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prominence

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prominence

prominence Sentence Examples

  • It is a more remarkable fact that, in spite of his prominence, neither Henry VIII.

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  • Judas and his zealots were thus able to maintain their prominence and gradually to increase their power.

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  • Each country is described with particular regard to its people as well as to its surface, and the prominence given to the human element is of special interest.

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  • With this view he studied the latter most laboriously, and in some measure certainly not without success, for he brought into prominence several points that had hitherto escaped the notice of his predecessors.

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  • He came again into prominence, however, during the World War.

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  • But by the ordinary student of thirty years later their work was to some extent overlooked, and the cell-wall assumed a prominence to which it was not entitled.

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  • Much prominence is also given to the cult of saints and martyrs.

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  • In the Geonic period there came into prominence the sect of the Karaites (Bene migra, " followers of the Scripture", the Protestants of Judaism, who rejected rabbinical authority, basing their doctrine and practice exclusively on The g P Y ICaraltes.

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  • show that Shishak's prominence was well known.'

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  • Gaseous Interchanges and their Mechanism.Another feature of the construction of the plant has in recent years come into greater prominence than was formerly the case.

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  • But his position as chief minister of Henry's ecclesiastical jurisdiction forced him into unpleasant prominence in connexion with the king's matrimonial experiences.

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  • Another element in this ideal scheme which comes into prominence is the sharp distinction between holy and profane.

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  • In this war, which, owing to the prominence of the Marsian rebels is often known as the Marsic War, they fought bravely against odds under their leader Q.

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  • He was the son of a raja of Thanesar, who gained prominence by successful wars against the Huns, and came to the throne in A.D.

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  • In 1509 William's young son, Philip, became landgrave, and by his vigorous personality brought his country into prominence during the religious troubles of the 16th century.

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  • The olfactory perceptive membrane is restricted to the posterior innermost region of the nasal chamber, where it covers a slight bulging-out prominence on the nasal wall.

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  • Turning to Christian evidence proper, we are struck with the continued prominence of the argument from prophecy.

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  • Many beetles make a hissing or chirping sound by rubbing a "scraper," formed by a sharp edge or prominence on some part of their exoskeleton, over a "file" formed by a number of fine ridges situate on an adjacent region.

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  • It is the custom of the Royal Agricultural Society of England to invite competitions at its annual shows in specified classes of implements, and an enumeration of these will indicate the character of the appliances which were thus brought into prominence in the latter years of the 19th and the early years of the 10th century.

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  • It gained prominence after 1543, when the archbishop of Esztergom and primate of Hungary made it his residence after the capture of Esztergom by the Turks.

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  • For the prominence of the " southern " element in Judah see E.

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  • An intermediate step between Anu viewed as the local deity of Erech (or some other centre), Bel as the god of Nippur, and Ea as the god of Eridu is represented by the prominence which each one of the centres associated with the three deities in question must have acquired, and which led to each one absorbing the qualities of other gods so as to give them a controlling position in an organized pantheon.

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  • In the south of the province Chanda was the seat of another Gond dynasty, which first came into prominence in the 16th century.

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  • Woolwich seems to have been a small fishing village until in the beginning of the 16th century it rose into prominence as a dockyard and naval station.

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  • Amid a great variety of motives the prominence of Kadesh in south Palestine is to be recognized, but it is uncertain what clans or tribes were at Kadesh, and it is possible that traditions, originally confined to those with whom the new conception of Yahweh is connected, were subsequently adopted by others who came to regard themselves as the worshippers of the only true Yahweh.

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  • He came into prominence in Aug.

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  • Anyone who even identified him would immediately attain national prominence just by doing so.

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  • We know from many sources the prominence assigned to women prophets in the Phrygian church.

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  • It constituted the most common form of divination in ancient Babylonia, where it can be traced back to the 3rd millennium B.C. Among the Etruscans the prominence of the rite led to the liver being looked upon as the trade-mark of the priest.

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  • In several passages the interpretation is bound up with that of Mizraim, and depends in general upon the question whether Ethiopia at a given time enjoyed the prominence given to it.

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  • A lenticel appears to the naked eye as a rounded or elongated scar, often forming a distinct prominence on the surface of the organ.

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  • In Israel as in Judah the political disasters not only meant a shifting of population, they also brought into prominence the old popular and non-official religion, the character of which is not to be condemned because of the attitude of lofty prophets in advance of their age.

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  • The prominence of Jerusalem, the centre of post-exilic Judaism, necessarily invited reflection.

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  • Many who followed the study of vegetable structure did not at that time give an equal prominence to this view.

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  • It is clear, however, that the Chinese came from the west, and entered their present territory along the course of the Hwang-ho at an unknown period, possibly about 3000 B.C. In early historical times China consisted of a shifting confederacy of feudal states, but about 220 B.C. the state of Tsin or Chin (whence the name China) came into prominence, and succeeded in forming a homogeneous empire, which advanced considerably towards the south.

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  • Indian history until Mahommedan times is marked by the unusual prominence of religious ideas, and is a record of intellectual development rather than of political events.

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  • It is in David's history that the clans of the south first attained prominence, and some of them are known to have been staunch upholders of a purer worship of Yahweh, or to have been associated with the introduction of religious institutions among the Israelites.

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  • And thus the hasty pamphlet of a half-educated Gothic monk has been forced into prominence, almost into rivalry with the finished productions of the great writers of classical antiquity.

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  • The case of James Nayler (1617?-1660), who, in spite of Fox's grave warning, allowed Messianic homage to be paid to him, is the best known of these instances; they are to be explained partly by mental disturbance, resulting from the undue prominence of a single idea, and partly by the general religious excitement of the time and the rudeness of manners prevailing in the classes of society from which many of these individuals came.

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  • Besides these, three or perhaps four groups, though widely distributed throughout the world, arrive in the Australian region at their culmination, presenting an abundance of most varied forms. These are the weaver-birds (Ploceidae), and the moreporks (Podargidae), but especially the kingfishers (Alcedinidae) and the pigeons (Columbidae), the species belonging to the two last obtaining in this region a degree of prominence and beauty which is elsewhere unequalled.

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  • External danger from a foreign foe, such as Midian or the Philistines, at once brought into prominence the claim and power of Yahweh, Israel's national war-god since the great days of the exodus.

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  • Although Judah was always closely connected with the south, these " southern " features (once clearly more extensive and complete) are found in the Deuteronomic and priestly compilations, and their presence in the historical records can hardly be severed from the prominence of " southern " families in the vicinity of Jerusalem, some time after the fall of Jerusalem.

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  • He early adopted Protestant views, a fact which brought him into prominence when Edward VI.

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  • 5) gives prominence to this idea.

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  • The increased prominence has also contributed to an influx of quality hotels for visitors.

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  • At times they merely bring into prominence again the ever-fresh fact of personal religious experience; at other times mysticism develops itself as a powerful solvent of definite dogmas.

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  • It is also recognized by many scholars that in the present account of the exodus there are indications of the original prominence of traditions of Kadesh, and also of a journey northwards in which Caleb, Kenites and others took part (§ 5).

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  • He came into temporary prominence again during the revolution of 1908.

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  • Sin has been given too much prominence in contemporary soteriology: God redeems from sin because he loves us?

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  • National rivalries had been accentuated and national differences brought into prominence by the meeting of the nations in a common enterprise; while, on the other hand, Mahommedans and Christians had fraternized as they had never done before during the progress of a Crusade.

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  • The growing prominence of the new northern group of " Hittite " states continued to occupy the energies of Egypt, and when again we have more external light upon Palestinian history, the Hittites are found strongly entrenched in the land.

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  • For Amos and Isaiah were able to single out those loftier spiritual and ethical elements which lay implicit in Mosaism and to lift them into their due place of prominence.

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  • The precise part these figures play is often idealized and expresses the later views of their prominence.

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  • In all these fields they have achieved prominence.

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  • As a statesman he has been very variously estimated, but it is generally agreed that a large number of the reforms and ideas of the Revolution were due to him; the ideas did not as a rule originate with him, but it was he who first gave them prominence.

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  • the prejudiced Western accounts of Alexius, and serves to bring Bohemund forward into his proper prominence.

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  • It first attained prominence with the settlement in.

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  • Thus the modern ideas, which have so powerfully extended and unified the subject, have loosened its connexion with "number" and "quantity," while bringing ideas of form and structure into increasing prominence.

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  • This Hinduizing process became more marked about the 5th century A.D., when, under S'rutavarman, the Khmers as a nation rose into prominence.

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  • Its presence at Shiloh, and its prominence in the life of Joshua, support the view that it was the palladium of the Joseph tribes, but the traditions in question conflict with others.

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  • Gold is found in the sands of all its upper tributaries, and coal and petroleum are amongst the chief mineral products which have been brought into economic prominence.

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  • The divaricators proper are stated by Hancock to arise from the ventral valve, one on each side, a little in advance of and close to the adductors, and after rapidly diminishing in size become attached to the cardinal process, a space or prominence between the sockets in the dorsal valve.

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  • Fechner, to whose doctrine of panpsychism he gave great prominence by his Einleitung in die Philosophic (1892; 7th ed., igloo; Eng.

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  • The prominence of the rubber industry here is due to Charles Goodyear, who in 1821 entered into partnership with his father Amasa Goodyear for the manufacture of hardware.

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  • But Hugh Latimer (1485?-1555) is the first great English preacher, and the wit and power of his sermons (1549) give them prominence in our literature.

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  • The most striking phenomenon which they bring into prominence is the effect of any considerable quantity of manganese in annihilating the magnetic property of iron.

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  • Thomson and others once more brought the conception of moving electric charges into prominence.

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  • The three groups communicated secretly through Switzerland, and it was felt that the time had come for the exiles to take a fresh step forward, in view of the prominence given to the doctrine of self-determination since the Russian Revolution and America's entry into the war.

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  • The conditions of the problem were such that unless Great Britain were to accept a humiliating rebuff, any correspondence, however skilfully conducted, was bound to bring into greater prominence the standing causes of offence between the two sides.

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  • Christian De Wet, who had first come into prominence as the captor of Lord Roberts's convoy at Waterval, and was now operating east and south-west of Bloemfontein in order to counteract the influence of Roberts's numerous flying columns which rode hither and thither offering peace, added to his laurels by ambushing Broadwood's mounted brigade and horse artillery at Sannah's Post, just outside Bloemfontein, on the 31st of March.

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  • From the prominence of the lights the festival is also known as the "Festival of Lights" or "Illumination" (Talmud).

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  • In its lower course, whatever is worthy of record clusters round the historical vicissitudes of Hamburg - its early prominence as a missionary centre (Ansgar) and as a bulwark against Slav and marauding Northman, its commercial prosperity as a leading member of the Hanseatic League, and its sufferings during the Napoleonic wars, especially at the hands of the ruthless Davotit.

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  • Harcourt (first commissioner of works), and Captain John Sinclair (secretary for Scotland) completed the ministry, a place of prominence outside the cabinet being found for Mr Winston Churchill as under-secretary for the colonies.

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  • His silence on the subject of Roman greatness and glory as contrasted with the prominence of these subjects in the poetry of men of provincial birth such as Ennius, Virgil and Horace, may be explained by the principle that familiarity had made the subject one of less wonder and novelty to him.

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  • The head is rounded and short, without prominent beetling ridges above the eyes, or a strong crest along the middle line of the back of the skull; and the tusks of the old males are of no very great length and prominence.

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  • Still the large size and prominence of the ears proclaim that both "Mafuka" and "Johanna" were chimpanzees and not gorillas.

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  • This tradition is important in spite of the fact that it first comes clearly before us in a writer belonging to the latter part of the 2nd century, because the prominence and fame of Luke were not such as would of themselves have led to his being singled out to have a Gospel attributed to him.

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  • But now that the grandi were suppressed politically, the lowest classes came into prominence, "adventurers without sense or virtue and of no authority for the most part, who had usurped public offices by illicit and dishonest practices" (Matteo Villani, iv.

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  • The Villa Munichen or Forum ad monachos, so called from the monkish owners of the ground on which it lay, was first called into prominence by Duke Henry the Lion, who established a mint here in 1158, and made it the emporium for the salt coming from Hallein and Reichenhall.

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  • Duff gave much thought and time to the university of Calcutta, which owes its examination system and the prominence given to physical sciences to his influence.

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  • Among butterflies (chOchO) Rein gives prominence to the broad-winged kind (Papilio), which recall tropical brilliancy.

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  • Its characteristics are exceptional tallness combined with slenderness and elegance of figure; a face somewhat long, without any special prominence of the cheekbones but having more or less oblique eyes; an aquiline nose; a slightly receding chin; largish upper teeth; a long neck; a narrow chest; a long trunk, and delicately shaped, small hands with long, slender fingers.

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  • Prominence of cheekbones is another special feature, but it is much commoner in the lower than in the upper classes, where elongated faces may almost be said to be the rule.

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  • He worked chiefly at Awata, and thus brought that factory into prominence.

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  • (c. 1371-1440), elector of Brandenburg, founder of the greatness of the House of Hohenzollern, was a son of Frederick V., burgrave of Nuremberg, and first came into prominence by saving the life of Sigismund, king of Hungary, at the battle of Nicopolis in 1396.

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  • Catulus in the preceding generation, was a kind of dilettante poet and a precursor of the poetry of pleasure, which attained such prominence in the elegiac poets of the Augustan age.

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  • The new extraneous element introduced into Roman literature draws into greater prominence the characteristics of the last great representatives of the genuine Roman and Italian spirit - the historian Tacitus and the satirist Juvenal.

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  • The deification of Julius Caesar was one important step: another was the natural prominence in the palace of the cult of the Genius of the emperor himself.

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  • The reasons which brought the revised creed into prominence at Chalcedon are still obscure.

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  • In an age when the foundations of the system on which society had rested for centuries were seriously shaken, such subjects as the right of the magistrate to interfere with the belief of the individual, and the limits of his authority over conscience, naturally assumed a prominence hitherto unknown.'

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  • The route along the banks of the Euphrates from south to north was so frequently taken by migrating tribes that the tradition has nothing improbable in itself, but the prominence given in the older narratives to the view that Haran was the home gives this the preference.

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  • This failed for several reasons, the foremost being that the language was not Arabic but Phoenician, and because professors and teachers, whose personal ascendancy was based on the official prominence of Italian, did not realize that educational institutions existed for the rising generation rather than to provide salaries for alien teachers and men behind the times.

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  • The prominence which legend assigns to its king Echemus in opposing the Heraclid invasion shows that it was one of the chief Peloponnesian communities in the preDorian epoch.

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  • Samuel Adams first came into wider prominence at the beginning of the Stamp Act episode, in 1764, when as author of Boston's instructions to its representatives in the general court of Massachusetts he urged strenuous opposition to taxation by act of parliament.

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  • Appointed deputy to the Legislative Assembly and subsequently to the Convention, he attained considerable prominence.

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  • Steam at high pressure exhausting into the atmosphere is still commonly used, but the great power required for raising heavy loads from deep pits at high speeds has brought the question of fuel economy into prominence, and more economical types of the two-cylinder tandem compound class with high initial steam pressure, superheating and condensing, have come in to some extent where the amount of work to be done is sufficient to justify their high initial cost.

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  • In this conclusion we can trace the prominence assigned by Fichte to the practical element, and the tendency to make the requirements of the ego the ground for all judgment on reality.

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  • The objects originally contemplated had been the restoration of the unity of the church and its reform in head and members; but so great had become the prominence of Bohemian affairs that to these also a first place in the programme of the approaching oecumenical assembly required to be assigned, and for their satisfactory settlement the presence of Huss was necessary.

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  • The exceptional dependence of Iowa on eastern markets has given more than ordinary prominence to railway legislation, and the conflict of interests between the railways and the shippers has agitated the state for forty years, various attempts being made to regulate freight rates by legal enactment.

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  • " In the same way, a theory that some particular substance, say water, is homogeneous and continuous may be a good working theory up to a certain point, but may fail when we come to deal with quantities so minute or so attenuated that their heterogeneity of structure comes into prominence.

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  • Mergui town has risen into prominence in recent years as the centre of the pearling trade in the neighbouring archipelago.

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  • Certainly the stage of development is an early one, as is shown, e.g., by the prominence of prophets, and the need that was felt for the vindication of the position of the bishops and deacons (there is no mention at all of presbyters); moreover, there is no reference to a canon of Scripture (though the written Gospel is expressly mentioned) or to a creed.

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  • The natives in preparing the skins remove both feet and wings, so as to give more prominence to the commercially valuable tuft of plumes.

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  • Similarly the hypothenar muscles for the little finger underlie the three ulnar marginal mountains, the sizes of which depend on their development and on the prominence of the pisiform bone.

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  • His theory of production is also deserving of attention from the fact that it takes into account and gives due prominence to immaterial goods.

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  • As deputy he chiefly acquired prominence by attacks on Magliani, treasury minister in the Depretis cabinet, and on the 9th of March 1889 was himself selected as treasury minister by Crispi.

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  • He was also a dramatist, and apart from his prominence as a Jewish Nationalist would have found a niche in the temple of fame.

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  • On the other hand, the names of some famous nations mentioned on the inscriptions are lacking, from which it may be concluded that they did not rise to prominence till a later date.

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  • Further, the greater the dissipation of energy the less is the prominence of the amplitude of vibration for exact coincidence over the amplitude when the periods are not quite the same, though it is still the greatest for coincidence.

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  • All theories of religion which give prominence to ancestor worship and the cult of the dead are to a certain extent Euhemeristic. But as the sole explanation of the origin of the idea of gods it is not accepted by students of comparative religion.

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  • It was published seven years (until the 20th of September 1841), and was never profitable, but it was widely popular, and it gave Greeley, who was its sole editor, much prominence.

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  • 7); nor again merely in the prominence given to the miracles of Jesus and in particular to the casting out of devils, but also in many of the sayings recorded in it, as in the great series contained in the narratives in ch.

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  • In his successive offices Mr Roosevelt not merely exerted a strong influence upon the immediate community, whose official representative he was at the time being, but by reason both of his forceful personality and of the often unconventional, although always effective, methods of work which he employed he achieved a national prominence out of ordinary proportion to the importance of his official position.

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  • His work in the governorship brought him still more into prominence as a national leader.

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  • Particular prominence is given to the tribe and kings of Judah (i Chron.

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  • Early in Stiirgkh's Ministry prominence was taken by the Catholic marriage question.

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  • 7 seq.), and it cannot be said that the former had originally the prominence now ascribed to it.

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  • The special god of this city was Ea, god of the sea and of wisdom, and the prominence given to this god in the incantation literature of Babylonia and Assyria suggests not only that many of our magical texts are to be traced ultimately to the temple of Ea at Eridu, but that this side of the Babylonian religion had its origin in that place.

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  • There is something chameleon-like in its appearances; its genuine views are kept in the background from tactical considerations, and first one aspect, then another, comes into prominence.

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  • There his vivacious eloquence brought him into prominence, and he was president of that body on the eventful day of the, 9th of Brumaire (November ro) 1799, when Napoleon overthrew the national councils of France at the palace of St Cloud.

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  • He turned to literature and published some mediocre poems. In January 1870 a violent incident brought him again into prominence.

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  • Accordingly he gives prominence to the personal element in history.

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  • Owing to the once prevalent desire of the adherents of one or another polity to find support in primitive precept or practice, the question has assumed a prominence out of proportion to its real importance, and the few and scattered references in early Christian writings have been made the basis for various elaborate theories.

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  • The prominence given by most of the Sophists to rhetoric, their cultivation of a subjective readiness as the essential equipment for life, their substitution of persuasion for conviction, all mark the sceptical undertone of their teaching.

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  • He entered the Celestine order and came into prominence during the pontificate of his uncle, Gregory XII., by whom he was appointed bishop of Siena, papal treasurer, protonotary, cardinal-priest of St Marco e St Clemente, and later cardinal-priest of Sta Maria in Trastevere.

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  • Petrarch was not only the imitator of Virgil, who had been the leading name in Latin letters throughout the middle ages; it was the influence of Petrarch that gave a new prominence to Cicero.

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  • The movement had its effect on the schools by discouraging the old classical routine of verbal imitation, and giving a new prominence to Greek and to German.

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  • Schulze's period of prominence in Berlin closely corresponded to that of Herbart at Konigsberg (1809-1833) and Göttingen (1833-1841), who insisted that for boys of eight to twelve there was no better text-book than the Greek Odyssey, and this principle was brought into practice at Hanover by his distinguished pupil, Ahrens.

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  • The provision for the joint influence of Great Britain and France over the New Hebrides (1906) brought these islands into some prominence owing to the hostile criticism directed against the British government both in Australia and at home.

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  • In giving greater prominence to events of religious importance and to their bearing upon the spiritual needs of contemporaries they view and interpret the past in a particular light, and will see in the past those growths which only in their own time have become mature.

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  • While he connects it with the Arabic root naba'a," come into prominence" (conj.

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  • trans., p. 554 seq.), the etymological sense of the word K'is is comparatively unimportant: The root seems to mean "to start up," "to rise into prominence," and so "to become audible."

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  • Yahweh's ever-present kingship in Israel, which was the chief religious idea brought into prominence by the national revival, demanded a more continuous manifestation of His revealing spirit than was given either by the priestly lot or by the rise of occasional seers; and where could this be sought except among the prophets?

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  • Even as professor of Greek he had given great prominence in his lectures to the study of the Scriptures; but he found a much more congenial sphere when, in 1698, he was appointed to the chair of theology.

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  • It is usually the case that a unit lasts later in trade than in coinage; and the prominence of this standard in Italy may show how it is that this mina (18 unciae = 7400) was known as the "Italic" in the days of Galen and Dioscorides (2).

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  • This first came into prominence in the opening decades of the 2nd century A.D., but is certainly older; it reached its height in the second third of the same century, and began to wane about the 3rd century, and from the second half of the 3rd century onwards was replaced by the closely-related and more powerful Manichaean movement.

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  • Even, therefore, if we can say that at the present day the gods are entirely spiritual, it is clearly possible to maintain that they have been spiritualized pari passu with the increasing importance of the animistic view of nature and of the greater prominence of eschatological beliefs.

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  • The departure of the Ordovician life from that of the Cambrian was perhaps most pronounced in the great development of the molluscs and crinoids (including cystoids), but corals were also abundant for the first time, and graptolites came into prominence.

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  • About 1870 she acquired prominence among the spiritualists of the United States, where she lived for six years, becoming a naturalized citizen.

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  • Secondly, the Eudemian Ethics, while not agreeing with Plato's Republic that the just can be happy by justice alone, does not assign to the external goods of good fortune (Eutu X ia) the prominence accorded to them in the Nicomachean Ethics as the necessary conditions of all virtue, and the instruments of moral virtue.

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  • The Lemnian version is due to the prominence of his cult at Lemnos in very early times; and his fall into the sea may have been suggested by volcanic activity in Mediterranean islands, as at Lipara, and Thera.

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  • Nevertheless it resulted in bringing him into still greater prominence.

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  • Its chief industry is the manufacture of tweeds and fine yarns, which, together with the fame of its medicinal springs, brought the burgh into prominence towards the end of the 18th century.

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  • It was, however, only very gradually that the figure and name of the Messiah acquired the prominence which they have in 2 The hopes which Haggai and Zechariah connect with the name of Zerubbabel, a descendant of David, hardly form an exception to this statement.

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  • him once more into international prominence.

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  • Associated with this is the strength and sharpness of the lower jaw, the prominence and anterior pcsition of the masseteric ridge, and the depth of the ramus from the alveolar line to the angle.

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  • The earliest mention of the springs of Kreuznach occurs in 1478, but it was only in the early part of the 19th century that Dr Prieger, to whom there is a statue in the town, brought them into prominence.

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  • During its later years his reign was much distrubed, however, by the contentions for ascendancy which arose between the Pharisees and Sadducees, the two rival sects or parties which then for the first time (under those names at least) came into prominence.

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  • Owing to various adventitious circumstances the sect came into great prominence politically and ecclesiastically for a few years about the middle of the 14th century.

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  • In the 13th century many hitherto unknown passes came into prominence, even some of the easy glacier passes.

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  • Into the pharyngeal cavity open salivary glands and radular sac. The former are paired and ventral, and open on a subradular prominence.

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  • Without positively asserting much more than he can prove, he gives prominence to all the circumstances which support his case; he glides lightly over those which are unfavourable to it; his own witnesses are applauded and encouraged; the statements which seem to throw discredit on them are controverted; the contradictions into which they fall are explained away; a clear and connected abstract of their evidence is given.

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  • now gives prominence to Elisha, his wonders, his hostility to the ruling dynasty and his regard for the aged Jehoshaphat of Judah.

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  • The herd never feeds without having a sentinel posted on some prominence to give notice of the approach of danger; which is done by stamping on the ground with the forefeet, and uttering a shrill whistling note, thus putting the entire herd on the alert.

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  • He first came into prominence at the court of Peter the Cruel, whose cause he finally deserted; he greatly distinguished himself in subsequent campaigns, during which he was twice made prisoner, by the Black Prince at Najera (1367) and by the Portuguese at Aljubarrota (1385).

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    0
  • The currents of the Caspian were investigated by the Knipovich expedition; it detected two of special prominence, a south-going current along the west shore and a north-going current along the east shore.

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  • From the time of the Restoration he acquired a new prominence in the public eye.

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  • In 1788 Sir Joseph Banks, at the request of the directors, drew up a memoir on the cultivation of economic plants in Bengal, in which he gave special prominence to tea, pointing out the regions most favourable for its cultivation.

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  • He made very evident the monarchical character of the Prussian state, and gave to the office of emperor a prominence greater than it had hitherto had.

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  • The truth is probably that the tradition of his wife's adultery and treachery was a genuine part of the Arthurian story, which, neglected for a time, was brought again into prominence by the social conditions of the courts for which the later romances were composed; and it is in this later and conventionalized form that the tale has become familiar to us.

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  • Here he soon gained a position of prominence at the bar, and published an annotated edition, which long remained standard, of the laws of Ohio.

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    0
  • From these contests of rival nobles, in which the names of Spinola and Doria stand forth with greatest prominence, Genoa was soon drawn into the great vortex of the Guelph and Ghibelline factions; but its recognition of foreign authority - successively German, Neapolitan and Milanese - gave way to a state of greater independence in 1339, when the government assumed a more permanent form with the appointment of the first doge, an office held at Genoa for life, in the person of Simone Boccanera.

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  • After 1880, the exertions of Count Kalnoky again established a fairly good understanding with Russia, as was shown by the meetings of Francis Joseph with the tsar in 1884 and 1885, but the outbreak of the Bulgarian question in 1885 again brought into prominence the opposed interests of Russia and Austria-Hungary.

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  • A new cabinet was formed (June 2) by Baron von Beck, permanent under secretary of state in the ministry for agriculture, an official of considerable ability who had first acquired prominence as an instructor of the heir apparent, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, in constitutional and administrative law.

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  • The worship of Hera is found, in different degrees of prominence, throughout the Greek world.

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  • In a similar nianner, the ethical and allegorical methods of interpretation came into much greater prominence towards the end of the New Kingdom.

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  • Worshipped in Memphis, he perhaps owed his importance more to the political prominence of that town than to anything else.

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  • so strong a light of the character of the khalifas despotism in the Sudan and the miserable condition of his misgoverned people, as detailed in the accounts of their captivity at Omdurman by Father Ohrwalder and Slatin Bey (published in 1892 and 1896), stirred public opinion in Great Britain, and brought the question of the recovery of the Sudan into prominence.

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    0
  • Their prolonged literary activity - for some of them, like Grundtvig, were busy to the last - had a slightly damping influence on their younger contemporaries, but certain names in the next generation have special prominence.

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  • Next year the Lancastrian revolution forced Henry into precocious prominence as heir to the throne.

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  • The overwhelming Liberal and Labour victory at the general election of 1906 began a new era in the fortunes of the party, and Lord Rosebery's individuality once more sank back from any position of prominence in regard to its new programme.

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  • 1844), which appeared in 1851, was intended to correct the life by Julius Hare, which had given too much prominence to theological questions.

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  • Carlyle meanwhile was suffering domestic troubles, unfortunately not exceptional in their nature, though the exceptional intellect and characters of the persons concerned have given them unusual prominence.

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    0
  • A few apparent exceptions occur along the western seaboard of Sutherland, in Skye and elsewhere, but examination of their structure at once explains the reason of their prominence and confirms the rule.

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  • He enforced the duty " of placing in the background whatever was accidental, temporary or secondary, and of bringing into due prominence what was primary and essential."

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    0
  • It is probable that Sozomen did not approve of Socrates's freer attitude towards Greek science, and that he wished to present a picture in which the clergy should be still further glorified and monasticism brought into still stronger prominence.

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  • But his accomplishments and ability were such as would have secured for him influence and prominence in any age of the Church; and besides being highly gifted intellectually and morally, he was marked by those specially human qualities which command the interest of all students of life and character.

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    0
  • The history of Assyria can now be traced back approximately to 2500 B.C., though it does not rise to political prominence until c. 2000 B.C. The name of the god is identical with that of the city, though an older form A-shir, signifying "leader," suggests that a differentiation between the god and the city was at one time attempted.

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  • In each of these cures prominence is given to the requirement and the reward of faith - that is to say, of personal confidence in the Healer: " Thy faith bath made thee whole."

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  • Possibly he means to insist on the advantages of country life over life in the city; if this be so, the paragraph bears witness to the prominence of the latter.

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  • The personal element gives an undue prominence to recent phenomena of the philosophic atmosphere.

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  • He was the father of Alfred Landon Rives (1830-1903), an engineer of some prominence, whose daughter, Amelie Rives (1863-), became well known as a novelist, her best known book being The Quick or the Dead?

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    0
  • The dynasty lasted nearly half a century, and is contemporary with the expansion of Phoenicia, and presumably therefore with some prominence of the south maritime coast.

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    0
  • The introduction, spread and prominence of the name Yahweh, the development of conceptions concerning his nature, his supremacy over other gods and the lofty monotheism which denied a plurality of gods, are questions of o.

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  • From this point of view the parts of the book are by no means all of equal value; critical analysis shows that often parallel or distinct narratives have been fused together, and that, whilst the older stories gave more prominence to ordinary human motives and combinations, 1 This is confirmed by the circumstance that in Judg.

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  • NICOLAY, the name of a French family of Vivarais which came rapidly into legal prominence at the end of the 15th century.

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    0
  • These resolutions later acquired extraordinary and pernicious prominence in the historical elaboration of the states'-rights doctrine.

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  • Now this view is inconsistent with the evidence of Plato, who, in the Sophist, in his final and operative definition, gives prominence to the eristical element, and plainly accounts it the main characteristic not indeed of the sophistry of the 5th century, but of the sophistry of the 4th.

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  • During the 12th and 13th centuries a family called Hoysala attained considerable prominence in the Mysore country, but they were overthrown by Malik Kafur in A.D.

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  • The drain of men told upon her vitality, their quality deteriorated, and their bigotry and intolerance raised even a fiercer opposition to them within the bounds of India; and as the Dutch and British came into prominence the Portuguese gradually faded away.

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  • His prominence as a candidate first for the presidential and then for the vice-presidential nomination in the Republican national convention of 1860 led to his being selected by President Lincoln as secretary of war.

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  • The town came into prominence at the time of the Reformation.

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    0
  • Of less prominence are Mt Banajao (7382 ft.), Mt Isarog (6634 ft.) and Mt Masaraga (5244 ft.).

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  • The persistent prominence which astrology continued to enjoy down to the border-line of the scientific movement of our own days, and which is directly traceable to the divination methods perfected in the Euphrates valley, is a tribute to the scope and influence attained by the astral theology of the Babylonian and Assyrian priests.

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  • In the " dialectical " dialogues the question of method and of the justification of its postulates attains at least a like prominence with the ostensible subject matter.

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  • The physical methods and spiritual exercises recommended by theosophists are those inculcated in the systems known in Hindu philosophy as Raja Yoga in contradistinction to the Hatha Yoga system, which is most commonly to be met with in India, and in which the material aspects are given greater prominence.

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  • This did not require prominence until the latter half of the 15th century, when its best masters were Cosimo Tura (1432-1495), Francesco Cossa (d.

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  • Besides these, the duke, who was henceforward elected by a body of eleven electors from among the aristocracy, would invite persons of prominence (the pregadi) in order to secure their assent and cooperation, whenever a measure of importance was to be placed before the great council.

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  • SERPENT - WORSHIP. From all parts of the world there is a very considerable body of evidence for the prominence of the serpent in religion, mythology and folk-lore.

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  • According to a common Indian belief a wealthy man who dies without an heir returns to guard his wealth in the form of a serpent, and Italian superstition supposed that to find a serpent's skin brought good luck (Leland) .2 No singular preference for jewels on the part of serpents will explain the belief, and creatures like the jackdaw which have this weakness do not enjoy this prominence in folk-lore.

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  • 95 sqq., A conspicuous feature in serpent-cults is the prominence of females.

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  • For other evidence for the prominence of females, see Fergusson, 82, 257 seq.

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  • the prominence given to this idea in Stephen's long speech) - and partly to jealousy of those who, by preaching the wider Messianic Evangel, were winning over the Gentiles, and particularly proselytes, in such great numbers.

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  • Of the particular days of the "great week" the earliest to emerge into special prominence was naturally Good Friday.

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  • The latter occupies a prominence on the south side of the bay, is surrounded by massive fortifications, and retains in its ruins and numerous tombs many traces of its former greatness as a commercial port.

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  • Patrick Calhoun attained some prominence in the colony, serving in the colonial legislature, and afterwards in the state legislature, and taking part in the War of Independence.

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  • When the commerce of New England was interrupted as a consequence of the Napoleonic wars, the abundance of water power afforded by the rivers encouraged manufacturing, and the region rapidly acquired prominence in this industry, especially in the manufacture of textiles, of boots and shoes, and of paper and wood pulp; in 1905 the value of the textile products of New England (excluding flax, hemp and jute) alone was $522,821,440 (more than 45% of that of the entire country), the value of boots and shoes was $181,023,946 (more than 55% of the total for the entire country), the value of paper and wood pulp was $49,813,133 (more than one-quarter of that of the entire country), and the value of all factory products amounted to $2,025,998,437 (nearly one-seventh of the total for the entire country).

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  • Secondary education, formerly instituted on two separate lines, classical and scientific, has been reformed so as to give more prominence to scientific education, even in the classical (linguistic) lyceums or gymnasia.

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    0
  • Clay's quick intelligence and sympathy, and his irreproachable conduct in youth, explain his precocious prominence in public affairs.

    0
    0
  • Education, relief of distress, regulation of labour and trade, are duties now in great part performed by public agencies, and their increasing prominence involves augmented expense.

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  • The great expansion in recent years of what is known as Municipal Trading has brought this aspect of local finance into prominence.

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  • Politically it came into special prominence at the time of the Elamite conquest, when it was made the centre of Elamite dominion in Babylonia, perhaps as a special check upon the neighbouring Erech, which had played a prominent part in the resistance to the Elamites.

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  • At the Trade Union Congress in 1887 he attacked the secretary, Mr. Broadbent, for supporting capitalist candidates at elections,: thus starting the campaign for Independent Labour representation which he brought into prominence in 1888 by contesting Mid-Lanark as an Independent Labour candidate.

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  • To formulate and show grounds for these laws is to construct a philosophy of induction, and it must not be forgotten that the first step towards the accomplishment of the task was made by Bacon when he introduced and gave prominence to the powerful logical instrument of exclusion or elimination.

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  • Whistler was bringing into prominence.

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    0
  • The prominence of the notion of the Alcheringa " dreamtime," or sacred past, in Central Australian religion illustrates the essential connexion perceived by the savage to lie between the sacred and the traditional.

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  • onwards; and the great Shinto revival of the r8th century brought the doctrine again into prominence.

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  • This had the obvious advantage of lifting two great families into prominence, the Semitic and the IndoGermanic. The Semitic peoples were closely bound together by common types of thought and civilization, and produced three of the leading religions of the world, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

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  • Two writers, the brothers Petri, sons of a smith at Orebro, take an easy prominence in so barren a period.

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  • He was a polemical writer of prominence on the side of the Reformers.

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  • Other gods, who come into prominence, are the dragon-slayer Verethraghna (Artagnes) and the Good Thought (Vohumano, Omanos); and even the Sacaean festival is adopted from Babylon (Berossus Jr. 3; Ctes., Jr. 16; Strabo xi.

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  • To this must be added the numerous Arabian tribes of the Mesopotamian d~ert, under their chiefs, among whom one Alchaudonius comes into prominence in the period of Tigranes and Crassus.

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  • This mine and a major mine in Turkey, which rose to prominence in the 1990s, now supply nearly all the world's borax.

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  • It was in that century that Portugal rose to prominence as a maritime power; and being anxious to enjoy at first hand some of the commerce which had brought such prosperity to Venice, Portugal determined to seek out an ocean pathway to the Indies.

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  • It was in connexion with this affair that Cecil Rhodes first came into prominence as a politician.

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    0
  • The colour of the eyes and their prominence or depression are relatively very constant characteristics.

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  • The most noticeable of these is the prominence assigned to certain leading ideas and motives, especially to that of holiness.

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  • Sometimes he gives prominence, and correctly, to the fact that the disputants partially failed to understand one another, because they had separate interests at heart - those on the one side desiring above everything to guard against polytheism, those on the other being most afraid of Sabellianism.

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  • Thus (I) Peter, James, John, Andrew, always appear as the first four, though the order varies, Mark representing relative prominence during Christ's ministry, and Acts actual influence in the Apostolic Church (cf.

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  • It acquired prominence as the meeting-point of a number of trails to the extreme western parts of North America.

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  • Owing to the advantages it enjoys as a trade centre, Delhi is recovering much of the prominence which it lost at the time of the Mutiny.

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  • It is, moreover, remarkable for the prominence of its brow-ridges, beneath which the small and closely approximated eyes are deeply sunk; the immense size of the canine teeth; and more especially for the extraordinarily vivid colouring of some parts of the skin.

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  • The prominence thus given to the moral aspects of the history tends to obscure in some degree the true relations and real importance of the events narrated, but it does so in Livy to a far less extent than in some other writers.

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  • But he unquestionably gave undue prominence to the tales of the prowess and glory of the Fabii, and probably also allowed his own strong aristocratic sympathies to colour his version of the early political controversies.

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  • Much of Clifford's contemporary prominence was due to his attitude towards religion.

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  • The effect is produced partly by the comments of the evangelist, which especially take the form of citations from the Old Testament; partly by the frequency with which certain expressions are used, and the prominence that is given in this and other ways to particular traits and topics.

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  • The United States came into prominence in about 1860, and the discovery of the famous Comstock lode in Nevada led to an enormous increase in the production.

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  • a male divinity who was believed to be born and to die at certain periods; probably he was an early form of Dionysus, but owing to his prominence in the island the Hellenic settlers may have called him Zeus; and this would explain the markedly Dionysiac character of the later Zeus-religion in Crete.

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  • This discovery brought both him and the Pneumatic Institution into prominence.

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  • In the Koran great prominence is given to his function as the medium of divine revelation, and, according to the Mahommedan interpreters, he it is who is referred to by the appellations "Holy Spirit" and "Spirit of Truth."

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  • The foot arises as a prominence on the ventral surface and grows forward, and at the end of five or six days the velum atrophies and the foot becomes the organ of locomotion; the animal then ceases to swim and sinks to the bottom.

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  • There the resistance of a series of igneous dykes gives prominence to the Pembroke peninsula, in which the fine fjord-like harbour of Milford Haven lies far out towards the Atlantic. The coast north of Pembroke and Merioneth has been worked into the grand sweep of Cardigan Bay, its surface carved into gently rounded hills, green with rich grass, which sweep downward into wide rounded valleys.

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  • It was not till the later part of the 18th century, when a series of inventions, unparalleled in the annals of industry, followed each other in quick succession, that the cotton manufacture took real root in the country, gradually eclipsing that of other European nations, although a linen manufacture in Lancashire had acquired some prominence as early as the 16th century.

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  • At all times conspicuous for his eloquence, honesty and recalcitrancy, he twice came with especial prominence before the public - in 1838, when, although at the time without a seat in parliament, he appeared at the bar of the Commons to protest, in the name of the Canadian Assembly, against the suspension of the Canadian constitution; and in 1855, when, having overthrown Lord Aberdeen's ministry by carrying a resolution for the appointment of a committee of inquiry into the mismanagement in the Crimean War, he presided over its proceedings.

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  • His chief prominence in politics, however, dates from 1903 onwards in consequence of his advocacy of "passive resistance" to the Education Act of 1902.

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  • But by the 2nd century the dyarchy is passing into a monarchy: the title of princeps recedes, and the title of imperator comes into prominence to designate not merely the possessor of a certain imperium, or the general of troops, but the simple monarch in the fulness of his power as head of the state.

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  • Cottonspinning, together with bleaching-works, has come into prominence in the 19th century in the district of Twente.

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  • Mitchell records an eruptive prominence followed next day in the same place by the appearance of a small spot.

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  • It is virtually identical with a group known as the " yellow stars," of which the most prominent examples are Capella, Pollux and Arcturus; this is not the most numerous group, however; more than one half of all the stars whose spectra are known belong to a simpler type in which the metallic lines are faint or absent, excepting hydrogen and sometimes helium, which declare themselves with increased prominence.

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  • statues are often equipped with the accoutrements of war.3 The fame of the Pythian oracle at Delphi, connected with the slaying of Python by the god immediately after his birth, gave especial prominence to the idea of Apollo as a god of prophecy.

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  • Livingstone may now be said to have completed the first period of his career in Africa, the period in which the work of the missionary had the greatest prominence.

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  • The term came into prominence in 1884-1885 in connexion with the scandals arising over the kidnapping of South Sea islanders for enforced labour on the sugar plantations of north Queensland.

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  • (2) the Christian priesthood being universal, the laity should share in the spiritual government of the Church; (3) a knowledge of Christianity must be attended by the practice of it as its indispensable sign and supplement; (4) instead of merely didactic, and often bitter, attacks on the heterodox and unbelievers, a sympathetic and kindly treatment of them; (5) a reorganization of the theological training of the universities, giving more prominence to the devotional life; and (6) a different style of preaching, namely, in the place of pleasing rhetoric, the implanting of Christianity in the inner or new man, the soul of which is faith, and its effects the fruits of life.

    0
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  • The prominence given to Edom, and the fact that Chaldea is not mentioned at all, make it probable that the passage was not written in Babylonia.

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  • In 1714 the question of finding the longitude at sea, which had been looked upon as an important one for several years, was brought into prominence by a petition presented to the House of Commons by a number of captains of Her Majesty's ships and merchant ships and of London merchants.

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  • A few unimportant tracts on questions of theoretical politics were followed in 1785 by the work which first brought Jacobi into prominence as a philosopher.

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  • This consists of hard, elongated, slender, cylindrical or tapering, thread-like masses of epidermic tissue, each of which grows, without branching, from a short prominence, or papilla, sunk at the bottom of a pit, or follicle, in the true skin, or dermis.

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  • Most schools of theology will concur, however, in giving prominence to a complementary point of view and making their systems a study of Divine revelation.

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  • The conceptions connected with Nusku are of distinctly popular origin, as is shown by his prominence in incantations, which represent the popular element in the cult, and it is significant that in the astro-theological system of the Babylonian priests Nusku-Girru is not assigned to any particular place in the heavens.

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  • The idea of Artemis '.s a virgin goddess, the "queen and huntress, chaste and fair," which obtained great prominence in early times, and seems inconsistent with her association with childbirth, is generally explained as due to her connexion with Apollo, but it is suggested by Farnell that irapOE'os originally meant "unmarried," and that "Apreµcs 7r-ap9Evos may have been originally the goddess of a people who had not yet the advanced Hellenic institutions of settled marriage.

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  • He further brought into prominence the effects of refraction in altering the apparent places of the heavenly bodies, and substituted Venus for the moon as a connecting-link between observations of the sun and stars.

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    0
  • It is true that Socrates brought into prominence the moral importance of rational and intelligent conduct as opposed to action which is the result of unintelligent caprice.

    0
    0
  • The muscular system is usually well developed, but there is deficiency of fatty tissue, which affects the features (particularly by giving relative prominence to the eyes) and the general character of the skin.

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    0
  • Partly, again, the analytical distinctness of Aristotle's manner brings into special prominence the difficulties that attend the Socratic effort to reconcile the ideal aspirations of men with the principles on which their practical reasonings are commonly conducted.

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  • It is true that the Cynics were more concerned to emphasize the negative side of the sage's well-being, while the Stoics brought into more prominence its positive side.

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    0
  • " naturally attracted attention; and the preponderance of moral over scientific interest, which was characteristic of the Roman mind, gave this question especial prominence.

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  • We may notice, in the first place, that the conception of morality as a code which, if not in itself arbitrary, is yet to be accepted by men with unquestioning submission, tends naturally to bring into prominence the virtue of obedience to authority; just as the philosophic view of goodness as the realization of reason gives a special value to self-determination and independence (as we see more clearly in the post-Aristotelian schools where ethics is distinctly separated from politics).

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  • far greater prominence under the new dispensation may be partly referred to the express teaching and example of Christ;.

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  • P Y g Changes in the external condition of Christianity, the different degrees of civilization in the societies of which it was the dominant religion, and the natural g process of internal development, continually brought different features into prominence; while again, the important antagonisms of opinion within Christendom frequently involved ethical issues - even in the Eastern Church - until in the 4th century it began to be absorbed in the labour of a dogmatic construction.

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  • The exposition of this conception presents to a great extent the same matter that was dealt with by the exposition of moral virtues, but in a different form; the prominence of which may perhaps be attributed to the growing influence of Roman jurisprudence, which attained in the 12th century so rapid and brilliant a revival in Italy.

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  • As the properly philosophic interest of scholasticism faded in the 14th and 15th centuries, the quasi-legal treatment of morality came again into prominence, borrowing a good deal of matter from Thomas and other schoolmen.

    0
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  • At the same time the rapid and remarkable success of Grotius's treatise (De jure belli et pacis) brought his view of Natural Right into prominence, and suggested such questions as - " What is man's ultimate reason for obeying these laws?

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  • 1169), came into prominence as a leader of the Welsh during the expedition of Henry II.

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  • The town, which was founded in 1849, and first came into prominence as a port in 1863, has a spacious and sheltered harbour, the best in Nicaragua.

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  • It was not till 1897 that Venizelos came into prominence as one of the leaders of the Cretan uprising of that year, which culminated in the removal of Turkish rule from Crete (1898).

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  • J., and rose to prominence in the State.

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    0
  • The peculiarities which owing to Ireland's isolation had survived were brought into prominence when the Irish missionaries came into contact with Roman ecclesiastics.

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  • The special prominence given to Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) in vv.

    0
    0
  • The prominence of Joshua as military and religious leader, and especially his connexion with Shechem and Shiloh, have suggested that he was a hero of the Joseph tribes of central Palestine (viz.

    0
    0
  • The prominence of the publishing interest has attracted to Leipzig a large number of gifted authors, and made it a literary centre of considerable importance.

    0
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  • Under the republic they emerge into prominence under a pontifex maximus, who took over the king's duties as chief administrator of religious law, just as his chief sacrificial duties were taken by the rex sacrorum; his dwelling was the regia, " the house of the king."

    0
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  • The importance of the tradition for the history of Israel explains both the prominence given to it (cf.

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    0
  • It has been heavily revised; note the alternating prominence of Hamor and Shechem, the condemnation of Simeon and Levi for their vengeance (cf.

    0
    0
  • Among other signs of dual origin are the alternation of" Jacob "and" Israel,"and the prominence of Judah (xliii.

    0
    0
  • 2 The increasing prominence of the old Calebite locality is not the least interesting phase in the comparative study of the patriarchal traditions.

    0
    0
  • Like the prominence of the traditions of Hebron and its hero Abraham, these features cannot be merely casual.'

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  • Meyer, pp. 3 0 5, 47 2) and the prominence of southern interests, and it would be in accordance with biblical evidence elsewhere if northern tradition had been taken over and adapted to the standpoint of the southern members of Israel, with the incorporation of local tradition which could only have originated in the south.'

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  • In Congress, though one of the youngest members, he at once sprang into prominence by his clever defence of Jackson during the consideration by the House of a bill remitting the fine imposed on Jackson for contempt of court in New Orleans.

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    0
  • the emphatic theism of his creed, and the rationalizing mysticism of some Oriental thought, may have sometimes led him astray, and given prominence to the less obvious features of Aristotelianism.

    0
    0
  • The latent nominalism of Aristotle only came gradually to be emphasized through the prominence which Christianity gave to the individual life, and, apart from passing notices as in Abelard, first found clear enunciation in the school of Duns Scotus.

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    0
  • Gebhard was a drunken and licentious man, who owes his prominence rather to his surroundings than to his abilities.

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    0
  • Probably it was ahead of the times, for not until nearly twenty years later was any prominence given to it, when Samuel Wagner, founder and editor of the American Bee Journal, became impressed with Mehring's invention and warmly advocated it in his paper.

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    0
  • If the observer is struck with the remarkable prominence of any one feature, it is probable that the remaining parts are deficient.

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    0
  • But he did not come into prominence until the night of the 30th-31st of May 1793, when he was provisionally appointed commandantgeneral of the armed forces of Paris by the council general of the Commune.

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  • Among the prominent buildings of the city are a public library, the high school, a theatre (owned by the Knights of Columbus), a Masonic Temple, the City Bank and several churches, of which the most notable, perhaps, are the Baptist, Methodist, and St Gabriel's (Roman Catholic), which is the gift of members of the Iselin family, to whose interest in yachting is due in part the prominence of the New Rochelle and Larchmont Yacht Clubs.

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  • This prominence in manufactures is due to excellent transportation facilities, to good water powers, to the ease with which labour is got from large cities, to plentiful capital (furnished by the large 1 The figure given above as the gross value of all manufactured products in 1900 includes that of all manufacturing and mechanical establishments.

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  • bony prominence or any muscle or tendon can be affected.

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  • Evo Morales came to prominence as a coca farmers ' leader, opposing the US-sponsored program to eradicate coca.

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  • They first gained prominence because of the abortive coup they staged against Fujimori in September 2000.

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  • Distinctions focusing on gender, or which are explicitly gendered, were given a different prominence in each table.

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  • opposition party should not depend on the prominence its leader is given on the national stage.

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  • osteotomy of the posterior calcaneum to make the prominence less protuberant.

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  • Given the prominence of Irving's political and racial beliefs at his trial, this result may appear paradoxical.

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  • The stance of an opposition party should not depend on the prominence its leader is given on the national stage.

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  • prominence as a leader of the church.

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  • prominence as the business aviation center for the county.

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  • You rightly give prominence to the role of old father Thames in your document.

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  • Why has it gained such prominence over the last year?

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  • In various periods of long Hindu history, the different deities have assumed prominence.

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  • In such a world, heavily wooded nations like Sweden might have achieved global prominence.

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  • Whether it deserves the prominence granted it by this model is doubtful.

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  • prominence accorded to Jennifer Jayne?

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  • The causes are similar to Tennis Elbow Presentation: Pain over the bony prominence on the inner side of the elbow.

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  • We would not expect to see similar undue prominence in any future series of the show broadcast on Bravo.

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  • We show that information structure in English can only be analyzed concurrently with prosodic prominence and phrasing.

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  • It is not the role of the media to give equal prominence to all news about an issue, whether good or bad.

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  • The solar prominence, bottom left, has a temperature of some 70 000 °C.

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  • John Millar Andrews rose to even greater public prominence than his father.

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  • prominence in the early 1980s, largely through the work of the American economist William Baumol.

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  • prominence in the early 1990s.

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  • prominence in the 1970s by targeting and attacking Saddam's regime.

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  • prominence in the 1960s with his regular appearance on The Frost Report where he met Ronnie Barker.

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  • prominence in the national security debate in the US.

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  • prominence in the 19th century.

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  • prosodic prominence and phrasing.

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  • New journals can take a long time to achieve respectability, let alone prominence.

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  • Among the father figures today are two eminent sculptors who came to prominence in the years after the Second World War.

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  • It shows a very clear solar prominence visible on the limb of the Sun.

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  • synth-pop outfit with much prominence on their electronic wizardry.

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  • theorized media in relation to what he called the sense ratio: the relative prominence of a single sensory organ.

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  • They first came to prominence some 20 years ago, with their dark noir thriller, Blood Simple.

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  • The arch of the vertebra features a small knob or prominence, called an anterior tubercle.

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  • The precarious position of the province on the borders of the country doubtless militated against an earlier industrial development, but since the separation from Belgium and the construction of roads, railways and canals there has been a general improvement, Tilburg, Eindhoven and Helmond all having risen into prominence in modern times as industrial centres.

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  • His Recherche de la verite, in 1674, was the baptism of the system into a theistic religion which borrowed its imagery from Augustine; it brought into prominence the metaphysical base which Louis Delaforge, Jacques Rohault and Regis had neither cared for nor understood.

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  • Undue prominence has commonly been assigned to him in the attack upon the Areopagus in 462 or 461 (see Areopagus, Cimon).

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  • Plutarch, who is clearly blinded by Pericles' subsequent brilliance, makes him suddenly burst into prominence and hold the highest place for 4 o years (i.e.

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  • The fact, however, appears to be that the prominence given to the heart in popular beliefs dates from the time when in the course of the development of anatomical knowledge the important function of the heart in animal life came to be recognized, whereas the supposition that the liver is the seat of vitality rests upon other factors than anatomical knowledge, and, being independent of such knowledge, also antedates it.

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  • border of the state is Lake Memphremagog with islands, a rugged prominence known as Owl's Head on its W.

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  • The heart-wood is dark in colour, takes a fine polish, and from the prominence of the medullary rays is valuable to the furniture maker; it weighs from 40 to 50 lb the cubic foot.

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  • It is essential to classify the subject-matter of geography in such a manner as to give prominence not only to facts, but to their mutual relations and their natural and inevitable order.

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  • Smith, Prophets of Israel, p. Iii); more prominence is evidently to be ascribed to the influence of the half-Arabian Jethro or Hobab, and this must be taken into consideration with what is known of Kenite and kindred clans (Exod.

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  • The circumstances favoured a closer alliance between the people of Palestine, and a greater prominence of the old holy places (Hebron, Bethel, Shechem, &c.), of which the ruined Jerusalem would not be one, and the existing condition of Judah and Israel from internal and non-political points of view - not their condition in the pre-monarchical ages - is the more crucial problem in biblical history.'

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  • Calebite, too, are Hebron and its patron Abraham, and both increase in prominence in the patriarchal narratives, where, moreover, an important body of tradition can have emanated only from outside Israel and Judah (see Genesis).

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  • There is much that is suggestive, for example, in the relation between the " postexilic " additions to the prophecies and their immediately earlier form; or in the singular prominence of the Judaean family of Perez (its elevation over Zerah, a half-Edomite family, Gen.

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  • Charles has done much by his editions to restore to their proper prominence in connexion with Jewish history the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, The Book of Jubilees, Enoch, &c. But Scharer gives a complete bibliography to which it must suffice to refer.

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  • In consequence of his prominence as a labour protagonist of the war, his life was threatened, along with the Prime Minister's, by the conspiracy of a Derby family of anarchists, who were duly convicted, and sentenced to considerable terms of penal servitude, in March 1917.

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  • The sanctity and, therefore, the importance of Eridu remained a fixed tradition in the minds of the people to the latest days, and analogy therefore justifies the conclusion that Anu was likewise worshipped in a centre which had acquired great prominence.

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  • Within the velar area the eyes and the cephalic tentacles commence to rise up, and on the surface of the post-oral region is formed a cap-like shell and an encircling ridge, which gradually increases in prominence and becomes the freely depending mantle-skirt.

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  • It is favourably situated at the confluence of a number of canals and rivers which communicate hence with the Zuider Zee by the Meppeler Diep, and rose rapidly into prominence in the 19th century.

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  • - During the 18th century the doctrine of the Inward Light acquired such exclusive prominence as to bring about a tendency to disparage, or, at least, to neglect, the written word (the Scriptures) as being " outward " and non-essential.

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  • The future Mme de Stael was from her earliest years a romp, a coquette, and passionately desirous of prominence and attention.

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  • A few summits in the extreme south-west in the neighbourhood of Cape Ghir still exceed 11,000 ft., and although the steadily rising ground from the coast and the prominence of nearer summits detract from the apparent height, this is on an average greater than that of the European Alps.

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  • On the other hand, the interrelation of events in Palestine and Syria during this period combine with the sudden prominence of Judah (under Uzziah) and the subsequent anti-Judaean and anti-Assyrian coalition (against Ahaz) to suggest that Uzziah had been supported by Assyria (cf.

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  • The increased importance of concealment for one's own guns and the certainty of being called upon to engage concealed targets, brought indirect laying into great prominence (see also Artillery).

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  • Thurlow Weed owed his early political advancement to the introduction into state politics of the anti-Masonic issue (see Anti-Masonic Party), which also brought into prominence his co-worker W.

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  • It had, however, learnt the danger of outraging the national and religious susceptibilities of Turkish Moslems. For the future they showed more deference to these sentiments, and, recognizing the forces behind them, gave more and more prominence to Pan-Islamism as a feature of the Committee's policy.

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  • Schulze's period of prominence in Berlin closely corresponded to that of Herbart at Konigsberg (1809-1833) and Göttingen (1833-1841), who insisted that for boys of eight to twelve there was no better text-book than the Greek Odyssey, and this principle was brought into practice at Hanover by his distinguished pupil, Ahrens.

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  • The Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae (Linz and Frankfort, 1618-162r), a lucid and attractive textbook of Copernican science,was remarkable for the prominence given to "physical astronomy," as well as for the extension to the Jovian system of the laws recently discovered to regulate the motions of the planets.

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  • The truth is probably that the tradition of his wife's adultery and treachery was a genuine part of the Arthurian story, which, neglected for a time, was brought again into prominence by the social conditions of the courts for which the later romances were composed; and it is in this later and conventionalized form that the tale has become familiar to us (see also Lancelot).

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  • In 1877, after the Seize Mai (see France: History), he was one of the republican majority who denounced the Broglie ministry, and he took a leading part in resisting the anti-republican policy of which the Seize Mai incident was a symptom, his demand in 1879 for the indictment of the Broglie ministry bringing him into particular prominence.

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  • The rise of the kingdom of Israel under Saul is treated at length, but more prominence is given to the influence of the prophet Samuel; and not only is Saul's history written from a didactic and prophetical standpoint (cf.

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  • (like the preceding story of Samson) deal with Danites, but the migration can hardly be earlier than David's time; and xix.-xxi., by describing the extermination of Benjamin, form a link between the presence of the tribe in the late narratives of the exodus and its new prominence in the traditions of Saul (q.v.).

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  • the fatherly love of God, the faith-mysticism of the Christian's relation to Christ, and the inward witness of the Spirit, fall into the background, while unusual prominence is assigned to the more tangible and practical tests of Christianity.

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  • In view of the apparent unity of the entire work, the only possible explanation seems to be that the book was written at first all in Hebrew, but for the convenience of the general reader whose vernacular was Aramaic, a translation, possibly from the same pen as the original, was made into king to great political prominence, owing to his extraordinary God given ability to interpret dreams. In both.versions, the heathen astrologers make the first attempt to solve the difficulty, which results in failure, whereupon the pious Israelite, being summoned to the royal presence, in both cases through the friendly intervention of a court official, triumphantly explains the mystery to the king's satisfaction (cf.

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  • In spite of slight physique and a dissolute life, his reckless courage and ambition brought him into prominence in the war against the Italians in Tripoli; he was made aide-de-camp to Wahid-ed-din, afterwards the Sultan Mohammed VI.

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  • Such a supposition would accord with the prominence acquired by the moon in the calendar and in astrological calculations, as well as with the fact pointed out (see SIN) that the moon-cult belongs to the nomadic and therefore earlier, stage of civilization, whereas the sun-god rises to full importance only after the agricultural stage has been reached.

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  • The Gospels give great prominence to the sorrowful mysteries of Christ.

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  • Hot Puppies are a synth-pop outfit with much prominence on their electronic wizardry.

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  • McLuhan theorized media in relation to what he called the sense ratio: the relative prominence of a single sensory organ.

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  • Also I think there is an undue prominence given to gay rights issues.

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  • Show: This extreme style of Siamese has come to prominence in the last 20 years.

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  • The Japanese see purple as a representation of wealth and prominence.

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  • This table is positioned in a place of prominence in respect of their special day.

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  • She is a talented actor who first came into prominence in 2000 with the television series Dark Angel, which ran for two years.

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  • Iams, headquartered in Dayton, Ohio, was founded by the Iams family in 1946, but it wasn't until 1982 that their kibble formula and marketing came together to propel the brand to national prominence.

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  • In an age of reality-based television entertainment and a general "tell-it-like-it-is" attitude in the public arena, plus size female models have been gaining a greater prominence in the fashion and advertising industries than ever before.

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  • Still, it represented a monumental step forward for Palm, a company that had been struggling to recapture its former prominence in the smartphone and PDA market.

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  • Chickens are a major carrier of salmonella bacteria, which accounts for its prominence in poultry products.

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  • The strongest form of traction involves inserting a stainless steel pin through a bony prominence attached by a horseshoe-shaped bow and rope to a pulley and weights suspended over the end of the patient's bed.

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  • This Irish dancer came to prominence as the lead dancer and choreographer for Riverdance, though he left the show before it began touring widely.

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  • Part of what has brought American Harlequin dance floors to prominence in the field of dance, both socially and professionally, is the wide variety of solutions the floors provide.

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  • While the first charts came from the courts of royalty in Europe, as America gained prominence worldwide it also became the place where the new dances were created.

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  • Enleve was introduced several years ago and quickly gained prominence due to its heavy marketing through infomercials and similar testimony-based advertisements.

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  • The line's precise techniques and stunning results are quickly leading the Germany-based company to worldwide prominence in the hair care industry.

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  • Carrie Prejean first came to national prominence in 2009 when she was crowned Miss USA.

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  • Salinas first came to prominence in 1997, when supermodel Tyra Banks wore one of the company's bikinis on the cover of Sports Illustrated's swimwear special.

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  • Acai has recently risen to media prominence because of two doctors, Dr. Perricone and Dr. Oz.

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  • Recently, acai has risen to prominence at the recommendation of Dr. Perricone and Dr. Oz, who called the acai berry a superfood because of the richness of nutrients in these little berries.

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  • While the cut is still not one of the most popular, it gained prominence when Sarah Jessica Parker's character, Carrie, received an Asscher cut diamond ring the HBO series, Sex and the City, when Aiden proposed to her.

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  • Yet the remaining members of the Asscher family began to rebuild the company and, over the years, it gradually regained its prominence and reputation.

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  • Her affair with Steve Frame produced son Jamie and her great love MacKenzie Cory (Douglas Watson) brought struggling Rachel to prominence and wealth.

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  • Led by a self-made businessman, his wife and their kids, the Tate family enjoyed prominence as one of Emmerdale's leading families.

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  • The prominence of family mental illness is also very much a part of the tapestry of OLTL.

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  • The Pirate Bay: Many people loved this bit torrent search engine, but it was because of its popularity and prominence that it was shut down in May 2006 for legal reasons.

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  • The Strokes formed in 1998, but it was in 2000 that they began to rise to prominence, in the wake of the garage rock revival with other "The" bands, like The Hives and The White Stripes.

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  • Frusicante briefly quit the band as they rose to prominence in the late 1980s and early 1990s, unwilling to deal with the pressures of fame.

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  • In the early 1980s, major labels began to pick up on the rap music craze and helped the genre grow to international prominence.

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  • However, Mexican rock in particular has gained international prominence.

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  • Steampunk owed a nod to cyberpunk, an earlier genre that rose to prominence in the 1970s and 1980s.

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  • In a world where information is plentiful and attention is scarce we focus on those things that have some prominence.

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  • But the trying winter campaign in the Crimea also brought into prominence defects perhaps traceable to his long connexion with the formalities and uniform regulations of military offices in peace time.

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  • One of the chief names for the priest was baru - literally the "inspector" - which was given to him because of the prominence of his function as an inspector of livers for the purpose of divining the intention of the gods.

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