect of which is to reconstitute the primary disturbance at the subsequent stages of its advance, thus accomplishing its propagation; so that each primary undulation is the envelope of an indefinite number of secondary undulations.
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  • The first volume of its memoirs,' published in the following year, contained a paper by Lagrange entitled Recherches sur la nature et la propagation du son, in which the power of his analysis and his address in its application were equally conspicuous.
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  • There are besides a number of learned societies in the various provinces for the fostering of special provincial or national aims. There are also a number of societies for the propagation of culture, both amongst the Hungarian and the non-Hungarian nationalities.
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  • She wrote Institutions dehysique (1740), Dissertation sur la nature et la propagation du feu (1 744), Doutes sur les religions reculees (1792), and in 1756 published a translation of Newton's Principia.
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  • The hostility he encountered in the propagation of these new religious ideas after his return to Khorasan in 1052 and Sunnite fanaticism compelled him at last to flee, and after many wanderings he found a refuge in Yumgan (about 1060) in the mountains of Badakshan, where he spent as a hermit the last decades of his life, and gathered round him a considerable number of devoted adherents, who have handed down his doctrines to succeeding generations.
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  • Sieffert, on account of the superscription, would date as early as 70-80, but acknowledges the hyper-Pauline affinity of the heresy, its propagation as a doctrine, and close relation to the Nicolaitan of Rev. ii.
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  • His chapter on the flea, in which he not only describes its structure, but traces out the whole history of its metamorphoses from its first emergence from the egg, is full of interest - not so much for the exactness of his observations, as for its incidental revelation of the extraordinary ignorance then prevalent in regard to the origin and propagation of "this minute and despised creature," which some asserted to be produced from sand, others from dust, others from the dung of pigeons, and others from urine, but which he showed to be "endowed with as great perfection in its kind as any large animal," and proved to breed in the regular way of winged insects.
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  • But from the English conquest to the close of the colonial era the chief purpose of the government with respect to education was to prepare leaders for the state church; to this end King's College was founded in 1754, and from 1704 to 1776 the other schools were principally those maintained by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts.
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  • There is no " transverse " disturbance, that is, there is in air no motion across the line of propagation, for such motion could only be propagated from one layer to the next by the " viscous " resistance to relative motion, and would die away at a very short distance from the source.
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  • The figure shows that when the curve of displacement slopes down in the direction of propagation there is compression, and the pressure is above the normal, and that when it slopes up there is extension, and the pressure is below the normal.
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  • What would have happened had it continued to depend upon its spiritual force only for propagation we cannot say.
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  • There is very little crack propagation with such slow cycles.
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  • Both use an ultrasonic wave propagation sensor mounted in the liquid medium.
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  • We are applying these methods to study ultrashort pulse propagation within the cavity of semiconductor lasers.
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  • In addition, the propagation of intense laser pulses through capillary tubes was undertaken.
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  • In 1650 parliament appointed a commission "for the better propagation and preaching of the gospel in Wales," and Powell acted as one of the principal advisers of this body.
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  • In December 1797 he joined his brother and some others in the formation of the "Society for the Propagation of the Gospel at Home," in building chapels or "tabernacles" for congregations, in supporting missionaries, and in maintaining institutions for the education of young men to carry on the work of evangelization.
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  • The velocity of propagation of electric waves is the same as that of light, viz., about moo million feet, or 300 million metres, per second.
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  • His advocacy of an American episcopate, in connexion with which he wrote the Answer to Dr Mayhew's Observations on the Charter and Conduct of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (London 1764), raised considerable opposition in England and America.
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  • His ritual and mysteries (Sacra Savadia) gained a firm footing in Rome during the 2nd century A.D., although as early as 139 B.C. the first Jews who settled in the capital were expelled by virtue of a law which proscribed the propagation of the cult of Jupiter Sabazius.
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  • In 1747 he applied his new calculus to the problem of vibrating chords, the solution of which, as well as the theory of the oscillation of the air and the propagation of sound, had been given but incompletely by the geometricians who preceded him.
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  • It is one thing to protect individuals from mosquito bites, another to prevent the propagation of the parasite in a whole community.
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  • The mission establishments were taken over in 1826 by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, which subsequently founded new stations in several parts of the district.
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  • During the middle ages cattle and sheep were the chief farm animals, but the intermixture of stock consequent on the common-field system was a barrier to improvement in the breed and conduced to the propagation of disease.
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  • But, without entering upon matters of this kind, we may inquire in what manner a primary wave may be resolved into elementary secondary waves, and in particular as to the law of intensity and polarization in a secondary wave as dependent upon its direction of propagation, and upon the character as regards polarization of the primary wave.
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  • There seems to be little doubt, notwithstanding, that one of the chief functions of the nerve cell is that of the propagation of a trophicj influence along its axon.
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  • We have analogies to this in the two nuclei of some of the protozoa, the one being solely for the purpose of propagation, the other being associated with the functional activities of the cell.
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  • From the time of Plato medicine has been accused of ministering to the survival of unfit persons, and to their propagation of children.
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  • Moreover, freedom of trade and of travel has been promoted by a reform of the antiquated, cumbrous, and too often futile methods of quarantine - a reform as yet very far from complete, but founded upon a better understanding of the nature and propagation of disease.
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  • With v=o, the angular velocity of the cylinder is 2w; in this way the velocity may be calculated of the propagation of ripples and waves on the surface of a vertical whirlpool in a sink.
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  • The chief educational establishment is Codrington College, founded by Colonel ChristopherCodrington, who in 1710 bequeathed two estates to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.
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  • It commemorates "the introduction and propagation of the noble law of Ta t'sin in the Middle Kingdom," and beneath an incised cross sets out in Chinese and Syriac an abstract of Christian doctrine and the course of a Syrian mission in China beginning with the favourable reception of Olopan, who came from Judaea in 636.
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  • But Mill and the others were fully justified in not aiding the propagation of a doctrine in which they might not wholly concur.
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  • The artificial propagation and preservation of salmon and other edible fresh-water fish have been carried on successfully under the supervision of a state commission.
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  • Means of vegetative propagation are general.
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  • If we omitted it we should have to assume this, and equation (6) would give us the velocity of propagation if the assumption were justified.
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  • By considering only the particles of air found in a right line, he reduced the problem of the propagation of sound to the solution of the same partial differential equations that include the motions of vibrating strings, and demonstrated the insufficiency of the methods employed by both his great contemporaries in dealing with the latter subject.
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