How to use Profusion in a sentence

profusion
  • The hills were a profusion of snowy dogwood and pink plumb and cherry blossoms.

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  • Lizards occur in great profusion and variety.

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  • It is of beautiful appearance, and the almost tropical profusion of its growth may have led to the early erroneous reports of the densely-wooded nature of these islands.

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  • And a profusion of forms is shown by the moulds and actual examples, for necklaces, decorations, inlay in stone and applied reliefs on vases.

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  • One of its rooms, called the "Golden Hall," from the profusion of its gilding, is 113 ft.

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  • The other part comprehends inner Persis lying northwards; it enjoys a pleasant climate and has fertile and well-watered plains, gardens with trees of all kinds, rich pasturages and forests abounding with game; with the exception of the olive all fruits are produced in profusion, particularly the vine.

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  • It was decorated in the most sumptuous fashion, and like the chapel, served by thirty-five priests, was furnished with a profusion of golden ornaments.

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  • There is a great profusion of fruit, the apples yielding a kind of cider which, however, does not keep longer than a month.

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  • In strong contrast to the poverty of Brazil in the larger mammals is the astonishing profusion of insect life in every part of the country.

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  • The finest part of the exterior is the choir, which is ornamented with a profusion of carved pinnacles and balustrading.

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  • There are remains of ancient forests consisting of wild olive trees and the camel thorn, near which grows the ngotuane, a plant with a profusion of fine, strongly scented yellow flowers.

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  • This theory Gibbon completely exploded in his Critical Observations (1770) - no very difficult task, indeed, but achieved in a style, and with a profusion of learning, which called forth the warmest commendations both at home and abroad.

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  • It is amongst Arthropods, however - and especially amongst insects - that mimicry, both Batesian and Miillerian, occurs in greatest profusion and perfection.

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  • The greater part of this trough is over 600 fathoms deep. The profusion of islands and their usually bold elevation give beauty and picturesqueness to the sea, but its navigation is difficult and dangerous, notwithstanding the large number of safe and commodious gulfs and bays.

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  • The most striking example is undoubtedly the Ca' d'Oro, so called from the profusion of gold employed on its façade.

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  • It was plain indeed that the fiscal question itself was ripe for the polls; Board of Trade statistics had been issued in profusion, and the whole case was before the country.

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  • The great gopuram, or gate-pyramid, is one of the most imposing buildings of the kind, rising in twelve stories to a height of upwards of 100 ft., and ornamented with a profusion of figures of men and animals formed in stucco.

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  • It possesses a great profusion of excellent timber, but the difficulty of extraction has so far restricted the lumber industry within somewhat modest limits.

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  • His patrons had been taken away by death, or estranged by the riotous profusion with which he squandered their bounty, and the ungrateful insolence with which he rejected their advice.

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  • It is significant that whereas the earlier Greeks had used precious stones only as a medium for the engraver's art, unengraven gems, valuable for their mere material, now came to be used in profusion for adornment.

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  • Now the Internet provides this profusion, which is not without dangers.

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  • His profusion was boundless.

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  • In all, about sixty kinds of timber of marketable quality are furnished in more or less profusion, but the difficulty of extraction, even in the regions situated in close proximity to the large waterways, renders it improbable that the timber trade of Borneo will attain to any very great dimensions until other and easier sources of supply have become exhausted.

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  • The profusion of plants argues for a profusion of plants argues for a profusion of burning regimes.

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  • It has been recently new roofed, and the east window contains a profusion of old stained glass.

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  • This coverage can provide the reader with at least one systematic approach to the sometimes bewildering profusion of ideas under the umbrella of Buddhism.

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  • For three miles together, there is the richest profusion of scenery.

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  • Here all my most favorite flowers grow in wild profusion.

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  • Nowhere in Britain do snowdrops grow in such profusion.

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  • At first the sheer profusion of growth is bewildering, like entering a wild wood.

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  • Instead of a shortage of available properties, we now have a veritable profusion of available homes.

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  • A more poignant reminder of Britain's past is the profusion of latin sparrows.

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  • On his return to London in 1818 he applied himself assiduously to the art of engraving, in which he acquired a skill that in after years became a most valuable assistant to his literary labours, and enabled him to illustrate his various humours and fancies by a profusion of quaint devices, which not only repeated to the eye the impressions of the text, but, by suggesting amusing analogies and contrasts, added considerably to the sense and effect of the work.

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  • The most striking example is undoubtedly the Ca' d'Oro, so called from the profusion of gold employed on its façade.

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  • The profusion of turrets, pinnacles, and dormer windows which decorates the roof of this, the chief portion of the château, constitutes the main feature of the exterior, while in the interior are a well-preserved chapel of the 16th century and a famous double staircase, the construction of which permits two people to ascend and descend respectively without seeing one another.

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  • B. patagonica (Groundsell Tree) is handsome in foliage, with white flower-heads, borne in profusion.

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  • Another fine Bramble is the Cut-leaved, or Parsley-leaved Bramble, which has a profusion of white blooms, succeeded by large delicious fruits.

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  • Indeed the profusion of articles of gold which have been found is remarkable; in the Dublin Museum may be seen bracelets, armlets, finger-rings, torques, crescents, gorgets, necklets, fibulae and diadems, all of solid gold and most exquisite workmanship.

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  • On the lagoons and lower reaches of the rivers the Viha (Typhonodorum lindleyanum), an arum endemic to Madagascar, grows in great profusion to a height of 12 or 13 ft.

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  • The votive offerings in clay, amber, bronze, ivory and lead found in great profusion within the precinct range from the 9th to the 4th century B.C. and supply invaluable evidence for early Spartan art; they prove that Sparta reached her artistic zenith in the 7th century and that her decline had already begun in the 6th.

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  • Here the cylindrical type of hut prevails; clothing is of skin or leather but is very scanty; iron ornaments are worn in profusion; arrows are not feathered; shields of hide, spears with leather sheaths are found and also fighting bracelets.

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  • Relinquishing, if not the stately magnificence, at least the gay and wasteful profusion which had characterized the court of Burgundy under the preceding duke, he had bent all his efforts towards the development of his military and political power.

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  • Abdurrahman III., an Oriental ruler of the great stamp, industrious, resolute, capable of justice, magnificent, and free handed without profusion, was eminently qualified to give all that his people wanted.

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  • Sezanne yields Ferns in profusion, mingled with other shade-loving plants such as would grow under the trees in a moist ravine; its vegetation is comparable to that of an island in the tropical seas.

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  • The Proteaceae are also missing; but other Dicotyledons occur in profusion, many of them being remarkable for the large size of their deciduous leaves.

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  • Several species of Nyssa are common to the two districts, as are a climbing palm, two vines, a magnolia, &c. The common tree at Bovey is Sequoia Couttsiae, which probably grew in profusion in the sheltered valleys of Dartmoor, close to the lake.

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  • The Holy Scriptures distributed with an absurd profusion in a country where the clergy itself is hardly able to understand and explain them " had been the " prime source of all the secret societies established in the empire."

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  • Cynthia enthusiastically described Yankee Boy, a natural mountain bowl with its picture perfect waterfall and profusion of flowers.

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  • We entered the park after a comfort stop and were immediately enchanted by the profusion of birds.

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  • The gullies and rock faces have a profusion of life including tiny spotted morays mostly found under the seaweed.

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  • Here, on a much smaller scale, you are surrounded by an even greater profusion of commemorative stonework.

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  • The stud y of the insect life of the peninsula opens a splendid field for scientific research, and the profusion and variety of insects found in these forests probably surpass those to be met with anywhere else in the world.

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  • It is a rapid grower, with a profusion of pink blossoms in summer.

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  • It is an evergreen with small leaves, and bears a profusion of large panicles of small white flowers.

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  • One of the finest is L. prostratum, a spreading little evergreen having flowers of a lovely blue, with faint reddish-violet stripes, in great profusion when the plant is well grown.

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  • Acutangula (Campanula Arvatica) - A pretty Spanish kind affording a profusion of starry deep violet flowers in July and August.

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  • Height, 9 inches to 12 inches, the lax branching stems bearing a rich profusion of large pendent bells of the deepest purple.

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  • Russia. It has in early summer a profusion of small white blossoms, and is suited for the rock garden or the margins of borders.

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  • Fully grown it makes a low tree with a dense wide-spreading head of slender branches loaded every May with a profusion of flowers of a pale pink when expanded, and of a brilliant crimson in the bud, when they are most beautiful.

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  • P. Lampeni is also grown against walls, where it bears a profusion of fragrant, creamy-white flowers, but it is tender, and probably now confined to collections.

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  • Its narrow oblong leaves show its purple-blue berries to advantage as they dangle in profusion in autumn.

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  • Rampion (Phyteuma) - The Rampions are neat, pretty, and interesting plants of the Bellflower order, with small flowers in profusion.

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  • Sand Pink (Tunica) - T. saxifraga is a small plant with a profusion of wiry stems that bear numerous elegant little rosy flowers.

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  • The Sea Buckthorn has silvery-looking Willow-like leaves and bears a profusion of orange berries.

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  • Limonium, of which there are several varieties; S. latifolia, the finest of all, with wide-spreading flower-stems and a profusion of small purplish-blue flowers; and S. tatarica, a dwarfer species, with distinct red flowers.

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  • Sun Rose (Helianthemum) - There are few more brilliant sights than masses of these when in full beauty, and they are of the easiest culture, dwarf, and bearing in great profusion flowers with fine diversity of color.

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  • The plant is 6 or 8 inches high, and bears a profusion of rose-colored blossoms with a dark centre.

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  • It is a plant of strong growth, forming many crowns and a profusion of clear yellow vanilla-scented flowers, from July into the autumn.

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  • Tall, blowsy perennials mingle with shorter flowers with equal ease, and while some like to plant hues of similar colors, many cottage gardeners just fill their gardens with a profusion of blossoms in whatever colors strike their fancy.

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  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia-A profusion of part of the stomach through an opening in the diaphragm that is present at birth.

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  • The mangrove grows on the shores of the west coast in profusion.

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  • It is characterized by its needle-leaved Coniferae, its catkin-bearing (Amentaceae) and other trees, deciduous in winter, and its profusion of herbaceous species.

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  • And it cannot be doubted that the profusion of Melastomaceae in South America was not derived from elsewhere, but the result of local evolution.

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  • The Madonna is here depicted with various saints, the archangel Michael and St Maurice holding her mantle, which is extended over the kneeling Gianfrancesco Gonzaga, amid a profusion of rich festooning and other accessory.

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  • Coco-nuts, cacao, bananas, mangoes and other tropical fruits are produced in profusion, but the production of foodstuffs (beans, Indian corn, mandioca, &c.) is not sufficient for local consumption.

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  • Owing to its southern exposure, its sheltered position, and a copious rainfall, vegetation, in part of a sub-tropical character, grows in great profusion.

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  • This fact will account for the profusion with which some orchids, like the common bee orchis for instance, are found in some seasons and their scarcity in others.

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  • Very beautiful sculpture, executed with an ivory-like minuteness of finish, is used to decorate the whole building with wonderful profusion.

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  • It was thought that martyrdom would atone for sin, and imprisoned confessors not only issued to the Churches commands which were regarded almost as inspired utterances, but granted pardons in rash profusion to those who had been excommunicated by the regular clergy, a practice which caused Cyprian and his fellow bishops much difficulty.

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  • The soil is fertile and produces rubber, cotton, sugar, coffee, cocoa, tobacco and nutmegs, all of which are exported; pimento (allspice) grows wild in the greatest profusion.

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  • The range of temperature is not sufficient to give the variety of annual wild flowers of more northern climates; nevertheless flowers cover the bottom lands and uplands in great profusion.

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  • Andros Island and the Abaco Islands may be specially noted for their profusion of large timber, including mahogany, mastic, lignum vitae, iron and bullet woods, and many others.

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  • The most remarkable consist of long avenues of menhirs or standing stones; but there is also a profusion of other erections, such as dolmens and barrows, throughout the whole district.

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  • Orange, olive, cypress and arbutus trees grow throughout the island, which, however, is too dry to have any profusion of vegetation.

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  • The city is attractively situated amidst a group of low hills in the heart of the lake country of western New York; the streets are wide, with a profusion of shade trees.

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  • The anthers are so situated that the pollen on escaping comes into contact with the stigma; in such flowers self-fertilization is compulsory and very effectual, as seeds in profusion are produced.

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  • The density of the forest is greatly augmented by the cipos, or lianas, which overgrow the largest trees to their tops, and by a profusion of epiphytes which cover the highest branches.

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  • On the one side we may see the increase of rich apparel and the profusion of clothes by which people of rank indicated their position.

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  • A profusion of precious stones, and absence of skill or refinement in workmanship, distinguish Roman from Greek or Etruscan jewelry; but in the character of the designs there is no real difference.

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  • On the mountain slopes orchids are found in great profusion.

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  • Collectors of glass are chiefly concerned with the drinking-glasses which were produced in great profusion and adapted for every description of beverage.

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  • The richness, profusion and microscopic accuracy of their decoration could scarcely have been surpassed; but, with very rare exceptions, their lack of delicacy of technique disqualifies them to rank as fine porcelains.

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  • In purity of tone and velvetlike gloss of surface there is distinct inferiority on the side of the Japanese ware, but in thinness of pale it supports comparison, and in profusion and beauty of incised decoration it excels its Chinese original.

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  • Meanwhile, the material found by Botta and Layard, and other successors, in the ruins of Nineveh, has been constantly augmented through the efforts of companies of other investigators, and not merely Assyrian, but much earlier Babylonian and Chaldaean texts in the greatest profusion have been brought to the various museums of Europe and America.

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  • It is composed of a circlet of pure gold set with pearls and precious stones in great profusion, which gives it a most sumptuous appearance.

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  • Among numerous Norman examples the first in interest is the small church at Barfreston, one of the most perfect specimens of its kind in England, with a profusion of ornament, especially round the south doorway and east window.

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  • Flowering plants are numerous, and the natives often (as in Hawaii) greatly appreciate flowers, which thus add a feature to the picturesqueness of islandlife, though they do not usually grow in great profusion.

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  • Among the more important features of the marine life of the period were (1) the great development of the molluscs, especially of cephalopods; (2) theabundanceoflargebrachiopods; (3) theaberrant tendencies of the trilobites; (4) the profusion of corals; and (5) the abundance, size and peculiar forms of the fishes.

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  • The Pacific coast Transition zone is noted for its forests of giant conifers, principally Douglas fir, Sitka spruce, Pacific cedar and Western hemlock, Here, too, mosses and ferns grow in profusion, and the sadal (Gaultheria shailon), thimble berry (Rubus nootkamus), salmon berry (Rubus spectabilis) and devils club, (Fatsia horr-ida) are characteristic shrubs.

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  • The climate is favourable to the growth of plums, cherries, strawberries, raspberries, currants, gooseberries, etc. There are many localities in which cranberries are successfully grown, and in which blueberries also grow wild in great profusion.

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  • But the valleys, especially those on the western side, are warm and healthy, enclose good pasture land and furnish fruits and wine in rich profusion.

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  • The most striking feature of the ruins is the profusion of columns, no fewer than 230 being even now in position; the main street is a continuous colonnade, a large part of which is still entire, and it terminates to the south in a forum of similar formation.

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  • The roof of the cathedral is built of blocks of marble, and the various levels are reached by staircases carried up the buttresses; it is ornamented with a profusion of turrets, pinnacles and statues, of which last there are said to be no fewer than 4440, of very various styles and periods.

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  • Of the numerous works of art discovered in the course of the excavations the statues and large works of sculpture, whether in marble or bronze, are inferior to those found at Herculaneum, but some of the bronze statuettes are of exquisite workmanship, while the profusion of ornamental works and objects in bronze and the elegance of their design, as well as the finished beauty of their execution, are such as to excite the utmost admiration - more especially when it is considered that these are the casual results of the examination of a second-rate provincial town, which had, further, been ransacked for valuables (as Herculaneum had not) after the eruption of 79.

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  • The climate indeed which favours tropical profusion of jungle growth - still steaming heat - is that most favourable for the cultivation of tea, and such climate, unfortunately, is often trying to the health of Europeans.

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  • Near the shores of the lake wild flowers grow in rich profusion.

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  • The contents of the tombs have been nearly destroyed by successive plunderers; enough remained to show that rich jewellery was placed on the mummies, a profusion of vases of hard and valuable stones from the royal table service stood about the body, the store-rooms were filled with great jars of wine, perfumed ointment and other supplies, and tablets of ivory and of ebony were engraved with a record of the yearly annals of the reigns.

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  • The facade, which is flanked by two square towers without spires, has three portals decorated with a profusion of statuary, the central portal having a remarkable statue of Christ of the 13th century; they are surmounted by two galleries, the upper one containing twenty-two statues of the kings of Judah in its arcades, and by a fine rose-window.

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  • Mayflies and dragon-flies danced in the sunlight; lizards darted across the paths; and legions of spiders pervaded the grass, many very beautiful - frosted - silver backs, or curious, like the saltigrades, who took a few steps and then gave a leap. There were crickets in infinite numbers; and flies innumerable, from slim daddy-long-legs to ponderous, black, hairy fellows known to science as Dejeaniae; hymenopterous insects in profusion, including our old friend the bishop of Ambato (possibly Dielis), in company with another formidable stinger, with chrome antennae, called by the natives ` the Devil '; and occasional Phasmas (caballo de palo) crawling painfully about, like animated twigs."

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  • The women are delicate in frame, with small hands and feet, fair complexions, beautiful black eyes, finely arched eyebrows, and a profusion of long black hair, which they dress to perfection, and ornament with pearls and gems. The Parsees are much more liberal in their treatment of women than any other Asiatic race; they allow them to appear freely in public, and leave them the entire management of household affairs.

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  • It is a hardy deciduous shrub, native of North America, which bears a profusion of rich yellow flowers in autumn and winter when the plant is leafless.

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  • The city's streets are broad and heavily shaded with a profusion of elm, oak and maple trees.

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  • A profusion of jewellery is worn of the most solid description, none hollow; silver is worn only by the very poor, coral only by negresses.

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  • In Sikkim the mountains are covered with dense forest of tall umbrageous trees, commonly accompanied by a luxuriant growth of under shrubs, and adorned with climbing and epiphytal plants in wonderful profusion.

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  • These fertile tracts produce rice and other cereals, cotton, tobacco, opium and fruits in profusion.

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  • The blackberry, raspberry, blueberry and strawberry grow wild in profusion throughout the state.

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  • Stick-insects are intolerant of cold, and attain their largest size and greatest profusion of species in the tropics, one West African species, Palophus centaurus, reaching a length of 9 in.

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  • Every natural hollow is full of water, around the margin of which long grasses, reeds and other aquatic plants grow in the greatest profusion, often making it difficult to say where the land ends and the water begins.

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  • Nothing could be better fitted to call forth such mathematical powers as those of Hamilton; for Laplace's great work, rich to profusion in analytical processes alike novel and powerful, demands from the most gifted student careful and often laborious study.

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  • Burke, on the contrary, was assiduous and orderly, and had none of the vices of profusion.

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  • The profusion of turrets, pinnacles, and dormer windows which decorates the roof of this, the chief portion of the château, constitutes the main feature of the exterior, while in the interior are a well-preserved chapel of the 16th century and a famous double staircase, the construction of which permits two people to ascend and descend respectively without seeing one another.

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  • Assignats were issued with such reckless profusion that the total for the three years of the Convention has been estimated at 7250 millions of francs.

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  • Burnham's record of discovery, which roused fresh enthusiasm for this line of inquiry by compelling recognition of the extraordinary profusion throughout the heavens of compound objects.

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  • Its volcanic soil has produced a profusion of tomatoes, olives, walnuts, grapes, oranges, lemons and figs.

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  • The last decade has seen a profusion of stylish streetcars sweeping into view.

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  • Both wrecks have an absolute profusion of life around them, which make them a very enjoyable dive.

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  • That gray-haired man, she said, indicating an old man with a profusion of silver-gray curly hair, who was surrounded by ladies laughing at something he said.

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