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prisons

prisons Sentence Examples

  • Since the abolition of flogging in the services, the use of the cat is now restricted to certain classes of offenders in military prisons (Army Act 1881, § 133).

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  • Prisons.The prisons of France, some of them attached to the ministry of the interior, are complex in their classification.

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  • Cellular imprisonment was, however, partially adopted for persons awaiting trial., Central prisons, in which prisoners lived and worked in association, had been in existence from the commencement of the i9th century.

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  • These prisons received all sentenced to short terms of imprisonment, the long-term convicts going to the bagnes (the great convict prisons at the arsenals of Rochefort, Brest and Toulon), while in 1851 transportation to penal colonies was adopted.

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  • There were, however, but few prisons in France adapted for the cellular system, and the process of reconstruction has been slow, In 1898 the old Paris prisons of Grande-Roquette, Saint-Plagie and Mazas were demolished, and to replace them a large prison with 1500 cells was erected at Fresnes-ls-Rungis.

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  • There are also reformatory establishments for juvenile offenders, and ddpDts de stireU for prisoners who are travelling, at places where there are no other prisons.

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  • A royal decree, dated February 1891, established three classes of prisons: judiciary prisons, for persons awaiting examination or persons sentenced to arrest, detention or seclusion for less than six months; penitentiaries of various kinds (ergastoli, case di reclusione, detenzione or custodia), for criminals condemned to long terms of imprisonment; and reformatories, for criminals under age and vagabonds.

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  • Certain types of dangerous individuals are relegated after serving a sentence in the ordinary convict prisons, and by administrative, not by judicial process, to special penal colonies known as domicilii coatti or forced residences.

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  • Notwithstanding the construction of new prisons and the transformation of old ones, the number of cells for solitary confinement is still insufficient for a complete application of the penal system established by the code of 1890, and the moral effect of the association of the prisoners is not good, though the system of solitary confinement as practised in Italy is little better.

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  • The crimes of his vicar Ezzelino, who laid whole provinces waste and murdered men by thousands in his Paduan prisons, increased the horror with which he was regarded.

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  • c. r 1 made special provision for convicted clerks who broke out of the prisons of the ordinary.

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  • They were, in those respects, far superior to the civil prisons of that day.

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  • All over Russia there is a network of such artels - in the cities, in the forests, on the banks of the rivers, on journeys and even in the prisons.

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  • Southwark was further noted for its inns and its prisons.

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  • Charles Dickens had an early acquaintance with Southwark, as his father was confined in the Marshalsea, one of several prisons here.

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  • In any case exile, and death in the prisons of Cayenne, now awaited the timid champions of law and order; while parliamentary rule sustained a shock from which it never recovered.

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  • His other works are mainly accounts of his travels: Sketches of the Natural, Political and Civil State of Switzerland (London, 1779), Account of the Russian Discoveries between Asia and America (London, 1780), Account of Prisons and Hospitals in Russia, Sweden and Denmark (London, 1781), Travels into Poland, Russia, Sweden and Denmark (London, 1784), Travels in Switzerland (London, 1789), Letter on Secret Tribunals of Westphalia (London, 1796), Historical Tour in Monmouthshire (London, 1801).

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  • Lefranc), are interesting and characteristic, consisting of verse-epistles, comedies (pieces in dramatic form on the death of Francis I., &c.), Les Prisons, a long allegorical poem of amorous-religious-historical tenor; some miscellaneous verse chiefly in dizains, and a later and remarkable piece, Le Navire, expressing her despair at her brother's death.

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  • Towards the close of his life he confined his ministry to charitable institutions, hospitals and prisons, where his sympathetic discourses and conciliatory manners were always effective.

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  • The service of the magistrates was at first in the hands of freemen; but the lower offices, as of couriers, servants of the law courts, of prisons and of temples, were afterwards filled by slaves.

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  • Hadrian took from masters the power of life and death and abolished the subterranean prisons.

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  • He preached in all the churches that were open to him, spoke in many religious societies, visited Newgate and the Oxford prisons.

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  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

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  • Law courts, government offices, prisons and a substantial bridge were built, good roads made, and a large staff of sanitary inspectors appointed.

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  • The Commons had ordered to be printed, among other papers, a report of the inspectors of prisons on Newgate, which stated that an obscene book, published by Stockdale, was given to the prisoners to read.

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  • Reaching Blackheath on the 12th, the insurgents burnt the prisons in Southwark and pillaged the archbishop's palace at Lambeth, while another body of rebels from Essex encamped at Mile End.

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  • The drawbridge of London Bridge having been lowered by treachery, Tyler and his followers crossed the Thames; and being joined by thousands of London apprentices, artisans and criminals, they sacked and burnt John of Gaunt's splendid palace of the Savoy, the official residence of the treasurer, Sir Robert Hales, and the prisons of Newgate and the Fleet.

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  • For many years the castles and prisons of Haverfordwest and Pembroke were filled to overflowing with French prisoners of war.

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  • The name of John Pringle (1707-1782) should also be mentioned as one of the first to study epidemics of fevers occurring in prisons and camps.

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  • The prisons within the metropolis are Brixton, Holloway, Pentonville, Wandsworth and Wormwood Scrubbs.

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  • The mob and some of the soldiers became menacing in their attitude towards the prisoners, so that it was deemed advisable to convey them to one or other of the Berlin prisons.

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  • The Army operates (1) by outdoor meetings and processions; (2) by visiting public-houses, prisons, private houses; (3) by holding meetings in theatres, factories and other unusual buildings; (4) by using the most popular song-tunes and the language of everyday life, &c.; (5) by making every convert a dailywitness for Christ, both in public and private.

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  • In this capacity he exhibited an almost feverish activity; he perpetually appeared at the bar of the assembly on behalf of the commune; he announced the massacres of September in the prisons in terms of apology and praise; and he sent off the famous circular of the 3rd of September to the provinces, recommending them to do likewise.

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  • The Nicandro was denounced to the Inquisition, and it is not impossible that Olivares might have ended in the prisons of the Holy Office, or on the scaffold, if he had not died on the 22nd of July 1645.

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  • As member of the insurrectionary Commune of the 10th of August 1792, he was delegated to visit the prisons, with full power to arrest suspects.

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  • After bold and repeated overtures for an exchange of prisoners - an important matter, both because the American frigates had no place in which to - stow away their prisoners, and because of the maltreatment _ of American captives in such prisons as Dartmoor - exchanges began at the end of March 1779, although there were annoying delays, and immediately after November 1781 there was a long break in the agreement; and the Americans discharged from English prisons were constantly in need of money.

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  • It keeps prisons.

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  • Under the present system, therefore, there is a biennial election (in even-numbered years) of a governor, a lieutenant-governor, a secretary of state, a state comptroller, a state treasurer, an attorney-general and a state engineer and surveyor; and the governor appoints, subject to the approval of the Senate, a superintendent of public works, a superintendent of state prisons, a superintendent of insurance, a superintendent of banks, a commissioner of excise, a commissioner of agriculture, a forest, fish and game commissioner, a commissioner of health, a commissioner of labour, a state architect, a state historian, a state librarian, two public service commissions, a civil service commission, a board of charities, a commission of prisons, a commission in lunacy, three tax commissioners and several other boards and commissions.

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  • Prisons, Poor Law, Charities, &c. - Penal institutions for sane adults, except reformatories for women, are under the general supervision of a state commission of prisons; hospitals for the insane are under the general supervision of a state commission in lunacy; and all other charitable and penal institutions, maintained wholly or in part by the state, or by any county, city or town within the state, are under the general supervision of a state board of charities.

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  • Each of these is under the immediate control of a superintendent appointed by the superintendent of state prisons.

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  • The state commission of prisons consists of seven members appointed by the governor with the consent of the Senate for a term of four years, and the institutions under its supervision in 1910 were the Sing Sing State Prison,' at Ossining, the Auburn State Prison at Auburn, the Clinton State Prison at Dannemora, the New York State Reformatory at Elmira, the Eastern New York Reformatory at Napanoch, five county penitentiaries, and all other institutions for the detention of sane adults charged with or convicted of crime, or retained as witnesses or debtors.

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  • The state prisons are under a superintendent of state prisons, appointed by the governor, with the consent of the Senate, for five years; and the state reformatories are managed by a board of seven managers similarly appointed for seven years.

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  • In the state reformatory at Elmira (which, like that at Napanoch, is for men between sixteen and thirty years of age who have been convicted of a state prison offence for the first time only), the plan of committing adult felons on an indeterminate sentence to be determined by their behaviour was first tested in America in 1877, and it has proved so satisfactory that it has been in part adopted for the state prisons.

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  • In order to minimize competition between prison labour and free labour, articles manufactured in the state prisons, the reformatories and the penitentiaries, are sold only to the institutions and departments of the state and its political divisions.

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  • The last gained him the friendship of the Marchesa di Barolo, the reformer of the Turin prisons, and in 1834 he accepted from her a yearly pension of 1200 francs.

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  • The Whig ministry had introduced a bill suspending the Constitution of Jamaica because the Assembly in that colony had refused to adopt the Prisons Act passed by the Imperial Legislature.

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  • No tribunal was formed, and the massacres in the prisons were the inevitable result.

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  • During the September massacres he wrote in his paper that the prisons were the centre of an anti-national conspiracy and that the people exercised a just vengeance on the guilty.

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  • the names, functions and powers of the houses of the legislature, the chief executive officials, and the courts of justice, with provisions regulating the electoral franchise; Provisions creating, or directing the creation of, a system of local government for cities and rural areas; Miscellaneous provisions relating to law and administration, including the militia, revenue and taxation, state prisons and hospitals, agriculture, banking and other corporations, railways, labor questions; Provisions for the amendment of the constitution; A schedule prescribing the method of submitting the draft constitution to the vote of the people, with temporary provisions regulating the mode of tranfition from the old constitutional arrang~ments to the new ones.

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  • Administrative law, including the regulation of urban and rural local government, state and local taxation and finance, education, public works, the liquor traffic, vaccination, adulteration, charities, asylums, prisons, the inspection of mines and factories, general laws relating to corporations, railways, labor questions.

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  • The latter have the management of county buildings, such as courthouses ar,d prisons, have power to lay out new main highways, to grant licences, and to apportion among the towns and cities the taxation necessary to meet county expenses.

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  • They were employed by the police in dealing with prostitutes, and on their authority lunatics were shut up in hospitals and sometimes in prisons.

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  • Lettres de cachet were abolished by the Constituent Assembly, but Napoleon reestablished their equivalent by a political measure in the decree of the 9th of March 1801 on the state prisons.

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  • This was one of the acts brought up against him by the senatus-consulte of the 3rd of April 1814, which pronounced his fall "considering that he has violated the constitutional laws by the decrees on the state prisons."

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  • See Honore Mirabeau, Les Lettres de cachet et des prisons d'etat (Hamburg, 1782), written in the dungeon at Vincennes into which his father had thrown him by a lettre de cachet, one of the ablest and most eloquent of his works, which had an immense circulation and was translated into English with a dedication to the duke of Norfolk in 1788; Frantz Funck-Brentano, Les Lettres de cachet d Paris (Paris, 1904); and Andre Chassaigne, Les Lettres de cachet sous l'ancien regime (Paris, 1903).

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  • P. Prisons.

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  • The reactionaries in power put off their promised reforms so persistently as to anger even Metternich; nor did the replacement of Bernetti by Lambruschini in 1836 mend matters; for the new cardinal secretary of state objected even to railways and illuminating gas, and was liberal chiefly in his employment of spies and of prisons.

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  • The study of the physical characteristics of criminals is discussed at great length by Lombroso, L` Uomo delinguente (1897); Ferri, L'Omicidio (1895); von Baer, Der Verbrecher (1893); Laurent, Les Habitues des prisons (1890); and Havelock Ellis, The Criminal (1901).

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  • Besides the prisons, which include one built on the cellular principle at Breda, the state supports three penal workhouses for drunkards and beggars.

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  • Missions are also held in prisons and workhouses, at the invitation of the authorities.

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  • The chief prisons are at Louvain, Ghent and St Gilles (Brussels), and the last named serves as a house of detention.

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  • Moreover, he built a number of forts which the people thought were intended for prisons; he filled the land with riotous and overbearing Swabians; he kept in prison Magnus, the heir to the duchy; and is said to have spoken of the Saxons in a tone of great contempt.

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  • The bishops from their prisons continued to govern the dioceses; for this purpose they appointed representatives, to whom they transferred their rights as Qrdinary and secretly authorized priests to celebrate services and to perform the other duties of an incumbent.

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  • In 1814 he wrote a number of articles, containing an exposition of utilitarianism, for the supplement to the fifth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the most important being those on "Jurisprudence," "Prisons" and "Government."

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  • Later on the reforming activity was extended to prisons, public health, and education, and has attained very satisfactory results.

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  • For a few months after the dissolution of the Neapolitan parliament the government abstained from persecution, but with the crushing of the Sicilian revolution its hands The were free; and when the commission on the affair of Neapolitan prisons, t h e 15th of May had completed its labours the state trials and arrests began.

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  • The progress made can only be realized by considering what prisons once were.

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  • The shocking picture drawn by John Howard of the state of prisons at the latter end of the 18th century will last for all time.

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  • At this time prisons were primarily places of detention, not of punishment, peopled by accused persons, still innocent in the eyes of the law, and debtors guilty only of breaches of the financial rules of a commercial country, framed chiefly in the interest of the creditor.

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  • The prisons were always full.

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  • The energy with which it was undertaken was the more remarkable because elsewhere throughout the United Kingdom the prisons, with few exceptions, remained deplorably bad.

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  • prisons were relapsing into their former horrid state of privation, filthiness, severity and neglect."

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  • They perambulated the country inspecting the prisons; they issued lengthy interrogatories to prison officials; they published periodical reports giving the result of their inquiries, with their views on the true principles of prison management, and much sound advice, accompanied by elaborate plans on the subject of prison construction.

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  • The importance of these acts cannot be over-estimated as supplying a legal standard of efficiency by which all prisons could be measured.

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  • One great drawback to general reform was that a large number of small prisons lay beyond the reach of the law.

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  • In 18 3 a select committee of the House of Commons went into the whole subject of secondary punishment and reported that, as the difficulties in the way of an effective classification of prisoners were insurmountable, they were strongly in favour of the confinement of prisoners in separate cells, recommending that the whole of the prisons should be altered accordingly and the expense borne by the public exchequer.

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  • The best American prisons had recently been visited by two eminent Frenchmen, J.

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  • He saw, however, great difficulties in making this the universal rule, chief among which was the enormous expense of providing suitable prisons.

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  • In 1830 Lord John Russell had given it as his opinion that cellular separation was desirable in all prisons.

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  • Even now the executive did not insist upon the construction of prisons on a new plan.

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  • Within half a dozen years no fewer than fifty-four new prisons were built on the Pentonville plan, which now began to serve generally as a "model" for imitation, not in England alone, but all over the world.

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  • The "cell" scheme of individual separation holds the ground, and countries which can afford the outlay have built or are building cellular prisons.

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  • Germany has embarked on penitentiary reforms with the provision of several new prisons; it is the same with the United States, Austria, Holland, Spain, Portugal, Denmark, Norway, Sweden.

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  • Pentonville was available for the first phase; Millbank was also pressed into the service, and accommodation was hired in some of the best provincial prisons, as at Wakefield and Leicester.

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  • Although the hulks at home had been condemned, convict establishments in which these floating prisons still formed the principal part were organized at Bermuda and Gibraltar.

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  • The chief efforts of the authorities were directed to the formation of public works prisons at home, and here the most satisfactory results were soon obtained.

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  • In many jurisdictions however the silent system, or that of associated labour in silence, was still preferred; and there might be prisons within a short distance of each other at which two entirely different systems of discipline were in force.

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  • He urged that all existing plans were inefficacious, and he advocated a new scheme by which the labour of all prisoners should be applied to agriculture in district prisons.

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  • It had exercised some supervision through its inspectors, had forbidden cells to be used until duly certified as fit, and had threatened to withhold exchequer contributions from prisons of which unfavourable reports were received.

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  • It began to be understood, moreover, that the prisons under local jurisdictions were not always conveniently and economically situated.

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  • These commissioners had power to consolidate by closing superfluous prisons, to establish one system of discipline, and generally by watchful supervision, aided by the experience of specialists, to maintain that muchdesired uniformity which had been so long and unsuccessfully sought.

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  • At the same time the co-operation of the local magistrates was invited so far as advice and assistance were concerned; but all real power and control has passed from their hands into that of the commissioners of prisons.

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  • The first was far less than the work free men did for a livelihood, the second larger, the third excessive, so that convicts often left prisons with thirty, forty, even eighty pounds in their pockets.

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  • After a short detention in a police cell, an offender, unless disposed of summarily, passes into one of His Majesty's prisons, there to await his trial at sessions or assizes.

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  • If this be "imprisonment," so called to distinguish it from "penal servitude," although both mean deprivation of liberty and are closely akin, it is undergone in one of the "local" prisons - the prisons till 1878 under local jurisdiction, but now entirely controlled by the state through the home secretary and the commissioners of prisons.

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  • A system of progressive stages based on the mark system has been adopted in the local prisons, and the prisoner's progress through each depends on his own industry and good conduct.

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  • His physical welfare is watched over by competent medical men; close attention is paid to the sanitary condition of prisons; strict rules govern the size of cells, with their lighting, warming and ventilation.

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  • In a word, as regards discipline, labour, treatment, exactly the same system obtains in the "local" prisons throughout the United Kingdom.

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  • The prisoner becomes a convict and undergoes his penalty in one or more of the convict prisons.

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  • The question will arise some day whether it is really necessary to maintain fifty-six local prisons, with all their elaborate paraphernalia, their imposing buildings and expensive staff, to maintain discipline in daily life and insist upon the proper observance of customs and usages, many of them of purely modern invention.

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  • It was also proposed to give four lectures or concerts a year in convict prisons.

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  • - The regime of cellular confinement has not been universally adopted; only six prisons are built on that principle and no more than 15% of the whole number of prisoners can be subjected to the system.

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  • This country has spared neither pains nor money in carrying out penal processes, and the Belgian prisons are examples of the cellular system prolonged to the utmost limits of human endurance.

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  • The cellular system has been adopted in all British colonies with various modifications, and prisons built on modern principles are to be found in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Cape of Good Hope.

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  • Two new prisons on the latest model have been erected at Copenhagen, ene for males and the other for females.

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  • Bavaria has four cellular prisons, the chief being at Munich and Nuremberg, but the collective system also obtains.

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  • Two new cellular prisons, Luttringhausen and Saarbruck, have recently been added.

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  • There are prisons for females at Heilbronn, and for males at Ludwigsburg and Stuttgart; in Wurttemberg itself the regime is collective.

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  • - There are three or more cellular prisons at Lisbon, Coimbra and Santarem, and the system of strict separation when first adopted in 1884 was expected both to amend and deter.

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  • Sweden, which adopted the cellular system in 1842, has now cells sufficient for prisoners sentenced to two years and less., There are three principal central prisons, one at Langholm near Stockholm, a second at Malmo and a third at Mya Varfet near Gothenburg.

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  • The administration of prisons rests mainly with the various state authorities, and there is no federal or general system which would introduce uniformity of treatment.

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  • The state prisons receive by far the largest proportion of the criminal population, more than half the general total being imprisoned therein.

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  • The newest prisons are generally lighter, more roomy, better ventilated and on the whole more comfortable than even the best British prisons.

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  • England for many years past, in adopting the principle of Public Works Prisons after a certain short period spent in separation, has pronounced in favour of open-air employment in association.

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  • The indoor manufactures followed in British prisons are not so varied as the foregoing and have been limited by the protests and objections raised by free or outside labour against alleged unfair competition.

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  • The total annual value of the labour applied in English prisons has varied.

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  • In1896-1897the total accruing from manufactures, farm operations and the ordinary service of the prison was £213,812, the prison population in local and convict prisons being 17,614; in1903-1904the total amounted to £244,518, the prison population on the 31st of March 1904 being 21,117.

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  • John Howard, State of Prisons in England and Wales (1784); Cesare Lombroso, L' Uomo delinquente, &c. (1899) Beaumont and A.

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  • Du Cane, Punishment and Prevention of Crime (1885); Braco, Estudos penitenciarios e criminaes (Lisbon, 1888); Garofalo, Studio sul delitto, sulle sui cause e sui mezzi di repressione (1890); Adolphe Guillot, Les Prisons de Paris (1890); Tallack, Preventive and Penological Principles (1896); Salillas, Vida penal en Espana (Madrid).

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  • There are state prisons with convicts working under the public account system, at San Quentin, Maria county, and Folsom, Sacramento county.

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  • Of these, the Tour de Constance, built by Louis IX., is the most interesting; it commands the northwestern angle of the ramparts, and contains two circular, vaulted chambers, used as prisons for Protestants after the revocation of the edict of Nantes.

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  • After confinement in various English prisons, he was transported in 1867 to Bunbury, Western Australia.

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  • His life was one of concealment and disguises; a price was put on his head; but he was fearless and indefatigable in carrying on his propaganda and in ministering to the scattered Catholics, even in their prisons.

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  • A year later he obtained from the government of July a mission to examine prisons and penitentiaries in America, and proceeded thither with his life-long friend Gustave de Beaumont.

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  • There were no police, sheriffs or public prisons.

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  • The policy of indeterminate sentence and paroles was adopted in 1897 in the two prisons and the reformatory.

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  • In Jamaica the planters, who had sullenly accepted the abolition of slavery, were irritated by the passage of an act of parliament intended to remedy some grave abuses in the management of the prisons of the island.

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  • Brooks, however, refused these conditions, saying that he could not reach the place designated "without running the gauntlet of mobs and assassins, prisons and penitentiaries, bailiffs and constables."

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  • The humiliation of the king and queen after their capture at Varennes; the compulsory acceptance of the constitution; the plain incompetence of the new Legislative Assembly; the growing violence of the Parisian mob, and the ascendency of the Jacobins at the Common Hall; the fierce day of the 20th of June (1792), when the mob flooded the Tuileries, and the bloodier day of the 10th of August, when the Swiss guard was massacred and the royal family flung into prison; the murders in the prisons in September; the trial and execution of the king in January (1793); the proscription of the Girondins in June, the execution of the queen in October - if we realize the impression likely to be made upon the sober and homely English imagination by such a heightening of horror by horror, we may easily understand how people came to listen to Burke's voice as the voice of inspiration, and to look on his burning anger as the holy fervour of a prophet of the Lord.

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  • The principal secular buildings are the town-hall, the county and city courts and prisons, the custom-house and the barracks.

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  • Having obtained an indefinite power of arrest, it soon filled the prisons of Paris.

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  • were sent to the prisons and began a butchery which lasted four days and consumed 1400 victims. The Commune addressed a circular letter to the other cities of France inviting them to follow the example.

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  • Hortense hurried to the spot and took steps which enabled her to save her second son from the Austrian prisons.

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  • Disease and famine; crushing imposts and extortions; official debasement of the currency; bankruptcy; state prisons; religious and political inquisition; suppression of all institutions for the safe-guarding of rights; tyranny by the intendants; royal, feudal and clerical oppression burdening every faculty and every necessary of life; monstrous and incurable luxury; the horrible drama of poison; the twofold adultery of Madame de Montespan; and the narrow bigotry of Madame de Maintenon-~--all concurred to make the end of the reign a sad contrast with the splendour of its beginning.

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  • The form of trial was soon discontinued, and the victims were sent to the guillotine or shot or cut down in the prisons en masse.

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  • absconds from other open prisons by foreign national prisoners during the same period.

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  • Her insane asylums are filled and the prisons are bursting with people.

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  • Glass Prisons, Empty Lives From ' Cleo ' to ' Nemo ' ' Finding Nemo ' is the latest animated blockbuster from Disney.

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  • This does not include several dozen brigands killed in skirmishes or while being transported to prisons.

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  • Eugene McAteer, Manchester Prisons don't prevent crime Does anyone seriously believe that increasing sentences will solve the problem of knife crime?

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  • detainees in Indian prisons.

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  • The website includes an online directory of Arts Activities in Prisons.

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  • eliminatelass="ex">Eliminating Unnecessary Attendance 15.5 The Scottish Court Service have been considering the potential for the use of television equipment to link courts with prisons.

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  • Chef Paul Loughran has been chosen by defense, prisons and police support services specialist ess as one of its Employees of the Year.

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  • The 'Psychological Prisons ' From Which They Never Escaped: the role of ability grouping in reproducing social class inequalities, 135 Ivor Goodson.

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  • highlights the fact that in some prisons half of all inmates have serious alcohol problems which are related to their offending.

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  • The action ranges from rural Essex to London's prisons and convict hulks; from the wilds of British Columbia to the Australian goldfields.

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  • inspector of prisons shies away from.

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  • prisons inspectorate issues critical report of HMP Doncaster, run by Serco.

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  • contents introduction Design of the study Methods Participants Materials Results and discussion The incidence of fear in prisons Are prisoners and officers afraid?

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  • Prior to this most prisons were owned and controlled locally by both county and boro magistrates.

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  • We have got the only prisons ombudsman that cannot take on any kind of staff complaint, not allowed.

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  • opiate misusers being released from prisons.

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  • overcrowded prisons simply do not work.

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  • Beginning in 1979, he persuaded a number of American prisons to paint their cells a camp, but supposedly pacifying shade.

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  • The prison is to house 100 prisoners during the first phase, who will mainly be transferred from the overcrowded prisons in Maputo.

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  • He detailed the struggle against isolation cells in Turkish prisons and the death fast, which has claimed 91 lives in 18 months.

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  • The remand prisons are much better than the situation at the camp.

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  • Probation work inside the prisons probation work inside the prisons Probation staff work in every prison around the country.

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  • Can Improved Access to Education in our Prisons Really reduce recidivism?

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  • remand prisons are much better than the situation at the camp.

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  • These centers are prisons in all but name, with detainees having fewer legal rights than criminals arrested on charges of rape and murder.

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  • At present, there are no methodologically rigorous evaluations of drug services within British prisons.

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  • Chris trained with renowned storyteller Ben Haggarty and now works in schools, prisons, festivals and companies all over the country.

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  • stymie Internet efforts in prisons.

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  • A growing number of prisons have set up Braille transcription services.

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  • Perhaps rednecks and third world tyrants can teach us how to build child prisons that work.

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  • eliminating unnecessary Attendance 15.5 The Scottish Court Service have been considering the potential for the use of television equipment to link courts with prisons.

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  • (2) Population compt~e a part, which includes soldiers and sailors, inmates of prisons, asylums, schools, members of religious communities, and workmen temporarily engaged in public works.

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  • There are (I) the maison darrlt, temporary places of durance in every arrondissement for persons charged with offences, and those sentenced to more than a years imprisonment who are awaiting transfer to a maison centrale; (2) the maison de justice, often part and parcel of the former, but only existing in the assize court towns for the safe custody of those tried or condemned at the assizes; (3) departmental prisons, or inaisons de correction, for summary convictions, or those sentenced to less than a year, or, if provided with sufficient cells, those amenable to separate confinement; (4) maisons centrales and pnitenciers agricoles, for all sentenced to imprisonment for more than a year, or to hard labor, or to those condemned to travaux forces for offences committed in prison.

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  • The same architect was responsible for the lofty "Bridge of Sighs" (1595-1605), connecting the ducal palace with the state prisons (1591-97) on the opposite side of the narrow canal on the east of the Rio del Palazzo.

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  • The State Penitentiary is at Baton Rouge, and a House of Detention at New Orleans; and there are parish prisons.

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  • Having made careful investigations, Gladstone, on the 7th of April 1851, addressed an open letter to Lord Aberdeen, bringing an elaborate, detailed and horrible indictment against the rulers of Naples, especially as regards the arrangements of their prisons and the treatment of persons confined in them for political offences.

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  • These latter exist in wondrous number and variety, exercising every imaginable form of good work - education, both primary and secondary; the care of hospitals, orphanages, penitentiaries, prisons; of asylums for the blind, the deaf and dumb, the insane; of refuges for the aged poor and the destitute.

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  • The abominable con ditions of the prisons in which the best men of the kingdom were immured, linked to the vilest' common criminals, was made known to the world by the famous letters of W.

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  • In some prisons hard labour was insisted upon, and embraced tread-wheels or the newly-invented cranks; in some it did not exist at all.

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  • Ruggles Brise, the English expert on prisons, declared that "the purity of the air and the cleanliness of the American prisons are admirable, and under a very elaborate system of warming by hot air, a regular and uniform temperature is sustained throughout the year, which, considering the varying nature of the climate from extreme heat to cold many points below zero, is a considerable engineering triumph."

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  • de Tocqueville, Systeme penitentiaire aux E tatsUnis (1837); Crawford, Report on Penitentiaries (U.S.A., 1838); Maconochie, Prison Discipline (1856); Dr Guillaurne, Progress of Prison Discipline in Switzerland (1872); Arthur Griffiths, Memorials of Millbank (1873), Chronicles of Newgate (1882); Armingol y Cornet, Prisons and Prison Discipline in Spain (1874); Stevens, Regime des etablissements pe'nitentiaires en Belgique (1875); F.

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  • We have eliminated debtors prisons, developed the idea of "women and children first," stigmatized child labor, made accommodations for conscientious objectors, widely adopted freedom of speech and the press and freedom of assembly, and a hundred more.

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  • This is the whole history of "My Prisons."

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  • From early in the morning, wearing a dressing jacket, she attended to her household affairs, and then she drove out: on holy days to church and after the service to jails and prisons on affairs of which she never spoke to anyone.

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  • There were bazaars, shops, warehouses, market stalls, granaries--for the most part still stocked with goods-- and there were factories and workshops, palaces and wealthy houses filled with luxuries, hospitals, prisons, government offices, churches, and cathedrals.

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  • Can Improved Access to Education in our Prisons Really Reduce Recidivism?

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  • Nurses working in prisons and nursing homes, for example, need to be aware of the possibility of scabies infection.

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  • Security is the utmost concern of prison officials, who are aware of some lawmakers ' attempts to stymie Internet efforts in prisons.

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  • Use the maps you find to help you navigate through prisons and other crime-filled locations.

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  • Just Community programs have been established in schools, prisons, and other institutions with a fair amount of success.

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  • In the nineteenth century, they were generally sent to reform schools that were similar to prisons.

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  • In general body lice infestations occur in crowded, unsanitary facilities, such as prisons and military or refugee camps.

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  • Criminal activities - Government facilities related to the punishment or legal enforcement of criminals like prisons and police stations.

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  • An Alcatraz tour is one of the best ways to see "the rock", one of the most famous maximum-security prisons in the history of the American penal system.

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  • Best known for housing one of the most infamous maximum-security prisons in all of America for 29 years, the island was also one of the military's strongest outposts in the entire west for some time before.

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  • Wardens from the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) were polled and selected their most incorrigible prisoners who were transferred to The Rock.

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  • They do outreach events at prisons, hospitals, festivals and more.

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  • These include battlefields, cemeteries, prisons, lighthouses and more like those discussed in 10_Most_Haunted_Places_in_America.

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  • Unlike American prison tattoos that may vary from one block to another, Russian prisons have a very specific code regarding prison tattoo meanings.

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  • The Army transferred the prison to the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) in 1934.

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