How to use Progenitors in a sentence

progenitors
  • Many students of the group, following Brauer, have regarded the Apterygota as representing the original wingless progenitors of the Pterygota, and the many primitive characters shown by the former group lend support to this view.

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  • This was split open by a thunderbolt, the old man sacrificing himself to save the lives of those who were inside, and from it there issued the progenitors of the present races of men, beasts, birds, fishes and plants.

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  • Philological investigations show that it is probable that the progenitors I From the enlistment of Kabyles speaking the Zouave dialect the Zouave regiments of the French army came to be so called.

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  • Attempts have been made to find in them the progenitors of the trades unions, but there seems to be no immediate connexion between the latter and the craft gilds.

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  • It would seem, from a somewhat obscure passage in the chronicle compiled from older the progenitors of the Poles, originally established on the Danube, were driven from thence by the Romans to the still wilder wilderness of central Europe, settling finally among the virgin forests and impenetrable morasses of the basin of the upper waters of the Oder and the Vistula.

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  • Mary was succeeded in her lifetime in 1567 by her only son James VI., who through his father Lord Darnley was also head of the second branch, there being no surviving male issue of the family from progenitors later than Robert II.

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  • For it is to be expected a priori that, since albinoes were derived from pigmented progenitors and may at any time appear, side by side with pigmented brothers, in a litter from pigmented parents, they would be carrying the pattern determinants of some one or other of their pigmented ancestors.

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  • But something liberal in the philosophy of their progenitors threw an attractiveness over the earlier Safawid kings which was wanting in those who came after them.

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  • The literary progenitors of the cancioneiro were the Spanish poets Juan de Mena, Jorge Manrique, Garci-Sanchez de Badajos and Rodriguez del Padron, and its main subjects.

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  • There was thus no grander lineage in China than that of Confucius; and on all his progenitors, since the throne of Shang passed from their line, with perhaps one exception, he could look back with complacency.

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  • And as man under a genealogical point of view belongs to the Catarhine or Old World stock, we must conclude, however much the conclusion may revolt our pride, that our early progenitors would have been properly thus designated.

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  • Lawless Protestant associations, called Peep o' Day Boys, terrorized the north and were the progenitors of the Orangemen (1789).

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  • The two species which are farthest removed in structure, the horse and the ass, produce, as is well known, hybrids or mules, which in certain qualities useful to man excel both their progenitors, and in some countries and for certain kinds of work are in greater requisition than either.

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  • It can hardly be expected that zebras and bontequaggas fresh from their native mountains and plains can be brought into competition as beasts of burden and draught with horses and asses, whose useful qualities have been augmented by the training of thousands of generations of progenitors.

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  • Without prosecuting this subject further, it may be enough here to follow out the lines of the Darley Arabian, the Byerly Turk, and the Godolphin Arabian or Barb, the main ancestors of the British thoroughbred of the 18th and 19th centuries, through several famous race-horses, each and all brilliant winners,-Flying Childers, Eclipse, Herod and Matchem,-to whom it is considered sufficient to look as the great progenitors of the race-horse of to-day.

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  • The fall of the Biainian kingdom, perhaps overthrown by Cyaxares; was apparently soon followed by an immigration of Aryan (Medo-Persian) races, including the progenitors of the Armenians» But they spread slowly, for the "Ten Thousand," when crossing the plateau to Trebizond, 401-400 B.C., met no Armenians after leaving the villages four days' march beyond the Teleboas, now Kara Su.

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  • The League of Gentlemen opt out of the challenge to become the progenitors of a new wave of British film horror.

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  • Their initial hypothesis was that mesodermal progenitors are present in the marrow, but differ from hematopoietic progenitors.

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  • These were the early industrial progenitors of the Rochdale Pioneers, a group of artisans who founded the Rochdale Equitable Pioneers Society in 1844.

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  • Held by the gift of the king's progenitors (CChR, 14271516, p. 4 ).

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  • We have been investigating the chemoattractants involved in releasing mast cell progenitors from the bone marrow and mediating their recruitment to tissues.

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  • Consequently, such scaffolds must provide the reparative cells or their progenitors or the specific attachment or binding sites for endogenous reparative cells or their progenitors or the specific attachment or binding sites for endogenous reparative cells.

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  • This galaxy was observed as part of a program to directly image the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae.

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  • Reid thus takes Hume's scepticism as, on its own showing, a reductio ad impossibile (see Hume, ad fin.) of accepted philosophical principles, and refuses, accordingly, to separate Hume from his intellectual progenitors.

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  • The annates were thereafter to accrue to the king; and bishops and archbishops were thenceforth, in case the pope refused to confirm them,' to be consecrated and invested within the realm, " in like manner as divers other archbishops and bishops have been heretofore in ancient times by sundry the king's most noble progenitors."

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  • But these cannot be considered the actual progenitors of Neoplatonism; their philosophic method is quite elementary as compared with the Neoplatonic, their fundamental principles are uncertain, and unbounded deference is still paid to the authority of Plato.

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  • Now, there is little doubt that the progenitors of both these sections came from a temperate region (in North America); so that here we have one moiety acclimatized to endure extreme heat, and the other extreme cold; and at this day exposure of either to the opposite extreme (or even, as we have seen, to the climate of an intermediate zone) is always pernicious and often fatal.

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  • They make shift to live merely by conformity, practically as their fathers did, and are in no sense the progenitors of a noble race of men.

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  • The historians of culture are quite consistent in regard to their progenitors, the writers of universal histories, for if historical events may be explained by the fact that certain persons treated one another in such and such ways, why not explain them by the fact that such and such people wrote such and such books?

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  • Consequently, such scaffolds must provide the reparative cells or their progenitors or the specific attachment or binding sites for endogenous reparative cells.

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  • You will learn names, colors of each dog, and if any of your dog's progenitors were AKC champions.

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  • Of these cognate races, which are described by the Greek writers as barbarous or non-Hellenic, the Illyrians and Epirots, he thinks, were respectively the progenitors of the Ghegs, or northern, and the Tosks, or southern, Albanians.

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