Production sentence example

production
  • Look at the way he made a production out of opening up the box.
    444
    178
  • Sheep production, mining volumes, births, crop production, weather patterns... it's all public information reports and numbers.
    166
    145
  • Metallurgy.The average production and value of iron and steel manufactured in France in the last four decades of the I 9th century is shown below Cast Iron.
    106
    87
  • Annual Average of Production in Men employed.
    87
    80
  • I played the vampire in a summer stock production.
    5
    1
    Advertisement
  • All these older methods have, however, been thrown into the background and rendered antiquated by inventions which have grown out of Hertz's scientific investigations on the production of electric waves.
    2
    0
  • The cotton factories excel chiefly in the production of red and printed cottons.
    4
    2
  • Howie remained silent during verbal our exchange, looking form one of us to the other, content to let us orchestrate the production.
    2
    1
  • For 1905 the total value of agricultural produce estimated at the place of production was 18,750,000 sterling, or about £4: 13: 4 per inhabitant.
    2
    1
  • The export of timber is in ordinary years valued at a million sterling and the total production at £ 2,250,000.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • The availability of the energy of magnetization is limited by the coercive force of the magnetized material, in virtue of which any change in the intensity of magnetization is accompanied by the production of heat.
    2
    1
  • If these were not at hand he might adjourn the case for their production, specifying a time up to six months.
    2
    1
  • But great stress was laid on the production of written evidence.
    3
    2
  • Allusion is made below to recent work on the production of undamped trains of electric waves.
    2
    1
  • Slaby paid considerable attention to the study of the phenomena connected with the production of the oscillations in the antenna.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The condenser method of making oscillations is analogous to the production of air vibrations by twanging a harp string at short intervals.
    1
    0
  • The so-called musical arc of Duddell has been the subject of considerable investigation, and physicists are not entirely in accordance as to the true explanation of the mode of production of the oscillations.
    1
    0
  • The production of maize is, however, insufficient, and 208,719 tons were imported in 1902about double the amount imported in 1882.
    1
    0
  • During the period 1900190 the average annual production of silk cocoons was 53,500 tons, an of silk 5200 tons.
    1
    0
  • With the exception of Parmesan, Gorgonzola, La Fontina and Gruyre, most of the Italian cheese is consumed in the locality of its production.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The chief minerals are sulphur, in the production of which Italy holds one of the first places, iron, zinc, lead; these, and, to a smaller extent, copper of an inferior quality, manganese and antimony, are successfully mined.
    1
    0
  • The total salt production in 1902 was 458,497 tons, of which 248,2i5 were produced in the government salt factories and the rest in the free salt-works of Sicily.
    1
    0
  • Handlooms and small spinTextiles ning establishments have, in the silk industry, given place to large establishments with steam looms. The production of raw silk at least tripled itself between 1875 and 1900, and the value of the silks woven in Italy, estimated in 1890 to be 2,200,000, is now, on account of the development of the export trade calculated to be almost 4,000,000.
    1
    0
  • The number has been reduced to less than half since 1897 by the suppression of smaller factories, while the production has increased from 47,690 millions to 59,741 millions.
    1
    0
  • The average production is about i8o,ooo hectolitres per annum.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The quantity of beer is about the same, the greater part of the beer drunk being imported from Germany, while the production of artificial mineral waters has somewhat decreased.
    1
    0
  • It is estimated that the total production of the finer wares amounts on the average to 400,000 per annum.
    1
    0
  • The production of mosaics is an industry still carried on with much success in Italy, which indeed ranks exceedingly high in th department.
    1
    0
  • The richest, however, of the co-operative societies, though few in number, are those for the production of electricity, for textile industries and for ceramic and glass manufactures.
    1
    0
  • Many objects in nature, organisms especially, seem to resemble the works of human design; there fore with high probability we infer a designing mind behind nature, adequate to the production of these special results.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • This process is an upward one, through the formation of the solar system and of our earth with its inorganic bodies, up to the production of man.
    1
    0
  • For De Maillet not only has a definite conception of the plasticity of living things, and of the production of existing species by the modification of their predecessors, but he clearly apprehends the cardinal maxim of modern geological science, that the explanation of the structure of the globe is to be sought in the deductive application to geological phenomena of the principles established inductively by the study of the present course of nature.
    1
    0
  • How far "natural selection" suffices for the production of species remains to be seen.
    1
    0
  • This latter fact is no doubt due to the production of an excess of plastic materials over and above what the tree requires for its immediate needs.
    1
    0
  • Grisebach declined to see anything in such forms but the production by nature of that which responds to external conditions and can only exist as long as they remain unchanged.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Commercial geography may be defined as the description of the earth's surface with special reference to the discovery, production, transport and exchange of commodities.
    1
    0
  • The production of sugar, begun by the early Spanish settlers, declined, but that of syrup increased.
    1
    0
  • But the internal rearrangements which accompany the production of a current do not cause any change in the original nature of the electrodes, fresh zinc being exposed at the anode, and copper being deposited on copper at the cathode.
    1
    0
  • We may here notice the frequent production of glucose by the action of enzymes upon other carbohydrates.
    1
    0
  • Coffee, tobacco, rice and various fruits of superior quality are produced with ease, but agriculture is neglected and production is limited to domestic needs.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The literary world marvelled at the encyclopaedic learning displayed by the author, and supposed that the French Academy, or some other society of scholars, must have combined their powers in its production.
    1
    0
  • From time to time efforts were made by those who believed that the Creator must have followed a symmetrical system in his production of animals to force one or other artificial, neatly balanced scheme of classification upon the zoological world.
    1
    0
  • Other mechanical disturbances may assist in this production of congenital variation.
    1
    0
  • Among other forest trees of economic importance are the silk-cotton tree (Bombax ceiba), the Palo de vaca, or cow-tree (Brosimum galactodendron), whose sap resembles milk and is used for that purpose, the Inga saman, the Hevea guayanensis, celebrated in the production of rubber, and the Altalea speciosa, distinguished for the length of its leaves.
    1
    0
  • The product is a crystalline solid of specific gravity 2.34, and melts at about 1430° C. See also German Patent 108817 for the production of crystallized silicon from silica and carborundum.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is a colourless, strongly refracting liquid, which boils at about 220° C., slight decomposition setting in above 150° C. Water decomposes it with production of leucone.
    1
    0
  • In 1906 the total area under tobacco in twenty-five states was 796,099 acres, and the production 682,428,530 Ib, valued at about £13,500,000.
    1
    0
  • Tobacco cultivation is an important industry, and the home production is carried out under government supervision.
    1
    0
  • The former faience had its origin at the close of the 17th century, the latter at the close of the 18th; but the Izumoyaki now procurable is a modern production.
    1
    0
  • The Yatsushiro faience is a production of the province of Higo, where a number of Korean potters settled at the close of the ~ hi 17th century.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Not without full reason have Western connoisseurs lavished panegyrics upon that exquisite production.
    1
    0
  • Of the total production in 1876, 5,016,488 oz., almost the whole was derived from the United States, Australasia and Russia.
    1
    0
  • Late in life he wrote a work on the great Roman families, wrongly identified with an extant poem De progenie Augusti Caesaris bearing the name of Messalla, but really a 15th-century production.
    1
    0
  • Many scale-insects are among the most serious of pests, but various species have been utilized by man for the production of wax (lac) and red dye (cochineal).
    1
    0
  • He was now driven in upon his books for the employment of a restless temperament; and to this irksomeness of enforced leisure may be ascribed the production of the Principe, the Discorsi, the Arte della guerra, the comedies, and the Historie fiorentine.
    1
    0
  • Fluorescent lighting increases the body's production of saliva, which helps prevent cavities.
    16
    15
  • In New South Wales the greatest production was in 1852, soon after the first discovery of the precious metal, when the output was valued at £2,660,946; the production in 1905 was about 270,000 oz., valued at £1,150,000.
    0
    0
  • In 1905 the production amounted to 1,983,000 oz., valued at £8,300,000.
    0
    0
  • For the period of thirty years during which the mine was worked the production of ore amounted to 234,648 tons, equal to 51,622 tons of copper, valued at £4,749,924.
    0
    0
  • The satisfactory price obtained during recent years has enabled renewed attention to be paid to copper mining in South Australia, and the production of the metal in 1905 was valued at £470,324.
    0
    0
  • In Western Australia the production from the tin-fields at Greenbushes and elsewhere was valued at £87,000.
    0
    0
  • Tasmania during the last few years has attained the foremost position in the production of tin, the annual output now being about £363,000.
    0
    0
  • The total value of tin produced in Australia is nearly a million sterling per annum, and the total production to the end of 1905 was £22,500,000, of which Tasmania produced about 40%, New South Wales one-third, Queensland a little more than a fourth.
    0
    0
  • In Victoria the production of antimony gave employment in 1890 to 238 miners, but owing to the low price of the metal, production has almost ceased.
    0
    0
  • Several companies are devoting all their energies to zinc extraction, and the output is now equal to about 5% of the world's production.
    0
    0
  • Rajputana is very poor in industrial production.
    0
    0
  • The discovery and production of commodities require a knowledge of the distribution of geological formations for mineral products, of the natural distribution, life-conditions and cultivation or breeding of plants and animals and of the labour market.
    0
    0
  • Hantzsch (Ber., 1901, 34, p. 3337) has shown that in the action of alcohols on diazonium salts an increase in the molecular weight of the alcohol and an accumulation of negative groups in the aromatic nucleus lead to a diminution in the yield of the ether produced and to the production of a secondary reaction, resulting in the formation of a certain amount of an aromatic hydrocarbon.
    0
    0
  • Oyonnax and its environs, north of Nantua, are noted for the production of articles in wood and horn, especially combs.
    0
    0
  • Coco-nuts, cacao, bananas, mangoes and other tropical fruits are produced in profusion, but the production of foodstuffs (beans, Indian corn, mandioca, &c.) is not sufficient for local consumption.
    0
    0
  • This increase in the diameter of stem and root is correlated with the increase in leaf-area each season, due to the continued production of new leaf-bearing branches.
    0
    0
  • It combines with many metals to form sulphides, and also decomposes many metallic salts with consequent production of sulphides, a property which renders it extremely useful in chemical analysis.
    0
    0
  • The cultivation of the soil is limited to local needs, except in the production of tobacco, which is exported to neighbouring states.
    0
    0
  • The treatise was therefore written before the birth of Boetius, if it be not a forgery; but there is no reason to suppose that the treatise was not a genuine production of the time to which it professes to belong.
    0
    0
  • With Dekker Ford also wrote the mask of The Sun's Darling; or, as seems most probable, they founded this production upon Phaeton, an earlier mask, of which Dekker had been sole author.
    0
    0
  • By means of his sons and his deputies (or viceroys) and by his system of matrimonial alliances he gave Athens a widespread influence in the centres of commerce, and brought her into connexion with the growing sources of trade and production in the eastern parts of the Greek world.
    0
    0
  • The production of pig-iron nearly doubled between 1890 and 1900, increasing from 446,800 tons in the former year to 801,600 in the latter; but since 1900 the output has declined, the total for 1904 (inclusive of Siberia) being 644,000 tons.
    0
    0
  • About that time a thorough reform of the machinery in use was effected whereby the number of hands employed was reduced, but the yearly production doubled or trebled.
    0
    0
  • The growth of the sugar industry is shown by the fact that in 1888-93 the average annual production of sugar was 444,520 tons, in 1902-3 it was 1,180,293 tons.
    0
    0
  • The department is authorized, on receipt of such report, to direct an inquiry to be made into the cause of any accident so reported, and the inspector appointed to make the inquiry is given power to enter any railway premises for the purposes of his inquiry, and to summon any person engaged upon the railway to attend the inquiry as a witness, and to require the production of all books, papers and documents which he considers important for the purpose.
    0
    0
  • The fouling of the air that results from the steam-engine, owing to the production of carbonic acid gas and of sulphurous fumes and aqueous vapour, is well known, and its use is now practically abandoned for underground working.
    0
    0
  • In these illustrations, which gave an impluse to the production of "enblems" and were copied in the English version, there appears a humour quite absent from the text.
    0
    0
  • He executed the first book in French; it was read (in 1767), as an anonymous production, before a literary society of foreigners in London, and condemned.
    0
    0
  • For the three years1875-1877the production of gold and silver in Nevada was more than the combined product of all the other American states and Territories.
    0
    0
  • In 1859 the mines were worked only for their gold; the ignorant miners threw away the " black stuff " which was really valuable silver ore with an assay value four times as great as that of their ores of gold; and when this was discovered there came a period of unprecedented silver production.
    0
    0
  • The gold production of 1907 was valued at $12,099,455; the silver production at $4,675,178.
    0
    0
  • The value of the production of the Goldfield District in 1904 amounted to $2,341,979.
    0
    0
  • After 1902 the production of gold and silver steadily increased, being $4,980,786 in that year, $9,184,996 in 1905, and $16,774,633 in 1907.
    0
    0
  • In the production of silver Nye county ranked first in 1907 ($3,667,973, of which $3,544,7 88 was from Tonopah), Churchill county second ($432,617, from Fairview, Wonder and Stillwater), and Eureka county (with lead silver ores) and Storey county were third and fourth respectively.
    0
    0
  • In 1907 the production of copper was 1,782,571 lb, valued at $356,514.
    0
    0
  • In 1903 and 1907 Nevada ranked second among the American states in the production of sulphur, but its output is very small in comparison with that of Louisiana.
    0
    0
  • The industries embrace the making of cheese, objects in cement, matches, and brushes, the production of silkworms, and printing; and the town is the centre of a rich agricultural district.
    0
    0
  • The principal production of this kind in our possession is the Hexaemeron of Basil, which contains several passages very like those of the Physiologus.
    0
    0
  • For example, when metallic zinc is dissolved in dilute sulphuric acid with production of zinc sulphate (in solution) and hydrogen gas, a definite quantity of heat is produced for a given amount of zinc dissolved, provided that the excess of energy in the initial system appears entirely as heat.
    0
    0
  • (3) The effect of change of volume against external pressure (due to production or consumption of mechanical energy) may be neglected in the case of solids, liquids or solutions, but must usually be taken into account when gases are dealt with.
    0
    0
  • A great part of Farr's literary production is to be found in the papers which, from 1839 to 1880, he wrote for each annual report of the registrar-general on the cause of the year's deaths in England.
    0
    0
  • The principal wealth of the island is derived from its olive groves; notwithstanding the destruction of many thousands of trees during each successive insurrection, the production is apparently undiminished, and will probably increase very considerably owing to the planting of young trees and the improved methods of cultivation which the Government is endeavouring to promote.
    0
    0
  • Mississippi ranks high among the southern states in the production of lumber.
    0
    0
  • In the production of vegetables and fruits the state ranks high.
    0
    0
  • The production in Rutherford and Burke counties and their vicinity was so great, and transportation to the United States Mint at Philadelphia so difficult, that from 1831 to 1857 gold was privately coined in I, 22 and 5 dollar pieces bearing the mark of the coiner " C. Bechtler, Rutherford county, N.C."
    0
    0
  • North Carolina is also the leading state in the Union in the production of monazite.
    0
    0
  • But the ovaries of worker ants are in some cases sufficiently developed for the production of eggs, which may give rise parthenogenetically to male, queen or worker offspring.
    0
    0
  • There is often a marked alternation in the production of vegetative and flowering shoots respectively; and, sometimes, from various circumstances, the flowering shoots are not produced for several years in succession.
    0
    0
  • Aridity has favoured the production of spines as a defence from external attack, sharp thorns are frequent, and asperities of various sorts predominate.
    0
    0
  • At Bankside were the Bear and the Paris Gardens, used for the popular sport of bear and bull baiting; and the Globe theatre, the scene of the production of many of Shakespeare's plays for fifteen years after its erection in 1599.
    0
    0
  • Thus in cows' butter, tributyrin, C 3 H 5 (O C 4 H 7 0) 3, and the analogous glycerides of other readily volatile acids closely resembling butyric acid, are present in small quantity; the production of these acids on saponification and distillation with dilute sulphuric acid is utilized as a test of a purity of butter as sold.
    0
    0
  • - Besides its use as a starting-point in the production of "nitroglycerin" (q.v.) and other chemical products, glycerin is largely employed for a number of purposes in the arts, its application thereto being due to its peculiar physical properties.
    0
    0
  • Its solvent power is also utilized in the production of various colouring fluids, where the colouring matter would not dissolve in water alone; thus aniline violet, the tinctorial constituents of madder, and various allied colouring matters dissolve in glycerin, forming liquids which remain coloured even when diluted with water, the colouring matters being either retained in suspension or dissolved by the glycerin present in the diluted fluid.
    0
    0
  • The remedy for the evils of the time was not so much the reduction as the equalization of the imposts, which would allow the poor to consume more, raise the production and add to the general wealth.
    0
    0
  • But the progress of husbandry, evidenced by the production of larger and better crops with more certainty, is due to that rationalizing of agricultural practices which is the work of modern times.
    0
    0
  • Its unfitness for the production of mutton, and increasing supplies of fine clothing wool from other countries, soon led to its total rejection.
    0
    0
  • The two most prominent causes assigned for the depression were bad seasons and foreign competition, aggravated by the increased cost of production and the heavy losses of live stock.
    0
    0
  • The practice is for the Board of Agriculture to appoint local estimators, who report in the autumn as to the total production of the crops in the localities respectively assigned to them.
    0
    0
  • By dividing the total production, say of wheat, in each county by the number of acres of wheat as returned by the occupiers on June 4, the estimated average yield per acre is obtained.
    0
    0
  • It is important to notice that the figures relating to total production and yield per acre are only estimates, and it is not claimed for them that they are anything more.
    0
    0
  • The imports of potatoes into the United Kingdom vary, to some extent inversely; thus, the low production in 1897 was accompanied by an increase of imports from 3,921,205 cwt.
    0
    0
  • The extent to which the annual production of the leading fodder crop may vary is shown in the table by the two consecutive years 1893 and 1894; from only nine million tons in the former year the production rose to upwards of fifteen million tons in the latter, an increase of over 70%.
    0
    0
  • Whatever the specific rotation, there may in practice be deviations from the plan of retaining on the farm the whole of the root-crops, the straw of the grain crops and the leguminous fodder crops (clover, vetches, sainfoin, &c.) for the production of meat or milk, and, coincidently, for that of manure to be returned to the land.
    0
    0
  • In the feeding experiments which have been carried on at Rothamsted it has been shown that the amount consumed both for a given live weight of animal within a given time, and for the production of a given amount of increase, is, as current food-stuffs go, measurable more by the amounts they contain of digestible and available non-nitrogenous constituents than by the amounts of the digestible and available nitrogenous constituents they supply.
    0
    0
  • The judges, in making their awards at the show held annually in December, at Islington, North London (since 1862), are instructed to decide according to quality of flesh, lightness of offal, age and early maturity, with no restrictions as to feeding, and thus to promote the primary aim of the club in encouraging the selection and breeding of the best and most useful animals for the production of meat, and testing their capabilities in respect of early maturity.
    0
    0
  • In the sheep section of the Smithfield show the classes for ewes were finally abolished in 1898, and the classes restricted to wethers and wether lambs, whose function is exclusively the production of meat.
    0
    0
  • Four out of the five essays are elaborate and powerful solutions of perplexing technical problems - the distribution of the gains of international commerce, the influence of consumption on production, the definition of productive and unproductive labour, the precise relations between profits and wages.
    0
    0
  • From this oppressive feeling he found relief in the thought set forth in the opening of the second book of his Political Economy - that, while the conditions of production have the necessity of physical laws, the distribution of what is produced among the various classes of producers is a matter of human arrangement, dependent upon alterable customs and institutions.
    0
    0
  • The manor was indeed self-sufficient and independent in the sense that it could furnish everything required by the majority of the inhabitants, and that over the greater part of rural England production was not carried on with a view to a distant market.
    0
    0
  • Thus the productive power of England was unrivalled, and her manufactures and business men, under a regime rapidly approximating to complete freedom of trade, could reap the full advantages to be derived from the possession of great national resources and production by machinery.
    0
    0
  • To buy in the cheapest market and sell in the dearest; to secure cheapness by lowering the expenses of production; to adopt the less expensive rather than the more expensive method of obtaining a given result - these and other maxims are as old as human society.
    0
    0
  • " Were the law different, nearly all the phenomena of the production and distribution of wealth would be other than they are."
    0
    0
  • To date the beginning of this earliest record of human production is impossible at present.
    0
    0
  • They point to the fact that, even in the new period, the palm for wealth and variety of civilized production still remained with Crete.
    0
    0
  • Under their rule peace was re-established, and art production became again abundant among the subject population, though of inferior quality.
    0
    0
  • The difference between schists and gneisses is mainly that the latter have less highly developed foliation; they also, as a rule, are more coarse grained, and contain far more quartz and felspar, two minerals which rarely assume platy or acicular forms, and hence do not lead to the production of a fissile character in the rocks in which they are important constituents.
    0
    0
  • The development of foliation in shaly rocks is undoubtedly closely akin to the production of cleavage in slates.
    0
    0
  • Tiedemann's carefully-wrought Anatomic and N aturgeschichte der V gel - which shows a remarkable advance upon the work which Cuvier did in 1805, and in some respects is superior to his later production of 1817.
    0
    0
  • The most important work of his life was his co-operation in the production of the Satire Menippee (1593), which did so much to damage the cause of the League; the harangue of the Sieur d'Aubray is usually attributed to his pen.
    0
    0
  • Special progress has been made in the production of mirrors, electric lamps, candelabra and mosaics.
    0
    0
  • Other important industries are wood-carving (of an artistic excellence long unknown), artistic iron-working, jewelling, bronze-casting, the production of steam-engines, machinery, matches (largely exported to Turkey, Egypt, Russia, Austria-Hungary and Greece), clock-making, wool-weaving and the manufacture of chemical manures.
    0
    0
  • The Indian corn crop was 67,501,144 bushels in 1870; 152,055,390 bushels in 1899 and 153,062,000 in 1909, when it was grown on 3,875,000 acres and the state ranked seventh among the states of the Union in the production of this cereal.
    0
    0
  • Dairying and the production of eggs are also important industries in all sections.
    0
    0
  • The mineral wealth of Ohio consists largely of bituminous coal and petroleum, but the state also ranks high in the production of natural gas, sandstone, limestone, grindstone, lime and gypsum.
    0
    0
  • About two-thirds of the total production of lead in Austria is extracted in Carinthia, the principal places being Bleiberg and Raibl.
    0
    0
  • The metallurgic industries are well developed, and consist in the production of iron, steel, machinery, small-arms, lead articles, wire-cables and rails.
    0
    0
  • Flowering and fruiting go on continually, although in diminishing degree, until the advent of frost, which kills the flowers and young bolls and so puts an end to the production of cotton for the season.
    0
    0
  • In the tropics the essential requirements are very similar, but there the dry season checks production in much the same way as do the frosts in temperate climates.
    0
    0
  • Cotton-picking is at once the most difficult and most expensive operation in cotton production.
    0
    0
  • It has been commonly thought that the production of cotton in the south is limited by the amount that can be picked, but this limit is evidently very remote.
    0
    0
  • In modern commercial cotton production ginning machines are always used.
    0
    0
  • Some of the American ginners are very large indeed, a number (Bulletin of the Bureau of the Census on Cotton Production) being reported as containing on the average 1 156 saws with an average production of 4120 bales of cotton.
    0
    0
  • The production, therefore, of the most perfect and efficient cotton-cleaning machinery is of importance alike to the planter and manufacturer.
    0
    0
  • Rivers of James Island, South Carolina, has resulted in the production of disease-resistant races.
    0
    0
  • Of the countries which were prominent in the production of cotton in 1790, Brazil and Asiatic Turkey alone remain " (U.S.A. Bureau of the Census, Bulletin No 76).
    0
    0
  • With a capacity for the production of cotton almost boundless, the crop which was so insignificant when the century began had in 1860 reached the enormous extent of 4,824,000 bales.
    0
    0
  • The department was actively assisted by the Cotton Production in the British West Indies: 1905-1906.1 British Cotton Growing Association, and the results have been very successful, as was shown at an exhibition held in Manchester in 1908.
    0
    0
  • Possessing soil, climate and apparently all the requisite elements from nature for the production of cotton to an almost boundless extent, and of a 1 Approximately.
    0
    0
  • There are no figures obtainable as to the production, but it must be very large, considering that the crop provides clothing for a large proportion of the population of China.
    0
    0
  • The production is not sufficient to meet the home demand; during the five years of normal trade before the war with Russia Japan imported annually about 800,000 bales of cotton, chiefly from British India, China and the United States, and during the same period exported each year some 2000 bales, mainly to Korea.
    0
    0
  • Some cotton is produced in European Russia in the southern Caucasus, but Turkestan in central Asia is by far the 1 Cotton Production 1906, U.S.A. Bureau of the Census, Bulletin No.
    0
    0
  • The production of cotton in Russia in 1906 was estimated at 675,000 bales of Soo lb each.
    0
    0
  • Calcium citrate must be manufactured with care to avoid an excess of chalk or lime, which would precipitate constituents of the juice that cause the fermentation of the citrate and the production of calcium acetate and butyrate.
    0
    0
  • Tartaric acid, which is sometimes present in large quantities as an adulterant in commercial citric acid, may be detected in the presence of the latter, by the production of a precipitate of acid potassium tartrate when potassium acetate is added to a cold solution.
    0
    0
  • The production of crude petroleum in the United States was officially reported to have been 2000 barrels in 1859, 4,215,000 barrels in 1869, 19,914,146 barrels in 1879, 35,163,513 barrels in 1889, 57,084,428 barrels in 1899, and 126,493,936 barrels in 1906.
    0
    0
  • Such a rock is typically exemplified by a coarse-grained sandstone or conglomerate, while a limestone may be naturally porous, or, like the Trenton limestone of Ohio and Indiana, rendered so by its conversion into dolomite and the consequent production of cavities due to shrinkage - a change occurring only in the purer limestones.
    0
    0
  • On the completion of drilling, or when the production is found to decrease, it is usual to torpedo the well to increase the flow.
    0
    0
  • It must be borne in mind that although the explosion may increase the production for a time, it is by no means certain that the actual output of a well is increased in all such cases, though from some wells there would be no production without the use of the torpedo.
    0
    0
  • The operation was, however, completely revolutionized in the United States by the introduction of the " cracking process," and by the division of the distillation into two parts, one consisting in the removal of the more volatile constituents of the oil, and the other in the distillation (which is usually conducted in separate stills) of the residues from the first distillation, for the production of lubricating oils and paraffin.
    0
    0
  • Petroleum products are also largely utilized in gas manufacture for, (1) the production of " air-gas," (2) the manufacture of oil-gas, and (3) the enrichment of coal-gas.
    0
    0
  • Tobacco culture, which declined after 1860 on account of the competition of Cuba and Sumatra, has revived since 1885 through the introduction of Cuban and Sumatran seed; the product of 1907 (6,937,500 lb) was more than six times that of 1899, the product in 1899 (1,125,600 lb) being more than twice that of 1889 (470,443 lb), which in turn was more than twenty times that for 1880 (21,182 lb)-the smallest production recorded for many decades.
    0
    0
  • The sweet potato and pea-nut crops have also become very valuable; on the other hand the Census of 1900 showed a decline in acreage and production of cotton.
    0
    0
  • Most of the tobacco used is imported from Cuba, though, as has been indicated, the production of the state has greatly increased since 1880.
    0
    0
  • Its concluding words suggest that its production was due to Khalid ben Yezid (died in 708), who was a pupil of the Syrian monk Marianus, and according to the Kitab-al-Fihrist was the first Mussulman writer on alchemy.
    0
    0
  • About the beginning of the 10th century, however, the view was promulgated that the spontaneous production of helium from radium may be an instance of the transformation of one element into another.
    0
    0
  • Cereals, forage crops, vegetables and fruits of the cold temperate zone can be produced easily, but distance from markets and lack of transport have restricted their production to local needs.
    0
    0
  • His programme included the collective ownership of the means of production and the international association of labour, but when in June 1899 he entered Waldeck-Rousseau's cabinet of "republican defence" as minister of commerce he limited himself to practical reforms, devoting his attention to the improvement of the mercantile marine, to the development of trade, of technical education, of the postal system, and to the amelioration of the conditions of labour.
    0
    0
  • An alkali or base is a substance which neutralizes an acid with the production of salts but with no evolution of hydrogen.
    0
    0
  • Thus, in the production of hydrochloric acid from hydrogen and chlorine 22,000 calories are developed; in the production of hydrobromic acid from hydrogen and bromine, however, only 8440 caloriesare developed; and in the formation of hydriodic acid from hydrogen and iodine 6040 calories are absorbed.
    0
    0
  • Lastly, in the production of gaseous hydriodic acid from hydrogen and solid iodine H2 - 1 - 12=HI+HI, so much energy is expended in the decomposition of the hydrogen and iodine molecules and in the conversion of the iodine into the gaseous condition, that the heat which it may be supposed is developed by the combination of the hydrogen and iodine atoms is insufficient to balance the expenditure, and the final result is therefore negative; hence it is necessary in forming hydriodic acid from its elements to apply heat continuously.
    0
    0
  • Tantalum has in recent years been turned to economic service, being employed, in the same manner as tungsten, for the production of the filaments employed in incandescent electric lighting.
    0
    0
  • Instances had already been recorded of cases where a halogen element replaced hydrogen with the production of a closely allied substance: Gay Lussac had prepared cyanogen chloride from hydrocyanic acid; Faraday, hexachlorethane from ethylene dichloride, &c. Here the electronegative halogens exercised a function similar to electro-positive hydrogen.
    0
    0
  • For example: nitric acid and sulphuric acid readily react with benzene and its homologues with the production of nitro derivatives and sulphonic acids, while in the aliphatic series these acids exert no substituting action (in the case of the olefines, the latter acid forms an addition product); another distinction is that the benzene complex is more stable towards oxidizing agents.
    0
    0
  • Hitherto we have generally restricted ourselves to syntheses which result in the production of a true benzene ring; but there are many reactions by which reduced benzene rings are synthesized, and from the compounds so obtained true benzenoid compounds may be prepared.
    0
    0
  • If we accept Kekule's formula for the benzene nucleus, then we may expect the double linkages to be opened up partially, either by oxidation or reduction, with the formation of di-, tetra-, or hexa-hydro derivatives, or entirely, with the production of open chain compounds.
    0
    0
  • It is remarkable that sulphur can replace two methine or CH groups with the production of compounds greatly resembling the original one.
    0
    0
  • Similarly a CH group may be replaced by a nitrogen atom with the production of compounds of similar stability; thus benzene gives pyridine, naphthalene gives quinoline and isoquinoline; anthracene gives acridine and a and 3 anthrapyridines.
    0
    0
  • Most of the simple ring systems which contain two adjacent carbon atoms may suffer fusion with any other ring (also containing two adjacent carbon atoms) with the production of nuclei of greater complexity.
    0
    0
  • Mention may be made of the phenomenon of halochromism, the name given to the power of colourless or faintly-coloured substances of combining with acids to form highly-coloured substances without the necessary production of a chromophoric group. The researches of Adolf von Baeyer and Villiger, Kehrmann, Kauffmann and others, show that this property is possessed by very many and varied substances.
    0
    0
  • (3) If a colourless compound gives a coloured one on solution or by salt-formation, the production of colour may be explained as a particular form of ionization (Baeyer), or by a molecular rearrangement (Hantzsch).
    0
    0
  • This theory explains the fluorescence of anthranilic acid (o-aminobenzoic acid), by regarding the aniline residue as the luminophore, and the carboxyl group as the fluorogen, since, apparently, the introduction of the latter into the non-fluorescent aniline molecule involves the production of a fluorescent substance.
    0
    0
  • His first music master was Gottlieb Muller, who thought him self-willed and eccentric; and his first production as a composer was an overture, performed at the Leipzig theatre in 1830.
    0
    0
  • In 1814 Tassaert observed the spontaneous formation of a blue compound, very similar to ultramarine, if not identical with it, in a soda-furnace at St Gobain, which caused the Societe pour l'Encouragement d'Industrie to offer, in 1824, a prize for the artificial production of the precious colour.
    0
    0
  • The art of lithography greatly affected the production of maps.
    0
    0
  • 4 Movable types are utilized in several other ways in the production of maps.
    0
    0
  • The production of these charts employed numerous licensed draughtsmen in the principal seaports of Italy and Catalonia, and among seamen these MS. charts remained popular long after the productions of the printing-press had become available.
    0
    0
  • In Brazil little or nothing is done by the central government, but the progressive states of Sao Paulo and Mines Gerdes have commissaos geographicos e geologicos engaged in the production of topographical maps.
    0
    0
  • Parallel with this great production of learned and imaginative works, Dahn published some twenty small volumes of poetry.
    0
    0
  • Under the Empire its use must have been extensive, for not only was it required for the production of books, but it was universally employed for domestic purposes, correspondence and legal documents.
    0
    0
  • The two parts are distinguished by difference of style; the Hebrew principle of parallelism of clauses is employed far more in the first than in the second, which has a number of plain prose passages, and is also rich in uncommon compound terms. In view of these differences there is ground for holding that the second part is a separate production which has been united with the first by an editor, an historical haggadic sketch, a midrash, full of imaginative additions to the Biblical narrative, and enlivened by many striking ethical reflections.
    0
    0
  • The style shows that the book was written in Greek, though naturally it contains Hebraisms. The author of the first part was in all probability an Alexandrian Jew; nothing further is known of him; and this is true of the author of the second part, if that be a separate production.
    0
    0
  • This gave rise to a production of sulphuretted hydrogen which is found in the deposits, as well as in the deeper waters.
    0
    0
  • Orchard fruits are fairly varied, but, compared with other states, unimportant; and the production of small fruits is comparatively small, the largest crop being strawberries.
    0
    0
  • The production of the island from 1850 to 1868 averaged 469,934 tons yearly, rising from 223,145 to 749,000; from 1869 to 1886 (continuing high during the period of the Ten Years' War), 632,003 tons; from 1887 to 1907 - omitting the five years 1896-1900 when the industry was prostrated by war,-909,827 tons (and including the war period, 758,066); and in the six harvests of 1901-1906, 1,016,899 tons.
    0
    0
  • Daiquiri, near Oriente, and mines near Nipe, on the north coast, are the chief centres of production.
    0
    0
  • After 1900 production was greatly increased and by 1906 had come to exceed half a million tons annually.
    0
    0
  • The acid finds considerable use in organic chemistry, being employed to discriminate between the different types of alcohols and of amines, and also in the production of diazo, azo and diazo-amino compounds.
    0
    0
  • The production of salt is also under the direction of the public debt administration.
    0
    0
  • We find in them the same beauties and the same defects that we observe in the production of the Iranian authors.
    0
    0
  • Appended to the Paedagogue are two hymns, which are, in all probability, the production of Clement, though some have conjectured that they were portions of the church service of that time.
    0
    0
  • His last production was Christ admonishing Martha.
    0
    0
  • It supports a fishing population of over 30,000, most of whom are Annamese; the fish, which are taken by means of large nets at the end of the inundation, are either dried or fermented for the production of the sauce known as nuoc-mam.
    0
    0
  • The history of the peach almond and nectarine is interesting and important as regards the question of the origin of species and the production and perpetuation of varieties.
    0
    0
  • Minnesota ranked third among the states of the Union in 1900 in the production of lumber, but in 1905 was fifth, the supply having diminished and the industry having been developed in the states of Washington and Louisiana.
    0
    0
  • Minnesota ranked first among the states in 1902 in the production of iron ore.
    0
    0
  • These facts of distribution are due to certain conditions that govern the production of organic substance in the oceans.
    0
    0
  • It follows, too, that when there is a number of substances, all essential for the elaboration of living material, and when one of these is present in minimal proportion, that one substance rules the production, just as the effective strength of a chain depends on the weakest link.
    0
    0
  • Following the great spring production of plant substance there is, therefore, a summer outburst of animal life.
    0
    0
  • Among the chief industries are those for the production of articles of food and drink.
    0
    0
  • An enormous development of agricultural resources has taken place within the Brahmaputra basin of late years, chiefly in the direction of tea cultivation, as well as in the production of jute and silk.
    0
    0
  • In accordance with the principles of energetics, any change which involves a decrease in the total available energy of the system will tend to occur, and thus the necessary and sufficient condition for the production of electromotive force is that the available energy of the system should decrease when the current flows.
    0
    0
  • In Africa it seems probable that the production of rubber from vines is likely to be entirely superseded in process of time, and replaced by the plantations of trees which are already being established in those districts in which careful experiment has determined the kind of rubber tree best adapted to the locality.
    0
    0
  • Although the cost of transport from the remote forest regions of some districts is a serious consideration, this is not likely to be operative in reducing production until there has been a considerable and permanent fall in price, by which time new areas in those countries in which planting is now taking place will probably have come into bearing.
    0
    0
  • In 1909 the total production of rubber is stated to have been about 70,000 tons, of which more than one-half came from tropical America, about one-third from Africa, whilst the remainder was chiefly of Asiatic origin, including " plantation " rubber from Ceylon and Malaya, which amounted to about 3000 tons.
    0
    0
  • Each year should therefore show an increase in the production of plantation rubber.
    0
    0
  • No trustworthy estimate of the rate of the increase of production can, however, be formed, as several uncertain economic factors have to be taken into account.
    0
    0
  • Among these are the precise extent of demand, the limit of the inevitable fall in price with largely increased production, the cost of labour as increasing amounts are required, and the effect of changed conditions on the output of " wild " rubber and the competition of the new plantations which are being established in tropical America.
    0
    0
  • Difficulties in the supply of labour in the East may hinder the further development of the rubber-planting industry, especially at a period when a reduction in the cost of production may be the chief problem.
    0
    0
  • During 1909, without any serious decline in production, the price rapidly rose, owing to extraordinary causes, to about ios.
    0
    0
  • Having regard to the present cost of producing " plantation " rubber, and to the probability that, apart from a possible increase in the price of labour, this cost is susceptible of further reduction, it may be concluded that rubber production will continue to be profitable even should a considerable fall in market value take place.
    0
    0
  • The yield of latex is at first small, but increases with successive tappings, which appear to stimulate the local production of latex, and finally reaches a maximum.
    0
    0
  • Too frequent tapping leads to the production of latex poor in caoutchouc, whilst tapping of trees before they are six or seven years old, and from 20-25 in.
    0
    0
  • The cost of production may be assumed to be about is.
    0
    0
  • It is, however, important to remember that rough as these native methods are they result in the production of rubber which commands the highest price.
    0
    0
  • The probabilities are that in the end the production of a rubber as nearly as possible free from water and impurities and of constant composition will be realized as best meeting the requirements of the modern manufacturer.
    0
    0
  • In the present transition stage of rubber production it is necessary for the manufacturer in Europe to wash all rubber.
    0
    0
  • In connexion with the production of rubber the most important factor is the proportion of caoutchouc it contains.
    0
    0
  • The presence of more than a small percentage of resin in the latex leads to the production of rubber containing much resin, which seriously depreciates its commercial value for most purposes.
    0
    0
  • Sulphur when warmed with caoutchouc combines with it, and on this fact the vulcanization of rubber depends, and also the production, with an excess of sulphur, of the hard black material known as vulcanite or ebonite.
    0
    0
  • Rubber slowly absorbs oxygen when exposed to air and light, the absorption of oxygen being accompanied by a gradual change in the characteristic properties of rubber, and ultimately to the production of a hard, inelastic, brittle substance containing oxygen.
    0
    0
  • From Aristophanes (Peace, 830 ff.) it is concluded that he died before the production of that play (421).
    0
    0
  • The principal mineral wealth of Upper Austria is salt, of which it extracts nearly 50% of the total Austrian production.
    0
    0
  • Others have arranged a means of obtaining high conductivity wire from cathode-copper without fusion, by depositing the metal in the form of a spiral strip on a cylinder, the strip being subsequently drawn down in the usual way; at present, however, the ordinary methods of wire production are found to be cheaper.
    0
    0
  • The production of butter for export began only in 1894, but grew with great rapidity.
    0
    0
  • The industries of Dessau include the production of sugar, which is the chief manufacture, woollen, linen and cotton goods, carpets, hats, leather, tobacco and musical instruments.
    0
    0
  • The principal industries include tanning, dyeing, tile-making, milling, the production of yeast and there is a large establishment for the manufacture of railway stock.
    0
    0
  • The harsher measures which about that time began to be adopted towards his co-religionists in France are usually assigned as the motive of this step. He now devoted himself during six years to the production of lenses of enormous focal distance, which, mounted on high poles, and connected with the eye-piece by means of a cord, formed what were called "aerial telescopes."
    0
    0
  • Germany, Austria, Hungary, France, Russia and the United States began to rank as producers during the second and third decades; Belgium entered in about 1840; Italy in the 'sixties; Mexico, Canada, Japan and Greece in the 'eighties; while Australia assumed importance in 1888 with a production of about 18,000 tons, although it had contributed small and varying amounts for many preceding decades.
    0
    0
  • Since this date, it has, on the whole, diminished, although large outputs occurred in isolated years, for instance, a production of 40,000 tons in 1893 was followed by 60,000 tons in 1896 and 40,000 in 1897.
    0
    0
  • In 1900 the production was 176,000 tons, and in 1905, 179,000 tons.
    0
    0
  • The United States, which ranked third with a production of 20,000 tons in 1850, maintained this annual yield, until 1870, when it began to increase; the United States now ranks as the chief producer; in 1900 the output was 253,000 tons, and in 1905, 3 1 9,744 tons.
    0
    0
  • Mexico increased its production from 18,000 tons in 1883 to 83,000 tons in 1900 and about 88,000 tons in 1905.
    0
    0
  • The Australian production of 18,000 tons in 1888 was increased to 58,000 tons in 1891, a value maintained until 1893, when a depression set in, only 21,000 tons being produced in 1897; prosperity then returned, and in 1898 the yield was 68,000 tons, and in 1905, 120,000 tons.
    0
    0
  • Canada became important in 1895 with a production of io,000 tons; this increased to 28,654 tons in 190o; and in 1905 the yield was 25,391 tons.
    0
    0
  • Bradford was at one time the centre of the clothing industry in the west of England, and was especially famous for its broadcloths and mixtures, the waters of the Avon being especially favourable to the production of good colours and superior dyes.
    0
    0
  • Maxwell has also given an explanation of the converse effect, namely, the production of longitudinal magnetization by twisting a wire when circularly magnetized by a current passing through it.
    0
    0
  • Further, it is pointed out by Korschelt and Heider that the hinder portion of the gut frequently acts in Arthropoda as an organ of nitrogenous excretion in the absence of any special excretory tubules, and that the production of such caeca from its surface in separate lines of descent does not involve any elaborate or unlikely process of growth.
    0
    0
  • No other country has been able to equal Brazil in the production of coffee, and under better labour conditions the country might compete with the foremost in the production of cane sugar, cotton and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • The principal sugar-producing states are Alagoas, Sergipe, Pernambuco, Bahia and Rio de Janeiro, and the production is between 200,000 and 300,000 tons, the greater part of which is consumed in the country.
    0
    0
  • Much has been said in regard to the production of wheat, and efforts have been made in various places to promote its cultivation.
    0
    0
  • The annual production is about 240,000 tons.
    0
    0
  • The singular adaptability of the Portuguese language to poetical expression, coupled with the imaginative temperament of the people, has led to an unusual production and appreciation of poetry.
    0
    0
  • Neither Pope nor Swift, who perhaps excelled him in particular branches of literary production, approached him in range of genius, or in encyclopaedic versatility.
    0
    0
  • In the same year the production of tea was 1,633,178 lb; of coffee, 24,8591b; of maize, 2,101,470 bushels; of potatoes, 419,946 bushels; and of sweet potatoes, 181,195 bushels.
    0
    0
  • In 1905 the production of wattle bark was 13,620 tons, and the area planted with the tree over 60,000 acres.
    0
    0
  • In this production Cobden advocated the same principles of peace, nonintervention, retrenchment and free trade to which he continued faithful to the last day of his life.
    0
    0
  • The agricultural census taken in 1895 shows the great progress made in agriculture by Hungary, manifested by the increase in arable lands and the growth of the average production.
    0
    0
  • The production of coal and iron trebled during the period 1880-1900, amounting in 1900 to 6,600,000 tons, and 463,000 tons respectively.
    0
    0
  • The value of the mining (except salt) and smelting production in Hungary amounted in 1900 to £4,500,000, while in 1877 the value was only £I,50o,000.
    0
    0
  • The branches of industry which have received special encouragement are those whose products are in universal request, such as cotton and woollen goods, and those which are in the service of natural production.
    0
    0
  • As a masterly production based on extensive investigation, we note the Wesselenyi Ferencz.
    0
    0
  • Theorems and formulae are appropriated wholesale without acknowledgment, and a production which may be described as the organized result of a century of patient toil presents itself to the world as the offspring of a single brain.
    0
    0
  • It has been maintained that this tendency to a severance of the hybrid stock into its components must favour the persistence of a new character of large volume suddenly appearing in a stock, and the observations of Mendel have been held to favour in this way the views of those who hold that the variations upon which natural selection has acted in the production of new species are not small variations but large and " discontinuous."
    0
    0
  • The suggestion requires further experimental testing, for which the case of the parthenogenetic production of a portion of the offspring, in such insects as the bee, offers a valuable opportunity for research.
    0
    0
  • 3 The power of a grating to construct light of nearly definite wavelength is well illustrated by Young's comparison with the production of a musical note by reflection of a sudden sound from a row of palings.
    0
    0
  • The total production (including the Komati and Swaziland fields) to the end of 1908 was 1,097,685 oz.
    0
    0
  • Though several large nuggets have been found (the largest weighing 215 oz.), the total production is not great, the highest output obtained by washing being worth about £300,000 in one year.
    0
    0
  • In the opening decades of the 19th century supplies began to be drawn from Banka; in 1820 this island contributed 1200 tons; the production was increased to 12,000 tons in 1900, when a diminution set in, 9960 tons being the output during 1905.
    0
    0
  • Billiton became of note in 1853 with a production of 40 tons, which increased to 6000 in 1900 and has since declined to about 3000 tons in 1905.
    0
    0
  • Australian deposits were worked in 1872, and in the following year the production was 3000 tons; the maximum outputs were in 1881-1883, averaging 10,000 tons annually; but the supply declined to 2420 tons in 1898 and has since increased to about 5028 tons in 1905.
    0
    0
  • The first stage has for its purpose the production of a fairly pure tinstone; the second the conversion of the oxide into metallic tin; and the third preparing a tin pure enough for commercial purposes.
    0
    0
  • Bishop Stubbs belongs to the front rank of historical scholars both as an author and a critic. Among Englishmen at least he excels all others as a master of every department of the historian's work, from the discovery of materials to the elaboration of wellfounded theories and literary production.
    0
    0
  • His last play was exhibited in 160 B.C., and shortly after its production he went abroad, "when he had not yet completed his twenty-fifth year."
    0
    0
  • The production of the so-called "artificial silk" depends on this action.
    0
    0
  • He is credited with a share in the production of the magnificent series of medals that commemorate the principal events of the age of Louis XIV.
    0
    0
  • Wheat was introduced by the Spaniards immediately after their occupation of Venezuela, and is grown in the elevated districts of Aragua and the western states, but the production does not exceed home consumption.
    0
    0
  • The production since then has"greatly declined.
    0
    0
  • Where a chronic inflammatory process has taken possession of an organ, or, let us say, has been located in periosteum or other fibrous part, there is a great tendency to the production of cicatricial fibrous tissue in mass.
    0
    0
  • This splitting up of the fats previously combined with albumin in the cell by the action of natural ferments - lipases - and the setting free of the fats under the influence of toxins represent the normal and the pathological process in the production of so-called fatty degeneration.
    0
    0
  • A number of interesting experiments, designed to test the relationship between the condition of suppuration and the production of amyloid, have been made of late years.
    0
    0
  • They were unable to verify any direct connexion between its production and the organism of tubercle.
    0
    0
  • A stimulus may act on all sides and induce a general effect without direction of movement, but in the production of movement in a definite direction the stimulus must be applied unilaterally.
    0
    0
  • Thus, while increased pressure in the blood or lymph vessels may be one factor, and increased permeability of the capillary endothelium another, increased osmotic pressure in the tissues and lymph is probably the most important in the production of dropsy.
    0
    0
  • Aniline and similar bases are oxidized and partially nitrated by nitroglycerin, with the production of non-explosive compounds.
    0
    0
  • But in the spring of next year the production of Lagrange-Chancel's libels, entitled the Philippiques, again brought suspicion on him.
    0
    0
  • At any rate he had, at the end of 1777 and the beginning of 1778, been carefully finishing a new tragedy - Irene - for production in the capital.
    0
    0
  • Many other devices have been introduced for facilitating the production of vacua.
    0
    0
  • For the production of high vacua, see Vacuum Tube; Liquid Gases.
    0
    0
  • Calcium cyanamide has assumed importance in agriculture since the discovery of its economic production in the electric furnace, wherein calcium carbide takes up nitrogen from the atmosphere to form the cyanamide with the simultaneous liberation of carbon.
    0
    0
  • Many synthetic processes are known for the production of acridine and its derivatives.
    0
    0
  • The total number of persons engaged in the production of textile fabrics in Burma according to the census of 1901 was 419,007.
    0
    0
  • In 1848 Bontemps was obliged to leave France for political reasons and came to England, where he initiated the optical glass manufacture at Chance's glass works near Birmingham, and this firm ultimately attained a considerable reputation in the production of optical glass, especially of large disks for telescope objectives.
    0
    0
  • The refractive indices of all glasses at present available lie between 1.46 and 1 90, whereas transparent minerals are known having refractive indices lying considerably outside these limits; at least one of these, fluorite (calcium fluoride), is actually used by opticians in the construction of certain lenses, so that probably progress is to be looked for in a considerable widening of the limits of available optical materials; possibly such progress may lie in the direction of the artificial production of large mineral crystals.
    0
    0
  • Manufacture of Optical Glass.-In its earlier stages, the process for the production of optical glass closely resembles that used in the production of any other glass of the highest quality.
    0
    0
  • Constancy of composition of the raw materials and their careful and thorough admixture in constant proportions are therefore essential to the production of the required glasses.
    0
    0
  • The crucibles or pots used for the production of optical glass very closely resemble those used in the manufacture of flint glass for other purposes; they are " covered " and the molten materials are thus protected from the action of the furnace gases by the interposition of a wall of fireclay, but as crucibles for optical glass are used for only one fusion and are then broken up, they are not made so thick and heavy as those used in flint-glass making, since the latter remain in the furnace for many weeks.
    0
    0
  • The furnace used for the production of optical glass is generally constructed to take one crucible only, so that the heat of the furnace may be accurately adjusted to the requirements of the particular glass under treatment.
    0
    0
  • From the large masses great lenses and mirrors may be produced, while the smaller pieces are used for the production of the disks and slabs of moderate size, in which the optical glass of commerce is usually supplied.
    0
    0
  • It will be readily understood from the above account of the process of production that optical glass, relatively to other kinds of glass, is very expensive, the actual price varying from 3s.
    0
    0
  • For the production of coloured sheet-glass, however, the employment of pot furnaces is still almost universal, probably because the quantities of glass required of any one tint are insufficient to employ even a small tank furnace continuously; the exact control of the colour is also more readily attained with the smaller bulk of glass which has to be dealt with in pots.
    0
    0
  • Flashed glass is produced by taking either the first or the last gathering in the production of a cylinder out of a crucible containing the coloured " metal," the other gatherings being taken out of ordinary white sheet-glass.
    0
    0
  • The complicated and indirect process of sheet-glass manufacture has led to numerous inventions aiming at a direct method of production by more or less mechanical means.
    0
    0
  • For the production of thick sheets which are subsequently to be polished the process may thus claim considerable success, but it is not as yet possible to produce satisfactory sheet-glass by such means.
    0
    0
  • The production of coloured glass for " mosaic " windows has become a separate branch of glass-making.
    0
    0
  • The following are typical analyses: The raw materials for the production of plate-glass are chosen.
    0
    0
  • The glass to be used for the production of plate is universally melted in pots or crucibles and not in open tank furnaces.
    0
    0
  • We have in the work of the monk Theophilus, Diversarum artium schedula, and in the probably earlier work of Eraclius, about the iith century, instructions as to the art of glass-making in general, and also as to the production of coloured and enamelled vessels, which these writers speak of as being practised by the Greeks.
    0
    0
  • In the 16th century it had become a trade of great importance, and about 1764 twenty-two furnaces were employed in the production of beads.
    0
    0
  • A more important outcome, however, of Italian influence was the production, in emulation of Venetian glass, of a glass made of refined potash, lime and sand, which was more colourless than the material it was intended to imitate.
    0
    0
  • The royal glass manufactory of La Granja de San Ildefonso was founded about 1725; in the first instance for the manufacture of mirror plates, but subsequently for the production of vases and table-ware in the French style.
    0
    0
  • It decomposes water at ordinary temperature with evolution of hydrogen but without production of silicon hydride, whilst cold hydrochloric acid attacks it vigorously with evolution of hydrogen and spontaneously inflammable silicon hydride.
    0
    0
  • In addition to the manufacture of woollen wares, for which it has long been known, there is now extensive production of vinegar, paraffin, potash and especially beetroot-sugar; while the surrounding district, which was formerly devoted in great part to marketgardening, is now turned almost entirely into beetroot fields.
    0
    0
  • This Greek production resembles the more ancient fourth book of Esdras in some respects.
    0
    0
  • It is a late production; for Ishmaelites are spoken of, the Crusades, and the taking of Jerusalem.
    0
    0
  • The late date of the production is obvious.
    0
    0
  • Production of flowers is uncertain under cultivation and seed is formed very rarely.
    0
    0
  • Jaggery production is entirely in native hands, and the greater part of the amount made is consumed locally; it only occasionally reaches the European market.
    0
    0
  • The details of manufacture of sugar from canes and of sugar from beetroots differ, but there are five operations in the production of the sugar of commerce from either material which are common to both processes.
    0
    0
  • But the great achievement of recent manufacture is the production, without the use of animal charcoal, of a cheaper, but good and wholesome article, in appearance equal to refined sugar for all intents and purposes, except for making preserves of fruits in the old-fashioned way.
    0
    0
  • Tha`alibi, a writer of the 11th century, says that Askar-Mokram had no equal for the quality and quantity of its sugar, " notwithstanding the great production of `Irak, Jorjan and India."
    0
    0
  • Under the bounty system, by which the protectionist countries of Europe stimulated the beet sugar industry by bounties on exports, the production of sugar in bounty-paying countries was encouraged and pushed far beyond the limits it could have reached without state aid.
    0
    0
  • It was agreed " to suppress the direct and indirect bounties which might benefit the production or export of sugar, and not to establish bounties of this kind during the whole duration of the convention," which was to come into force on the 1st of September 1903, and to remain in force five years, and thenceforward from year to year, in case no state denounced it twelve months before the 1st of September in any year.
    0
    0
  • This statement is quite consistent with the continuous production of new segments at the neck of the scolex, for such a process is analogous to the development of the segments in a Chaetopod, which is a perfectly distinct phenomenon from the regeneration of new segments to supply the place of a head or tail-end or some other portion that has been lesioned.
    0
    0
  • This change, which is called eosinophilia, indicates the production of a noxious substance in the blood.
    0
    0
  • The oxygen of the air may also bring about chemical changes which result in the production of soluble substances removable by rain, the insoluble parts being left in a loosened state.
    0
    0
  • In the case of fair average farm crops it has been shown that for the production of one ton of dry matter contained in them from 300 to 500 tons of water has been absorbed and utilized by the plants.
    0
    0
  • That: the action of living organisms is the cause of the production of nitrates is supported by the fact that the change does not occur when the soil is heated nor when it is treated with disinfectants which destroy or check the growth and life of bacteria.
    0
    0
  • The bacteria, which are present in almost all soils, enter the root-hairs of their host plants and ultimately stimulate the production of an excrescent nodule, in which they live.
    0
    0
  • - The influence of different kinds of soil as a factor in the production of disease requires to be considered, in regard not only to the nature and number of the microorganisms they contain, but also to the amount of moisture and air in them and their capacity for heat.
    0
    0
  • Among the most noteworthy workers at the problems involved in the question of the influence of soil in the production of disease we find yen Foder, Pettenkofer, Levy, Fleck, von Naegeli, Schleesing, Muntz and Warrington.
    0
    0
  • When these various unions of dealers and of craftsmen embraced all the trades and branches of production in the town, little or no vitality remained in the old gild merchant; it ceased to have an independent sphere of activity.
    0
    0
  • Tobacco being cultivated over such a large area of the world, under very varying climatic conditions, and by many different races of mankind, the methods employed in its production naturally differ very considerably.
    0
    0
  • As the United States of America produce more tobacco than any other country it will be best to deal generally with conditions there and to refer to marked differences in dealing with production in other countries.
    0
    0
  • The successful production of cigar tobaccos from Cuban and Sumatran seed was a development of the late 19th century.
    0
    0
  • In the arts it is employed in the preparation of varnishes, and as a mordant for the production of colours on calico.
    0
    0
  • The soil of Zeeland consists of a fertile sea clay which especially favours the production of wheat; rye, barley (for malting), beans and peas, and flax are also cultivated.
    0
    0
  • His father, a drysalter and dealer in colours, used sometimes to make experiments in the hope of finding improved processes for the production of his wares, and thus his son early acquired familiarity with practical chemistry.
    0
    0
  • In the latter year the imports amounted to £467,000, and the exports to £451,000; coffee, the mainstay of Yemen trade, shows a serious decline from £302,000 in 1902 to £229,000 in 1904; this is attributable partly to the great increase of production in other countries, but mainly to the insecurity of the trade routes and the exorbitant transit dues levied by the Turkish administration.
    0
    0
  • The present article, as explained under Electrochemistry, treats only of those processes in which electricity is applied to the production of chemical reactions or molecular changes at furnace temperatures.
    0
    0
  • A production so degraded as the early Makuzu faience could not possibly have a lengthy vogue.
    0
    0
  • TokyO was never a centre of ceramic production.
    0
    0
  • Its only notable production of a ceramic character was the work of Miura Kenya (1830-1843), who followed the methods of the celebrated Haritsu (I 6881704) of KiOto in decorating plain or lacquered wood with mosaics of raku faience having colored glazes.
    0
    0
  • A majority of the artists are content to copy old pictures of Buddhas sixteen disciples, the seven gods of happiness, and other similar assemblages of mythical or historical personages, not only because such work offers large opportunity for the use of striking colors and the production of meretricious effects, dear to the eye of the average Western householder and tourist, but also because a complicated design, as compared with a simple one, has the advantage of hiding the technical imperfections of the ware.
    0
    0
  • Their great aim seems to be the production of the exquisite Chinese monochromes known as u-kwo-tien-tsing (blue of the sky after rain) and yueh-peh (clair-detune).
    0
    0