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privative

privative

privative Sentence Examples

  • aemete, from Teutonic a, privative, and maitan, cut or bite off, i.e.

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  • avw,uaXla, unevenness, derived from a y -, privative, and ouaXbs, even), a deviation from the common rule.

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  • a-, privative, and ywvia, an angle), the term given to the imaginary lines on the earth's surface connecting points at which the magnetic needle points to the geographical north and south.

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  • a-, privative, and KaTaXap43 u'av, to seize), a term used in Scepticism to denote incomprehensibility.

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  • &TOµos, from a-, privative, and TEµvEw, to cut) until the middle of the 19th century, when a differentiation was established.

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  • a-, privative, and O€6, God), literally a system of belief which denies the existence of God.

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  • it-, privative, and g pyov, work; hence meaning "inert"), a gaseous constituent of atmospheric air.

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  • a-, privative, and 06Aj, right of seizure), a place of refuge.

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  • Plato proceeds to explain by his principle of difference both privative and negative predicates, and also the possibility of false predication.

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  • a-, privative, xpcopa, colour), in optics,, the property of transmitting white light, without decomposing it into the colours of the spectrum; "achromatic lenses" are lenses which possess this property.

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  • a-, privative, ari^y�a, a point).

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  • Her name, the "Unalterable" (a- privative, and Tpbirav, to turn), indicates her function, that of rendering the decisions of her sisters irreversible or immutable.

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  • Other suggested derivations are: (intensive) and pa0s, breast, " full-breasted "; a (privative) and � to-o-w, touch, " not touching men "; maza, a Circassian word said to signify " moon," has suggested their connexion with the worship of a moongoddess, perhaps the Asiatic representative of Artemis.

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  • av-, privative, and ai�a, blood), literally "want of blood," a word used as a generic term for various forms of disease characterized by a defective constitution of the blood.

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  • privative jurisdiction to the Court of Session.

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  • privative clause inserted into the Migration Act 1958 in 2001.

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  • ACEPHALI (from a-, privative, and Kal)aXii, head), a term applied to several sects as having no head or leader; and in particular to a strict monophysite sect that separated itself, in the end of the 5th century, from the rule of the patriarch of Alexandria (Peter Mongus), and remained "without king or bishop" till they were reconciled by Mark I.

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  • aemete, from Teutonic a, privative, and maitan, cut or bite off, i.e.

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  • avw,uaXla, unevenness, derived from a y -, privative, and ouaXbs, even), a deviation from the common rule.

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    0
  • a-, privative, and ywvia, an angle), the term given to the imaginary lines on the earth's surface connecting points at which the magnetic needle points to the geographical north and south.

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  • a-, privative, and KaTaXap43 u'av, to seize), a term used in Scepticism to denote incomprehensibility.

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    0
  • &TOµos, from a-, privative, and TEµvEw, to cut) until the middle of the 19th century, when a differentiation was established.

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  • a-, privative, and O€6, God), literally a system of belief which denies the existence of God.

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  • AMORPHISM (from a, privative, and pop0, form), a term used in chemistry and mineralogy to denote the absence of regular or crystalline structure in a body; the adjective "amorphous," formless or of irregular shape, being also used technically in biology, &c.

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  • it-, privative, and g pyov, work; hence meaning "inert"), a gaseous constituent of atmospheric air.

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  • a-, privative, and 06Aj, right of seizure), a place of refuge.

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  • Plato proceeds to explain by his principle of difference both privative and negative predicates, and also the possibility of false predication.

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  • a-, privative, xpcopa, colour), in optics,, the property of transmitting white light, without decomposing it into the colours of the spectrum; "achromatic lenses" are lenses which possess this property.

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  • A system fulfilling this condition and free from spherical aberration is called " aplanatic " (Greek a-, privative, irXavrl, a wandering).

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  • a-, privative, ari^y�a, a point).

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  • Her name, the "Unalterable" (a- privative, and Tpbirav, to turn), indicates her function, that of rendering the decisions of her sisters irreversible or immutable.

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  • Other suggested derivations are: (intensive) and pa0s, breast, " full-breasted "; a (privative) and � to-o-w, touch, " not touching men "; maza, a Circassian word said to signify " moon," has suggested their connexion with the worship of a moongoddess, perhaps the Asiatic representative of Artemis.

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  • av-, privative, and ai�a, blood), literally "want of blood," a word used as a generic term for various forms of disease characterized by a defective constitution of the blood.

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