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prohibitions

prohibitions Sentence Examples

  • In 1705 Cartesianism was still subject to prohibitions from the authorities; but in a project of new statutes, drawn up for the faculty of arts at Paris in 1720, the Method and Meditations of Descartes were placed beside the Organon and the Metaphysics of Aristotle as text-books for philosophical study.

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  • The rules of the Scribes enumerated thirty-nine main kinds of work forbidden on the Sabbath, and each of these prohibitions gave rise to new subtilties.

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  • Moreover, the prohibitions are strengthened and multiplied.

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  • But they came round none the less, in spite of Innocent's renewed prohibitions.

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  • Theobald was followed (1240-1241) by Richard of Cornwall, the brother of Henry III., who, like his predecessor, had to sail in the teeth of papal prohibitions; but neither of the two achieved any permanent result, except the fortification of Ascalon.

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  • English law has largely moulded, for example, criminal and commercial law and the law of evidence; the development of the law of corporations, damages, prohibitions and such extraordinary remedies as the mandamus has been very similar to that in other states; while in the fusion of law and equity, and the law of successions, family relations, &c., the civil law of Spain and France has been unaffected.

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  • The making of beads was probably practised at Venice from a very early period, but the earliest documentary evidence bearing on the subject does not appear to be of earlier date than the 14th century, when prohibitions were directed against those who made of glass such objects as were usually made of crystal or other hard stones.

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  • Flanders became a battle-field in the great struggle between France and England, and the war of trade prohibitions led to infractions of the German privileges in Bruges.

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  • The productior was always scanty, and, owing to official prohibitions, the ware did not find its way into the general market.

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  • Prohibitions in respect of night work, the work of women (especially mothers) and young persons have been dealt with in the sense of the resolutions adopted at international conferences.

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  • The national government is, however, interdicted from using these powers in certain directions by the following prohibitions (art.

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  • The figure was doubled by 1895 and trebled in 1897; in spite of prohibitions, imports into Persia continued on a large scale.

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  • Slavery and the slave trade continued to flourish in the interior in the early years of the 10th century, despite the prohibitions of the Portuguese government.

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  • Similar prohibitions are common in Africa, where fetish priests are often reduced to a diet of herbs and roots.

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  • These prohibitions were renewed in the 13th and 14th centuries (ibid.

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  • Primary and secondary senses of the term between them cover so much ground that it is not surprising to find taboo used in Polynesia as a name for the whole system of religion, founded as it largely is on prohibitions and abstinences.

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  • Other clauses dealt with the rights of the Laplanders to graze their reindeer alternatively in either country, - and with the question of transport of goods across the frontier by rail or other means of communication, so that the traffic should not be hampered by any import or export prohibitions or otherwise.

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  • it is one of the extraordinary remedies - such as mandamus, certiorari and prohibitions, which the superior courts may grant.

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  • Prohibitions against Molech worship, vv.

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  • For the most part this is founded on Dutch models, and testifies in a high degree to the king's progressive aims. Provision was made for the better education of the lower, and the restriction of the political influence of the higher clergy; there were stern prohibitions against wreckers and "the evil and unchristian practice of selling peasants as if they were brute beasts"; the old trade gilds were retained, but the rules of admittance thereto made easier, and trade combinations of the richer burghers, to the detriment of the smaller tradesmen, were sternly forbidden.

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  • At the celebrated council of Clermont (1095), at which the first crusade was preached, Urban strengthened the former prohibitions by declaring that no one might accept any spiritual office from a layman, or take an oath of fealty to any layman.

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  • Encouragement of industry was not wanting; the state undertook to develop the herds of merino sheep, by issuing prohibitions against inclosures, which proved the ruin of agriculture, and gave premiums for large merchant ships, which ruined the owners of small vessels and reduced the merchant navy of Spain to a handful of galleons.

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  • He strongly urged the repeal of the penal laws which pressed upon the Catholics; he condemned the restrictions imposed by Great Britain on the commerce of Ireland, and also the perpetual interference of the Irish parliament with industry by prohibitions and bounties.

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  • chrysotile prohibitions in ten EU countries could be in jeopardy.

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  • circumvent prohibitions on discrimination against a specific group by discriminating against everyone equally.

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  • Beyond prohibitions pertaining to near kin, the choice of marriage partners was open to kin and non-kin alike.

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  • These prohibitions convey welcome messages about the vital nature of utility services.

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  • The ban on all religious groups is merely an artifice to circumvent prohibitions on discrimination against a specific group by discriminating against everyone equally.

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  • The standard contains no prohibitions against casting away any const qualifier.

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  • In 1705 Cartesianism was still subject to prohibitions from the authorities; but in a project of new statutes, drawn up for the faculty of arts at Paris in 1720, the Method and Meditations of Descartes were placed beside the Organon and the Metaphysics of Aristotle as text-books for philosophical study.

    0
    0
  • The rules of the Scribes enumerated thirty-nine main kinds of work forbidden on the Sabbath, and each of these prohibitions gave rise to new subtilties.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the prohibitions are strengthened and multiplied.

    0
    0
  • But they came round none the less, in spite of Innocent's renewed prohibitions.

    0
    0
  • Theobald was followed (1240-1241) by Richard of Cornwall, the brother of Henry III., who, like his predecessor, had to sail in the teeth of papal prohibitions; but neither of the two achieved any permanent result, except the fortification of Ascalon.

    0
    0
  • English law has largely moulded, for example, criminal and commercial law and the law of evidence; the development of the law of corporations, damages, prohibitions and such extraordinary remedies as the mandamus has been very similar to that in other states; while in the fusion of law and equity, and the law of successions, family relations, &c., the civil law of Spain and France has been unaffected.

    0
    0
  • The making of beads was probably practised at Venice from a very early period, but the earliest documentary evidence bearing on the subject does not appear to be of earlier date than the 14th century, when prohibitions were directed against those who made of glass such objects as were usually made of crystal or other hard stones.

    0
    0
  • Flanders became a battle-field in the great struggle between France and England, and the war of trade prohibitions led to infractions of the German privileges in Bruges.

    0
    0
  • The productior was always scanty, and, owing to official prohibitions, the ware did not find its way into the general market.

    0
    0
  • Prohibitions in respect of night work, the work of women (especially mothers) and young persons have been dealt with in the sense of the resolutions adopted at international conferences.

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  • This is, perhaps, his most marked deviation from the rigour of principle; it was doubtless a concession to popular opinion with a view to an attainable practical improvement The wisdom of retaliation in order to procure the repeal of high duties or prohibitions imposed by foreign governments depends, he says, altogether on the likelihood of its success in effecting the object aimed at, but he does not conceal his contempt for the practice of such expedients.

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  • The national government is, however, interdicted from using these powers in certain directions by the following prohibitions (art.

    0
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  • The figure was doubled by 1895 and trebled in 1897; in spite of prohibitions, imports into Persia continued on a large scale.

    0
    0
  • Slavery and the slave trade continued to flourish in the interior in the early years of the 10th century, despite the prohibitions of the Portuguese government.

    0
    0
  • Similar prohibitions are common in Africa, where fetish priests are often reduced to a diet of herbs and roots.

    0
    0
  • These prohibitions were renewed in the 13th and 14th centuries (ibid.

    0
    0
  • Primary and secondary senses of the term between them cover so much ground that it is not surprising to find taboo used in Polynesia as a name for the whole system of religion, founded as it largely is on prohibitions and abstinences.

    0
    0
  • Other clauses dealt with the rights of the Laplanders to graze their reindeer alternatively in either country, - and with the question of transport of goods across the frontier by rail or other means of communication, so that the traffic should not be hampered by any import or export prohibitions or otherwise.

    0
    0
  • it is one of the extraordinary remedies - such as mandamus, certiorari and prohibitions, which the superior courts may grant.

    0
    0
  • Prohibitions against Molech worship, vv.

    0
    0
  • For the most part this is founded on Dutch models, and testifies in a high degree to the king's progressive aims. Provision was made for the better education of the lower, and the restriction of the political influence of the higher clergy; there were stern prohibitions against wreckers and "the evil and unchristian practice of selling peasants as if they were brute beasts"; the old trade gilds were retained, but the rules of admittance thereto made easier, and trade combinations of the richer burghers, to the detriment of the smaller tradesmen, were sternly forbidden.

    0
    0
  • At the celebrated council of Clermont (1095), at which the first crusade was preached, Urban strengthened the former prohibitions by declaring that no one might accept any spiritual office from a layman, or take an oath of fealty to any layman.

    0
    0
  • Encouragement of industry was not wanting; the state undertook to develop the herds of merino sheep, by issuing prohibitions against inclosures, which proved the ruin of agriculture, and gave premiums for large merchant ships, which ruined the owners of small vessels and reduced the merchant navy of Spain to a handful of galleons.

    0
    0
  • He strongly urged the repeal of the penal laws which pressed upon the Catholics; he condemned the restrictions imposed by Great Britain on the commerce of Ireland, and also the perpetual interference of the Irish parliament with industry by prohibitions and bounties.

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    0
  • The standard contains no prohibitions against casting away any const qualifier.

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  • When you first receive a diagnosis of acid reflux, the list of dietary prohibitions may seem discouragingly long.

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