Processions sentence example

processions
  • In the middle ages there was a constant succession of pageants, processions and tournaments.

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  • All work was to be suspended that all might join in the processions.

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  • Day and night, long processions of all classes and ages, headed by priests carrying crosses and banners, perambulated the streets in double file, reciting prayers and drawing the blood from their bodies with leathern thongs.

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  • The king and his courtiers joined in the processions in the garb of penitents, and scourged themselves with ostentation.

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  • The blanched fronds are also sold in large quantities for the processions of Palm Sunday, and after they have received the blessing of the priest they are regarded throughout Spain as certain defences against lightning.

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  • The kalimaukion is also worn by the other clergy in ordinary life, and with their vestments at processions, &c.

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  • The ceremonial clothing of the god on the occasion of festal processions, undertaken in Egypt by the `` master of secret things," may be compared with the well-known Babylonian representations of such promenades.

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  • The Missal of the Roman Church now enjoins incensation before the introit, at the gospel and again at the offertory, and at the elevation, in every high mass; the use of incense also occurs at the exposition of the sacrament, at consecrations of churches and the like, in processions, in the office for the burial of the dead and at the exhibition of relics.

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  • The royal processions arranged in connexion with coronations were of great antiquity, but one of the earliest to be described is that of Henry III.

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  • Among other events which made the streets gay and centred in processions to St Paul's may be specially mentioned the Thanksgiving Day on the 27th of February 1872 for the recovery of the prince of Wales after his dangerous illness; and the rejoicings at the Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887, and the Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

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  • Some of the later specimens have views of cities, battle scenes and processions painted in grisaille.

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  • The Army operates (1) by outdoor meetings and processions; (2) by visiting public-houses, prisons, private houses; (3) by holding meetings in theatres, factories and other unusual buildings; (4) by using the most popular song-tunes and the language of everyday life, &c.; (5) by making every convert a dailywitness for Christ, both in public and private.

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  • The subjects depicted are processions of figures, human and divine (Yasili Kaya, Euyuk, Giaur Kalessi); scenes of sacrifice or adoration, or other cult-practice (Yasili Kaya, Euyuk, Fraktin, Ivriz, and perhaps the figures seated beside tables at Marash Sakchegeuzu, Sinjerli, &c.); of the chase (Arslan Tepe, Sakchegeuzu); but not, as known at present, of battle.

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  • Alms were often given even to non-gildsmen; lights were supported at certain altars; feasts and processions were held periodically; the funerals of brethren were attended; and masses for the dead were provided from the common purse or from special contributions made by the gildsmen.

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  • One type took the form of a candelabrum with a small flat brazier on the top. They were carried in processions and were lifted by cords.

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  • In Umbrian villages on Easter Sunday the images of Jesus and His Mother are carried in rival processions from their respective chapels, and are made to bow when they meet face to face.

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  • Next year the Mass, processions and the images of saints were abolished.

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  • Courtrai celebrated the 600th anniversary of the battle mentioned above by erecting a monument on the field in 1902, and also by fetes and historical processions that continued for a fortnight.

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  • The cremations of great people, which often last several days, are the occasion of public festivities and are celebrated with processions, theatrical shows, illuminations and fireworks.

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  • Processions with pipe and hand-drum, such as that described in I Sam.

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  • The rites performed were such as are found elsewhere - prayer, sacrifice, processions, dances, Brasseur de Bourbourg.

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  • Finally, for the convenience of processions, the nave and chancel aisles were carried round behind the high altar as ambulatories.

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  • According to the actual use of the Roman Catholic Church dalmatic and tunicle are worn by deacon and subdeacon when assisting at High Mass, and at solemn processions and benedictions.

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  • It was used as a promenade, and as a place from which to view the festal processions as they passed towards the Altis.

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  • Raised on three steps, and formed by a single Doric colonnade, open towards the Altis, it afforded a place from which spectators could conveniently view the passage of processions and the sacrifices at the great altar of Zeus.

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  • Church festivals, civic and ecclesiastical processions are almost as animated and picturesque as in Seville itself; and many medieval customs continue to flourish side by side with the most modern features of industrial life, giving to Barcelona a character altogether unique among Spanish cities.

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  • Horse-breeding is most important in Friesland, which produces the well-known black breed of horse commonly used in funeral processions.

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  • A car drawn by oxen seems to have been widely used in the processions of Hera, and the cow was her most frequent sacrifice.

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  • The Mahmal, a kind of covered litter, first originated by Queen Sheger-ed-Dur, is brought into the city in procession, though not with as much pomp as when it leaves with the pilgrims. These and other processions have lost much of their effect since the extinction of the Mamelukes, and the gradual disuse of gorgeous dress for the retainers of the,, officers of state.

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  • Farther on, separated from the forecourt by smaller though still massive pylons, lay a hypostyle hall, so called from its covered colonnades; this hall was used for all kinds of processions.

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  • Among the Greeks and Romans, on the other hand, the chariot had passed out of use in war before historical times, and was retained only for races in the public games, or for processions, without undergoing any alteration apparently, its form continuing to correspond with the description of Homer, though it was lighter in build, having to carry only the charioteer.

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  • Just as the inhabitants of each town honoured their tutelar deity by solemn processions to his temple, so, at the period of the Olympic games, the temple of Zeus at Olympia formed the goal of multitudes from every Hellenic country.

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  • The visitation of the holy places was conducted in processions headed by the Franciscans of the Convent of Zion.

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  • The hawthorn has been regarded as the emblem of hope, and its branches are stated to have been carried by the ancient Greeks in wedding processions, and to have been used by them to deck the altar of Hymen.

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  • The tiara, the pontifical head-dress, is not used strictly speaking in the course of the liturgical functions, but only for processions.

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  • In Travancore a serpent-god is the property of a family, the priests of a temple; the eldest female carries the image at the festal processions and must lead a celibate life (Oldham, 153 seq.).

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  • In the middle of the year he was sent by the princes to invite Kerbogha to settle all differences by a duel; and in 1099 he appears as treasurer of the alms at the siege of Arca (March), and as leader of the supplicatory processions in Jerusalem which preceded the battle of Ascalon (August).

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  • Processions of many thousands of workmen were organized, in Stockholm and in other towns of the kingdom, just before the Riksdag began the discussion on the above-mentioned bill of the government, and when the bill was introduced in the chambers a general and wellorganized strike took place and continued during the three days the debate on the bill lasted.

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  • He first explored the Odeum and the Great Theatre situate in the city itself, and in the latter place had the good fortune to find an inscription which indicated to him in what direction to search for the Artemision; for it stated that processions came to the city from the temple by the Magnesian gate and returned by the Coressian.

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  • Torches and lamps were also carried in, religious processions.

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  • There seems to be no record of candles having been carried in other processions in England since the Reformation.

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  • Because of his fame as a frontier hero, of the circumstance that a part of his home at North Bend, Ohio, had formerly been a log cabin, and of the story that cider, not wine, was served on his table, Harrison was derisively called by his opponents the " log cabin and hard cider " candidate; the term was eagerly accepted by the Whigs, in whose processions miniature log cabins were carried and at whose meetings hard cider was served, and the campaign itself has become known in history as the "log cabin and hard cider campaign."

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  • Harrison's canvass was conspicuous for the immense Whig processions and mass meetings, the numerous " stump " speeches (Harrison himself addressing meetings at Dayton, Chillicothe, Columbus and other places), and the use of campaign songs, of party insignia, and of campaign cries (such as " Tippecanoe and Tyler too "); and in the election he won by an overwhelming majority of 234 electoral votes to 60 cast for Van Buren.

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  • Some of the effigies were carried in funeral processions according to custom, but this was not done later than 1 735.

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  • Mayor's show in London is the most conspicuous survival; the processions connected with royal coronations and with court ceremonies generally; the processions of friendly societies, so popular in Great Britain and America; processions organized as a demonstration of political or other opinions; processions forming part of the ceremonies of public worship. In a narrower sense of "going forth, proceeding," the term is used in the technical language of theology in the phrase "Procession of the Holy Ghost," expressing the relation of the Third Person in the Triune Godhead to the Father and the Son.

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  • Processions have in all peoples and at all times been a natural form of public celebration, as forming an orderly and impressive Greek and way in which a number of persons can take part in Roman Prosome ceremony.

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  • Religious and triumphal processions are abundantly illustrated by ancient monuments, e.g.

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  • Processions played a prominent part in the great festivals of Greece, where they were always religious in character.

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  • Besides these public processions, there were others connected with the primitive worship of the country people, which remained unchanged, and were later to influence the worship of the Christian Church.

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  • There are, indeed, Processions early instances of the use of the word processio by in the Christian writers, but it does not in any case Christian appear to have the modern meaning "procession."

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  • As to public processions, these seem to have come into rapid vogue after the recognition of Christianity as the religion of the empire.

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  • What is certain is that certain festivals involving processions were adopted by the Christian Church from the pagan calendar of Rome.

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  • It is impossible to describe in detail the vast development of processions during the middle ages.

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  • Those taking part in processions are to walk bare-headed (weather permitting), two and two, in decent costume, and with reverent mien; clergy and laity, men and women, are to walk separately.

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  • Violet is the colour prescribed for processions, except on the Feast of Corpus Christi, or on a day when some other colour is prescribed.

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  • At the litaniae majores and minores and other penitential processions, joyful hymns are not allowed, but the litanies are sung, and, if the length of the procession requires, the penitential and gradual psalms.

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  • The observance or variation of the discipline belongs to the Congregation of Rites; in pontifical processions, which are regulated by the masters of the ceremonies (magistri ceremoniarum pontificalium), these points are decided by the chief cardinal deacon.

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  • As to processions within the churches, some difference of opinion having arisen as to the regulating authority, the Congregation of Rites has decided that the bishop must ask, though not necessarily follow, the advice of the chapter in their regulation.

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  • The stern simplicity of Calvinism, indeed, would not tolerate religious processions of any kind, and from the "Reformed" Churches they vanished altogether.

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  • The more conservative temper of the Anglican and Lutheran communions, however, suffered the retention of such processions as did not conflict with the reformed doctrines, though even in these Churches they met with opposition and tended after a while to fall into disuse.

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  • At present funeral processions survive in general only in the country districts; the processional cross or crucifix is still carried.

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  • Among the processions that survived the Reformation in the English Church was that of the sovereign and the Knights of the Garter on St George's day.

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  • Processions, with singing of the litany or of hymns, appear also to have been always usual on such occasions as the consecration of churches and churchyards and the solemn reception of a visiting bishop. Under the influence of the Catholic revival, associated with the Oxford Tractarians, processions have become increasingly popular in the English Church, pre-Reformation usages having in some churches been revived without any legal sanction.

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  • Before this the so-called cappa choralis, a black, bell-shaped, hooded vestment with no liturgical significance, had been worn by the secular and regular clergy at choir services, processions, &c. This was in its origin identical with the chasuble, and if, as Father Braun seems to prove, the cope developed out of this, cope and chasuble have a common source.'

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  • Here was the god's most famous shrine, and games were celebrated in his honour every five years, accompanied by solemn processions.

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  • This was the route followed on the occasion of triumphal processions.

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  • It was found also that many of the poorer rectors and parish priests, and a great many chaplains and curates, were in secret association with the Lollards, so much so that in many places processions were never made and worship on saints' days was abandoned.

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  • They have also laid bare the site of the "Gate of Ishtar" on the east side of the mound and the little temple of Nin-Makh (Beltis) beyond it, as well as the raised road for solemn processions (A-ibur-sabu) which led from the Gate of Ishtar to E-Saggila and skirted the east side of the palace.

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  • Phallic and other obscene emblems were carried abroad in processions in Attica both by women and men.

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  • In social life the religious zeal favored by the Inquisition led to such things as those public processions of flagellants which Went On in Spain till the end of the 18th century.

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  • It is now generally agreed that the scenes represented are religious processions.

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  • In England a parish-ale or feast was always held after the perambulation, which assured its popularity, and in Henry VIII.'s reign the occasion had become an excuse for so much revelry that it attracted the condemnation of a preacher who declared "these solemne and accustomable processions and supplications be nowe growen into a right foule and detestable abuse."

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  • This feature originated in the 5th century, when Mamercus, bishop of Vienna, instituted special prayers and fasting and processions on these days.

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  • It was worn by a senior clergyman during special religious processions.

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  • Prayer flags fluttering on the tallest mountain passes, innumerable monasteries and temples with frequent processions of devout pilgrims.

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  • In the time of Edward III the royal family watched processions in Cheapside from a balcony on the tower of St Mary's.

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  • During the 19th century there were at least 2 groups who organized processions at this season.

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  • It is often said that ghostly processions and spectral monks dressed in white habits haunt the track.

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  • These totally superfluous police horsemen were never in the processions in earlier years.

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  • Other decrees denounced the abuse of indulgences, of festivals of saints, and of processions and suggested reforms; others again enjoined the closing of shops on Sunday during divine service, the issue of service-books with parallel translations in the vernacular, and recommended the abolition of all monastic orders except that of St Benedict, the rules of which were to be brought into harmony with modern ideas; nuns were to be forbidden to take the vows before the age of 40.

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  • Mutinies occurred, it is true, during the next few weeks in Kronstadt and Sevastopol, and in December there was streetfighting for several days in Moscow, but such serious disorders were speedily suppressed, and thereafter the revolutionary manifestations were confined to mass meetings, processions with red flags, attempts on the lives of officials and policemen, robberies under arms and agrarian disturbances.

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  • The walls of the nave are adorned with mosaics of the 6th century; the scenes from the New Testament above the windows date from the time of Theodoric, while the somewhat stiff processions below, of virgins on one side and of saints on the other, are substitutions of the latter half of the 6th century for representations which probably contained some allusion to Arianism or episodes in the life of Theodoric (so Ricci).

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  • Especially in France, but also in England and in other parts of Europe, the festival of St Crispin was for centuries the occasion of solemn processions and merry-making, in which gilds of shoemakers took the chief part.

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  • No contemporary, unaided by personal knowledge, could be expected to trust in Wagner's purity of ideal on the strength of Tannhauser, which actually achieved popularity by such coarse methods of climax as the revivalistic end of the overture, by such maudlin pathos as 0 du mein holder Abendstern, and by the amiably childish grand-opera skill with which half the action is achieved by processions and a considerable fraction of the music is represented by fanfares.

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  • Besides the strictly liturgical vestments there are also numerous articles of costume worn at choir services, in processions, or on ceremonial occasions in everyday life, which have no sacral character; such are the almuce, the cappa and mozzetta (see Cope), the rochet (q.v.), the pileolus, a skullcap, worn also sometimes under mitre and tiara.

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  • Near the site are the rock reliefs of Yasili Kaya in two hypaethral galleries, showing, in the one, two processions composed of over sixty figures meeting at the head of the gallery; in the other, isolated groups of figures, fifteen in number (see for detailed description Murray's Guide to Asia Minor, 18 95, pp. 23 ff.).

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  • For the processions that formed part of the ritual of the eucharist, those of the introit, the gospel and the oblation, the earliest records date from the 6th century and even later (see Duchesne, Origines, 2nd ed., pp. 77, 1 54, 181; 78, 194), but they evidently were established at a much earlier date.

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  • The Reformation abolished in all Protestant countries those processions associated with the doctrine of transubstantiation (Corpus Christi); "the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper," according to the 28th Article of Religion of the Church of England "was not by Christ's ordinance reserved, carried about, lifted up, or worshipped."

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  • With "the profane, ungodly, presumptuous multitude" (to quote Baxter's Saint's Rest, 16 5 o, pp. 344, 345), however, these "processions and perambulations" appear to have been very popular, though "only the traditions of their fathers."

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  • York 's original city waits headed spectacular Sheriffs ' processions, resplendent in scarlet liveries and silver badges.

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  • Acting as a bedcover is a Mortlake tapestry sumpter cloth, which was woven for Ralph Montagu 's ambassadorial processions to Versailles.

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  • These traditional masks continue to be used today in ceremonial events such as funerals, processions, weddings and religious rituals.

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  • The use of the word is, however, late, the vigiliae (pernoctationes, 7ravvvXiSes) having originally been the services, consisting of prayers, hymns, processions and sometimes the eucharist, celebrated on the preceding night in preparation for the feast.

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  • Hyndman and others in Socialist meetings and processions in London to demand work for the unemployed.

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  • It is worn, too, on the vigils of fasts, Ember Days and days of intercession, on the Feast of Holy Innocents (if on a week-day), at litanies, penitential processions, and at other than solemn benedictions and consecrations.

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  • Between this outlet and the Dipylon were found a boundary-stone, inscribed Epos Kepaµ€LKou, which remains in its place, and the foundations of a large rectangular building, possibly the Pompeium, which may have been a robing-room for the processions which passed this way.

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  • The place-name "Gospel Oak," which occurs in London and elsewhere, is a relic of these rogation processions, the gospel of the day being read at the foot of the finest oak the parish boasted.

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  • After the Reformation the processions gradually ceased to be ecclesiastical in England, and are now practically secularized into the perambulation of the parish boundaries on or about Ascension Day.

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  • Hitherto the chasuble had been worn indifferently by all ministers at the eucharist, even by the acolytes; it had been worn also at processions and other non-liturgical functions; it was now exalted into the mass vestment par excellence, worn by the celebrant only, or by his immediate assistants (deacon and subdeacon) only on very special occasions.

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  • White is also the colour proper to sacramental processions, and generally to all devotions connected with the exposition of the Blessed Sacrament.

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  • Violet vestments are also worn on days of intercession, at votive masses of the Passion, at certain other masses of a pronouncedly intercessory and penitential character, at intercessory processions, at the blessing of candles on Candlemas Day, and at the blessing of the baptismal water.

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  • As this increases from zero, the two processions which correspond to the two halves of the aperture begin to overlap, and the overlapping gradually increases until there is almost complete superposition.

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  • If the retardation be too little, the overlapping of the processions is incomplete, so that besides the procession of half period there are residues of the original processions of full period.

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