Profit sentence examples

profit
  • I turned a good profit on that piece of real estate.

  • Land for farming purposes is expensive, and wages are high, leaving small profit, unless it happens that a man, with his family to assist him, works his own land.

  • He had helped her blend her dream of a horse ranch into a profit making package of a guest ranch.

  • It is hard to see how all-out war turns a profit for anyone in any scenario.

  • You know Cade; you could make a profit off this ranch other ways than running cattle.

  • Herod put his own profit above the Law, acting after his kind, and he also was God's instrument.

  • Dr Alem, who had been permitted to return from exile, was not slow to profit by the occasion.

  • of the net income, leaving a profit for the year of £914,216.

  • At the very moment when Matthias was about to profit by the disappearance of his most capable rival, another dangerous rebellion, headed by the primate and the chief dignitaries of the state, with the object of placing Casimir, son of Casimir IV., on the throne, paralysed Matthias's foreign policy during the critical years 1470-1471.

  • If you figure out a way to do this all day and still make the ranch turn a profit, you could make a fortune teaching your method at seminars.

  • It is a labor to task the faculties of a man--such problems of profit and loss, of interest, of tare and tret, and gauging of all kinds in it, as demand a universal knowledge.

  • But they would not profit by Boston's misfortune.

  • 1804); (ii.) cheptel by moiety (cheptel d moietie) - here each of the contracting parties furnishes half of the stock, which remains common for profit or loss (Art.

  • The expansion of Levantine trade which ensued in the Hellenistic age brought especial profit to Rhodes, whose standard of coinage and maritime law became widely accepted in the Mediterranean.

  • The profit derived from the 20% thus removed is a very large one.

  • The prices charged for dispensing are lower in countries where the number of pharmacies is limited by law, the larger returns enabling the profit to be lessened.

  • "It was a small estate that brought in no profit," replied Prince Andrew, trying to extenuate his action so as not to irritate the old man uselessly.

  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.

  • Even if the agent made no profit he was bound to return double what he had received, if he made poor profit he had to make up the deficiency; but he was not responsible for loss by robbery or extortion on his travels.

  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.

  • But he had a strict eye to profit in all his dealings with them.

  • We have already seen that among the princes who joined the First Crusade there were some who were rather politiques than devots, and who aimed at the acquisition of temporal profit as well as of spiritual merit.

  • The Spanish rulers made efforts to govern wisely and liberally, showing great complaisance, particularly in heeding the profit of the colony, even at the expense of Spanish colonial commercial regulations.

  • The king of Spain, Philip IV., received the author coldly, and it is said even tried to suppress his book, fearing that the Portuguese, who had just revolted from Spain (1640), would profit by its information.

  • The Piedmontese defeated the enemy ~t Pastrengo (April 30), but did not profit by the victory.

  • Hence a tacit understanding between Bismarck and Austria that the latter should profit by Italian resentment against France to draw Italy into the orbit of the Austro-German alliance.

  • Butchers have palmed off upon their customers imported fresh meat as homegrown, and secured a dishonest profit by charging for it the prices of the latter, which are considerably in excess of those of the imported product.

  • But by far tht greatest profit the Italians reaped was the emancipation of theh burghs.

  • Squarcione, whose original vocation was tailoring, appears to have had a remarkable enthusiasm for ancient art, and a proportionate faculty for acting, with profit to himself and others, as a sort of artistic middleman; his own performances as a painter were merely mediocre.

  • In after life he retained a lively feeling of interest in Winchester school, and remembered with admiration and profit the regulative tact of Dr Goddard, and the preceptorial ability of Dr Gabell, who were successively head-masters during his stay there.

  • England's commercial relations with Charles V.'s subjects in the Netherlands put war with the emperor almost out of the question; and cool observers thought that England's obvious policy was to stand by while the two rivals enfeebled each other, and then make her own profit out of their weakness.

  • Pledges were often made where the intrinsic value of the article was equivalent to the amount of the debt; but antichretic pledge was more common, where the profit of the pledge was a set-off against the interest of the debt.

  • 1827-1830); (iv.) the term " cheptel " is also improperly applied to a contract by which cattle are given to be housed and fed - here the lessor retains the ownership, but has only the profit of the calves (Art.

  • He did not derive much profit from this new favour, as he died on the 29th of June following, without his nomination having been sanctioned by the pope.

  • Albinus fostered and turned to his profit the struggles of priests with priests and of Zealots with their enemies.

  • halfpenny a box on lucifer matches in 1871 (for which he suggested the epigram ex luce lucelluni, "out of light a little profit") roused a storm of opposition, and had to be dropped.

  • To profit by individual experience is thus the only criterion we possess of the existence of the conscious experience itself.

  • During his three years of office as resident he was able to render not a few valuable services to the Company; but it is more important to observe that his name nowhere occurs in the official lists of those who derived pecuniary profit from the necessities and weakness of the native court.

  • His reading was largely designed to enable him fully to profit by the long-contemplated Italian tour which began in April 1764 and lasted somewhat more than a year.

  • It turns out that, even when doing what you love, both passion and profit matter—but that particular piece of wisdom came later with age.

  • Idumaean or Philistine of Ascalon, Antipater had displayed the capacity of his adoptive or adopted nation for his own profit and theirs.

  • Growing up out of the captain of the people or signore of the commune, the tyrant annihilated both parties for his own profit and for the peace of the state.

  • In New Zealand and Australia rabbits, introduced either for profit or sport, have increased to such an extent as to form one of the most serious pests that the farmers have to contend against, as the climate and soil suit them perfectly and their natural enemies are too few and too lowly organized to keep them within reasonable bounds.

  • Thus the later part of the Decline and Fall, while the narrative of certain episodes will always be read with profit, does not convey a true idea of the history of the empire or of its significance in the history of Europe.

  • of the budget, and include in the first place the salt revenue (£T1, 227,750), which is assigned to the Public Debt Administration, and tobacco revenues of which the larger part, £ T86 5,737, is assigned to the same administration, the total (including share of Tumbeki profit) producing £T965,754; the remaining monopolies are: fixed payment from the Tumbeki Company, £T40,000; explosives, £T106,323; seignorage (Mint), £T10,466; and posts and telegraphs, £T912,129.

  • If we are to accept and profit by Dorpfeld's nomenclature, we must be satisfied that, in their later historic habitats, both Lycians and Carians showed unmistakable signs of having formerly possessed the civilizations attributed to them in prehistoric times - signs which research has hitherto wholly failed to find.

  • The Belgian state telegraphs were started in 1850 and were at first very profitable, but for the years 1866-9 they yielded an average profit of only 2.8 per cent., and subsequently failed to earn operating expenses, the reasons for the steady decline of the profits being the opening of relatively unprofitable lines and offices, increases in wages, and a diminution in growth of the foreign and transit messages which had constituted the most profitable part of the whole business.

  • Numerous less distinguished adepts also practised the art, and sometimes were so successful in their deceptions that they gained the ear of kings, whose desire to profit by the achievements of science was in several instances rewarded by an abundant crop of counterfeit coins.

  • If let on share-profit, the landlord and tenant shared the loss proportionately to their stipulated share of profit.

  • Partly to satisfy public opinion, partly in order to profit by the favorable disposition of the British government, and partly in the hope of remedying the error committed in 1882 by refusal to co-operate with Great Britain in Egypt, the Italian government in January 1885 despatched an expedition under Admiral Caimi and Colonel Saletta to occupy Massawa and Beilul.

  • In a speech urging their adoption appear the often-quoted words: "Tarquin and Caesar had each his Brutus, Charles the First his Cromwell, and George the Third [here he was interrupted by cries of" Treason "1 and George the Third may profit by their example!

  • We have reason to believe that some organisms profit by experience and show that they do so by the modification of their behaviour in accordance with circumstances.

  • Alexander was not the only person responsible for the general unrest in Italy and the foreign invasions, but he was ever ready to profit by them.

  • In a world without abundance, socialism removes the one reliable creator of abundance—the individual profit motive—and that results in a lower standard of living for everyone.

  • The substantial education supplied by the parish schools, of which nearly the whole population could then avail themselves, had diffused through all ranks such a measure of intelligence as enabled them promptly to discern and skilfully and energetically to take advantage of this spring-tide of prosperity, and to profit by the agricultural information now plentifully furnished by means of the Bath and West of England Society, established in 1777; the Highland Society, instituted in 1784; and the National Board of Agriculture, in 1793.

  • This means that non-military manufacturing interests in the United States no longer profit as in the past from war.

  • In many places Friends have felt the need of bringing spiritual help to those who are unable to profit by the somewhat severe discipline of their ordinary manner of worship. To meet this need they hold (chiefly on Sunday evenings) meetings which are not professedly " Friends' meetings for worship," but which are services conducted on lines similar to those of other religious bodies, with, in some cases, a portion of time set apart for silent worship, and freedom for any one of the congregation to utter words of exhortation or prayer.

  • Fambri was ruined by his enterprise, but other manufacturers, more expert than he, drew profit from his initiative, and founded flourishing factories at Pellestrina and Burano.

  • The Internet is full of sites that offer good to humanity and yield no profit for the people working on them.

  • which had proved hitherto a source of profit.

  • But Elizabeth did not profit long by this atrocity.

  • Broken as is the surface, poor as is the soil of certain tracts, there is but little of the island which will not ultimately be cultivated with profit as pumice and clay-marl yield to labour.

  • But there is reason to believe that the influence of the example of its numerous members did not extend to the common tenantry, who not unnaturally were reluctant to adopt the practices of those by whom farming was perhaps regarded as primarily a source of pleasure rather than of profit.

  • It had finally been in the black and she was actually making a profit.

  • Certainly neither had been taught to misrepresent for their own profit.

  • On such lands, where otherwise desirable, it may sometimes be planted with profit.

  • Both cattle-breeding and sheep-grazing are more profit able than dairying; but the Kirghiz herds are not well tended, being left to graze on the steppes all the year, where they perish from wild animals and the cold.

  • It had a run of forty-five nights, and brought the author not a little profit.

  • Probably Wellington's failure to co-operate at Ligny had heightened the Prussian chief-of-staff's unworthy suspicions of the good faith and soldierly qualifications of the British marshal; and it was well for the allies that Blucher was able to resume command before Napoleon had time to profit from the dissensions that would probably have arisen had Gneisenau remained in control.

  • Ruding enumerates 128 mints operated at various times in the United Kingdom, including some established by usurpation, as in the reign of Stephen by certain barons, and also mints established by grants to ecclesiastics to be worked for their own profit.

  • There is in every society or neighbourhood, an ordinary or average rate of wages and profit in every different employment of labour and stock, regulated by principles to be explained hereafter, as also an ordinary or average rate of rent.

  • These may be called the natural rates at the time when and the place where they prevail; and the natural price of a commodity is what is sufficient to pay for the rent of the land, the wages of the labour, and the profit of the stock necessary for bringing the commodity to market.

  • There are several varieties of the contract, (i.) simple cheptel (cheptel simple) in which the whole stock is supplied by the lessor - the lessee taking half the profit and bearing half the loss (Art.

  • But if hereditary behaviour is unaccompanied by consciousness, it can in no wise contribute to experience, and can afford no data by which the organism can profit.

  • The usury prohibition did not deny the legitimacy of profit.

  • Enjoyed unprecedented profit at walter s insurance coverage for causes of the.

  • Tobacco, vegetables and other garden produce are much cultivated; cotton could probably be grown with profit.

  • A man who bought a slave abroad, might find that he had been stolen or captured from Babylonia, and he had to restore him to his former owner without profit.

  • Gold, copper, iron and manganese are also found in various parts of the district, and there are tin mines at Maliwun, upon which European methods have been tried without much profit, owing to the cost of labour.

  • The difference between the nominal value of silver and bronze coin and its intrinsic value is retained by the state to cover the expenses of manufacture and as a source of profit.

  • These ores were worked by the ancients, but so inefficiently that their spoilheaps can be smelted again with profit.

  • Some of the complaints against the companies, however, were exaggerated, and the estimates formed of the possible commercial development of telegraphy were optimistic. The basis for these estimates was the experience of other countries, which, however, did not justify the expectation that a large increase of business consequent on reduction of rates could be obtained without serious diminution of profit.

  • Thus free thought received a check, by which not only ecclesiastical but political tyrants knew how to profit.

  • Unfortunately these genuine grievai~ces were taken advantage of by the Socialists for their own purposes, and strikes and disorders were sometimes promoted without cause and conciliation impeded by outsiders who acted from motives of personal ambition or profit.

  • 3 The treatise of Varenius is a model of logical arrangement and terse expression; it is a work of science and of genius; one of the few of that age which can still be studied with profit.

  • Miller, he was appointed manager of the Rensselaer & Saratoga railway, which he bought up when it was in a very bad condition, and skilfully reorganized; in the same way he bought and reorganized the Rutland & Washington railway, from which he ultimately realized a large profit.

  • Gould gained control of the Union Pacific, from which in 1883 he withdrew after realizing a large profit.

  • The country has a great wealth of minerals, silver having been found, and copper, lead, iron, coal and rock-salt being wrought with profit.

  • Sheep were small and their fleeces light, nevertheless, owing to the meagreness of the yields of cereals' and the demand for wool for export, sheep-farming was looked to, as early as the 12th century, as the chief source of profit.

  • The diminution of the population by one-half led to a scarcity of labour and an increase of wages which deprived the landowner of his narrow margin of profit.

  • The outside cost of construction of the first section, which lies entirely in the plains of Konia, is estimated to have been £625,000; the company retained, therefore, a profit of at least I' 4 millions sterling on this first part of the enterprise.

  • But the Turks did not profit much by their victory.

  • It is still, however, the centre of distribution for a very large, if scantily populated, country, and it also derives much profit from pilgrims, lying as it does on the route which Shiite pilgrims from Persia must take on their way to the sacred cities.

  • These parsissoks, elected at the rate of about one representative to 120 voters, wear a cap with a badge (a bear rampant), and aid the European members of the council in distributing the surplus profit apportioned to each district, and generally in advising as, to the welfare of that part of Greenland under their partial control.

  • The second part of the act provides that if any person or persons, bodies politic and corporate, for any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit, directly or indirectly, or for or by reason of any promise, agreement, grant, bond, covenant or other assurances.

  • The declaration is to the effect that the clergyman has not received the presentation in consideration of any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit directly or indirectly given or promised by him or any one for him to any one; that he has not made any promise of resignation other than that allowed by the Clerical Resignation Bonds Act 1828; that he has not for any money or benefit procured the avoidance of the benefice; and that he has not been party to any agreement invalidated by sec. 3 sub-sec. 3 of the act which invalidates any agreement for the exercise of a right of patronage in favour or on the nomination of any particular person, and any agreement on the transfer of a right of patronage (a) for the retransfer of the right, or (b) for postponing payment of any part of the consideration for the transfer until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (c) for payment of interest until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (d) for any payment in respect of the date at which a vacancy occurs, or (e) for the resignation of a benefice in favour of any person.

  • Cicero was on friendly terms with both him and Roscius, the equally distinguished comedian, and did not disdain to profit by their instruction.

  • 7), when the Edomites joined the Chaldaeans, drew profit from the overthrow of the Jews, whose land they partly occupied, and exercised barbarous cruelty towards the fugitives of Jerusalem (Obad.

  • As a result of this compromise the budget of 1899 was passedlin little more than a month, and the commercial and tariff treaty with Austria were renewed till 1903.2 But the government had to pay for this complacency with a so-called " pactum," which bound its hands in several directions, much to the profit of the opposition during the " pure " elections of 1901.

  • Delambre from the data there supplied marked the profit derived from the investigation by practical astronomy.

  • Other institutions include higher elementary schools for pupils certified to be able to profit by higher instruction; and schools for blind, deaf and defective children.

  • Further, both time and money are required for the development of the mining property before any profit can be realized.

  • In order to determine the probable profit and life of the mine a definite scale of operations must be assumed, the money required for development and plant and for working capital must be estimated, the methods of mining and treating the ore determined, and their probable cost estimated.

  • In many cases the state or the ruler has sought to obtain a share in the profits of mining, or even to work mines for the individual profit of the ruler or of the state.

  • It is a curious fact that at the present day much or even most of the wine of finest quality is made at or near to the northern limits of possible cultivation with profit.

  • The protection afforded to the planters by their government, however, enables them to pursue the industry with considerable profit, notwithstanding the poor return for their labour in saleable produce.

  • But the importation of foreignsugar, cheapened by foreign state aid to a price which materially reduced the fair and reasonable profit of native cultivators, was a state of things the Indian government could not accept.

  • Tobacco cultivation is a government monopoly, and in 1905 the crop amounted to about 106,572,000 ib, yielding a profit to the government of some £3,500,000.

  • This contract relieved Peru of its crushing burden of foreign indebtedness, and turned an apparently heavy loss to the bondholders into a possible profit.

  • The town is not situated so as to profit largely by the development of the resources of Yezo, and as a port of foreign trade its outlook is indifferent.

  • On the same day Cutler and Sargent " for themselves and associates " transferred to William Duer, then Secretary of the Treasury Board, and his associates " one equal moiety of the Scioto tract of land mentioned in the second contract," it being provided that both parties were to be equally interested in the sale of the land, and were to share equally any profit or loss.

  • That theory is based upon the fact that after the opening of the country to foreign intercourse in 1857, hundreds of inferior specimens of netsuke were chiselled by inexpert hands, purchased wholesale by treaty-port merchants, and sent to New York, London and Paris, where, though they brought profit to the exporter, they also disgusted the connoisseur and soon earned discredit for their whole class.

  • The gross earnings of all the lines during the fiscal year I 9051906 were 7 millions sterling, approximately, and the gross expenses (including the payment of interest on loans and debentures) were under 31/8 millions, so that there remained a net profit of 31/8 millions, being at the rate of a little over 81/8% on the invested capital.

  • The actual purchase price of the 17 lines was calculated at 43 millions sterling (about double their cost price), on the following basis: (a) An amount equal to 20 times the sum obtained by multiplying the cost of construction at the date of purchase by the average ratio of the profit to the cost of construction during the six business terms of the company from the second half-year of 1902 to the first half-year of 1905.

  • It was calculated that this redemption would be effected in a period of 32 years, after which the annual profit accruing to the state from the lines would be 51/8 millions sterling.

  • Not only is vein-material formerly regarded as unremunerative now extracted at a profit, but in many instances increased gold-values have been encountered below zones of relative barrenness, and operators have been encouraged to make costly preparations for really deep mining - more than 3000 ft.

  • in thickness, to be worked at a profit, which had formerly been abandoned as too hard to be worked by hand-labour.

  • From the first he tried to profit by his marriage, and after the death of Henry I.

  • As regards Spanish America, England was content to profit by theAsiento treaty, which gave her the monopoly of slavehunting for the Spanish colonies and an opening for contraband trade.

  • In former times, however, advantage was sometimes taken of the remedy as a means of profit.

  • In 1610 a vessel was despatched with merchandise suitable for traffic with the Indians, the voyage resulted in profit, and a lucrative trade in peltry sprang up. Early in 1614 Adriaen Block explored Long Island Sound and discovered Block Island.

  • The net profit made by the board in 1 9 06 was £ 4 5,000.

  • In 1907 the net profit on these was over £8000.

  • In the history of the United States the politician has been too often the man who, in connexion with some other trade or profession, has taken up politics as a tool to carve out some personal ambition or manufacture a financial profit.

  • In numerous speeches and addresses he expressed his belief in a strong colonial government, but a government administered for the benefit of the people under its control and not for the profit of the people at home.

  • On land the presence of a few educated Phanariots, such as Demetrios Ypsilanti or Alexander Mavrocordato, was powerless to inspire the rude hordes with any sense of order or of humanity in warfare; while every lull in the fighting, due to a temporary check to the Turks, was the signal for internecine conflicts due to the rivalry of leaders who, with rare exceptions, thought more of their personal power and profit than of the cause of Greece.

  • Their judicial functions also brought profit to the priests, fines being exacted for certain offences and paid to them (2 Kings xii.

  • The first sources of the enormous wealth he subsequently attained were his introduction of sleeping-cars for railways, and his purchase (1864) of Storey Farm on Oil Creek, where a large profit was secured from the oil-wells.

  • Casimir's few wars were waged entirely for profit, not glory.

  • No attempt was made to profit by the embarrassments of the Russians in their war with Turkey.

  • The species and varieties of mammals and birds that have a commercial value as farmyard stock or as pets, are for the most part easy to keep, are attractive to the public and may be a source of profit.

  • " In Plutarch pleasure is so mixed and confounded with profit, that I esteem the reading of him as a paradise for a curious spirit to walk in at all time."

  • The main profit has been reaped by Jewish usurers.

  • He could already count nearly five years' nominal service, an example of those naval abuses which he was to denounce (and to profit by) during a large part of his career.

  • In identifying the compiler with Moses, Astruc failed to profit from some of his predecessors: and the fact that he held to the traditional (Mosaic) origin of the Pentateuch may have prevented him from seeing the similar facts which would have led him to continue his analysis into the remaining books of the Pentateuch.

  • In relation to the earliest social stage, we need consider nothing but the amount of labour employed in the production of an article as determining its exchange value; but in more advanced periods price is complex, and consists in the most general case of three elements - wages, profit and rent.

  • The same circumstances detertnine the variation of profits, but in an opposite direction; the increase of stock, which raises wages, tending to lower profit through the mutual competition of capitalists.

  • High or low wages and profit are the causes of high or low price; high or low rent is the effect of it."

  • The first is such as yields a profit without passing into other hands.

  • The second consists of such goods, raised, manufactured or purchased, as are sold for a profit and replaced by other goods; this sort of capital is therefore constantly going from and returning to the hands of its owner.

  • In advancing industrial communities, the portion of annual produce set apart as capital, bears an increasing proportion to that which is immediately destined to constitute a revenue, either as rent or as profit.

  • The line was capitalized at $46,000,000 and has paid a good profit on the investment.

  • The book brought him little profit at first, but became immensely popular.

  • In 1559 du Bellay published at Poitiers La Nouvelle Maniere de faire son profit des lettres, a satirical epistle translated from the Latin of Adrien Turnebe, and with it Le Poete courtisan, which introduced the formal satire into French poetry.

  • Sheep-farming and cattle-raising are carried on very generally, and, with the fisheries, provide the main occupation of the inhabitants, though they profit not a little from the tourists who flock to many of the islands throughout the summer.

  • The indigo and cotton plantations yield little profit, owing to foreign competition, and have in most cases been converted to other uses.

  • Establishments for evaporating fruit are now found in most of the larger apple-growing districts, and canning factories and jam factories have been established in many parts of Canada, and are conducted with advantage and profit.

  • per ton, a low rate, reached in Dec. 1900, is yet sufficiently high, it is claimed, to leave a profit; indeed, there have frequently been times when the rate was as low as id.

  • Practically every form of investment in which a man is capable of indulging involves the lending and borrowing of money, the interest exacted being the profit which the lender receives for the use of.

  • Carew in 1602 states that it had lately purchased a corporation and derived great profit from its trade with Ireland.

  • No barrister can be appointed who is of less than fifteen years' standing, or a member of parliament, or holder of any office of profit (other than that of recorder) under the crown; nor can any barrister try a petition in any borough in which he is recorder or in which he resides, or which is included in his circuit.

  • In the second season it consisted of thirty families with property valued at $27,725; in 1846 there were 180 resident members, and the net profit for the year was $9029.

  • Philological rather than theological in character, it marked an epochal change from the old homiletic commentary, and though more recent research, patristic and papyral, has largely changed the method of New Testament exegesis, Alford's work is still a quarry where the student can dig with a good deal of profit.

  • One of his most notable works was his Teutschlands Wohlfarth in which he urged that the natural resources of Germany should be developed for the profit of the country and gave various instances of how this might be done.

  • They did not, however, renounce all intervention or all profit in the nominations to prelacies, but their intervention was no longer exhibited under the forms which the Hildebrandine party held to be illegal.

  • Those manufacturers who act as merchants aim to retain the merchant profit and must employ a merchant capital in stocks.

  • Ingots of Chinese silver were sent from Lhasa with a small proportion of gold dust, and an equal weight in mohurs was returned, leaving to the Nepal rajahs, between gold dust and alloy, a good profit.

  • was spontaneous, and Catherine had no need to do more than let it be known that she was prepared to profit by her husband's downfall.

  • Voltaire and the encyclopaedists with whom she corresponded, and on whom she conferred gifts and pensions, repaid her by the grossest flattery, while doing their best to profit by her generosity.

  • His own honorarium as author consisted of 200 copies, of which, however, he had to give away many to friends, to the king, the principal courtiers, the papal nuncio, &c. What remained he sold for his own profit at the price of a crown each, but the sale did not recoup him his outlay.

  • But though his book brought him no profit it brought him reputation, so widely spread, and of such long endurance, as no other legal treatise has ever enjoyed.

  • Hence it may be inferred that the insects which imitate ants profit in the same way that spiders do from this form of mimicry.

  • And 1 In a letter dated the 4th of April 1882, referring to the publication of his drama Mary Stuart, Swinburne wrote, to Edmund Clarence Stedman: "Mary Stuart has procured me two satisfactions which I prefer infinitely to six columns of adulation in The Times and any profit thence resulting.

  • Gold occurs in the central region, where it is worked at a profit, and it has also been worked in the Menangkabo district and the interior of Padang.

  • The profit on the working, which is carried on by the state, is slight.

  • It was gradually recognized that the masses of water which collected wherever peat-digging had been carried on were an unnecessary menace to the neighbouring lands, and also that a more enduring source of profit lay in the bed of the fertile sea-clay under the peat.

  • The United Provinces were recognized as free and independent, and Spain dropped all her claims; the uti possidetis basis was adopted in respect to all conquests; the Scheldt was declared entirely closed - a clause which meant the ruin of Antwerp for the profit of Amsterdam; the right to trade in the East and West Indies was granted, and all the conquests made by the Dutch from the Portuguese were ceded to them; the two contracting parties agreed to respect and keep clear of each other's trading grounds; each was to pay in the ports of the other only such tolls as natives paid.

  • That is ore from which there is reasonable hope that metal can be extracted with profit, if not to-day, then within a reasonable length of time.

  • Rock containing 22% of gold is an extraordinarily rich gold ore; that with 21% of copper is a profitable one to-day; that containing 21% of iron is not so to-day, for the sole reason that its iron cannot be extracted with profit in competition with the existing richer ores.

  • In so doing he was one of the first physicians of modern times to profit by a mode of study which is now reckoned indispensable.

  • If this possibility in regard to I Peter is granted, it is fatal to the theory, because at the time when the epistle was written official presbyters were so well established that abuse and degeneration had already begun to creep in and some of the elders were already guilty of "lording it over their heritage" and making a profit out of their office (I Pet.

  • But Waldeck, hoping to profit by this momentary success, sent a portion of his right wing towards St Amand, where it merely shared the fate of his left, and the day was decided.

  • As the Kandahari rupee is worth about 8 annas (half an English rupee) the government thus realizes a profit of 1%.

  • Such stolen property as could not be returned to the owners with profit was taken abroad in a sloop purchased for this work.

  • Our people as a whole will profit, for successful home-making is but another name for the upbuilding of the nation."

  • The chief support which had sustained him through the most arduous labour of his life was the hope that she would enjoy the fame and the profit which he anticipated from his Dictionary.

  • He concentrated all his energies on the government and defence of northern and eastern Germany, leaving the southern and western districts to profit by his example, while his policy of refraining from interference in the affairs of the other duchies tended to diminish the ill-feeling which existed between the various German tribes and to bring peace to the country as a whole.

  • The Romanists saw the significance of this movement and, fortunately for them, were able to profit by the dissensions which were breaking out in the ranks of their opponents, especially the doctrinal differences between the followers of Luther and those of Zwingli.

  • of France, who, like Henry II., wished to profit by the quarrels in Germany, and who interfered in the disputed succession to the duchies of Cleves and Julich.

  • At first this great king was coldly received by the Protestants, who were ignorant of his designs and did not want a stranger to profit by the internal disputes of their country.

  • The princes knew well how to profit by the national prostration.

  • This policy has not, however, produced the intended effect; for the Poles founded a society to protect their own interests, and have often managed to profit by the artificial value given to their property.

  • He was satisfied that the Germans should profit by the commercial liberty allowed in the British colonies.

  • Many brood sows are fattened to greatest profit after the second or third litter.

  • Scientific research might prosper, just as poetry withered, under the patronage of kings, and such research had now a vast amount of new material at its disposal and could profit by the old Babylonian and Egyptian traditions.

  • Comrnerce.The trade of Egypt has developed enormously since the British occupation in 1882 ensured to all classes of the community the enjoyment of the profit of their labor.

  • Finally, it may be mentioned that a sum proportionately large is available from public funds and regular parliamentary grants for furthering science and arts by temporary subventions to students, authors, artists and others of insufficient means, in order to enable them to carry out particular works, to profit by foreign travel, &c. The principal scientific societies and institutions are detailed under Copenhagen.

  • The bishoprics of Bremen and Verden, the province of Farther Pomerania and the isle of Riigen which her armies had actually conquered, and which had been guaranteed to her by a whole catena of treaties, went partly to the upstart electorate of Hanover and partly to the upstart kingdom of Prussia, both of which states had been of no political importance whatever at the beginning of the war of spoliation by which they were, ultimately, to profit so largely and so cheaply.

  • Silver, copper, lead and iron are worked to some profit, while arsenic, alum, graphite, marble, porcelain, precious and building stones are also found.

  • The bull was then issued, and the pilgrims became even more numerous, to the profit of both clergy and citizens.

  • Carlyle, indomitably determined to make no concessions for immediate profit, wrote slowly and carefully, and turned out some of his most finished work.

  • Sea-lions, seals and dolphins are a source of profit.

  • A similar railway, of which the chief source of profit was the passenger traffic, was opened between Edinburgh and Dalkeith in 1831, branches being afterwards extended to Leith and Musselburgh.

  • Business worries, however, interrupted him; it was found necessary to reconstruct the company owing to its having grown out of proportion with the existing division of profit and labour.

  • But more than this, Great Britain had gained a reputation for patient and persevering efforts to promote the spread of civilization in these regions, a prestige which yielded profit during the difficult years of the World War, and was not without its effect in India.

  • The profit made upon the chlorine produced has to make up for the loss on the alkali.

  • It can be grown in the tropics from the level of the sea to a height equal to that of the Pyrenees and in the south and middle of Europe, but it cannot be grown in England with any chance of profit, except perhaps as fodder.

  • The real difficulty in India is to find the ore, the fuel, and the flux in sufficiently close proximity to yield a profit.

  • At the same time the operation of the revenue sale law had introduced a new race of zamindars, who were bound to their tenants by no traditions of hereditary sympathy, but whose sole object was to make a profit out of their newly purchased property.

  • It was recognized that the inheritance of future generations was being recklessly sacrificed to satisfy the immoderate desire for profit.

  • The area under cotton increased enormously, and the growers managed to retain in their own hands a fair share of the profit.

  • In 1908 the total length of railways open in India was 30,578, m., which carried 330 million passengers and 64 million tons of goods, and yielded a net profit exceeding 4 Facilities for irrigation (q.v.) vary widely, and irrigation works differ both in extent and in character.

  • The total number of letters, &c., carried by the post exceeds 800 millions, and the service yields a small profit to the state.

  • John Dollond, to whom the Copley medal of the Royal Society had been the first inventor of the achromatic telescope; but it was ruled by Lord Mansfield that" it was not the person who locked his invention in his scrutoire that ought to profit for such invention, but he who brought it forth for the benefit of mankind."3 In 1747 Leonhard Euler communicated to the Berlin Academy of Sciences a memoir in which he endeavoured to prove the possibility of correcting both the chromatic and.

  • ridibundus, are a source of no small profit to their proprietors, - the eggs, which are rightly accounted a great delicacy, being taken on an orderly system up to a certain day, and the birds carefully protected.

  • The conditions, however, were not observed by the imperial generals, who for their own profit forced the new settlers to buy food at famine prices.

  • The word, " What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul?"

  • It shared indeed in the dreariness and corruption of the times commonly called the " dark ages," but when at last a productive period began the Church was the first to profit by it.

  • They did not, however, profit by their discovery, because, amongst the Egyptians, writing was clearly a mystery in both senses - only possible at that period for masters in the craft, and also something, like the writing of medical prescriptions at the present day in Latin, which was not to be made too easily intelligible to the common people.

  • This was tolerated with approval by men who repeated Leo X.'s witty epigram: "What profit has not that fable of Christ brought us !"

  • It was a marked characteristic of the Renaissance in France to appropriate the spoils of Greece and Rome for the profit of the mother tongue.

  • Foreign weavers of cloth were established at Wakefield by Henry VII.; and Leland, writing in the time of Henry VIII., states that its "whole profit standeth by coarse drapery."

  • The point of law was argued by Bacon, and decided by the chancellor in favour of the king, who put the question to the judges individually, " Whether, if at any time, in a case depending before the judges, which his majesty conceived to concern him either in power or profit, and thereupon required to consult with them, and that they should stay proceedings in the meantime, they ought not to stay accordingly?"

  • He trafficked in public offices for the profit of Mazarin and in his own behalf.

  • Under certain circumstances, however, the native animals may recover, for in some cases they even profit by man's advent, and at times themselves become pests, like the Kea parrot (Nestor notabilis), which attacks sheep in New Zealand, and the bobolink or rice-bird (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in North America.

  • Borrowers were not induced to borrow as a rule with the view of employing the capital so obtained at a greater profit, but they were compelled of necessity to borrow as a last resort.

  • In favourable localities and with judicious management these establishments yield very considerable profit (see Feather).

  • Indiscriminate cutting has occasionally been confined within certain bounds, but such restrictions were generally either of short duration or made for the convenience and profit of local governors.

  • Auriferous alluvial strata have been discovered in various localities, but everywhere the scarcity of water has been a bar to their being exploited with profit.

  • Referring to the policy of the company, Watermeyer says: - The Dutch colonial system as exemplified at the Cape of Good Hope, or rather the system of the Dutch East India Company (for the nation should not wholly suffer under the condemnation j ustly incurred by a trading association that sought only pecuniary profit), was almost without one redeeming feature, and was a dishonour to the Netherlands' national name.

  • But after two months he found he was not in a position to profit by the lectures of the greatest Greek scholar of the time.

  • From his throne at Leiden he ruled the learned world; a word from him could make or mar a rising reputation; and he was surrounded by young men eager to listen to and profit by his conversation.

  • Ricardo's theory of distribution has been briefly enunciated as follows: "(I) The demand for food determines the margin of cultivation; (2) this margin determines rent; (3) the amount necessary to maintain the labourer determines wages; (4) the difference between the amount produced by a given quantity of labour at the margin and the wages of that labour determines profit."

  • But once let this system be presented to men in earnest about right living, and eager to profit by what they are taught, and an ethical reform is inevitable.

  • Seeking for commercial profit, not in the exchange of commodities, but solely in the acquisition of actual gold and silver, and realizing that the home market could not absorb a tithe of the merchandise imported, the Lisbon capitalists sent their ships to discharge in Antwerp (where a Portuguese staple was established in 1503), or in some other port near the central markets of Europe.

  • Most of all did it profit by the statesmanship of Aratus, who initiated its expansive policy, until in 228 it comprised Arcadia, Argolis, Corinth and Aegina.

  • In the exploitation of her forest products, however, are to be found the industries that yield the greatest immediate profit to Bolivia.

  • After the collapse of that company a secret committee of inquiry was appointed by the Commons, and Aislabie, who had in the meantime resigned the seals of his office, was declared guilty of having encouraged and promoted the South Sea scheme with a view to his own exorbitant profit, and was expelled the House.

  • Although there was no strong public sentiment against the practice, Pitt altogether refused to profit by it.

  • The tree is rarely planted in mixed plantations where profit is an object; it interferes with its neighbours and occupies too much room.

  • In this office he was in constant intercourse with Pepys, whose diary frequently mentions him; but the insinuations of Pepys against him must not be taken too seriously, as there is no evidence to show that Batten in making a profit from his office fell below the standards of the time.

  • The copper lodes of New South Wales contain ores of a much higher grade than those of many well-known mines .worked at a profit in other parts of the world, and, with a fair price for copper, the production largely increases.

  • The Sadducee was a Jew outwardly so long as he so retained place, power and profit.

  • Such disqualifications include the holding of any office or place of profit under the council other than the office of chairman, and the being concerned or interested in any contract or S r n ?'

  • All sewers, whether made by the council, by their predecessors, or by private persons, vest in the district council, that is to say, become their property, with some exceptions, of which the principal is sewers made by a person for his own profit.

  • The whale fishery also has greatly fallen off; there is no profit on the oil and the whales are sought for the baleen alone; they are much less numerous too than they once were, and have to be sought farther and farther north.

  • No person who holds any office of profit or trust under the state or the United States is eligible to the legislature, and no member, during the term for which he was chosen, shall be appointed or elected to any office created, or the emoluments of which have been increased during his term.

  • The attempt to throw off the British yoke was confined to a few disaffected ex-rulers and their heirs, with their numerous clansmen and hangers-on, besides the badmashes and highwaymen who saw their way to profit by the removal of the British administration under which their peculiar talents found no safe outlet.

  • In addition to floc), Temple left to Swift the trust and profit of publishing his posthumous writings.

  • The resulting profit was small, and Swift's editorial duties brought him into acrimonious relation with Lady Giffard.

  • With his fierce hatred of what he recognized as injustice, it was impossible that he should not feel exasperated at the gross misgovernment of Ireland for the supposed benefit of England, the systematic exclusion of Irishmen from places of honour and profit, the spoliation of the country by absentee landlords, the deliberate discouragement of Irish trade and manufactures.

  • There is no reason to think that the English ministry wished otherwise; but secret influences were at work, and a patent for supplying Ireland with a coinage of copper halfpence was accorded to William Wood on such terms that the profit accruing from the difference between the intrinsic and the nominal value of the coins, about 40%, was mainly divided between him and George I.'s favourite duchess of Kendal, by whose influence Wood had obtained the privilege.

  • Place and profit were comparatively indifferent to him; he declares that he never received a farthing for any of his works except Gulliver's Travels, and that only by Pope's management; and he had so little regard for literary fame that he put his name to only one of his writings.

  • The excuse, as a rule, may hold good, that the postal charge is only a reasonable one for service rendered, so that the net income of the post office really resembles the profit of a business, but the element of taxation appears undoubtedly to enter.

  • Taxes in his view must come out of rent, or profit, or the wages of labour; and he observes that every tax which falls finally upon one only of the three sorts of revenue "is necessarily unequal in so far as it does not affect the other two," and in examining different taxes he disregards as a rule this sort of inequality, and confines his observations "to that inequality which is occasioned by a particular tax falling unequally upon that particular sort of private revenue which is affected byl it."

  • People are induced to do things they would otherwise leave alone, Dr to leave alone what they would otherwise do, because money is given to them out of the pockets of the tax-payers to make it worth their while to do so; but there is palpably loss and not profit in the proceeding.

  • person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States shall be an elector."

  • Livingston's final victory in the courts brought him little financial profit because of the heavy expenses of the litigation.

  • Hicks's teachings on slavery had impressed both James and Lucretia; in 1830 James gave up a lucrative cotton commission business that he might not profit from the products of slave labour; and both took an active part in the campaign against slavery.

  • On the 8th of March 1673 Newton wrote to Oldenburg, the secretary of the Royal Society: " Sir, I desire that you will procure that I may be put out from being any longer Fellow of the Royal Society: for though I honour that body, yet since I see I shall neither profit them, nor (by reason of this distance) can partake of the advantage of their assemblies, I desire to withdraw."

  • Percentage: Brokerage, commission, discount, dividend, interest, investment, profit and loss.

  • Its great ranges, whose insufficient rainfall makes impossible the certain, and therefore the profitable, cultivation of cereals, or other settled agriculture, lend themselves with profit to stock and dairy farming.

  • It was to the great profit of England that they died within two years of each other, the elder in 1040, the younger in 1042.

  • But he soon found that his subjects were not inclined to follow him; they were resigned to the loss of the Ange~in heritage, whose union with England brought no profit to them, however much it might interest their king.

  • Llewelyn-ap-Gruffydd, the old ally of de Montfort, had come with profit out of the civil wars of 126366, and having won much land and more influence during the evil days of Henry III., was reluctant to see that his time of prosperity had come to an end, now that a king of a very different character sat on the English throne.

  • For more than three years Lancaster practically reigned in his cousins name; it was soon found that the realm got no profit thereby, for Earl Thomas, though neither so apathetic nor so frivolous as Edward, was not a whit more competent to conduct either war or domestic administration.

  • In the commencement of his continental war Edward took little profit either from his assumption of the French royal title, or from the lengthy list of princes of the Low Countries - Battle of whom he enrolled beneath his banner.

  • The sole achievement of the early years of the war which was of any profit to Edward or his realm was the great naval triumph of Sluys (June 24, 1340), which gave the English the command of the sea for the next twenty years.

  • Hence there arose, both in and out of parliament, a violent agitation for the removal of Lancaster from power, and the punishment of the favorites, who were believed, with complete justification, to be misusing the royal name for their own private profit.

  • The rivalry between them was purely personal; both were prepared to go on with the Lancastrian experiment, the attethpt to govern the realm in a constitutional fashion by an alliance between the king and the parliament; both were eager persecutors of the Lollards; both were eager to make profit for England by interfering in the civil wars of the Orleanists and Burgundians which were now devastating France.

  • It Phil, ~ was to no profit that Bedford brought over the young BU~ndy Henry VI.

  • He owned many ships, and traded with great profit to himself abroad, because he could promise, as a king, advantages to foreign buyers and sellers with which no mere merchant could compete.

  • The survivors of that time were capable of taking arms for any cause that offered a chance of unreasonable profit, and no ones loyalty could be trusted.

  • In the year of the treaty of Etaples the Yorkist conspiracies began once more to thicken, and Henry was fortunate to escape with profit from the French war before his domestic Yorkist troubles recommenced.

  • In 1500 it was for the common profit of the realm that there should exist such a court, which could reduce even the most powerful offender to order.

  • were at war; and the popes and Poles attempt to profit by the Pilgrimage of Grace came too late to produce any effect except the ruin of Poles family.

  • He would have been astonished to hear that, before the end of the century, his office had to deal with more than 3,000,000,000 postal packets a year, and that the net profit which it paid into the exchequer was to be more than double what it received in 1839.

  • The national spirit, vaporized into a cosmopolitan mist, was fast condensing again under mortification and insult from abroad uncompensated by any appreciable percentage of cash profit.

  • An acre thus produces $11.60,.making a gross profit of $5.60.

  • When this is deducted from the gross profits of $5.60 prices found above, We have a net profit of $3.32 an acre, not an exorbitant one by any means.

  • In the early days of wheat-farming the bonanza farmer often speculated, but experience has taught him that he had better leave this to the men in the cities, and content himself with the profit from the business under his eye.

  • Excellent profit is made in certain parts of the island from the herring fishery; this is especially the case on the east coast.

  • The first part of his life was devoted to mercantile and financial pursuits at Cadiz and then in Madrid, where he managed the affairs of and liquidated a mercantile and industrial society to the satisfaction and profit of the shareholders.

  • These successes produced a great effect; the cause of discovery, now connected with boundless hopes of profit, became popular; and many volunteers, especially merchants and seamen from Lisbon and Lagos, came forward.

  • Of these the former, in his two voyages of 1455 and 1456, explored part of the courses of the Senegal and the Gambia, discovered the Cape Verde Islands (1456), named and mapped more carefully than before a considerable section of the African littoral beyond Cape Verde, and gave much new information on the trade-routes of north-west Africa and on the native races; while Gomez, in his first important venture (after 1448 and before 1458), though not accomplishing the full Indian purpose of his voyage (he took a native interpreter with him for use "in the event of reaching India"), explored and observed in the Gambia valley and along the adjacent coasts with fully as much care and profit.

  • "In a word, we object to all legislation, all authority, and all influence, privileged, patented, official and legal, even when it has proceeded from universal suffrage, convinced that it must always turn to the profit of a dominating and exploiting minority, against the interests of the immense majority enslaved."

  • So well did he profit by the teaching he received in this quarter that, in 630 or 631, Cyrus was appointed to the vacant patriarchate of Alexandria, and in 633 succeeded in reconciling the Severians of his province on the basis of Ala 6Eav5pGKi Elip.-yEta (one divine-human energy).

  • These animals are of great use and profit to their masters, for their wool is very good and fine, particularly that of the species called pacas, which have very long fleeces; and the expense of their food is trifling, as a handful of maize suffices them, and they can go four or five days without water.

  • It is not easy to defend the principle that a landlord who has already lost his rent should also have to pay the defaulter before getting a new tenant or deriving a profit from the farm by working it himself.

  • The consolidated rate was now paid by the occupier, who would profit by economy and lose by extravagance.

  • Aquitaine, hitherto the common prey of all the Frankislh kings, having in vain tried to profit by the struggles between Fredegond and Brunhilda, and set up an independent king, Gondibald, now finally burst her bonds in 670.

  • Despite a temporary triumph, when Childeric was forced to recognize the principle of hereditary succession in public offices, and when the mayoralties of Neustria and Burgundy were alternated to the profit of both, Lger soon fell into disgrace and was exiled to that very monastery of Luxeuil to which Ebromn had been relegated.

  • suddenly liberated Richard, and in five years that devil set free took from Philip all the profit of his trickery, and shut him off from Normandy by the strong fortress of ChteauGaillard (1194-1199).

  • had not the wit to profit, was successfully avenged by Guise, who was appointed lieutenant-general of the kingdom.

  • When the abdication of Christina of Sweden caused a quarrel between Charles Gustavus of Sweden and John Casimir of Poland, by which the emperor and the elector of Brandenburg hoped to profit, Mazarin (August 15, 1658) leagued the Rhine princes against them; while at the same time the substitution of Pope Alexander VII.

  • He never perceived how its loss threw France back a full century, to the great profit of foreign nations; while neither did the Church perceive that she had been firing on her own troops.

  • He wished to turn the eyes of contemporary adventurous France towards her distant interests, the wars of religion having diverted her Colbert attention from them to the great profit of English, on~,e~s.

  • The hive bee is, moreover, the only insect known to be capable of domestication, so far as labouring under the direct control of the bee-master is concerned, its habits being admirably adapted for embodying human methods of working for profit in our present-day life.

  • Authorities differ with regard to the age during which the queen-bee is useful to the bee-keeper who works for profit.

  • As a rule, it may be said that the man content to start with an apiary of moderate size - say fifty stocks - may realize a fair profit from comb-honey only; but so limited a venture would need to be supplemented by some other means before an adequate income could be secured.

  • The well-read and intelligent bee-keeper, content to work on orthodox lines, will be able to manage an apiary - large or small - by guiding and controlling the countless army he commands in a way that will yield him both pleasure and profit.

  • The Arab-speaking and Mahommedan population found their religion and language respected, and from the first showed a marked desire to profit by the new order.

  • Show specimens generally profit by being born earlier.

  • The house of correction pays the city a profit of $35, 000 to $40,000 a year.

  • When there is no other means of entering into commercial relations with remote and savage races save by enterprise of such magnitude that private individuals could not incur the risk involved, then a company may be well entrusted with special privileges for the purpose, as an inventor is accorded a certain protection by law by means of a patent which enables him to bring out his invention at a profit if there is anything in it.

  • In Stock Exchange slang the term is used of an operator who applies for a portion of a new security being issued, not with a view to holding it, but with the intention of immediate realization, at a profit if possible.

  • Horses were high maintenance animals, and there would be no profit until the safari and the guest ranch were completed.

  • He hastily denied his endeavors were for profit, but tossed in a caveat of "possible help with expenses."

  • By the end of the summer I'll have enough profit to roof the house.

  • He was an amiable chap, who wouldn't give any profit forecasts.

  • He was an astute businessman who easily could turn a profit.

  • You cannot profit from the proceeds of crimes that take place abroad.

  • Actuary A life part qualified actuary A life part qualified actuary with profit testing experience for a 3 month contract needed.

  • The seed is a common adulterant of mustard seed (Brassica) either by chance or for profit.

  • advantageous for programs like profit sharing, benefits, health care, pension plans and disability insurance.

  • after-tax profit becomes £ 160.

  • A deliberate breach of the health and safety legislation with a view to profit seriously aggravates the offense.

  • She keeps a margin from selling airtime which makes up her profit.

  • amortiseortized profit on sale remains a capital matter.

  • amortisell is amortized through the profit and loss account over its useful economic life.

  • He confirms that this cut applied to with profit annuitants as well as to pension and endowment investors.

  • apportionment of profit?

  • asylum seeker detained there brings profit to GSL.

  • In order to enjoy and profit from reading, pupils must achieve automaticity of word recognition.

  • These opinions have been based primarily on detailed examination and interpretation of company balance sheets, profit and loss accounts, and payment performance.

  • Without profit sharing an Islamic banking makes direct investment and equity financing a must.

  • bazaar in aid realized nearly £ 1,000 profit.

  • This allows a bettor to close his position and take a profit or loss even before the event itself has ended.

  • By chasing profit, you become more bland, " is Duncan's take.

  • The Radon Council are a non profit making regulatory body for the radon industry.

  • You'll receive a competitive salary; performance-related bonuses, profit sharing and employer funded pension.

  • break-even analysis allows firms to identify the minimum level of sales needed to make a profit.

  • BSE crisis - the madness of the profit system EIGHTY PEOPLE have died a horrible death.

  • Workers in McDonald's make profit through their ability to cook burgers at very low pay rates.

  • calculated in accordance with the depreciation described in the Profit and loss explanatory notes.

  • Citizen florida home insurance owner friend Camille campbell profit without having lack of data.

  • capital gain on a profit, the £ 40,000 could go straight to the Inland Revenue.

  • In the world of supermarket cartels, of course, profit is everything!

  • They made a business buying chicken feed with their own money and recouping the costs, with profit, from sales of eggs.

  • clubroom activities showed a modest profit.

  • In the US, schooling is a $ 650 billion marketable commodity to be traded for a profit.

  • It can only be of profit then to learn how Boston dealt with intending communicants.

  • computation of taxable profits is the entity's accounting profit.

  • However, it's not just Asian cooking that can profit from the addition of a little coconut cream.

  • Date: 19 June 2006 Alternative ways to farming profit at the Royal Show There are real opportunities in non-food crops.

  • cumulated profit for example) at all times.

  • depreciated over the term and interest is charged to the profit and loss account.

  • All the income derived from practice does not equal profit.

  • desperate to regain rates of profit which match their non-European competitors.

  • divisible balance available for profit and rent.

  • Turn a profit car insurance uk women domino 's pizza with according to your.

  • These magazines are there simply to sell advertising, they are profit generating publications not educational or philanthropic publications.

  • encapsulated in the phrase " a non profit distributing company " or " a not for profit company " .

  • enmeshed in a global economy based on money, profit and exchange - capitalism.

  • In Miller's work the view that profit must outweigh humanity is often excoriated.

  • expenditure on R&D when calculating their profit for tax purposes.

  • A keen eye had he for situations where a profit might accrue.

  • Once again the profit margins returned from the bulls have been a real eye-opener with a top gross of just under £ 2200.

  • To improve their profit margins, Insurance Companies began to establish their own fire brigades.

  • Marx argued that the main driving force behind capitalist crises lies in what he called the tendency of the rate of profit to fall.

  • How to understand and use cash-flow forecasts and profit and loss accounts and what information you would need to produce them.

  • We want to be the best professional fundraisers in the UK not for profit sector.

  • Mission objectives are various: make profit, search and destroy, rescue hostages and rob the banks.

  • hypothetical tenant in an ability to pay scenario is likely to have no profit motive.

  • He will be a completely gross, vulgar farmer, totally inattentive to appearances, and thinking of nothing but profit and loss.

  • He has also returned the once heavily indebted weekly to profit.

  • This would offer a virtually inexhaustible source of profit for OPEC.

  • business interruption - the usual cover is for eighteen months ' loss of profits based on your last annual profit figure.

  • irrevocable license allowing others to profit from his work.

  • A man who had kin in a village in which there was a specialty would profit by such ties in trading.

  • It's quite something to say that you're a buy-to-let landlord or that you've bought and developed a property and sold it for a profit.

  • levitation for fun and profit " occupies pp.

  • He doesn't sound like someone who would sign an irrevocable license allowing others to profit from his work.

  • More efficient harvesting techniques affect those species that profit from seed wastage (e.g. linnet, corn bunting ).

  • lust for profit against a background of lawlessness in a gun culture.

  • Their profit margins are likely to come under intense pressure leading to the possible closure of smaller chemists in rural areas.

  • The small or niche market has been responsible for many people making a nice profit from the Internet.

  • The solicitor I used was not really a rip-off merchant he was just an ordinary solicitor making a healthy profit like most other solicitors.

  • middleman's profit.

  • molly house more for pleasure than for profit.

  • The profit motive test should not be applied here.

  • net rental income profit.

  • non profit making regulatory body for the radon industry.

  • People have the mistaken notion that business is sales minus costs and expenses is equal to profit.

  • Rover tried to generate almost obscene levels of profit from the City.

  • It seemed obscene a private entity could profit off the imprisonment of fellow citizens.

  • operate revenues forged ahead, growing 19% year on year whilst operating profit increased by 15% .

  • We have received a profit of £ 5,000 on a capital outlay of £ 10,000 - 50% gross return on capital.

  • In a world where profit usually beats principle, how can socially responsible investment become palatable?

  • pass-through profit distributions, a foreign citizen may form a limited liability company.

  • payback period is complete, savings become extra profit!

  • Look at verse 17a: Unlike so many, we do not peddle the word of God for profit.

  • Released on February 14th 2005 at £ 9.99 every single penny of profit will go to UNICEF.

  • perversion for profit All praise the Prelinger Archives for bringing us this unintentionally hilarious 1950s propaganda film.

  • pretax profit of 70 million pounds from the sale.

  • Sales revenues forged ahead, growing 19% year on year whilst operating profit increased by 15% .

  • These forces will continue to insist that all production should be aimed at maximizing profit.

  • The group that earns the most profit at the end of the project is the winner.

  • The company made £ 83 million pre-tax profit last year.

  • Rentals can normally be offset against taxable profit * .

  • Our retail energy supply gross profit grew by 14% to £ 95 million.

  • Tax is then charged o the net rental income profit.

  • profit margins looks set to continue.

  • profit motive.

  • profit maximization.

  • profit sharing plan, where contributions are made in the form of company stock.

  • profit warnings in a year.

  • As a result we even posted a small overall trading profit for the year.

  • profit before taxation shown in the statutory accounts.

  • The K-factor only affects the SCR, and so relates only to the impact of discretionary profit sharing in the stress scenarios.

  • profit sharing scheme, subsidized canteen & free uniform.

  • profit sharing basis.

  • pursuit of profit.

  • reap more of the profit their books generate.

  • There were many variations in the way this problem was tackled and in the amount of profit considered reasonable.

  • BOC is concerned with a falling rate of profit in the conditions of the impending recession.

  • reckon when they do hit profit, it will be substantial.

  • remediate the site for housing would, possibly, significantly dent the developer's desired profit margin.

  • It is likely that profit remittances in the future will rise in response to the recent rise in FDI to Africa from the UK.

  • reorganization items, UAL earned a net profit for the third quarter totaling $ 68 million.

  • resale at a large profit turns out otherwise.

  • savvy marketers online have been using this tactic to profit big.

  • Rev A L Birkbeck - Asked whether any progress had been made over animal sentience versus profit.

  • That way you scoop up plenty of shares cheaply with each market setback, ensuring you make a decent profit in the long run.

  • To date no company has been able to get oil out of oil shale at a profit.

  • Beside, in my plan I clearly shew how much profit the Crown ought to get per annum.

  • shocking indictment of the brutality of the profit system.

  • In terms of operating profit margins Miller ranks sixth, proving it can compete with the majors.

  • The economic impact of genetically modified cotton on south African smallholders: yield, profit and health effects.

  • squeeze on profit margins looks set to continue.

  • WAQ makes money available for signing players, thus strengthening the QPR squad - Profit.

  • Whatever the reason, profit or just plain stupidity, for showing these the people involved must be stopped.

  • subcontinent in the 18th century their concern was profit.

  • subordination of the public interest to the needs of private profit.

  • subsidiaryinclude details on principal subsidiaries, capital, accounts and dividends, turnover, pre-tax profit and earnings per share.

  • sweepre's profit in selling childcare, and so the very big disadvantages about it are swept under the carpet.

  • Bonuses can be paid via employe profit sharing schemes, usually tax-free.

  • The hypothetical tenant in an ability to pay scenario is likely to have no profit motive.

  • Anyone selling a dose of heroin to a young girl like that for a mere tenner 's profit is surely beneath contempt?

  • This stops the short termers getting in who only want there 10 - 20% profit ove a few weeks.

  • tidy profit with the tales of his story.

  • table T1 shows the profit for each of the six outcomes.

  • Your bread sucks « ssh tunnels for fun and profit · Team Laser Explosion!

  • unclassified on the profit & loss by class report?

  • Why do amounts connected to a payroll item show up as unclassified on the profit & loss by class report?

  • usury prohibition did not deny the legitimacy of profit.

  • Prithee, be silent, boy; I profit not by thy talk; thou art said to be Achilles ' male varlet.

  • You ca n't vilify the music companies for seeking to profit from their intellectual property that is just good business practice.

  • However, last month's profit warning was probably more traumatic than all three put together for Carnival investors.

  • The profit sharing some will call a typical weeknight.

  • whipping up racist hatred to profit at the ballot box on June 10th.

  • Profit before tax and the exceptional write-off up 18.3% to £ 369 million (£ 312 million ).

  • yearling bulls at a price we can dictate whereby we can turn a profit.

  • On the voyage he became acquainted with a fur-trader, by whose advice he devoted himself to the same business, buying furs directly from the Indians, preparing them at first with his own hands for the market, and selling them in London and elsewhere at a great profit.

  • Almost all other countries, moreover, share in the benefit of the minimum tariff, and profit by the modifications it may successively undergo.

  • His study of the making of gun-barrel iron in England enabled him to be of great assistance to the United States government during the Civil War, when he refused any profit on such orders.

  • The law, however, enabled provinces most heavily burdened by land tax to accelerate their portion of the survey, and to profit by the reassessment of the tax on the new basis.

  • The profit made by the state, which is entirely devoted to a special fund for means against malaria, amounted in these five years to 41 ~759 It has been established that two 3-grain pastilles a day are a sufficient prophylactic; and the proprietors of malarious estates and contractors for public works in malarious districts are bound by law to provide sufficient quinine for their workmen, death for want of this precaution coming under the provisions of the workmens compensation act.

  • Revenue from taxation had risen in a decade from 7,000,000 to 20,200,000; profit on state monopolies had increased from 7,000,000 to 9,400,000; exports had grown to exceed imports; income from the working of telegraphs had tripled itself; railways had been extended from 2200 to 6200 kilometres, and the annual travelling public had augmented from 15,000,000 to 25,000,000 persons.

  • On the whole, the state derives profit from its railways, although several of the later lines, while imperative for state purposes, must necessarily yield but a very small revenue, or be worked at a loss.

  • In 1902 Congress provided for the beginning of extensive irrigation works in the arid West, and Nevada (where preliminary reconnaissances had been made in 1889-1890) was the first state to profit from this undertaking.

  • If 'the earl had known how to profit by this victory, he might now have successfully withstood the English power in Ireland; for in every part of Ireland - and especially in the south, where James Fitzthomas Fitzgerald with O'Neill's support was asserting his claim to the earldom of Desmond at the head of a formidable army of Geraldine clansmen - discontent broke into flame.

  • 126); but Palmyra was not an industrial town, and the exacting fiscal system which drew profit even out of the bare necessaries of life - such as water, oil, wheat, salt, wine, straw, wool, skins (see Tariff ii.

  • any such corrupt cause or consideration, every such presentation, collation, gift and bestowing, and every admission, institution, investiture and induction shall be void, frustrate and of none effect in law; and it shall be lawful for the queen to present, collate unto, or give and bestow every such benefice, dignity, prebend and living ecclesiastical for that one time or turn only; and all and every person or persons, bodies politic and corporate, that shall give or take any such sum of money, &c., directly or indirectly, or that shall take or make any such promise, &c., shall forfeit and lose the double value of one year's profit of every such benefice, &c., and the person so corruptly taking, procuring, seeking or accepting any such benefice, &c., shall be adjudged a disabled person in law to have or enjoy the same benefice, &c. Admission, institution, installation or induction of any person to a benefice, &c., for any sum of money, &c., renders the offender liable to the penalty already mentioned.

  • By the Simony Act 1713 if any person shall for money, reward, gift, profit or advantage, or for any promise, agreement, grant, bond, covenant, or other assurance for any money, &c., take, procure or accept the next avoidance of or presentation to any benefice, dignity, prebend or living ecclesiastical, and shall be presented or collated thereupon, such presentation or collation and every admission, institution, investiture and induction upon the same shall be utterly void; and such agreement shall be deemed a simoniacal contract, and the queen may present for that one turn only; and the person so corruptly taking, &c., shall be adjudged disabled to have and enjoy the same benefice, &c., and shall be subject to any punishment limited by ecclesiastical law.

  • The taille servile can scarcely be termed a tax; it was rather a tax which had degenerated into a source of profit for certain individuals.

  • He defined faith as commonly understood to mean " not the conformity of what we say with fact, but an opinion upon divine things founded upon credulity which seeks after profit."

  • Carlyle's sarcastic remark on Lacretelle's history of the Revolution, that it " exists, but does not profit much," is partly true of all his books.

  • Sometimes they are proverbial sayings or moral adages, such as "Par divers moyens on arrive a pareille fin," "Qu'il ne faut juger de notre heur qu'apres la mort," "Le profit de l'on est le dommage de l'aultre."

  • Its Connexional Book Room, opened in 1891, yields an annual profit of from £1600 to £ 2000, the profits being devoted to help the colleges and to establish Sunday school libraries, etc. Its chapels in 1907 numbered 1641 (with accommodation for 488,080), manses 229; its churches numbered 1428, ministers 921, unordained preachers 318, deacons 6179; its Sunday Schools 1731, teachers 27,895, scholars 193,460, communicants 189,164, total collections for religious purposes £300,912.

  • The act further provides that if any one for the purpose of earning interest, commission, reward or other profit sends or causes to be sent to a person whom he knows to be an infant any circular or other document which invites the person receiving it to borrow money or to apply to any person or at any place with a view to obtaining information or advice as to borrowing money, he shall be liable, if convicted on indictment, to imprisonment with or without hard labour, or to a fine, or to both imprisonment and fine.

  • 801-803), always ready to profit by Gesner's information, and generally without acknowledgment, again described and repeated the former figures of the bird; but he corrupted his predecessor's Ramphestes into Ramphastos, and in this incorrect form the name, which should certainly be Rhamphestes or Rhamphastas, was subsequently adopted by Linnaeus and has since been recognized by systematists.

  • On the 20th of October 1740, Charles died, leaving his dominions in no condition to resist the attacks of the powers, which, in spite of having adhered to the Pragmatic Sanction, now sought to profit from weakness.

  • hunda, booty), the pursuit of game and wild animals, for profit or sport; equivalent to "chase" (like "catch," from Lat.

  • The former may profit by the study of his marvellous lucidity and vehemence, the latter by his sublime audacity in exaggeration and the sophistry with which he involves the innocent halfpence in the obloquy of the nefarious patentee.

  • He fully admits that the question is altered when vice is attended by pleasure and profit to the vicious man, virtue by loss and calamity; and even that it is " not truly reasonable that men by adhering to virtue should part with their lives, 1 It should be noticed, however, that it is only in his treatment of Equity and Benevolence that he really follows out the mathematical analogy (cf.

  • Any officer - state, county or municipal - who, through negligence or connivance, permits a prisoner to be seized and lynched, forfeits his office and becomes ineligible to hold any office of trust or profit in the state unless pardoned by the governor.

  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.

  • That's certainly good for you; more C2000s means more profit.

  • I do not doubt that she derived from them much pleasure and not a little profit.

  • It is not necessary that a child should understand every word in a book before he can read with pleasure and profit.

  • "Now I must disclose to you the chief aim of our Order," he said, "and if this aim coincides with yours, you may enter our Brotherhood with profit.

  • Their needs are ignored in the pursuit of profit.

  • This could develop more allowing authors to reap more of the profit their books generate.

  • The issue is whether profit commissions receivable in respect of years that are not yet closed should be included in these assets.

  • Obviously major expansion is going to hit profits, but I reckon when they do hit profit, it will be substantial.

  • Taking the necessary steps to remediate the site for housing would, possibly, significantly dent the developer 's desired profit margin.

  • Excluding the reorganization items, UAL earned a net profit for the third quarter totaling $ 68 million.

  • However, sometimes a property that looks like a quick, easy resale at a large profit turns out otherwise.

  • Really savvy marketers online have been using this tactic to profit big.

  • However, the profit includes a charge for the self-insurance element of the claim.

  • The facts are not in dispute and provide a shocking indictment of the brutality of the profit system.

  • The economic impact of genetically modified cotton on South African smallholders: yield, profit and health effects.

  • When the British first gained a foothold on the Indian subcontinent in the 18th century their concern was profit.

  • It is costly and it will lead to the subordination of the public interest to the needs of private profit.

  • Entries include details on principal subsidiaries, capital, accounts and dividends, turnover, pre-tax profit and earnings per share.

  • There 's profit in selling childcare, and so the very big disadvantages about it are swept under the carpet.

  • It was said that he made quite a tidy profit with the tales of his story.

  • Table T1 shows the profit for each of the six outcomes.

  • Your bread sucks « ssh tunnels for fun and profit · Team Laser Explosion !

  • However, last month 's profit warning was probably more traumatic than all three put together for Carnival investors.

  • My gripe is with the dealers who just want to make a huge profit without regard for the welfare of the animals.

  • The BNP are whipping up racist hatred to profit at the ballot box on June 10th.

Browse other sentences examples →