Priory sentence example

priory
  • He practically made me call my brother and now I'm going up to Weston Priory in Vermont and spend the week with him.

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  • The guildhall is formed from part of the Priory.

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  • In the same year that college took possession of the alien priory of Sele, Sussex, the proceedings for the suppression of which had been going on since 1469.

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  • The next year saw the appropriation to the college of the Augustinian Priory of Selborne, Hants.

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  • In the old town of Bridlington the church of St Mary and St Nicholas consists of the fine Decorated and Perpendicular nave, with Early English portions, of the priory church of an Augustinian foundation of the time of Henry I.

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  • Queen Catherine was residing at Ampthill in Bedfordshire, and to suit her convenience the court was held at the priory of Dunstable in the immediate neighbourhood.

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  • In exempt convents the head of the monastery or priory exercised jurisdiction subject to an appeal to the pope.

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  • Besides the priory of St Mary Overy, there was the hospital of St Thomas, founded in 1213 from the neighbouring priory of Bermondsey, and forming the origin of the great modern hospital of the same name in Lambeth (q.v.).

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  • The Saxon fort of Alaric was replaced by a Norman castle built by William de Mohun, first lord of Dunster, who founded the priory of St George.

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  • Its chief interest is the beautiful remains of the Priory of St John, founded in 1230 by John Bisset of the Aird, for Cistercian monks.

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  • Muswell Hill took name from a holy well, of high repute for curative powers, over which an oratory was erected early in the 12th century, attached to the priory of St John of Jerusalem in Clerkenwell.

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  • Monastic remains are scanty, but there are interesting portions of a priory incorporated with the school buildings at Repton.

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  • Facing the castle, on the western side of the pill, stand the considerable remains of Monkton Priory, a Benediction house founded by Earl William Marshal as a cell to the abbey of Seez or Sayes in Normandy, but under Henry VI.

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  • The priory church, now the parish church of the suburb of Monkton, contains monuments of the families of Meyrick of Bush and Owen of Orielton.

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  • Two other ancient churches remain, but are not used for worship. There are ruins of a priory dedicated to SS.

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  • The early chroniclers declare that St Aldhelm founded a church near Wareham about 701, and perhaps the priory, which is mentioned as existing in 876, when the Danes retired from Cambridge to a strong position in this fort.

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  • Further incursions made by the Danes in 998 and in 1015 under Canute probably resulted in the destruction of the priory, on the site of which a later house was founded in the 12th century as a cell of the Norman abbey of Lysa, and in the decayed condition of Wareham in 1086, when 203 houses were ruined or waste, the result of misfortune, poverty and fire.

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  • The church of St Peter and St Paul is a fine fragment of the church of the Augustinian priory founded by Henry I.

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  • He endowed the priory by charter with the lordship of the manor and borough, which it retained till its dissolution in 1536-1537.

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  • At Monkhill there are the remains of a Tudor building called the Old Hall, probably constructed out of the old priory of St John's.

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  • This was destroyed by the Danes but refounded as a priory by Earl Leofric in 1017.

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  • The town was a borough by prescription, and its privileges began with the grants made to the priory and its tenants.

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  • The church of St Martin is ancient, and contains stained glass from Cartmel priory in Furness.

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  • Outside the north-west angle of the castle, Richard de Clare in 1256 founded a Dominican priory, which was burnt by Glendower in 1404.

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  • Souvigny possesses the church of a famous Cluniac priory dating from the 11th-12th and 15th centuries, and containing the splendid tombs (15th century) of Louis II.

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  • The scanty remains of Blantyre Priory, founded towards the close of the 13th century, stand on the left bank of the Clyde, almost opposite the beautiful ruins of Bothwell Castle.

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  • Close by are the remains of St Mary's Priory, which comprise a large Perpendicular gatehouse, refectory, precinct wall, abbot's gate and still-house.

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  • A grammar school, founded 1554, occupied part of the Priory, but was removed in 1874 to new buildings.

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  • In the Domesday Survey it appears as a me g ne borough under Juhel of Totnes, founder of the castle and priory; it had 95 burgesses within and 15 without the borough, and rendered military service according to the custom of Exeter.

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  • In the parish of Ardchattan, on the north shore, stands the beautiful ruin of St Modan's Priory, founded in the 13th century for Cistercian monks of the order of Vallis Caulium.

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  • A well-preserved gateway of red sandstone and portions of two towers of the castle are included in the buildings of the present gaol, and the old parish church of St Peter contains some interesting monuments, amongst them being the altar tomb (of the 6th century) of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K.G., and his wife, which was removed hither for safety at the Reformation from the desecrated church of the neighbouring Priory of St John.

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  • Some vestiges of this celebrated monastic house, which formerly owned the famous Welsh MS. known as the "Black Book of Carmarthen," are visible between the present Priory Street and the river.

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  • It is mainly Early English, but the original church, attached to a Benedictine priory, was founded in 1095 on the site of a convent established by Eanswith, daughter of Eadbald, king of Kent in 630.

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  • At Davington, close to Faversham, there are remains, incorporated in a residence, of the cloisters and other parts of a Benedictine priory founded in 1153.

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  • N.W., shows slight remains of the originalAugustinian priory; but the present beautiful gabled building, picturesquely situated, dates mainly from 1618.

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  • The name and church existed in the time of Richard I., when the priory of Burscough was founded.

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  • Later he erected the priory, for canons of his order, of which the nave and transepts of the church remain.

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  • St Saviour's in Southwark (q.v.), the cathedral church of the modern bishopric of Southwark, was the church of the priory of St Mary Overy, and is a large cruciform building mainly Early English in style.

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  • St Helen's, Bishopsgate, belonged to a priory of nuns founded c. 1212, but the greater part of the building is later.

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  • The priory of Bermondsey in Surrey was founded by Aylwin Child, citizen of London about 1082.

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  • It was in existence many years before the priory of the nuns of St Helen's was founded.

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  • His tomb was situated by the side of the Roman road, where rose the priory of St-Denis-de-l'Estree, which existed until the, 8th century.

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  • It belonged to an Augustinian priory founded by Henry I.

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  • The manor of Wembley belonged to the priory of Kilburn until that foundation was dissolved by Henry VIII.

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  • In the district between this and North Walsham are Paston, taking name from the family which is famous through the Paston Letters, and the fragments of Bromholm Priory, a Cluniac foundation.

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  • A priory of friars of the Holy Trinity was founded at Hounslow in 1296, and existed till the dissolution of the monasteries.

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  • The priory chapel was used as a church till 1830, after which its place was taken by the existing church of the Holy Trinity (1835).

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  • The priory of St Denys, an Augustinian foundation of 1124, gives name to a suburb by the Itchen, and has left only fragmentary ruins.

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  • At the dissolution he surrendered his priory without compunction to the crown, and received a liberal pension.

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  • The earliest were the priory of Christ's Church and the abbey of St Peter and St Paul, now called St Augustine's, both at Canterbury, founded by Augustine and the monks who accompanied him to England.

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  • Other Saxon foundations were the nunneries at Folkestone (630), Lyminge (633; nunnery and monastery), Reculver (669), Minster-in-Thanet (670), Minster-in-Sheppey (675), and the priory of St Martin at Dover (696), all belonging to the Benedictine order.

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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).

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  • Other houses of which there are slight remains are Lesnes abbey, near Erith, and Bilsington priory near Ashford, established in 1178 and 1253 respectively, and both belonging to the Augustinian canons; and the house of Franciscans at Canterbury (1225).

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  • But no remains exist of the priories of Augustinian canons at Canterbury (St Gregory's; 1084), Leeds, near Maidstone (1119), Tunbridge (middle of 12th century), Combwell, near Cranbrook (time of Henry II.); the nunnery of St Sepulchre at Canterbury (about 110o) and Langdon abbey, near Walmer (1192), both belonging to the Benedictines; the Trinitarian priory of Mottenden near Headcorn, the first house of Crutched Friars in England (1224), where miracle plays were presented in the church by the friars on Trinity Sunday; the Carmelite priories at Sandwich (1272) and Losenham near Tenterden (1241); and the preceptory of Knights of St John of Jerusalem at West Peckham, near Tunbridge (1408).

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  • When he wrote Handlyng Synne he had been (11.63-76) fifteen years in the priory, beginning to write in "englysch rime in 1303."

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  • Other buildings of interest are the guildhall, a 15th-century structure of brick; Shodfriars Hall, a half-timbered house adjacent to slight remains of a Dominican priory; the free grammar school, founded in 1554, with a fine gateway of wrought iron of the 17th century brought from St Botolph's church; and the Hussey Tower of brick, part of a mansion of the 16th century.

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  • The districts included preserve the names of ancient manors, and in Canonbury, which belonged as early as the 13th century to the priory of St Bartholomew, Smithfield, traces of the old manor house remain.

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  • In the order of St John of Jerusalem a priory was a group of commanderies ruled by a "grand prior."

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  • The Public Walks forms a pleasant promenade parallel to the wall, and in the centre of it stands a picturesque octagonal Chapel of the Red Mount, exhibiting ornate Perpendicular work, and once frequented by pilgrims. The church of St Margaret, formerly the priory church, is a fine building with two towers at the west end, one of which was formerly surmounted by a spire, blown down in 1741.

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  • He all but completed the cathedral which his predecessor, William of St Carilef, had begun; fortified Durham; built Norham Castle; founded the priory of Mottisfout and endowed the college of Christchurch, Hampshire.

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  • He was imprisoned by the duke at Gex from 1519 to 1521, lost his priory, and became more and more anti-Savoyard.

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  • He had been imprisoned for political reasons, for he did not become a Protestant till after his release, and then found that his priory had been destroyed in 1534 He obtained a pension from Geneva, and was four times married, but owing to his extravagances was always in debt.

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  • It was attached to a Benedictine priory, founded about the beginning of the 12th century as a cell of St Albans abbey by William de Albini.

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  • The site chosen for it was that of the ancient priory of Kilmainham, founded by Strongbow for Knights Templars.

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  • In Llanfaes there was formerly a Dominican priory, but in 1542 Henry VIII.

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  • The town commands a magnificent view of the Brecknock Beacons, and is noted for its promenades on the banks of the Usk, and in the priory groves.

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  • There are several houses of interest, notably the Priory and Dr Awbrey's residence (now called Buckingham House), both built about the middle of the 16th century, but the finest specimen is Newton (about a mile out, near Llanfaes) built in 1582 by Sir John Games (a descendant of Sir David Gam), but now a farmhouse.

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  • He subsequently founded, near the castle, the Benedictine priory of St John, which he endowed and constituted a cell of Battle Abbey.

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  • Charles however, stayed a night at the priory house shortly after the battle of Naseby.

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  • A priory only differed from an abbey in that the superior bore the name of prior instead of abbot.

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  • The Liber Pluscardensis, a valuable authority on early Scots history, was compiled in the priory by Maurice Buchanan in 1461.

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  • There are no traces of the fortified palace of the bishops of Durham, of the White Friars' monastery founded in 13J4, or of the Austin priory founded in 1341.

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  • In the neighbourhood of Northallerton is the priory of Mount Grace, a Carthusian foundation of 1397.

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  • The chantry of St Edmund the Martyr which stood on the opposite side of the town was a part of Edward III.'s endowment to the priory, and became so famous as a place of pilgrimage, especially for those on their way to Canterbury, that the part of Watling Street which crossed there towards London was sometimes called " St Edmund's Way.

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  • The picturesque Augustinian priory of Michelham lies 2 m.

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  • This elder Alan, whose name occurs in Breton documents before r080, went on crusade in 1097, and was apparently succeeded by his brother Flaald, whose son, the younger Alan, enjoyed the favour of Henry I., who bestowed on him Mileham and its barony in Norfolk, where he founded Sporle Priory.

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  • Upon St Serf's, the largest, which commemorates the patron saint of Fifeshire, are the ruins of the Priory of Portmoak - so named from St Moak, the first abbot - the oldest Culdee establishment in Scotland.

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  • Some time before 961 it was made over to the bishop of St Andrews, and shortly after 1144 a body of canons regular was established on it in connexion with the priory of canons regular founded in that year at St Andrews.

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  • Among ecclesiastical buildings are remains of two monastic foundations - the priory of St Botolph, founded early in the 12th century for Augustinian canons, of which part of the fine Norman west front (in which Roman bricks occur), and of the nave arcades remain; and the restored gateway of the Benedictine monastery of St John, founded by Eudo, steward to William II.

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  • The plan given by Viollet-le-Duc of the Priory of St Jean des Bons Hommes, a Cluniac cell, situated between the town of Avallon and the village of Savigny, shows that these diminutive establishments comprised every essential feature of a monastery, - chapel, cloister, chapter-room, refectory, dormitory, all grouped according to the recognized arrangement.

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  • A Cluniac priory founded here shortly after the Conquest has left no remains.

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  • He received several grants of monastic estates, including the priory of Christ Church in London and the abbey of Walden in Essex, where his grandson, Thomas Howard, earl of Suffolk, built Audley End, doubtless named after him.

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  • The site of a Norman priory can be traced.

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  • In the vicinity, Monk Bretton Priory, a Cluniac foundation of 1157, retains a Perpendicular gatehouse, some Decorated domestic remains, and fragments of the church.

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  • Traces of the moat and the foundations are still to be seen in Priory Close.

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  • The parish church, of mixed architecture, including the Norman nave of the old priory church, and containing some of the most beautiful examples of window tracery in England, was restored in 1866, and enlarged by the addition of a south nave in 1879.

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  • The original foundation dated from 1213, was situated in Southwark, and was connected with the priory of Bermondsey.

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  • Besides the parish church there is a Roman Catholic priory and church.

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  • The churches of St Munchin (to whom is attributed the foundation of the see in the 6th century) and St John, Whitamore's Castle and a Dominican priory, are other remains of antiquarian interest; while the principal city and county buildings are a chamber of commerce, a custom house commanding the river, and court house, town hall and barracks.

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  • Fergus, lord of Galloway, a celebrated church-builder of the 12th century, had his principal seat on Palace Isle in a lake called after him Loch Fergus, near St Mary's Isle, where he erected the priory de Trayle, in token of his penitence for rebellion against David I.

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  • The priory was afterwards united as a dependent cell to the abbey of Holyrood.

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  • In low a priory was founded at Solesmes and placed under the authority of the abbey of La Couture of Le Mans.

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  • The chief buildings are the Carmelite Priory (ruins dating perhaps from the 13th century); a Bluecoat school (1514); a free grammar school (1527); an orphan girl school (funds left by Thomas Howel to the Drapers' Co., in Henry VII.'s reign); the town hall (built in 1572 by Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, enlarged and restored in 1780); an unfinished church (begun by Leicester); a market hall (with arcades or "rows," such as those of Chester or Yarmouth); and the old parish church of St Marcella.

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  • In the neighbourhood is the fine mansion of Audley End, built by Thomas, 1st earl of Suffolk, in 1603 on the ruins of the abbey, converted in 11 9 0 from a Benedictine priory founded by Geoffrey de Mandeville in 1136.

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  • The borough includes the parish of Clerkenwell (q.v.), a locality of considerable historic interest, including the former priory of St John, Clerkenwell, of which the gateway and other traces remain.

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  • The remains of the splendid foundation of St Martin's priory, of the 12th century, include the great gate, the house refectory, with campanile, and the spacious strangers' refectory, now incorporated in Dover College.

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  • The college of St Martin for twenty-two secular canons, which had been established in the castle in 696, was removed into the town in the beginning of the 8th century, and in 1139 became a Benedictine priory under the jurisdiction of that at Canterbury, to which see the lands are still attached.

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  • Among educational establishments is Dover College, occupying the site and remaining buildings of St Martin's priory, with additional modern buildings.

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  • A fine Norman doorway, now appearing as the entrance to a hotel, is preserved from an Augustinian priory founded in the reign of Henry I.

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  • Loftus, however, favoured the project of founding a university in Dublin, though on lines different from Perrot's proposal, and it was largely through his influence that the corporation of Dublin granted the lands of the priory of All Hallows as a beginning of the endowment of Trinity College, of which he was named first provost in the charter creating the foundation in 1591.

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  • Whitehaven (Witofthaven) was an insignificant possession of the priory of St Bee which became crown property at the dissolution of the religious houses.

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  • In 1696 he was elected to fill the place of La Bruyere in the French Academy; and on the completion of the education of the young princes the king bestowed upon him the rich priory of Argenteuil, in the diocese of Paris (1706).

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  • In 1781 he obtained the rich priory of Lyons, near Peronne, and in 1785 he was elected to the Academy, as successor of Lefranc de Pompignan.

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  • Only the site can be traced of the Cistercian priory to which it belonged.

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  • There are beautiful remains of the priory church, chiefly Early English; but there is a chapter-house of ornate Norman work.

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  • The name is derived from the fact that the land belonged to a priory of St Mary Spital, founded in 11 9 7.

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  • In 1118, according to tradition, but more probably as late as 1138, David, prince of Cumbria, here founded a priory for Augustinian monks from the abbey of St Quentin at Beauvais in France, and in 1147, after he had become king, erected it into an abbey dedicated to the Virgin.

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  • A fine crypt, along with remains of the prior's lodging, refectory and chapel, may still be viewed, as the priory was purchased by private subscription and handed over to the municipality in 1896.

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  • The exclusive right of ferryage was granted to the priory in 1332.

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  • On the 7th of October 1366, William Edingdon, the treasurer of England and bishop of Winchester, died; on the 13th of October Wykeham was recommended by the king to the chapter of monks of St Swithun's cathedral priory and elected bishop.

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  • Ruins -of an Augustinian priory, founded in 1129, are beautifully situated near the eastern extremity of the town.

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  • But the most beautiful seal of this period, and in many respects the most beautiful medieval seal in existence, is the monastic seal of Merton Priory, in Surrey, of the year 1241.

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  • A John Hooper was likewise canon of Wormesley priory in Herefordshire; but identification of any of these with the future bishop is doubtful.

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  • Although it was erected for Cistercians from the priory of Kinloss, near Forres, the property of the Columban monastery was removed to it.

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  • In consequence of his professed attachment to the doctrines of Luther he was first imprisoned in the dungeons of Antvorskov and thence transferred, in the spring of 1525, to the Grey Friars' cloister at Viborg in Jutland, where he preached from his prison to the people assembled outside, till his prior, whom he won over to his views, permitted him to use the pulpit of the priory church.

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  • Thirsk is first mentioned as a borough in a charter granted by Roger de Mowbray to Newburgh Priory in the reign of Henry II.

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  • Finding, however, in the cloister neither calm nor solitude, and having gradually turned again to study, he yielded after a year to urgent entreaties from without and within, and went forth to reopen his school at the priory of Maisoncelle (1120).

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  • Removed by friendly hands, for the relief of his sufferings, to the priory of St Marcel, near Chalon-sur-Saone, he died on the 21st of April 1142.

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  • Here was situated a priory, founded in 1 100, which grew to great wealth and fame as the principal institution in England of the Knights Hospitallers of the Order of St John of Jerusalem.

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  • Adjoining the priory was St Mary's Benedictine nunnery, St James's church (1792) marking the site, and preserving in its vaults some of the ancient monuments.

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  • Of its priory, dedicated to St Rufus, a few ruins still exist.

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  • On the death of Robert de Hwlfordd, the benefactor and perhaps founder of the priory of St Mary and St Thomas, in 1213, the lordship of the castle reverted to the Crown, and was purchased for 1000 marks from King John by William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, who gave various privileges to the town.

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  • The Burgoynes of Sutton, whose baronetcy dates from 1641, have been in Bedfordshire since the 15th century, whilst the Osborn family have owned Chicksands Priory since its purchase by Peter Osborn in 1576.

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  • The monastic remains in Bedfordshire include the fine fragment of the church of the Augustinian priory at Dunstable, serving as the parish church; the church (also imperfect) of Elstow near Bedford, which belonged to a Benedictine nunnery founded by Judith, niece of William the Conqueror; and portions of the Gilbertine Chicksands Priory and of a Cistercian foundation at Old Warden.

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  • Where Middlesbrough now stands there were at one time a small chapel and priory founded by Robert de Brus of Skelton Castle.

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  • The priory fell into ruins at the time of the Reformation, and no trace now remains beyond some stones built into the wall of a brewery.

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  • It takes its name, inaccurately, from the great foundation of Bolton Priory, the ruins of which are among the most exquisitely situated in England.

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  • William de Meschines and Cicely de Romili, his wife, heiress of Robert, founded and endowed a priory at Embsay or Emmesay, near Skipton, in 1120, but it was moved here in 1151 by their daughter, Alice de Romili, wife of William FitzDuncan, who gave the manor to the monks in exchange for other lands.

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  • There are fragments of a Cluniac priory of the 12th century.

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  • Hitchin Priory is a mansion on the site of a Carmelite foundation of the early 14th century.

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  • About this time Robert, who had founded St Augustine's Priory in Bristol, gave to the Black Canons there the five churches in Berkeley and Berkeley Herness.

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  • In their priory church he was buried in 1170, Berkeley descending to his son and heir Maurice..

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  • Under the influence of Queen Margaret in 1075 the foundations were laid of the Benedictine priory, which was raised to the rank of an abbey by David I.

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  • The community afterwards united with the Devonport Sisters, founded by Miss Sellon in 1849, and together they form what is known as Ascot Priory.

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  • It was known and smelted by British and Romans, and by the monks of Furness Abbey and Conishead Priory, both in the district.

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  • Conishead Priory, near Ulverston, an Augustinian foundation of the reign of Henry II., has left no remains, but of the priory of Cartmel (1188) the fine church is still in use.

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  • A large nunnery, called St Augustine's Priory, was erected near the town in 1861; while eastward is the Jacobean Forde House, belonging to the earl of Devon, and visited by Charles I.

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  • Tradition claims that King Athelstan threw up defensive earthworks here, but the existing castle is attributed to Joel of Totnes, who held the manor during the reign of William the Conqueror, and also founded a Cluniac priory, dedicated to St Mary Magdalene.

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  • From this date the borough and priory grew up side by side, but each preserving its independent privileges and rights of government until the dissolution of the latter in 1535.

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  • In consequence of the war with France in the reign of Edward III., this manor was annexed by the crown, and was conferred on the newly founded college of New College, Oxford, together with all the possessions, spiritual and temporal, of the priory.

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  • N., are the picturesque ruins of a Cluniac priory, founded shortly after the Conquest by William de Warren.

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  • It may be noted that de Warren founded a similar castle and priory at Lewes in Sussex.

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  • He was endowed with the wealthy priory of Crato.

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  • Country seats worthy of note (chiefly modern) are Aswarby Hall, Belton House, Brocklesby, Casewick, Denton Manor, Easton Hall, Grimsthorpe (of the 16th and 18th centuries, with earlier remains), Haverholm Priory, Nocton Hall, Panton Hall, Riby Grove, Somerby Hall, Syston Park and Uffington.

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  • At Coggs, in the water-meadows bordering the river immediately below Witney, a priory was attached to the Benedictine Priory of Fecamp, and of this there are Early English remains in the vicarage, while the church is mainly Decorated.

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  • Of the Cistercian priory, founded about 1165 by Cospatric of Dunbar, and destroyed by the 1st earl of Hertford in 1545, which stood a little to the east of the present market-place, no trace remains; but for nearly four hundred years it was a centre of religious fervour.

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  • Among the principal buildings are the church of St Mary, a Decorated and Perpendicular structure, with lofty tower and spire; the Roman Catholic academy named St Peter's Priory, and a grammar school.

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  • As well as being such a splendid setting the priory also has superb sound acoustics.

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  • The retable is only part of a much larger altarpiece that probably once stood in the Priory at Thetford in Norfolk.

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  • This child was the first of the royal bloodline, whose existence is protected by the Priory of Sion.

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  • In Herefordshire the Augustinian canonesses at Aconbury had fish ponds as did Titley Priory.

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  • He was educated by the monks of Beauly Priory and founded a church in Kilmuir and in Glenelg.

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  • It was formerly collegiate, and the yearly revenue of the priory was valued at 243 l.

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  • Go straight across crossroads (slight dogleg) into Priory Lane.

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  • Built in 1872, Nutfield Priory was designed to reflect the rather extravagant architecture of the Palace of Westminster.

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  • In the early 17th century a magnificent carved oak fireplace surround was installed at Reigate Priory around the Howard stone fireplace.

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  • The Priory is built on the site of a nunnery founded by the Princess.

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  • The original friary was founded in 1338 (no one knows the story of how it came to be known as The Priory ).

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  • All that remains of the priory today is the magnificent 16th Century gatehouse.

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  • The priory also produced mead, and this activity at least is still ongoing, even if not carried out by monks.

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  • The priory granted the 2 messuages to Edward Taillour for 80 years from 1535 at £ 11.

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  • Set in 6½ acres of gardens, the Priory is sited on an island surrounded by England's longest water filled medieval moat.

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  • As the name suggests Bolton Abbey was originally a large monastic Estate, based around the 12 th century priory.

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  • A second phase of planting is planned for Priory Gardens to enhance the rather monotonous bank of single species shrub planting.

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  • Park Gates The ornate gates to the Park commemorate the opening of Priory Park in 1920.

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  • Originally, the group were awarded an NBS award to hold a pageant to portray the medieval history of the Priory.

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  • These all lie within the large oval outline which represents the priory precinct.

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  • The Knights Templar founded a priory in the late twelfth century, which may have encouraged settlement.

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  • In Rochester he dissolved the priory of St. Andrew which was attached to the Cathedral.

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  • Stone from the nearby ruined priory was used in the construction of the mill house.

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  • They also established a small priory under the supervision of the great abbey of St Martin les Champs in Paris.

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  • Wenlock priory, ruins of a large 12th Century Cluniac priory built on ruins of a 7th Century construction.

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  • Trentham, their main landed seat, had been an Augustinian priory.

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  • In the 12th century a Benedictine priory, formed with monks from Evesham Abbey, was founded.

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  • John de Mowbray above mentioned was the founder of the Carmelite priory at Shoreham.

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  • Thoby priory occupies the site of a 12th century priory of Austin Canons which was dissolved in 1536.

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  • In Bath a great cathedral priory engulfed the whole southeast quarter of the city.

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  • Case Study A lavish wedding for 200 guests was held at a 16th century priory.

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  • Here we'll find the national collection of old-fashioned roses housed in the walled garden of the 12th century Augustinian Priory.

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  • Secondly, two benches will be installed within sight of the old priory ruins.

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  • The town's main thoroughfares were carefully planned out with the large market square at the center and close to the Priory gates.

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  • The incident outside the Grammar School on Priory Road where a 45 year old woman was making her way home.

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  • Meanwhile Waynflete himself had been advanced to the highest office in the state, the chancellorship, the seals being delivered to him by the king in the priory of Coventry in the presence of the duke of York, apparently as a person acceptable to both parties.

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  • The founder of the priory was Walter de Gaunt, about 1114, and the institution flourished until 1537, when the last prior was executed for taking part in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

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  • The principal benevolent institutions are Guy's Hospital, St Thomas's Street, founded in 1721 by Thomas Guy, with an important medical school; and Bethlehem Royal Hospital for the Insane, commonly corrupted to Bedlam, the origin of which is found in a priory of the 13th century founded within the City, beside the modern Liverpool Street.

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  • There may be mentioned also an early pier in the church of St Katherine Cree or Christ Church, Leadenhall Street, belonging to the priory church of the Holy Trinity; old monuments in the vaults beneath St James's Church, Clerkenwell, formerly attached to a Benedictine nunnery; and the Perpendicular gateway and the crypt of the church of the priory of St John of Jerusalem (see Finsbury).

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  • Little more than a mile to the west lies the royal and police burgh of Pittenweem (Gaelic, "the hollow of the cave"), a quaint old fishing town (pop. 1863), with the remains of a priory.

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  • Murray, who edited The Romance and Prophecies (E.E.T.S., 1875), thinks that he was living three years later in a Cluniac priory in Ayrshire.

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  • The prefix of the name of the town is derived from a priory of nuns founded here in 1150.

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  • The decay of the town began in the Toth century owing to the recession of the sea, and it received another blow in the suppression of its priory by Henry IV.

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  • Locally, there are strong cultural associations with the Priory; farmers widely attribute the reclamation of this area to the monks.

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  • At the top of Baker Street is the Parish Church and the ruins of the Priory.

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  • The garden to the NW was the graveyard of the Priory and sepulchral stones and remains have come to light.

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  • The most dramatic change in the post-medieval period was the suppression of the priory in 1539.

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  • The temporalities of the priory in the diocese of Canterbury were valued at £ 65 10 s.

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  • In the Taxation of 1291 the priory is said to own temporalities worth £ 25 15 s.

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  • Buckland priory had at least three tenements in the parish attached to their manor of North Petherton.

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  • The town 's main thoroughfares were carefully planned out with the large market square at the center and close to the Priory gates.

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  • The bishop made a visitation of the priory in 1343.

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  • The Priory retained wardship of the young heir while Thomas WILLENHALL [apparently John 's brother] unsuccessfully pursed a claim against the estate.

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  • An old mansion called the Priory dates in part from 1393.

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  • At the age of ten he was put to school with the canons of Merton priory in Surrey.

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