Printed sentence examples

  • The first printed edition appeared in London in 1553.

  • This is printed on an ornamental title-page.

  • Betsy printed out Martha's Email and a list of FBI offices around the country.

  • (probably William Warner), first printed in 1595, which Shakespeare may possibly have used (in MS.) for his Comedy of Errors.

  • Claudia introduced the men, reading from printed biographies.

  • She jumped and glanced down, spotting the picture Ashley had printed and posted all over the apartment.

  • I now thought it time to teach her to read printed words.

  • The royal library contains about 400,000 printed volumes, including one of the largest collections of Bibles in the world, and also about 20,000 MSS., many of great rarity.

  • Elisabeth held the first page in her hand and printed across the top read, 'God's Promise Unfolding'.

  • Toward night candles were burning round his coffin, a pall was spread over it, the floor was strewn with sprays of juniper, a printed band was tucked in under his shriveled head, and in a corner of the room sat a chanter reading the psalms.

  • The best account of the life of Davila is that by Apostolo Zeno, prefixed to an edition of the history printed at Venice in 2 vols.

  • Blesdijk's Historia (not printed till 1642) accuses Jorisz of having plures uxores.

  • Leo called Theodore Lascaris to Rome to give instruction in Greek, and established a Greek printing-press from which the first Greek book printed at Rome appeared in 1515.

  • There is in the British Museum a poem printed in 1666, entitled Letter to the bishop of Munster containing a Panegyrick of his heroick achievements in heroick verse.

  • - The editio princeps of the works of Archimedes, with the commentary of Eutocius, is that printed at Basel, in 1544, in Greek and Latin, by Hervagius.

  • It is not known to have been printed before 1786, when it appeared in Pinkerton's Ancient Scottish Poems. 3.

  • The title-page of the piece, which was printed by Thomas Colwell in 1575, states that it was played not long ago at Christ's College, Cambridge, and was "made by Mr S.

  • There are reasons to suppose however that the play had been in Colwell's hands some time before it was printed, and it may well be identical with the Dyccon of Bedlam for which he took out a licence in 1562-1563, "Diccon the Bedlem" being the first of the dramatis personae of Gammer Gurton.

  • In 1838 Lundy removed to Lowell, La Salle county, Illinois, where he printed several copies of the Genius of Universal Emancipation.

  • The same firm is also constructing a micrometer in which the readings of the head are printed on a band of paper instead of being read off at the time of observation.

  • An English prose romance, Helyas Knight of the Swan, translated by Robert Copland, and printed by W.

  • de Godeffroy de Boulin (printed 1504) and is reprinted by W.

  • It was also printed by Wynkyn de Worde in 1512.

  • These are printed by O.

  • She had learned the printed letters, and for some time had amused herself by making simple sentences, using slips on which the words were printed in raised letters; but these sentences had no special relation to one another.

  • Hundreds of printed reports covered our premises like a winter blizzard making us look as busy as a toy store at Christmas.

  • Printed brochures, gratis from Myrtle Somebody whose brother-in-law was a printer, were placed about town by tiny Tonya, an eight-year-old Latina waif hired by Fred for five bucks.

  • Norton in 1877, and his Letters were edited and privately printed at Cambridge, Mass., in 1878 by James Bradley Thayer.

  • It consists in punching, by means of " a puncher," a series of holes in a strip of paper in such a way that, when the strip is sent through another instrument, called the " transmitter," the holes cause the circuit to be closed at the proper times and for the proper proportionate intervals for the message to be correctly printed by the receiving instrument or recorder.

  • As a proof of the seriousness with which he regarded the literary vocation, it may be mentioned that he used to write out his poems in printed characters, believing that that process best enabled him to understand his own peculiarities and faults, and probably unconscious that Coleridge had recommended some such method of criticism when he said he thought "print settles it."

  • Even the manuscripts left at his death were so incomplete that Todhunter, into whose hands they were put, found it impossible to use them in the publication of a second edition of the original treatise, and wisely printed them, in 1865, in a supplementary volume.

  • His Weltbuch, a supplement to his Chronica, was printed at Tubingen in 1534; the publication, in the same year, of his Paradoxa at Ulm brought him into trouble with the authorities.

  • Not interpreting this as applying to works printed outside Ulm, he published in 1538 at Augsburg his Guldin Arch (with pagan parallels to Christian sentiments) and at Frankfort his Germaniae clzronicon, with the result that he had to leave Ulm in January 1539.

  • purgatory; it was not, however, printed until after his death (Leipzig, 1606).

  • - The editio princeps, based mainly on a transcript of D, was printed at Venice, 1472: the first scientific text, based on B, C and D, was that of Camerarius, completed 1552, in whose steps followed Lambinus (with a commentary which is still useful), 1576; Taubmann, 1605-1621; Pareus (a meritorious edition), 1619 and 1623; Guyet, edited by Marolles, 1658; Gronovius (the "Vulgate"), 1664-1684; then, after the lapse of more than a century, came the editions of Bothe, 1809-1811; Naudet, 1830; and Weise, 1837-1848.

  • Of English plays, the interlude called Jack Juggler (between 1547 and 1553) was based on the Amphitruo, and the lost play called the Historie of Error (acted in 1577) was probably based on the Menae-chmi; Nicholas Udall's Ralph Royster Doyster, the first English comedy (acted before 1551, first printed 1566), is founded on the Miles gloriosus; Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors (about 1591) is an adaptation of the Menaechmi; and his Falstaff may be regarded as an idealized reproduction or development of the braggart soldier of Plautus and Terence - a type of character which reappears in other forms not only in English literature (e.g.

  • If by any chance wrong signals are printed or the instruments get out of phase, the sender is stopped by the receiver sending a few signals, after which both type-wheels are again set to zero and correspondence continued.

  • " Philadelphia," received wireless messages printed on the ordinary Morse tape at a distance of 1557 m.

  • In 1904 a regular system of communication of press news and private messages from the Poldhu and Cape Breton stations to Atlantic liners in mid-Atlantic was inaugurated, and daily newspapers were thenceforth printed on board these vessels, news being supplied to them daily by electric wave telegraphy.

  • The fragment should therefore be regarded as supplementary to the Taxatio Ecclesiastics Angliae et Walliae printed by the Record Commissioners in 1802.

  • Printed matter is 2c. (Id.) per 50 grammes (s3/4 oz.).

  • All the while a vast amount of revolutionary literature was being printed in Switzerland, France and England, and smuggled into Italy; the poet Giusti satirized the Italian princes, the dramatist G.

  • A very excellent edition of the twentyseven canonical books has been recently printed there, and there exist in our European libraries a number of Pali MSS.

  • According to Suetonius (Caesar, 56), many authorities considered Oppius to have written the histories of the Spanish, African and Alexandrian wars which are printed among the works of Caesar.

  • In English medieval literature it appears in three somewhat different versions: Sir Orpheo, a " lay of Brittany " printed from the Harleian MS. in J.

  • His work Suma de Geografia, which was printed in 1519, is the first Spanish book which gives an account of America.

  • These are always printed in the editions on the same page as the Mishnah and Gemara, the whole, with various other matter, filling generally about 12 folio volumes.

  • and printed editions to a greater or less extent.

  • The introduction of printing (first dated Hebrew printed book, Rashi, Reggio, 1475) gave occasion for a number of scholarly compositors and proof-readers, some of whom were also authors, such as Jacob ben Ilayyim of Tunis Later waters.

  • Bibliographies of printed books: Steinschneider, Catalogus libr.

  • A complete list of Airy's printed papers, numbering no less than 518, will be found in his Autobiography, edited in 1896 by his son, Wilfrid Airy, B.

  • and almost all the printed editions) or Liber Creaturarum (c. 1 435).

  • He is also said to have written, at dates unknown, The London Merchant (which, however, was an earlier name for Beaumont and Fletcher's Knight of the Burning Pestle) and The Royal Combat; a tragedy by him, Beauty in a Trance, was entered in the Stationers' Register in 1653, but never printed.

  • The Queen, or the Excellency of the Sea, a play of inverted passion, containing some fine sensuous lines, printed in 1653 by Alexander Singhe for private performance, has been recently edited by W.

  • In his next two works, undoubtedly those most characteristically expressive of his peculiar strength, 'Tis Pity she's a Whore (acted c. 1626) and The Broken Heart (acted c. 1629), both printed in 1633 with the anogram of his name Fide Honor, he had found horrible situations which required dramatic explanation by intensely powerful motives.

  • In a third tragedy, Love's Sacrifice (acted c. 1630; printed in 1633), he again worked on similar materials; but this time he unfortunately essayed to base the interest of his plot upon an unendurably unnatural possibility - doing homage to virtue after a fashion which is in itself an insult.

  • Among the spurious works of Athanasius is printed a tract entitled About Virginity, ch.

  • The Icelandic, in a Copenhagen MS. of the 13th century, was printed by Professor Th.

  • In the following year he printed a collection of Scots Songs.

  • In 1832 the Registro Trimestre, a literary and scientific journal printed at Mexico, contained a communication by Dr. Pablo de la Llave, describing this species (with which he first became acquainted before 1810, from examining more than a dozen specimens obtained by the natural-history expedition to New Spain and kept in the palace of the Retiro near Madrid) under the name by which it is now known, Pharomacrus mocino.3 Quezal, male and female.

  • The poems are printed in Pinkerton's Ancient Scottish Poems (1786), i.

  • Here Venantius Fortunatus, the Italian poet, found a friendly reception, and two of the poems printed under his name are usually attributed to Radegunda.

  • He wrote An Inquiry into the Principles of Beauty in Grecian Architecture (London, 1822), and the Correspondence of the Earl of Aberdeen has been printed privately under the direction of his son, Lord Stanmore.

  • Ptolemaei magnam compositionem (printed at Venice in 1496), and his own De Triangulis (Nuremberg, 1533), the earliest work treating of trigonometry as a substantive science.

  • The prose Lancelot was frequently printed; J.

  • C. Brunet chronicles editions of 1488, 1494, 1513, 1520 and 1533 - of this last date there are two, one published by Jehan Petit, the other by Philippe Lenoire, this last by far the better, being printed from a much fuller manuscript.

  • Here in 1743 Christopher Sauer, one of the sect's first pastors, and a printer by trade, printed the first Bible (a few copies of which are still in existence) published in a European language in America.

  • He was continually being fined for allowing his pigs to stray in the street, selling bad meat, letting his house to doubtful characters for illegal purposes, and generally infringing the by-laws respecting weights and measures (extracts from the Ipswich records, printed in the Athenaeum, 1900, i.

  • Matthew Paris also wrote a life of Edmund Rich (q.v.), which is probably the work printed in W.

  • Garnet's Ghost was published as a broadside in 1679, but the other Satires on the Jesuits, although written at the same time, were not printed until 1681.

  • Hill Burton, selections from his correspondence and a biography, were published by Dr Bowring, in eleven closely printed volumes (1838-1843).

  • The first Awe work, written by James Donaldson, was printed in culture in 1697, under the title of Husbandry Anatomized; or, Scotland an Inquiry into the Present Manner of Tilling and in the 18th Manuring the Ground in Scotland.

  • The legend of an indecent consecration at the Nag's Head tavern in Fleet Street seems first to have been printed by the Jesuit, Christopher Holywood, in 1604; and it has long been abandoned by reputable controversialists.

  • Amongst the older works on Origen those of Huetius (printed in Delarue, vol.

  • In 1881 and 1884 he printed some notes on the elements of vector analysis for the use of his students; these were never formally published, but they formed the basis of a text-book on Vector Analysis which was published by his pupil, E.

  • 9 The first printed edition and translation of the Sidra rabba, by Matth.

  • Poschiavo in the Grisons) but was printed by John Wolfe in London, where Castelvetri was staying; the name of the alleged printer is an anagram of Jacobum Castelvetrum.

  • Most of these are printed in Migne, Patrologia graeca, clvi.; the letters have been edited by E.

  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.

  • The original Latin text was printed at Cologne (1473), Spires (1483), Paris (1500), Oxford (1598 and 1599), &c. It was first translated into English by J.

  • The twenty-six books De Animalibus of Albertus Magnus (Groot), printed in 1478, are founded mainly on Aristotle.

  • of England, and probably written soon after 1121, as printed by the late Mr Thomas Wright, in his Popular Treatises on Science written during the Middle Ages (London, 1841).

  • collections formed by a certain nobleman who had travelled in Eastern Europe, Western Asia and Egypt - possible Breidenbach, an account of whose travels in the Levant was printed at Mentz in 1486 - it is really a medical treatise, and its zoological portion is mainly an abbreviation of the writings of Albertus Magnus, with a few interpolations from Isidorus of Seville (who flourished in the beginning of the 7th century, and was the author of many works highly esteemed in the middle ages) and a work known as Physiologus.

  • The revival of learning was at hand, and William Turner, a Northumbrian, while residing abroad to avoid persecution at home, printed at Cologne in 1544 the first commentary on the birds mentioned by Aristotle and Pliny conceived in anything like the spirit that moves modern naturalists.'

  • Contemporary with these three men was Ulysses Aldrovandus, a Bolognese, who wrote an Historia Naturalium in sixteen folio volumes, most of which were not printed till after his death in 1605; but those on birds appeared between 1599 and 1603.

  • It is certain that the first four volumes were written if not printed before that method was promulgated, and when the fame of Linnaeus as a zoologist rested on little more than the very meagre sixth edition of the Systema Naturae and the first edition of his Fauna Suecica.

  • In 1783 Boddaert printed at Utrecht a Table des planches enlumineez, 9 in which he attempted to refer every species of bird figured in that extensive series to its proper Linnaean genus, and to assign it a scientific name if it did not already possess one.

  • 7 He also prepared for publication a second edition of his Index Ornithologicus, but this was never printed, and the manuscript came into A.

  • 9 Of this work only fifty copies were printed, and it is one of the rarest known to the ornithologist.

  • Of still wider interest are the accounts of Cook's three famous voyages, though unhappily much of the information gained by the naturalists who accompanied him on one or more of them seems to be irretrievably lost: the original observations of the elder Forster were not printed till 1844, and the valuable collection of zoological drawings made by the younger Forster still remains unpublished in the British Museum.

  • Barton's Fragments of the Natural History of Pennsylvania,' both printed at Philadelphia, one in 1791, the other in 1799; but J.

  • The earliest list of British birds we possess is that given by Merrett in his Pinax rerun naturalium Britannicarum, printed in London in 1667.4 In 1677 Plot published his Natural History of Oxfordshire, which reached a second edition in 1705, and in 1686 that of Staffordshire.

  • A similar work on Lancashire, Cheshire and the Peak was sent out in 1700 by Leigh, and one on Cornwall by Borlase in 1758 - all these four being printed at Oxford.

  • No real second edition ever appeared, but in anticipation of it Sir Thomas Browne prepared in or about 1671 (?) his " Account of Birds found in Norfolk," of which the draft, now in the British Museum, was printed in his collected works by Wilkin in 1835.

  • In 1816 Vieillot published at Paris an Analyse d'une nouvelle ornithologie elementaire, containing a method of classification which he had tried in vain to get printed before, both in Turin and in London.

  • 4 The method was communicated to the Turin Academy, on 10th January 1814, and was ordered to be printed (Mem.

  • A similar bibliography of Russian ornithology by Alexander Brandt was printed at St Petersburg in 1877 or 1878.

  • Nitzsch, printed at Leipzig in 1811 - a miscellaneous set of detached essays on some Nitzsch.

  • This thereat German comparative anato- Johannes great p mist did in two communications to the Academy of Sciences of Berlin, one on the 26th June 1845 and the other on the 14th May 1846, which, having been first briefly published in the Academy's Monatsbericht, were afterwards printed in full, and illustrated by numerous figures, in its Abhandlungen, though in this latter and complete form they did not appear in public until 1847.

  • By some unaccountable accident, the date of the original communication to the Academy of Berlin is wrongly printed.

  • Bonaparte, in his Saggio di una distribuzione metodica degli Animali Vertebrati, published at Rome, and in 1837 communicated to the Linnean 'Society of London, " A new Systematic Arrangement of Vertebrated Animals," which was subsequently printed in that Society's Transactions (xviii.

  • The library of San Marco contains upwards of 35,000 printed volumes and about 10,000 manuscripts.

  • The part of this work, generally called Opus Tertium, is printed by Brewer (pp. 1-310), who considers it to be a complete treatise.

  • The ruins first became known to Europe through the visit of Dr William Halifax of Aleppo in 1691; his Relation of a voyage to Tadmor has been printed from his autograph in the Pal.

  • The earliest work of Orosius, Consultatio sive commonitorium ad Augustinum de errore Priscillianistarum et Origenistarum, explains its object by its title; it was written soon after his arrival in Africa, and is usually printed in the works of Augustine along with the reply of the latter, Contra Priscillianistas et Origenistas liber [ad Orosium.

  • There were no printed circulars, except the monthly prices current of all kinds of produce, but brokers used to send particulars of business done to their customers in letters.

  • 1 Its methods were stated to be: " To afford information to every country capable of producing cotton, both by the diffusion of printed directions for its cultivation, and sending competent teachers of cotton planting and cleaning, and by direct communication with Christian missionaries whose aid and co - operation it solicits; to supply, gratuitously, in the first instance, the best seeds to natives in every part of the world who are willing to receive them; to give prizes for the extended cultivation of cotton; and The Association published a weekly paper known as The Cotton Supply Reporter.

  • Under the head of laws come the assizes of the Kingdom, edited by Beugnot in the Recueil des historiens des croisades; and the assizes of Antioch, printed at Venice in 1876.

  • Poggio's works were printed at Basel in 1538, "ex aedibus Henrici Petri."

  • The work was printed by the king's printer and dedicated to Louvois, which points to the probability that the government did not disapprove of it.

  • An edition of the Arabic text has been printed at Bulaq, (7 vols., 1867) and a part of the work has been translated by the late Baron McG.

  • This property is usually obtained by mixing soft and hard soaps, or, more rarely, by adding gum tragacanth to a hard soap. In the textile trades the wool scourer employs a neutral olive-oil soap, or, on account of its cheapness, a neutral curd or curd mottled brand; the cotton cleanser, on the other hand, uses an alkaline soap, but for cleaning printed cottons a neutral olive-oil curd soap is used, for, in this case, free alkali and resin are objectionable; olive-oil soap, free from caustic alkali, but often with sodium carbonate, is also used in cleansing silk fibres, although hard soaps free from resin are frequently employed for their cheapness.

  • The earlier translations, such as the Turba Philosophorum and other works printed in collections like the Artis auriferae quam chemiam vocant (1572), Theatrum chemicum (1602), and J.

  • Much bibliographical and other information about the later writers on alchemy is contained in Bibliotheca Chemica (2 vols., Glasgow, 1906), a catalogue by John Ferguson of the books in the collection of James Young of Kelly (printed for private distribution).

  • Tartaglia's first printed work, entitled Nuova scienzia (Venice, 1 537), dealt with the theory and practice of gunnery.

  • It was not printed till 1558, ten years after the author's death, and then under the title of Les Amants fortunes.

  • The Marguerites consist of a very miscellaneous collection of poems, mysteries, farces, devotional poems of considerable length, spiritual and miscellaneous songs, &c. The Dernieres poesies, not printed till 1896 (by M.

  • The earliest "Garland" was printed in 1670, and in 1678 appeared a prose version which was reprinted by W.

  • His tractate (1542) against the permission of bigamy in the case of Philip of Hesse was not allowed to be printed (the manuscript is in the Heidelberg university library).

  • Since 1871 abstracts of papers appearing in the other journals have been printed.

  • Usually, when the symbols of the elements are written or printed with a figure to the right, it is understood that this indicates a molecule of the element, the symbol alone representing an atom.

  • From the pyrone ring the following series of compounds are derived (for brevity, the hydrogen atoms are not printed): Penthiophene gives, by a similar introduction of nitrogen atoms, penthiazoline, corresponding to meta-oxazine, and para-thiazine, CH 2 CH 2o CH CO „ .„0 C ?

  • Maps were thus named after the material upon which they were drawn or painted, and it should be noted that even at present maps intended for use in the open air, by cyclists, military men and others, are frequently printed on cloth.

  • If this tint be printed in grey or brown, isohypses, in black or red, show distinctly above it.

  • The same combination is possible if hills engraved in the ordinary manner are printed in colours, as is done in an edition of the i-inch ordnance map, with contours in red and hills hachured in brown.

  • Generally from to 24 gores and two small segments for the polar regions printed on vellum paper are used for each globe.

  • - Maps were first printed in the second half of the 15th century.

  • Zincographs are generally used for producing surface blocks or plates which may be printed in the same way as a wood-cut.

  • Photographic processes have been utilized not only in reducing maps to a smaller scale, but also for producing stones and plates from which they may be printed.

  • The manuscript maps intended to be produced by photographic processes upon stone, zinc or aluminium, are drawn on a scale somewhat larger than the scale on which they are to be printed, thus eliminating all those imperfections which are inherent in a pen-drawing.

  • or stone, but after the 10th century they were printed from wood-blocks.

  • Associated with it are Francesco Pizigano (1367-1373), Francesco de Cesanis (1421), Giacomo Giroldi (1422-1446), Andrea Bianco (43-44) Giovanni Leardo (1442-1452), Alvise Cadamosto, who was associated with the Portuguese explorers on the west coast of Africa (1454-1456) and whose Portolano was printed at Venice in 1490, and Fra Mauro (1457).

  • This version was first printed in 1475 at Vicenza, but its contents had become known through MS. copies before this, and their study influenced the construction of maps in two respects.

  • He published in 1507 a huge map of the world, in 12 sheets, together with a small globe of a diameter of I 10 mm., the segments for which were printed from wood-blocks.

  • island-, covered with printed gores were produced by L.

  • Of SchOner we know that he produced four globes, three printed from segments (1515, 1523, 1 533), and p SCF12MER.S FIG.

  • These Dutch maps and charts are generally accompanied by descriptive notes or sailing directions printed on the back of them.

  • Reliefs from printed maps were first produced.

  • (a) in outline, with contours in black, (b) with hills hachured in brown or black, and (c) printed in five colours.

  • to i in., in two editions, both printed in colour, the one with hills stippled in brown, the other coloured on the " layer system " as a strata-relief map; a map of the United Kingdom on a scale of 4 m.

  • On both these maps the hills are printed in grey chalk.

  • It is printed in three colours, and gives contours at intervals of io metres.

  • They are printed in three colours, contours at intervals of 10 and 20 metres being in brown, incidental features (ravines, cliffs, glaciers) in black or blue.

  • The last is printed in five colours, the ground is shown in contours of io metres interval and grey stippling.

  • The Book of Discipline in its successive printed editions from 1783 to 1906 contains the working rules of the organization, and also a compilation of testimonies borne by the Society at different periods, to important points of Christian truth, and often called forth by the special circumstances of the time.

  • Of the many prophetic and polemical works that were attributed to Joachim in the 13th and following centuries, only those enumerated in his will can be regarded as absolutely authentic. These are the Concordia novi et veteris Testamenti (first printed at Venice in 1519), the Expositio in Apocalypsin (Venice, 1527), the Psalterium decem chordarum (Venice, 1527), together with some "libelli" against the Jews or the adversaries of the Christian faith.

  • Another Itinerary, preserved at Einsiedeln, printed by Mabillon, dates from the latter half of the same century.

  • In 1799 a new edition was brought out by the Society, and he managed to secure 700 copies of the io,000 issued; the Sunday School Society got 3000 testaments printed, and most of them passed into his hands in 1801.

  • In the Moslem schools, which, in 1905, comprised 855 mektebs or primary schools, and 41 madrasas or high schools, instruction is usually given in Turkish or Arabic; while in Orthodox schools the books are printed in Cyrillic characters.

  • The first printing-press in Turkey was established by an Hungarian who had assumed the name of Ibrahim, and in 1728 (1141) appeared the first book printed in that country; it was Vanlpuli's Turkish translation of Jevheri's Arabic dictionary.

  • novel, Sophie, printed in 1786, and a tragedy, Jeanne Grey, published in 1790.

  • Some years afterwards (perhaps in 1228) Leonardo dedicated to the well-known astrologer Michael Scott the second edition of his Liber abaci, which was printed with Leonardo's other works by Prince Bald.

  • The Liber abaci, which fills 459 printed pages, contains the most perfect methods of calculating with whole numbers and with fractions, practice, extraction of the square and cube roots, proportion, chain rule, finding of proportional parts, averages, progressions, even compound interest, just as in the completest mercantile arithmetics of our days.

  • The prices to be paid for European and native articles are fixed every year, the prices current in Danish and Eskimo being printed and distributed by the government.

  • A catalogue of the printed books in the Welsh department, which soon became a standard work of reference, was published in 1898, while a calendar of the Welsh MSS.

  • He printed privately as a pamphlet, in June 1887, a brief and touching sketch of his father.

  • In the autumn of this year he received a visit 'at Vailima from the countess of Jersey, in company with whom and some others he wrote the burlesque extravagance in prose and verse, called An Object of Pity, privately printed in 1893 at Sydney.

  • He cut the wood blocks for the books which he printed in Tirgovishtea, Ramnicu, Snagov and Bucharest.

  • He was also the first to introduce Oriental founts of type into Rumania, and he printed there the first Arabic missal for the Christians of the East (Ramnicu, 1702).

  • He also trained Georgians in the art of printing, and cut the type with which under his pupil Mihail Ishtvanovitch they printed the first Georgian Gospels (Tiflis, 170 9).

  • In the same neighbourhood is the Johanneum, erected in 1834 and in which are preserved the town library of about 600,000 printed books and 5000 MSS.

  • The early printed editions of Pliny erroneously named the discoverer Obsidius, and the rock obsidianus.

  • In the summer of 1864 a sermon which he preached and printed on Baptismal Regeneration (a doctrine which he strenuously repudiated, maintaining that immersion was only an outward and visible sign of the inward conversion) led to a difference with the bulk of the Evangelical party, both Nonconformist and Anglican.

  • In addition to the works already mentioned, his Cosmotheoros- a speculation concerning the inhabitants of the planets - was printed posthumously at the Hague in 1698, and appeared almost simultaneously in an English translation.

  • A volume entitled Opera posthuma (Leiden, 1703) contained his "Dioptrica," in which the ratio between the respective focal lengths of object-glass and eye-glass is given as the measure of magnifying power, together with the shorter essays De vitris figurandis, De corona et parheliis, &c. An early tract De ratiociniis tin ludo aleae, printed in 16J7 with Schooten's Exercitationes mathematicae, is notable as one of the first formal treatises on the theory of probabilities; nor should his investigations of the properties of the cissoid, logarithmic and catenary curves be left unnoticed.

  • A biography of Huygens was prefixed to his Opera varia (1724); his Eloge in the character of a French academician was printed by J.

  • The chansons de geste of the cycle of Guillaume are: Enfances Garin de Monglane (15th century) and Garin de Monglane (13th century), on which is founded the prose romance of Guerin de Monglane, printed in the 15th century by Jehan Trepperel and often later; Girars de Viane (13th century, by Bertrand de Barsur-Aube), ed.

  • But his assent to this was only extracted from him in 1540 by the importunities of his friends, especially of his enthusiastic disciple George Joachim Rheticus (1514-1576), who printed, in the Narratio prima (Danzig, 1540), a preliminary account of the Copernican theory, and simultaneously sent to the press at Nuremberg his master's complete exposition of it in the treatise entitled De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (1543).

  • But the first printed copy reached Frauenburg barely in time to be laid on the writer's death-bed.

  • His treatise De monetae cudendae ratione, 1526 (first printed in 1816), written by order of King Sigismund I., is an exposition of the principles on which it was proposed to reform the currency of the Prussian provinces of Poland.

  • At his death Glanvill left a piece entitled Sadducismus Triumphatus (printed in 1681, reprinted with some additions in 1682, German trans.

  • Some doubt exists concerning Geoffrey's share in the compilation of the Vita et mors Edwardi II., usually attributed to Sir Thomas de la More, or Moor, and printed by Camden in his Anglica scripta.

  • is printed in vol.

  • The first edition, from a MS. no longer extant, was printed by J.

  • - This book has been preserved in Greek, Ethiopic, Armenian and Slavonic. The Greek was first printed at Venice in 1609, and next by Ceriani in 1868 under the title Paralipomena Jeremiae.

  • - Though the Latin version of this book was thrice printed in the 16th century (in 1527, 1550 and 1599), it was practically unknown to modern scholars till it was recognized by Conybeare and discussed by Cohn in the Jewish Quarterly Review, 1898, pp. 2 79-33 2.

  • It was printed by W.

  • Few as were the years of work allotted to him, and few as are the printed pages covered by the record of his researches, his name is, and will remain, a household word among mathematicians.

  • His mathematical enthusiasm was for the time completely quenched, and during two years the printed volume of his Mecanique, which he had seen only in manuscript, lay unopened beside him.

  • A portion of his Latin verse is printed in the first volume (pp. 306354) of Delitiae poetarum Scotorum (Amsterdam, 1637).

  • 2 it was agreed that the written and printed memoranda should be in English but might be accompanied by a translation into the language of the power on whose behalf they were put in.

  • The canons are printed in C. Mirbt, Quellen zur Geschichte des Papsttums (Tubingen, 1901), p. 46 f.; Hefele, Conciliengeschichte, ed.

  • The Commons had ordered to be printed, among other papers, a report of the inspectors of prisons on Newgate, which stated that an obscene book, published by Stockdale, was given to the prisoners to read.

  • xxiii.); and during the same period flourished Sigismondo Tizio (a priest of Siena, though born at Castiglione Aretino), whose voluminous history written in Latin and never printed (now among the MSS.

  • The poem appears, on the authority of Laing, to have been printed at the press of Chepman & Myllar about 1508, but the fragments which Laing saw are not extant.

  • The first complete edition, now available, was printed by Lekprevik for Henry Charteris in 1570 (Brit.

  • Weary with this work, he took a post at Borch College in 1710, where he wrote, and printed in 1711, his first work, An Introduction to the History of the Nations of Europe, and was permitted to present to King Frederick IV.

  • The Kaffirs have their own organ, Ipipa lo Hlunga (the paper of grievances), issued at Maritzburg, and the Asiatics, Indian Opinion, a weekly paper started in 1903 and printed in English, Gujarati, Hindi and Tamil.

  • The rapid growth of the Indian population from about 1890 caused much disquiet among the majority of the white inhabitants, who viewed with especial anxiety the activities 1 The causes, both local and general, are set forth in a despatch by the governor of the 21st of June 1906 and printed in the Blue Book, Cd.

  • Accepted at first as Aristotle's, and actually printed in the first Latin editions of his works, the book is in reality an Arabian compilation of Neoplatonic theses.

  • Monroe returned to America in the spring of 1797, and in the following December published a defence of his course in a pamphlet of 500 pages entitled A View of the Conduct of the Executive in the Foreign Affairs of the United States, and printed in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin Bache (1769-1798).

  • A catalogue of his library was printed in 1813.

  • The first volume was printed in German in 1836, and subsequently translated into Czech.

  • The first Hungarian grammar known is the Grammatica HungaroLatina of John Erdosi alias Sylvester Pannonius, printed at SarvarUjsziget in 1539.

  • Hungarian history, and may be assigned to the middle of the 12th century; the Carmen Miserabile of Rogerius; the Liber Cronicorum of Simon Kezai, belonging to the end of the 13th century, Early the so-called " Chronicon Budense," Cronica Hungarorum, printed at Buda in 1473 (Eichhorn, Geschichte der Litteratur, ii.

  • Other relics belonging to this period are the oath which John Hunyady took when elected governor of Hungary (1446); a few verses sung by the children of Pest at the coronation of his son Matthias (1458); 1 An example of this work, printed on vellum in Gothic letter (Augsburg, 1488), and formerly belonging to the library of Matthias Corvinus, king of Hungary, may be seen in the British Museum.

  • From the appearance of the first extant printed Magyar First made known by Coloman Thaly (1871) from a discovery by MM.

  • Valyi-Nagy, the first Magyar 1 The earliest, styled " Song on the Discovery of the right hand of the Holy King Stephen," and printed at Nuremberg by Anton Koburger in 1484, is lost.

  • naturalis et matheseos, 1472-1875 (Budapest, 1878), where the number of Magyar works bearing on the natural sciences and mathematics printed from the earliest date to the end of 1875 is stated to be 3811, of which 106 are referred to periodicals.

  • These works are the earliest printed books on mathematics.

  • The best original account of the rebellion of Wat Tyler is the "Anonimal Chronicle of St Mary's, York," printed by G.

  • He also wrote homilies on various subjects, and a speech againt usurers, printed with other works in Migne, Patrologia Graeca, c. i.

  • Though now remembered chiefly for invaluable contributions to the theory of music, it is evident that he must have been famous both as a practical musician and as a composer; for, notwithstanding the limited number of his printed works, consisting of a volume entitled Modulationes Sex Vocum (Venice, 1566), and a few motets and madrigals scattered through the collections of Scotto and other contemporary publishers, he both produced and superintended the public performance of some important pieces in the service of the republic. First among these was the music written to celebrate the battle of Lepanto (on the 7th of October 1571).

  • Cleve, printed in the Journal of the London Chemical Society for 1895, contains a list of Marignac's papers.

  • Neckam also wrote Corrogationes Promethei, a scriptural commentary prefaced by a treatise on grammatical criticism; a translation of Aesop into Latin elegiacs (six fables from this version, as given in a Paris MS., are printed in Robert's Fables inedites); commentaries, still unprinted, on portions of Aristotle, Martianus Capella and Ovid's Metamorphoses, and other works.

  • Lagarde, 1875); (b) the old Latin, which as revised by Jerome in 383 after the current Greek text forms the Psalterium romanum, long read in the Roman Church and still used in St Peter's; (c) various Arabic versions, including that printed in the polyglots of Le Jay and Walton, and two others of the four exhibited together in Lagarde's Psalterium, Job, Proverbia, arabice, 1876; on the relations and history of these versions see G.

  • It did not, however, obtain ecclesiastical currency - the old versions holding their ground, just as English churchmen still read the Psalms in the version of the " Great Bible " printed in their Prayer Book.

  • In Notulae syriacae (privately printed 1887) Wright edited the surviving fragment of a 3rd recension which is preserved in a 13th-century MS. at Cambridge.

  • It has been suggested that this part of his life was 1 See A Testimonie of Antiquitie, sheaving the auncient fayth in the Church of England touching the sacrament of the body and bloude of the Lord here publikely preached, printed by John Day (1567).

  • p. 583), printed the Canones ad Wulsinum episcopum, and suggested Alfric Putta or Putto, archbishop of York, as the author, adding some note of others bearing the name.

  • There are other isolated sermons and treatises by f lfric, printed in vol.

  • ' Printed by Benjamin Thorpe in Ancient Laws and Institutes of England (1840), with the later pastoral for Wulfstan.

  • This was first printed in the Nouvelles de la republique des lettres (January 1685) and, as Vie de Corneille, was included in all the editions of Fontenelle's OEuvres.

  • There have been several collective editions of Fontenelle's works, the first being printed in 3 vols.

  • He became a member of the Committee of Public Instruction early in 1793, and after carrying many useful decrees on the preservation of national monuments, on the military schools, on the reorganization of the Museum of Natural History and other matters, he brought forward on the 26th of June his Projet d'education nationale (printed at the Imprimerie Nationale), which proposed to lay the burden or primary education on the public funds, but to leave secondary education to private enterprise.

  • Her letters to Constant were printed in the Revue suisse (April 1844), her Lettres-Memoires by E.

  • Certain writings of Joannitius, translated into Latin, were popular in the middle ages in Europe, and were printed in the 16th century.

  • 980-1037) and was more than once translated into Latin and printed.

  • It was translated into Latin, and more than once printed, as were some of his lesser works, which thus formed a part of the contribution made by the Arabians to European medicine.

  • Three hundred medical writers in Arabic are enumerated by Ferdinand Wiistenfeld (1808-1899), and other historians have enlarged the list (Haser), but only three have been printed in the original; a certain number more are known through old Latin translations, and the great majority still exist in manuscript.

  • The best-known is the rhyming Latin poem on health by Joannes de Meditano, Regimen sanitatis Salerni, professedly written for the use of the "king of England," supposed to mean William the Conqueror; it had an immense reputation in the middle ages, and was afterwards many times printed, and translated into most European languages.

  • Among the writers it may be sufficient to mention here Gariopontus; Copho, who wrote the Anatome porci, a well-known medieval book; Joannes Platearius, first of a family of physicians bearing the same name, whose Practica, or medical compendium, was afterwards several times printed; and Trotula, believed to be the wife of the last-named.

  • A more important work, the Practica seu lilium medicinae, of Bernard Gordon, a Scottish professor at Montpellier (written in the year 1307), was more widely spread, being translated into French and Hebrew, and printed in several editions.

  • Crafts, printed in the Journal of the London Chemical Society for 1900.

  • A minute knowledge of printed books and a methodical examination of departmental and communal archives furnished him with material for a long course of successful lectures, which gave rise to some important works on municipal history and led to a great revival of interest in the origins and significance of the urban communities in France.

  • In this he was disappointed, but he had the work printed at Rouen nevertheless, and spent the summer of 1723 revising it.

  • The Henriade was at last licensed in France; Brutus, a play which he had printed in England, was accepted for performance, but kept back for a time by the author; and he began the celebrated poem of the Pucelle, the amusement and the torment of great part of his life.

  • surreptitiously printed, which he accomplished.

  • In a few days printed copies appeared.

  • Voltaire had sent copies away; others had been printed abroad; and the thing was irrecoverable.

  • There remains only the huge division of his correspondence, which is constantly being augmented by fresh discoveries, and which, according to Georges Bengesco, has never been fully or correctly printed, even in some of the parts longest known.

  • The fire of 1666 destroyed all the documents of the Parish Clerks Company, and in its hall in Silver Street only printed tables from about the year 1700 are to be found.

  • by virtue of an act of common council, and (2) that a petition to the king, in which it was alleged that by the prorogation of parliament public justice had been interrupted, had been printed by order of the Court of Common Council.

  • This was first printed by Stow in his Survey.

  • The following are some of the Chronicles of London which have been printed, arranged in order of publication: R.

  • Rawlinson's Natural History and Antiquities of Surrey (1719); his antiquarian notes on Wiltshire were printed in Wiltshire; the Topographical Collections of John Aubrey, corrected and enlarged by J.

  • Jackson (Devizes, 1862); part of another MS. on "The Natural History of Wiltshire" was printed by John Britton in 1847 for the Wiltshire Topographical Society; the Miscellanies were edited in 1890 for the Library of Old Authors; the "Minutes for Lives" were partially edited in 1813.

  • The Hebrew Book of Noah, a later work, is printed in Jellinek's Bet ha-Midrasch, iii.

  • This book was first printed from one MS. by Mai, Script.

  • This Arabic work has not been printed, but a summary of the contents is given by Nicoll in his catalogue of the Oriental MSS.

  • right, shared by the Vittorio Emanuele library of Rome, of receiving a copy of every work printed in Italy, since 1870 (since 1848 it had enjoyed a similar privilege with regard to works printed in Tuscany).

  • It contains some 50o,000 printed volumes, 700,000 pamphlets, over 9000 prints and drawings (including 284 by Albert Diirer), nearly 20,000 MSS., and 40,000 letters.

  • Unfortunately, however, the confusion engendered by a defective organization has long been a byword among the people; there is no printed catalogue, quantities of books are buried in packingcases and unavailable, the collection of foreign books is very poor, hardly any new works being purchased, and the building itself is quite inadequate and far from safe; but the site of a new one has now been purchased and the plans are agreed upon, so that eventually the whole collection will be transferred to more suitable quarters.

  • It contains nearly io,000 MSS., including many magnificent illuminated missals and Bibles and a number of valuable Greek and Latin texts, 242 incunabula and 11,000 printed books, chiefly dealing with palaeography; it is in some ways the most important of the Florentine libraries.

  • He wrote a book entitled The Method of Preparing Medicines and Diet, which was translated into Hebrew in the year 1280, and thence into Latin by Paravicius, whose version, first printed at Venice, 1490, has passed through several editions.

  • Early in Elizabeth's reign, however, he wrote a larger catechism, to serve as a statement of Protestant principles; it was printed in 1570, and in the same year appeared his "middle" catechism, designed it would seem for the instruction of "simple curates."

  • The Annales were first published in 1525 and are printed in the Monumenta Germaniae historica, Bande iii.

  • The narrative was first printed at Pesaro in 1513, in what Apostolo Zeno calls lingua inculta e rozza.

  • It is the chief centre in Germany of the cotton, wool, silk and velvet manufactures, and of upholstery, drapery and haberdashery of all descriptions, of printed calicoes, of Turkey-red and other dyes, and of fine chemicals.

  • The most important was his De Origine ac Progressu schismatis Anglicani, which was continued after 1558 by Edward Rishton, and printed at Cologne in 1585; it has been often re-edited and translated, the best English edition being that by David Lewis (London, 1877).

  • Such external evidence as exists bearing on the origin of the Heliand and the companion poem is contained in a Latin document printed by Flacius Illyricus in 1562.

  • are printed side by side.

  • 997) a History of Egypt; `Otbi wrote the History of Mahmud of Ghazna, at whose court he lived (printed on the margin of the Egyptian edition of Ibn al-Athir); Tha'labi (d.

  • 1260) Biographical aexicon, already 1 Of this work the Gotha aibrary has a portion containing 290-320 A.H., of which the part about the West has been printed by Dozy in the Bayan, and the rest was published at aeiden in 1897.

  • 2 A fragment (198-251 A.H.) is printed in de Goeje, Fragm.

  • 1276), better known as Elmacin, was printed by Erpenius in 1625.

  • 1332), but only extracts from it have been printed.

  • c. 1349), best known by his Cosmography, wrote a Chronicle which has been printed in Egypt.

  • While thus employed he conceived the idea of the journal-afiche, and after the arrest of the king at Varennes in June 1791 he placarded a large printed sheet on all the walls of Paris twice a week, under the title of the Ami des Citoyens, journal fraternel.

  • The violent tone of some of his printed manifestoes about this time, especially of his Lob des Konigs u.

  • When the French government decided on printing a general catalogue of the printed books in the Bibliotheque, Delisle became responsible for this great undertaking and took an active part in the work; in the preface to the first volume (1897) he gave a detailed history of the library and its management.

  • After his retirement (February 21, 1905) he brought out in two volumes a catalogue and description of the printed books and MSS.

  • This is a history of Spain from the earliest times down to 1456, and was printed at Granada in 1545, and also in the Rerum Hispanicarum Scriptores aliquot, by R.

  • He also wrote the Kitab ushShama'il on the character and life of Mahomet (printed at Calcutta, 1846).

  • After holding a school mastership and two curacies, he was made rector of St Martin's Orgar in London in 1628, where he took a leading part in the contest between the London clergy and the citizens about the city tithes, and compiled a treatise on the subject, which is printed in Brewster's Collectanea (1752).

  • the image has the same appearance as the object and is not perverted as when the reflection of a printed page is viewed in a mirror.

  • The royal library contains over 1,300,000 printed volumes and 30,000 manuscripts.

  • The American committee which cooperated in the revision desired to employ the name Jehovah wherever Jhvh occurs in the original, and editions embodying their preferences are printed accordingly.

  • All the printed editions, however, consist of four parts, the additional one being entitled Speculum Morale.

  • The Speculum Naturale fills a bulky folio volume of 848 closely printed double-columned pages.

  • A list of Vincent's works, both MS. and printed, will be found in the Histoire litteraire de France, vol.

  • The Tractatus consolatorius pro morte amici and the Liber de eruditione filiorurn regalium (dedicated to Queen Margaret) were printed at Basel in December 1480.

  • The Liber de Institutione Principum, a treatise on the duties of kings and their functionaries, has never yet been printed, and the only MS. copy the writer of this article has been able to consult does not contain in its prologue all the information which Echard seems to imply is to be found there.

  • The so-called first edition of the Speculum Majus, including the Speculum Morale, ascribed to Johann Mentelin and long celebrated as the earliest work printed at Strassburg, has lately been challenged as being only an earlier edition of Vincent's three genuine Specula (c. 1468-70), with which has been bound up the Speculum Morale first printed by Mentelin (c. 1 473-7 6).

  • In a fragment of autobiography printed in the Athenaeum (12th of January 1850) he says that he was entirely self-taught, and attributes his poetic development to long country walks undertaken in search of wild flowers, and to a collection of books, including the works of Young, Barrow, Shenstone and Milton, bequeathed to his father by a poor clergyman.

  • is not in the earlier editions of Lactantius; it was discovered and printed by Baluze in 1679.

  • A posthumous work entitled Contemplatio Philosophica was printed for private circulation in 1793 by his grandson, Sir William Young, Bart., prefaced by a life of the author, and with an appendix containing letters addressed to him by Bolingbroke, Bossuet, &c. Several short papers by him were published in Phil.

  • The Confutatio Alcorani, printed at Seville in 1500, at Venice in 1607, adds hardly anything to the sections of the Itinerary devoted to Moslem belief, &c. Ricold's Libellus contra Nationes Orientales and Contra errores Judaeorum have never been printed.

  • In the printed text this document, entitled An Invective Against the Armenians, is dated 800 years after Constantine, but the author Isaac Catholicos almost certainly belonged to the earlier time.

  • (Strassburg, 1900), 2nd revised edition, separately printed (ib., 1905); W.

  • Peregrinorum et gesta Regis Ricardi; this last, with some valuable historical letters, is printed in W.

  • Vast p PRINTED If ouds of dust and stones, blown out of the crater and funnel of ie volcano, were hurled into the air and carried for hundreds miles, the finer particles falling to the earth even.

  • Three elegies were formerly attributed to Pedo by Scaliger; two on the death of Maecenas (In Obitum Maecenatis and De Verbis Maecenatis moribundi), and one addressed to Livia to console her for the death of her son Drusus (Consolatio ad Liviam de Morte Drusi or Epicedion Drusi, usually printed with Ovid's works); but it is now generally agreed that they are not by Pedo.

  • The first calico printed in the United States was made at East Greenwich about 1794.

  • £5000 were printed in 1710, and from that time until 1751 there were nine separate issues.

  • Tennyson was already writing copiously - "an epic of 6000 lines" at twelve, a drama in blank verse at fourteen, and so on: these exercises have, very properly, not been printed, but the poet said of them at the close of his life, "It seems to me, I wrote them all in perfect metre."

  • These he had originally intended to publish alone, and an earlier privately printed Morte d'Arthur,- Dora, and other Idylls, of 1842, is the despair of book-collectors.

  • In 1857 two Arthurian poems had been tentatively and privately printed, as Enid and Nimue, or the True and the False, to see how the idyllic form would be liked by the inner circle of Tennyson's friends.

  • This is the time of two of his rare, privately printed pamphlets, The Window; or, the Loves of the Wrens (1867), and The Victim (1868).

  • It is a curious fact that the printed editions always give it in conjunction with this latter and that the two have also been preserved together in a Welsh manuscript translation.

  • - There are early printed editions of the Perceval (1530) and of the Perlesvaus (1516 and 1523).

  • The municipal library, with 300,000 volumes, boasts among its rarer treasures a Gutenberg Bible printed at Mainz between 1450 and 1455, another on parchment dated 1462, the Institutiones Justiniani (Mainz, 1468), the Theuerdank, with woodcuts by Hans Schaufelein, and numerous valuable autographs.

  • Thus the first real newspaper did not see the light until 1861, when aYedc publisher brought out the Batavia News, a compilation of items from foreign newspapers, printed on Japanese paper from wooder blocks.

  • They were in fact nothing better than inferior maga zines, printed from wood-blocks, issued weekly or monthly, ani giving little evidence of enterprise or intellect, though connecte with them were the names of men destined to become famous in th world of literature, as Fukuchi Genichiro, Tsji Shinji (afterward Baron TsUji) and Suzuki Yuichi.

  • Shortly afterwards there appeared in Yokohama whence it was subsequently transferred to TOkyothe Mainichi Shimbun (Daily News), the first veritable daily and also the first journal printed with movable types and foreign presses.

  • The principal Japanese supporter of this school was TaigadO (1722-1775), but the volume of copies of his sketches, TafgadO sansui juseki, published about 1870, is one of the least attractive albums ever printed in Japan.

  • But authentic examples of his work now remaining, printed in three colors, seem to show a technique too complete for an origin quite so recent.

  • 1895), whose books of birdsthe Bairei hyakucho gwafu (1881 and 1884) and Yaka-notsuki (1889)are unequalled of their kind; Imao Keinen, who also issued a beautiful set of illustrations of birds and flowers (Keinen kwacho gwafu), engraved by Tanaka Jirokichi and printed by Miki NisaburO (1891-1892); and Watanabe Seitei, whose studies of similar subjects have appeared in Seitei kwac/jO gwafu (1890-1891) and the Bijutsu sekai (1894), engraved by Goto Tokujiro.

  • The printed sources have been catalogued by H.

  • It subsequently came into the hands of Captain Marryatt, who printed in it many of his sea-tales.

  • The Nouvelles ecclesiastiques (1728-1803) were first printed and circulated secretly by the Jansenists in opposition to the Constitution unigenitus.

  • In course of time a large number of similar publications were issued, some illustrated, for instance: Illustrierte Zeitung (Leipzig, 1843), Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung (1892), Die Woche (1899) the last the most widely circulated of the kind, 500,000 being printed.

  • This was printed in the English Historical Review, and afterwards separately.

  • In 1676 he was appointed chaplain to Lawrence Hyde (afterwards earl of Rochester), ambassador-extraordinary to the king of Poland, and of his visit he sent an interesting account to Edward Pococke in a letter, dated Dantzic, 16th December, 1677, which was printed along with South's Posthumous Works in 1717.

  • He now wrote his Letters on the Study of History (printed privately before his death and published in 1752), and the True Use of Retirement.

  • The discovery that the poet had printed secretly 1500 copies of The Patriot King caused him to publish a correct version in 1749, and stirred up a further altercation with Warburton, who defended his friend against Bolingbroke's bitter aspersions, the latter, whose conduct was generally reprehended, publishing a Familiar Epistle to the most Impudent Man Living.

  • L'Histoire d'Angleterre, embracing the period from the invasion of the Romans to the death of Charles I., was printed at the Hague in 1724 in 8 vols.

  • An early expression of reviving Lithuanian national consciousness was the appearance of the newspaper" Ausra,"which, printed in East Prussia, lived for three years, though even in that short period its editor, banished from Germany, had to take refuge at Prague.

  • His Morte d'Arthur, printed by Caxton in 1485, epitomizes the rich mythology which Geoffrey's work had first called into life, and gave the Arthurian story a lasting place in the English imagination.

  • It was first printed at Basel in 1559, and hasbeen edited with an introduction by G.

  • During his confinement there was found among his papers a criticism upon the Jesuits, which was printed after his death as Discursus de erroribus qui in forma gubernationis societatis Jesu occurrunt (Bordeaux, 1625), and was reprinted by order of Charles III.

  • Rooke's Journal for 1700-2 has been printed by the Navy Record Society.

  • The cases, or rather a selection of the cases, are printed in A.

  • A curious passage on the subject, by Ibn Khaldun, an Arabian medieval savant, is quoted by Mr Thomas from the printed Extracts of MSS.

  • The first printed edition of the book, by a certain Blaise de Vigenbre, dates from 1585, is dedicated to the seigniory of Venice (Villehardouin, it should be said, has been accused of a rather unfair predilection for the Venetians), and speaks of either a part or the whole of the memoirs as having been printed twelve years earlier.

  • The library, including 300,000 printed books and io,000 MSS., was, however, transferred to a large and new Renaissance edifice in 1887.

  • It thus came to pass that in Purcell's voluminous biography much that was obviously never intended for the public eye was, perhaps inadvertently, printed, together with a good deal of ungenerous comment.

  • The speech was discovered by Aurispa at Mainz in 1432, as part of a collection of Panegyrici; and was first printed by Fr.

  • These books were printed in the editio princeps (Venice, 1471).

  • - The correspondence with Trajan was apparently preserved in a single Paris MS.; Epp. 41-121 were first printed by Avantius of Verona (1502); and Epp. I-40 by Aldus Manutius (1508).

  • With the exception of a Preface to the Sermons of Dr Whichcote, one of the Cambridge Platonists or latitudinarians, published in 1698, Shaftesbury appears to have printed nothing himself till 1708.

  • None of these pieces seems to have been printed either with his name or his initials.

  • These volumes contain in addition to the four treatises already mentioned, Miscellaneous Reflections, now first printed, and the Inquiry concerning Virtue or Merit, described, as "formerly printed from an imperfect copy, now corrected and published intire," and as "printed first in the year 1699."

  • M.)/n==Authorities== - In Dr Thomas Fowler's monograph on Shaftesbury and Hutcheson in the series of "English philosophers" (1882) he was able largely to supplement the printed materials for the Life by extracts from the Shaftesbury papers in the Record Office.

  • He displayed his interest in his native land by the publication of a Cohortatio ad Concordiam Pietatis, miss y in Patriam suam (1544) which had the express approval of Luther, and a Cohortatio ad Pietatis Concordiam ineundam (1559)� The best early account of Alesius is the Oratio de Alexandro Alesio of Jacob Thomasius (April 1661), printed in the latter's Orationes (No.

  • A series of school books, in the Maltese language printed in Roman characters, with translations in English interlined in different type, was produced at the government printing office and sold at cost price.

  • To-day, though Bibles are still printed with the year 4004 B.C. in the margin of the first chapter of Genesis, no scholar would pretend to regard this reference seriously.

  • 325, printed in Anderson's Collections, vol.

  • Being a man of wealth, he printed at his own expense the numerous papers which he wrote on various branches of this science, and communicated them to scholars in almost every country of Europe.

  • 603, who gives a list of his printed speeches and letters; Foss, Lives of the Judges, vi.

  • The two panegyrics by unknown authors (one printed among the poems of Tibullus as iv.

  • In the meantime, however, he printed a volume of his Rugby sermons, to show definitely what his own religious positions were.

  • A translation of the Andria and three original comedies from his pen are extant, the precise dates of which are uncertain, though the greatest of them was first printed at Rome in 1524.

  • printed, along with a letter from James Short, in Phil.

  • Considerable attention was attracted by his first publication, De Trinitatis erroribus (1531, printed by John Setzer at Hagenau).

  • of 1000 copies was secretly printed at Vienna by Balthasar Arnollet.

  • On 26th February, a letter, enclosing a sheet of the printed book, and revealing the secret of its authorship, was written from Geneva by Guillaume H.

  • 1542 fol.; printed by Caspar Trechsel at Vienne); on this work Tollin founds his high estimate of Servetus as a comparative geographer; the passage incriminated on his trial as attacking the verity of Moses is from Lorenz Friese; the accounts of the language and character of modern nations show original observation.

  • Most of his few remaining letters are printed by Mosheim; his letter from Louvain was despatched in duplicate (to evade capture), but both were seized; one is in the Record Office (U.

  • The Cena de le Ceneri, or Ash Wednesday conversation, devoted to an exposition of the Copernican theory, was printed in 1584.

  • Toland (dated 1713, but probably printed earlier and very rare); of the preface to De l'Infinito (J.

  • His first tractate (1535, first printed 1627) is directed against the "horrible and gross blasphemy of John of Leiden" - though the genuineness of this tract has been doubted.

  • Menno's writings in Plattdeutsch, printed at various places, are numerous, with much sameness, and what an unfriendly critic would call wool-gathering; through them shines a character attractive by the sincerity of its simple and warm spirituality, the secret of Menno's influence.

  • His chief work appeared in 1713, under the title Clavis Universalis, or a New Inquiry after Truth, being a Demonstration of the NonExistence or Impossibility of an External World 1 (printed privately, Edinburgh, 1836, and reprinted in Metaphysical Tracts, 1837, edited by Sam.

  • When, nearer the end of the century (1481-1495), King pitch, and brand themselves with the sign of the cross in token of their baptism "(Libro del conocimiento de todos reynos, &c., printed at Madrid, 1877).

  • Both of these dramas, which were not printed at the time but were widely circulated in manuscript, are of the type which preceded the Shakespearean age - they are allegorical and all the characters are types.

  • historic (1611, 4 parts); Beschryvinghe van Out Batavien (Arnheim, 1612); Het oude gontsche Chronycxken van Hollandt, edited by him, and printed at Amsterdam in 1663; Principes Hollandiae Zelandiae et Frisiae (Haarlem, 1650), translated (1678) into Dutch by Pieter Brugman.

  • The Vita Anselmi, first printed at Antwerp in 1551, is probably the best life of the saint.

  • Less noteworthy are Eadmer's lives of St Dunstan, St Bregwin, archbishop of Canterbury, and St Oswald, archbishop of York; these are all printed in Henry Wharton's Anglia Sacra, part ii.

  • The fragments of a work De Natali Institutione, dealing with astronomy, geometry, music and versification, and usually printed with the De Die Natali of Censorinus, are not by him.

  • This safe conduct, which had been frequently printed, stated that Huss should, whatever judgment might be passed on him, be allowed to return freely to Bohemia.

  • Thanks to his father's excellent advice, he gave up writing doggerel verse (much of which had been printed by his brother and sold on the streets) and turned to prose composition.

  • His success in reproducing articles he had read in The Spectator led him to write an article for his brother's paper, which he slipped under the door of the printing shop with no name attached, and which was printed and attracted some attention.

  • To refute this book and to prove that there could be no such thing as religion, he wrote and printed a small pamphlet, A Dissertation on Liberty and Necessity, Pleasure and Pain, which brought him some curious acquaintances, and of which he soon became thoroughly ashamed.

  • Upon his promise not to publish the letters Franklin received permission to send them to Massachusetts, where they were much passed about and were printed, and they were soon republished in English newspapers.

  • ., Philadelphia: Printed by B.

  • The first novel printed in America was Franklin's reprint in 1744 of Pamela; and the first American translation from the classics which was printed in America was a version by James Logan (1674-1751) of Cato's Moral Distichs (173J).

  • In 1 744 he published another translation of Logan's, Cicero On Old Age, which Franklin thought typographically the finest book he had ever printed.

  • In France he had a private press in his house in Passy, on which he printed " bagatelles."

  • 3 Closely related to Franklin's political pamphlets are his writings on economics, which, though undertaken with a political 1 " Seventy-five editions of it have been printed in English, fiftysix in French, eleven in German and nine in Italian.

  • It has been printed at least four hundred times, and is to-day as popular as ever."

  • He numbered among his friends Dr 1 Printed in 1662 as an appendix co J.

  • In constituting the text, he imposed upon himself the singular restriction of not inserting any various reading which had not already been printed in some preceding edition of the Greek text.

  • They are usually printed as an appendix.

  • For a bibliography of the printed sources, see H.

  • A list of the ruins, printed in the handbook on Mexico published by the Department of State in Washington, covers several pages.

  • Three months after his nomination he forbade anything of any kind whatever to be printed concerning his administration, thus refusing advice as well as censure.

  • The new view of faith is bracketed with the old, and practically neutralized by it; as was already the case in Melanchthon's theological definitions in the 1552-1553 edition of Loci Communes, also printed in other works by him.

  • His Personal Reminiscences of Early Days in,California, originally privately printed in 1878, was republished in 1893 with George C. Gorham's Story of the Attempted Assassination of Justice Field.

  • It was first printed at Spires in 1482.

  • In the August of that year Zwingli printed a pamphlet in which he set forth his views of the Lord's Supper.

  • But everything of which he could cheat his appetite was spent on Arabic books, and when he had read all that was then printed he thirsted for manuscripts, and in March 1738 started on foot for Hamburg, joyous though totally unprovided, on his way to Leiden and the treasures of the Warnerianum.

  • It was written before 821, and having been very popular during the middle ages, was first printed at Cologne in 1521.

  • It is printed in about 20 languages.

  • As regards the " Declaration of Faith, Church Order and Discipline " adopted in 1833, and still printed in the official Year Book " for general information " as to " what is commonly believed " by members of the Union, what is characteristic is the attitude taken in the preliminary notes to " creeds and articles of religion."

  • Important documents for Congregational Faith and Order, with historical introductions, are printed in Williston Walker's Creeds and Platforms of Congregationalism (New York, 1893).

  • The Works of John Woolman appeared in two parts at Philadelphia, in 1774-1775, and have often been republished; a German version was printed in 1852.

  • After May 1845 a semi-weekly edition was also printed, which ultimately reached a steady circulation of from 15,000 to 25,000.

  • On his way to Paris for the purpose of getting it printed he stayed for some time at Blois, where he met De Thou.

  • The chief authority for the early history of Saxony is Widukind, whose Res gestae Saxonicae is printed, together with the works of other chroniclers, in the Monumenta Germanica historica, Scriptores.

  • - The materials for the investigation of this singular phase of prehistoric life were first collected and systematized by Dr Ferdinand Keller (1800-1881), of Zurich, and printed in Mittheilungen der Antiquarischen Gesellschaft in Zurich, vols.

  • They include an Account of the Printed Text of the Greek New Testament (1854), a new edition of T.

  • Maine, "Minute on the Kathiawar States" (1864; printed in Life and Speeches, p. 320) and Early History of Institutions (1875); P. Laband, Staatsrecht des deutschen Reiches (Freiburgim-Breisgau and Tubingen, 1876); R.

  • The pamphlets were printed at a secret press established by John Penry, a Welsh puritan, with the help of the printer Robert Waldegrave, about midsummer 1588, for the issue of puritan literature forbidden by the authorities.

  • was for a long time printed (with the title Philosophumena) among the works of Origen; Books iv.-x.

  • A small edition de luxe of this work, with other pieces, was printed in 1758 in the palace of Versailles under the king's immediate supervision, some of the sheets, it is said, having been pulled by the royal hand.

  • Printed examples of his work as commentator and hymn writer respectively may be found in the Firamentum trium ordinum (Paris, 1512), and his office for Trinity Sunday in the "unreformed" breviary.

  • He established an astronomical observatory at Paramatta in 1822, and the Brisbane Catalogue, which was printed in 1835 and contained 7385 stars, was the result of observations made there in 1822-1826.

  • Or to put it more exactly, the "Apostolic Fathers" represent, chronologically in the main and still more from the religious and theological standpoint, the momentous process of 1 Cotelier included the Acts of Martyrdom of Clement, Ignatius and Polycarp; and those of Ignatius and Polycarp are still often printed by editors.

  • Some posthumous fragments of another opera, Daphnis et Chloe, were printed in 1780; and in 1781 appeared Les Consolations des miseres de ma vie, a collection of about one hundred songs and other fugitive pieces of very unequal merit.

  • See Memorial of Benjamin Helm Bristow, largely prepared by David Willcox (Cambridge, Mass., privately printed, 1897); Whiskey Frauds, 44th Cong., 1st Sess., Mis.

  • His only printed works are a fragment on the Eucharist (inserted by Jean Mabillon in his edition of the works of St Bernard), and the Morelia Abbreviata and De Origine Animae (in E.

  • In his Herbarium, printed at Strassburg (1530-1536), he gave descriptions of a large number of plants, chiefly those of central Europe, illustrated by beautiful woodcuts.

  • He was followed by other writers, - Leonhard Fuchs, whose Historia Stirpium (Basel, 1542) is worthy of special note for its excellent woodcuts; Hieronymus Bock, whose Kreutter Buch appeared in 1539; and William Turner, "The Father of English Botany," the first part of whose New Herbal, printed in English, was issued in 1551.

  • From this manuscript an edition was printed in 1574 under the direction of Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury; but this contained many interpolations and alterations which were copied by subsequent editors.

  • which Badius printed for him in 1505 .

  • For the next eighteen months he is entirely lost to view; when he reappears in April 1511, he is leaving More's house and taking the Moria to be printed privily in Paris.

  • The series of the Fathers alone contains Jerome (1516), Cyprian (1520), Pseudo-Arnobius (1522), Hilarius (1523), Irenaeus (Latin, 1526), Ambrose (1527), Augustine (1528), Chrysostom (Latin, 1530), Basil (Greek, 1532, the first Greek author printed in Germany), and Origen (Latin, 1536).

  • In four reprints, 1519, 1522, 1527, 1 535, Erasmus gradually weeded out many of the typographical errors of his first edition, but the text remained essentially such as he had first printed it.

  • .-tom His complete works have been printed twice; by the Froben firm under the direction of his literary executors (9 vols., Basel, 1540); and by Leclerc at Leiden (11 vols., 1703-1706).

  • and printed books.

  • Lemery, that the paper was not printed.

  • The second version (L2), which consists of vi.-xi., was first printed at Venice in 1522, by Gieseler in 1832, Dillmann in 1877 and Charles in 1900.

  • In 1845 he published Mara, a poem in four cantoes (85 pp., Longmans), containing a description of a young poet who printed 1000 copies of his first poem, of which only 10 were sold.

  • In the year 1474 a press was set up in the latter city, where Gunther Zainer printed the first book.

  • A few fragments printed in Polish had appeared before this, as the Lord's Prayer in the statutes of the bishops of Breslau in 1475, the story of Pope Urban in Latin, German and Polish in 1505, &c.; but the first complete work in the Polish language appeared from the press of this printer at Cracow in 1521, under the title, Speeches of the Wise King Solomon.

  • Szarzynski, who died young in 1581, deserves notice as having introduced the 1 His collected works were printed in 1584; they were many times reprinted, the best edition being that of Warsaw (4 vols., 1884).

  • This has been twice printed in comparatively recent times (Instrukcya Jak6ba Sobieskiego kasztelana Krakowskiego dana pane Orchowskiemu ze strony synow, Vilna, 1840).

  • It was not published in French until 1870, although an English translation was printed by the Hakluyt Society in 1859.

  • The only existing manuscript is in the Vatican, and the Epitoma has been printed by J.

  • Some of the early printed editions follow the original version of Tristan's death, now found in one manuscript only (B.N.

  • His Handbook of the Stars (1866) was refused by Messrs Longmans and Messrs Macmillan, but being privately printed, it sold fairly well.

  • as king and man"), printed in the transactions of the Swedish Academy (vols.

  • He published his books either anonymously or under borrowed names, and was forced to have them printed out of France.

  • The first printed edition was in 1470 at Venice.

  • In producing Plato, Athenaeus and Aristophanes, the scholar-printer was largely aided by Musurus, who also edited the Aldine Pausanias (1516) and the Etymologicum printed in Venice by another Greek immigrant, Callierges (1499) The Revival of Learning in Italy ends with the sack of Rome (1527).

  • His translation of a treatise of Galen was printed at Cambridge in 1521 by Siberch, who, in the same year and place, was the first to use Greek type in England.

  • The Greek text of his Be(3Xia iaTpcUca was printed at Paris in 1548 and his De Lumbricis at Venice in 1570.

  • and printed editions is that of the Massoretic text, the date of which is usually placed somewhere between the 6th and 8th centuries of the Christian, era.

  • Of the systems of punctuation which are known to us, the more familiar is the Tiberian, or sublinear, which is found in all printed editions of the Hebrew Bible.

  • variants, or, more probably, as emendations corresponding to the errata or corrigenda of a modern printed book.

  • Its value for critical purposes is considerably discounted by the late date of the MSS., upon which the printed text is based.

  • began to be printed and in 1522 was published.

  • Various Jewish editions of the Hebrew Bible had already been printed - in part.

  • These MSS., and the Hebrew Bibles as usually printed, contain -in reality two perfectly distinct texts - the work of two different :ages separated from one another by centuries: the one is a text of the Old Testament itself, the other a text of a later Jewish -_interpretation of the Old Testament.

  • The results of textual criticism, including a considerable number of conjectural emendations, are succinctly presented in Kittel's Biblia Hebraica (1906); but the text here printed is the ordinary Massoretic (vocalized) text.

  • The dates printed in heavy type are certain, at least within a unit.

  • (Printed at Mainz, 1452-6.

  • - First printed English Bible, 1535.

  • (Printed by P. Quentel, Cologne, 1525, from the only remaining fragment, in British Museum.) i how e x cellent foe..si r,a i thero'?.

  • In the 15th century the history of the printed Vulgates begins.

  • The printed text is that published in 1778-1803 by J.

  • But in practice it is general, and certainly convenient, to regard their work rather as material for criticism, and to begin the history of textual criticism with the earliest printed editions which sought to establish a standard Greek Text.

  • It was printed in 1514, and is thus the first printed text, but is not the first published, as it was not issued until 1522.

  • Erasmus issued new editions in 1519, 1522, 1527 and 1535, and the Aldine Greek Testament, printed at Venice in 1518, is a reproduction of the first edition.

  • A little later Richard Bentley conceived the idea that it would be possible to reconstruct the original text of the New Testament by a comparison of the earliest Greek and Latin sources; he began to collect material for this purpose, and issued a scheme entitled " Proposals for Printing " in 1720, but though he amassed many notes nothing was ever printed.

  • It covers the Pentateuch (1st ed., Constantinople, 1512) and the " Five Rolls " (Pesaro, 1519; the whole printed first at Venice, 1545); Germ.

  • His writings passed in MS. from hand to hand, and few of them were printed in his lifetime.

  • They received sixteen guineas a sheet (sixteen printed pages), increased subsequently to twentyfive guineas in many cases, instead of the two guineas which formed the ordinary London reviewer's fee.

  • (printed 1658, dated 1659); The French Gardener: instructing how to cultivate all sorts of Fruit-trees..

  • Written about 1750, it was first printed in Barcelona in 1882 (later edition, San Sebastian, 1896).

  • No satisfactory life of Burghley has yet appeared; some valuable anonymous notes, probably by Burghley's servant Francis Alford, were printed in Peck's Desiderata Curiesa (1732), i.

  • The first book printed in Europe was the Latin Bible, and Copinger estimates that 124 editions of the Vulgate had been issued by the end of the 15th century.

  • The Italian Bible was printed a dozen times before A.D.

  • The Corporation for the Promoting and Propagating of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in New England (founded in 1649) bore the expense of printing both the New Testament and the Bible as a whole (Cambridge, Mass., 1663 - the earliest Bible printed in.America), which John Eliot, one of the Pilgrim Fathers, translated into "the language of the Massachusetts Indians," whom he evangelized.

  • Early in the 18th century it printed editions in Arabic, and promoted the first versions of the Bible in Tamil and Telugu, made by the Danish Lutheran missionaries whom it then supported in south India.

  • In 1804 the Bible, or some part of it, had been printed in about fifty-five different tongues.

  • Up to 1816-1817 these societies had printed altogether 436,000 copies of the Scriptures, and had received from the British and Foreign Bible Society gifts amounting to over X 62,000.

  • issued a ukase suspending the society's operations -after it had printed the Scriptures in thirty different languages, seventeen of which were new tongues, and had circulated volumes from the Caucasus to Kamchatka.

  • 5 An interesting letter of Smith to Dundas (1st November 1779) on free trade for Ireland is printed in the Eng.

  • Many of his lectures are printed in the first and second volumes of his published works.

  • (1899), Gustav Adolf (1900), and Gustav Vasa (1899); Till Damascus (1898) indicated a return in the direction of religion; Folkungasagan (1899) was represented in 1901; and the OA plays Avent (" Advent ") and Brott och brott (" Crime for Crime "), printed together in 1899, were successfully represented in 1900, both in Sweden and Germany.

  • The table is printed to one figure less than in the Descriptio.

  • London, printed by George Miller, 1631.

  • Briggs had himself been engaged in filling up the gap, and in a lettex to John Pell, written after the publication of Vlacq's work, and dated October 25, 1628, he says: " My desire was to have those chiliades that are wantinge betwixt 20 and 90 calculated and printed, and I had done them all almost by my selfe, and by some frendes whom my rules had sufficiently informed, and by agreement the busines was conveniently parted 'amongst us; but I am eased of that charge and care by one Adrian Vlacque, an Hollander, who hathe done all the whole hundred chiliades and printed them in Latin, Dutche and Frenche, moo bookes in these 3 languages, and hathe sould them almost all.

  • It is printed on the back of the last page of the table itself, and so cannot have been torn out from the copies that are without it.

  • The first four figures of the logarithms are printed at the top of the columns.

  • The utility of such logarithms was first pointed out by Leonelli in a book entitled Supplement logarithmique, printed at Bordeaux in the year XI.

  • (1802/3); he calculated a table to 14 places, but only a specimen of it which appeared in the Supplement was printed.

  • The first table that was actually published is due to Gauss, and was printed in Zach's?llonatliche Correspondenz, xxvi.

  • The Waldenses of Savoy and France, the Brethren (small communities of evangelical dissenters from the medieval faith) of Germany, and the Unitas Fratrum of Bohemia all used the same catechism (one that was first printed in 1498, and which continued to be published till 1530) for the instruction of their children.

  • An English translation, probably by John Bidle, was printed in Amsterdam and widely circulated.

  • Even when (as in the Shorter Westminster Catechism and the School Catechism) the Creed is simply printed as an appendix, or where (as in the Free Church Catechism) it is not mentioned at all, its substance is dealt with.

  • The genuineness of the two fragments of a letter from her to her son Gaius, printed in some editions of Cornelius Nepos, is disputed.

  • BIBLE The history of the vernacular Bible of the English race resolves itself into two distinctly marked periods - the one being that of Manuscript Bibles, which were direct translations from the Latin Vulgate, the other that of Printed Bibles, which were, more or less completely, translations from the original Hebrew and Greek of the Old and New Testaments.

  • The Printed Bible.

  • - It is singular that while France, Spain, Italy, Bohemia and Holland possessed the Bible in the vernacular before the accession of Henry VIII., and in Germany the Scriptures were printed in 1466 and seventeen times reprinted before Luther began his great work, yet no English printer attempted to put the familiar English Bible into type.

  • No part of the English Bible was printed before 1525, no complete Bible before 1535, and none in England before 1538.

  • Tyndale and his assistant, William Roye, managed, however, to escape higher up the Rhine to Worms, and they succeeded in carrying with them some or all of the sheets which had been printed.

  • In 1530, however, the whole of the Pentateuch was printed in Marburg by Hans Luft; it is provided with prefaces and marginal annotations of a strongly controversial character.

  • and XXXV.," and printed at Antwerp by Godfried van der Haghen.

  • His execution took place on the 6th of October 1536, and about the same time a small folio reprint of his revised edition of 1534 was brought out in England, the first volume of Scripture printed in this country, probably by T.

  • In later years, between 1536 and 1550, numerous editions of Tyndale's New Testament were printed, twenty-one of which have been enumerated and fully described by Francis Fry.9 " The history of our English Bible begins with the work of Tyndale and not with that of Wycliffe," says Dr Westcott in his History of the English Bible, p. 316, and it is true that one of the most striking features of the work of Tyndale is its independence.

  • Jenkinson, Early English Printed Books in the Univ.

  • Christopher Froschouer of Zurich, 3 who printed the edition of 1550, and that the sheets were sent for binding and distribution to James Nicolson, the Southwark printer.'

  • This first of all printed English Bibles is a small folio in German black letter, bearing the title: " Biblia, The Bible; that is, the Holy Scripture of the Olde and New Testament, faithfully and truly translated out of Douche (German) and Latyn into Englishe, M.D.XXXV."

  • A second edition in folio, " newly oversene and corrected," was printed by Nicolson, with English type, in 1537; and also in the same year, a third edition in quarto.

  • The volume was printed in black letter in double columns, and three copies are preserved in the British Museum.

  • It will have been observed that the translations of Holy Scripture which had been printed during these years (1525-1539) were all made by private men and printed without any public authority.

  • 2 The volume, in a convenient quarto size, printed in clear Roman type, and provided with marginal annotations, gained immediate popularity in England, where a Bible suited for household demands had long been needed.

  • The changes introduced by the Genevan translators were, as a rule, a great improvement, and the version received a ready welcome and immediate popularity, not only on account of its intrinsic merits, but because of its handy size, usually that of a small quarto, and of its being printed, like Whittingham's New Testament, in a readable Roman type instead of black letter.

  • 2 Printed in Bagster's Hexapla, 1841, reprinted separately in 1842.

  • of the Printed Editions of Holy Scripture in the Libr.

  • In the second edition of the Bishops' Bible, 1572, the two texts were actually printed side by side; in all later editions except one (1585) the older Psalter alone remained.

  • 1611.1 Since that time many millions of this revised translation have been printed, and the general acceptance of it by all English-speaking people of, 1whatever denomination is a testimony to its excellence.

  • The work of the English revisers was regularly submitted to their consideration; their comments were carefully considered and largely adopted, and their divergences from the version ultimately agreed upon were printed in an appendix to the published work.

  • The text of the Revised Version is printed in paragraphs, the old division of books into chapters and verses being retained for convenience of reference.

  • Lovett, The Printed English Bible, 1525-1885 (1894); G.

  • For the early printed Bibles: H.

  • He left valuable materials for a just comprehension of his career in the autobiography (Adventures while Prosecuting Researches and Inquiries on Polish Matters) printed in his Polska.

  • Ford's privately printed Bibliotheca Chaunciana (Brooklyn, N.

  • With it were printed thirteen odes entitled Vers lyriques.

  • The chief source of his biography is his own poetry, especially the Latin elegy addressed to Jean de Morel, "Elegia ad Janum Morellum Ebredunensem, Pyladem suum," printed with a volume of Xenia (Paris, 1569).

  • The first of a series of ephemerides, calculated on these principles, was published by him at Linz in 1617; and in that for 1620, dedicated to Baron Napier, he for the first time employed logarithms. This important invention was eagerly welcomed by him, and its theory formed the subject of a treatise entitled Chilias Logarithmorum, printed in 1624, but circulated in manuscript three years earlier, which largely contributed to bring the new method into general use in Germany.

  • Keppleri Somnium (first printed in 1634) and a vast mass of his correspondence.

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