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princeton

princeton

princeton Sentence Examples

  • Princeton, New Jersey >>

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  • He was one of the founders of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), was a member of the New York Council for some years before the War of Independence, a member and president of the First Provincial Congress of New York (1775), and a member of the Second Provincial Congress (1775-1776).

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • He graduated as valedictorian in 1808 at the college of New Jersey (Princeton); studied theology under the Rev. Walter Addison of Maryland, and in Princeton; was ordained deacon in 1811 and priest in 1814; and preached both in the Stone Chapel, Millwood, and in Christ Church, Alexandria, for some time.

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  • Scott, Mammalia of the Santa Cruz Beds, Edentata, Rep., Princeton Exped.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • Hodge of Princeton and Leonard Woods of Andover.

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  • It was removed to Princeton in 1755, funds for its aid being received from England, Ireland and Scotland.

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  • Theological seminaries had been organized: the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton, N.

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  • 1 This agreement, proposed to the General Assembly in 1870 by the directors of Princeton and of Union, gave the Assembly a veto on the election and removal of professors.

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  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.

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  • He was descended in the sixth generation from Jonathan Dickinson, first president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and his ancestors had been closely connected with the Presbyterian church.

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  • In 1846 he graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary, and was instructor in Hebrew there in 1846-1849.

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  • From August 1851 until his death, in Princeton, New Jersey, on the 10th of February 1900, he was professor of Biblical and Oriental Literature in Princeton Theological Seminary.

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  • in 1921, having also been made previously a member of the Amsterdam and Copenhagen Academies, while the universities of Geneva, Manchester, Rostock and Princeton conferred honorary degrees on him.

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  • Morse, The Federalist Party in Massachusetts (Princeton, N.J., 1909); and the biographies and writings of George Cabot, Fisher Ames, Gouverneur Morris, John Jay, Rufus King, Timothy Pickering, Theodore Sedgwick, C. C. Pinckney and J.

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  • He refused calls to churches in Dublin and Rotterdam, and in 1766 declined an invitation brought him by Richard Stockton to go to America as president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); but he accepted a second invitation and left Paisley in May 1768.

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  • He died on his farm, Tusculum, near Princeton, on the 1 5th of November 1794.

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  • There is a statue of Witherspoon in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, and another on the University Library at Princeton.

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  • In 1760 he graduated at Princeton.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1810 at the head of his class; then studied law in the office of his father, Alexander J.

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  • As an authority on the Inquisition he stood in the highest rank of modern historians, and distinctions were conferred on him by the universities of Harvard, Princeton, Pennsylvania, Giessen and Moscow.

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  • In 1812 he became first professor in the newly established Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, where he remained until his death at Princeton on the 22nd of October 1851, filling successively the chairs of didactic and polemic theology (1812-1840), and pastoral and polemic theology (1840-1851).

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  • He graduated at Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1820, and at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823, was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey (1825-1830) and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia(1830-1867).

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  • LEONARD WOODS (1774-1854), American theologian, was born at Princeton, Massachusetts, on the 19th of June 1774.

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  • He studied at Yale and Princeton, graduating from the latter in 1766, studied theology for a year, then law, and began to practise at Hartford in 1771.

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  • from Princeton, New Jersey, in 1841, was chosen by the Assembly of the Free Church to succeed Chalmers in the chair of divinity in the New College, Edinburgh.

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  • C. Butler of Princeton University undertook the task of excavation.

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  • He then lived for two years in Italy and Greece, was a student in the Union Theological Seminary in New York city from 1853 to 1855, and in 1856 graduated at the Princeton Theological Seminary.

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  • He was a tutor for four years in the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and from 1859 until his death was professor of Greek language and literature in New York University.

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  • The New Englander (1843-1892), the Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review (1825), the Ncitional Quarterly Review (1860) and the New York International Review (1874-1883), may also be mentioned.

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  • After graduating at Princeton in 1841 he practised law in St Louis, and later served in the Mexican War.

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  • PRINCETON, a city and the county-seat of Gibson county, Indiana, U.S.A., about 27 m.

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  • Princeton was first settled in 1814, and was chartered as a city in 1884.

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  • Cleveland's second term expired on the 4th of March 1897, and he then retired into private life, universally respected and constantly consulted, in the university town of Princeton, New Jersey, where he died on the 24th of June 1908.

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  • He was a trustee of Princeton University and Stafford Little lecturer on public affairs.

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  • He published Presidential Problems (New York, 1904), made up in part of lectures at Princeton University, and Fishing and Hunting Sketches (1906).

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  • Dr Smith contributed articles on Calvin, Kant, Pantheism, Miracles, Reformed Churches, Schelling and Hegel to the American Cyclopaedia, and contributed to McClintock and Strong's Cyclopaedia; and was editor of the American Theological Review (1859 sqq.), both in its original form and after it became the American Presbyterian and Theological Review and, later, the Presbyterian Quarterly and Princeton Review.

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  • He was educated at the Philadelphia Latin School, the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), and Princeton, where he graduated in 1793.

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  • The College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, was situated here from 1747 to 1756, for all but the first few months under the presidency of the Rev. Aaron Burr, who published in 1752 the well-known Newark Grammar, long used in Princeton and originally prepared for Burr's very successful boys' school in Newark.

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  • His father, the Rev. Aaron Burr (1715-1757), was the second president (1748-1757) of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; his mother was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the well-known Calvinist theologian.

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  • William Stryker's Battles of Trenton and Princeton (Boston, 1898); and others mentioned in Winsor and Van Tyne.

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  • WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE (1774-1833), commodore in the United States navy, was born on the 7th of May 1774 in Princeton, New Jersey.

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  • The son graduated at Princeton in 1849, studied under Franz in Berlin, under Friedrich Ritschl at Bonn and under Schneidewin at Göttingen, where he received his doctor's degree in 1853.

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  • The two Continental Congresses (1774, and 1 7751 781) met in Philadelphia, except for the months when Philadelphia was occupied by the British army and Congress met in Lancaster and York, Pennsylvania, and then in Princeton, New Jersey.

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  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1810.

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  • He studied law at Princeton, New Jersey, in the office of Richard Stockton, whose sister Hannah he married in 1762, and in November 1760 he was licensed as a counsellor and attorney-at-law, afterwards practising at Elizabethtown, New Jersey.

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  • He was a trustee and a benefactor of the college of New Jersey (afterwards Princeton University).

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  • Battles of Trenton and Princeton >>

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  • Princeton and Germantown.

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  • In 1904 it was stated that the system was gaining favour in the east,' and that it had been adopted more or less by all the eastern colleges and universities with the exception of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Columbia.

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  • He graduated at the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) at the head of a class of thirty-five in 1766, and immediately afterwards removed to Maryland, teaching at Queenstown in that colony until 1770, and being admitted to the bar in 1771.

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  • Both Princeton and Yale, U.S.A., conferred on him the degree of D.

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  • His Son James Donald Cameron (1833-) was born at Middletown, Pennsylvania, on the 14th of May 1833, graduated at Princeton in 1852, became actively interested in his father's banking and railway enterprises, and from 1863 to 1874 was president of the Northern Central railway.

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  • In 1769 the son entered the college of New Jersey (nor Princeton University), where, in the same year, he founded the well-known literary club, "The American Whig Society."

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  • He graduated in 1771, but remained for another year at Princeton studying, apparently for the ministry, under the direction of John Witherspoon (1722-1794).

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  • in height; it was begun in 1848, but the work was abandoned in 1855-1877, but was completed in 1884 at a cost of $1,300,000.2 Among statues of Washington are the half-nude seated figure (1843) by Greenough in the Smithsonian Institution, and an equestrian statue (1860) of Washington at the Battle of Princeton by Clark Mills in Washington Circle.

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  • A volume of lectures given in America, The Sea in English Poetry, was published in 1913, and in 1914 he was elected to a professorship of modern English literature at Princeton University.

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  • Washington's retreat through New Jersey; the manner in which he turned and struck his pursuers at Trenton and Princeton, and then established himself at Morristown, so as to make the way to Philadelphia impassable; the vigour with which he handled his army at the Brandywine and Germantown; the persistence with which he held the strategic position of Valley Forge through the dreadful winter of 1777-1778, in spite of the misery of his men, the clamours of the people and the impotence and meddling of the fugitive Congress - all went to show that the fibre of his public character had been hardened to its permanent quality.

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  • Princeton (14,196, Hayden), Mt.

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  • 1855), of Princeton University; it was climbed again in 1897 by a party led by F.

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  • This enabled Professor Tiele to arrange the chief religions in certain groups, starting from the primitive conception of the common life of the objects of the surrounding scene:-3 1 Princeton Review, May 1881, quoted by Tiele, Elements of the Science of Religion (1897), i p. 42.

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  • James Manning (1738-1791), who had just been graduated from Princeton with high honours, was thought of as a suitable leader in the enterprise, and was sent to Rhode Island (1763) to confer with leading men, Baptist and other.

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  • Here, with Manning as president and Hezekiah Smith (1737-1805), his class-mate at Princeton, as financial agent and influential supporter, the institution (since 1804 known as Brown University) was for many years the only degree-conferring institution controlled by Baptists.

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  • With a view to a legal career he graduated (1773) at Princeton, but soon afterwards, on the outbreak of the War of Independence, he became an officer in the patriot forces.

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  • His uncles, John Breckinridge (1797-1841), professor of pastoral theology in the Princeton Theological Seminary in1836-1838and for many years after secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871), for several years superintendent of public instruction in Kentucky, an important factor in the organization of the public school system of the state, a professor from 18J3 to 1871 in the Danville Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Danville, Kentucky, and the temporary chairman of the national Republican convention of 1864, were both prominent clergymen of the Presbyterian Church.

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  • John Cabell Breckinridge graduated in 1838 at Centre College, Danville, Kentucky, continued his studies at Princeton, and then studied law at Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky.

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  • He studied at the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) from 1774 to 1776, when the institution was closed on account of the outbreak of the War of Independence; served for a short time in a New Jersey militia company; studied law at Bute Court-house, North Carolina, in 1 7771 7 80, at the same time managing his tobacco plantation; was a member of a Warren county militia company in 1780-1782, and served in the North Carolina Senate in 1781-1785.

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  • In 1832 he was elected to the chair of natural philosophy in the New Jersey college at Princeton.

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  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton) in 1815, and in 1819 at the Princeton Theological seminary, where he became an instructor in 1820, and the first professor of Oriental and Biblical literature in 1822.

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  • In 1825 he established the quarterly Biblical Repertory, the title of which was changed to Biblical Repertory and Theological Review in 1830 and to Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review in 1837.

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  • With it, in 1840, was merged the Literary and Theological Review of New York, and in 1872 the American Presbyterian Review of New York, the title becoming Presbyterian Quarterly and Princeton Review in 1872 and Princeton Review in 1.877.

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  • His more important essays were republished under the titles Essays and Reviews (1857), Princeton Theological Essays, and Discussions in Church Polity (1878).

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  • The 24th of April 1872, the fiftieth anniversary of his election to his professorship, was observed in Princeton as his jubilee by between 400 and 500 representatives of his 2700 pupils, and $50,000 was raised for the endowment of his chair.

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  • He died at Princeton on the 19th of June 1878.

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  • Besides his articles in the Princeton Review, he published a Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (1835, abridged 1836, rewritten and enlarged 1864, new ed.

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  • His SOn, Archibald Alexander Hodge (1823-1886), also famous as a Presbyterian theologian, was born at Princeton on the 18th of July 1823.

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  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1841, and at the Princeton Theological seminary in 1846, and was ordained in 1847.

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  • In 1878 he succeeded his father as professor of didactic theology at the Princeton seminary.

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  • Among the prominent institutions not receiving state aid are Princeton University, at Princeton; Rutgers College (excluding its agricultural school), at New Brunswick; and the Stevens Institute of Technology, at Hoboken.

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  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

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  • Important events in the period of royal government were the preaching of George Whitefield in 1739 and the following years, and the chartering of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1746, and of Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1766.

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  • The Congress of the Confederation met in Princeton, in Nassau Hall, which still stands, from June to November 1783.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1797, and was admitted to the bar in 1800.

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  • In 1757, on the death of President Burr, who five years before had married Edwards's daughter Esther, he reluctantly accepted the presidency of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he was installed on the 16th of February 1758.

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  • Almost immediately afterwards he was inoculated for smallpox, which was raging in Princeton and vicinity, and, always feeble, he died of the inoculation on the 28th of March 1758.

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  • He was buried in the old cemetery at Princeton.

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  • He lived in Stockbridge in1751-1755and spoke the language of the Housatonic Indians with ease, for six months studied among the Oneidas, graduated at Princeton in 1765, studied theology at Bethlehem,Connecticut, under Joseph Bellamy,was licensed to preach in 1766, was a tutor at Princeton in 1766-1769, and was pastor of the White Haven Church, New Haven, Connecticut, in 1769-1795, being then dismissed for the nominal reason that the church could not support him, but actually because of his opposition to the Half-Way Covenant as well as to slavery and the slave trade.

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  • Gardiner (Boston, 1901); Exercises Commemorating the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of Jonathan Edwards, held at Andover Theological Seminary, October 4-5, 1903 (Andover, 1904); and among the addresses delivered at Stockbridge in October 1903, John De Witt, " Jonathan Edwards: A Study," in the Princeton Theological Review (January, 1904).

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  • Scott, "Mammalia of the Santa Cruz Beds - Edentata," Rep. Princeton Exped.

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  • 1865), graduated in 1886 at Princeton (from which he received the degree of LL.D.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1879, studied law at the University of Virginia in 1879-1880, practised law in Atlanta in 1882-1883, and received the degree of Ph.D.

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  • He was associate professor of history and political economy at Bryn Mawr in1885-1888and at Wesleyan University in 1888-1890; professor of jurisprudence and political economy at Princeton in 1890-1895, of jurisprudence in 1895-1897, and subsequently of jurisprudence and politics; and in 1902 he became president of Princeton University, being the first layman to hold that office.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1781, was admitted to the bar in 1785, and began to practise law in New York City, rapidly rising to distinction.

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  • On Franklin's recommendation he was made a doctor of divinity by the university of Edinburgh in 1765; he had received a master's degree at Harvard in 1754, and was made doctor of divinity in 1780 by Dartmouth and in 1784 by the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) .

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  • to the S., John Witherspoon (1722-1794), president of the,College of New Jersey (Princeton), and Charles Nisbet (1736-1804), president of Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, were born.

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  • He was present at Princeton; was chiefly responsible for the mistake in attacking the "Chew House" at Germantown; urged New York as the objective of the campaign of 1778; served with efficiencylat Monmouth and at Yorktown; and after the surrender of Cornwallis was promoted major-general, and served as a commissioner on the exchange of prisoners.

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  • In the home of the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson (1688-1747), its first president, the first sessions of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) were held in 1747, but immediately afterwards the college removed to Newark.

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  • Crosby, "The Topography of Sparta," in American Journal of Archaeology (Princeton, 1893), viii.

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  • He graduated at Union College in 1821; studied theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823-1828, being in1826-1828in charge of the classes of Charles Hodge; was licensed to preach by the Carlisle Presbytery in 1828; and in1830-1840was professor of Biblical literature in the newly founded Western Theological Seminary of Allegheny, Pennsylvania.

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  • Nevin characterized his critics as pseudo-Protestants, urged (with Dr Charles Hodge, and against the Presbyterian General Assembly) the validity of Roman Catholic baptism, and defended the doctrine of the "spiritual real presence" of Christ in the Lord's Supper, notably in The Mystical Presence: a Vindication of the Reformed or Calvanistic Doctrine of the Holy Eucharist (1846); to this the reply from the point of view of rationalistic puritanism was made by Charles Hodge in the Princeton Review of 1848.

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  • He studied at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, and after graduating from Princeton in 1873 and from the Princeton Theological School in 1877, he spent two years at the university of Berlin.

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  • From 1900 he was professor of English literature at Princeton.

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  • Eminent princeton professor those who had admittedly very broad hour pizzeria and.

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  • 1863) graduated at Williams College in 1885, practised law in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1888-1903, was professor of politics at Princeton University in 1903-1908, and in 1908 became president of Williams College.

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  • He was one of the founders of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), was a member of the New York Council for some years before the War of Independence, a member and president of the First Provincial Congress of New York (1775), and a member of the Second Provincial Congress (1775-1776).

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  • Hodge of Princeton and Leonard Woods of Andover.

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  • It was removed to Princeton in 1755, funds for its aid being received from England, Ireland and Scotland.

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  • Theological seminaries had been organized: the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton, N.

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  • 1 This agreement, proposed to the General Assembly in 1870 by the directors of Princeton and of Union, gave the Assembly a veto on the election and removal of professors.

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  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.

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  • He was descended in the sixth generation from Jonathan Dickinson, first president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and his ancestors had been closely connected with the Presbyterian church.

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  • In 1846 he graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary, and was instructor in Hebrew there in 1846-1849.

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  • From August 1851 until his death, in Princeton, New Jersey, on the 10th of February 1900, he was professor of Biblical and Oriental Literature in Princeton Theological Seminary.

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  • In 1868 he refused the presidency of Princeton College; as senior professor he was long acting head of the Theological Seminary.

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  • in 1921, having also been made previously a member of the Amsterdam and Copenhagen Academies, while the universities of Geneva, Manchester, Rostock and Princeton conferred honorary degrees on him.

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  • He was principal of the Latin school of Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1879-1883, and was professor of jurisprudence and political economy in the College of New Jersey (Princeton University) from 1884 until his death in Princeton, N.J., on the 21st of July 1889.

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  • Morse, The Federalist Party in Massachusetts (Princeton, N.J., 1909); and the biographies and writings of George Cabot, Fisher Ames, Gouverneur Morris, John Jay, Rufus King, Timothy Pickering, Theodore Sedgwick, C. C. Pinckney and J.

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  • He refused calls to churches in Dublin and Rotterdam, and in 1766 declined an invitation brought him by Richard Stockton to go to America as president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); but he accepted a second invitation and left Paisley in May 1768.

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  • He died on his farm, Tusculum, near Princeton, on the 1 5th of November 1794.

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  • There is a statue of Witherspoon in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, and another on the University Library at Princeton.

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  • In 1760 he graduated at Princeton.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1810 at the head of his class; then studied law in the office of his father, Alexander J.

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  • As an authority on the Inquisition he stood in the highest rank of modern historians, and distinctions were conferred on him by the universities of Harvard, Princeton, Pennsylvania, Giessen and Moscow.

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  • In 1812 he became first professor in the newly established Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, where he remained until his death at Princeton on the 22nd of October 1851, filling successively the chairs of didactic and polemic theology (1812-1840), and pastoral and polemic theology (1840-1851).

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  • He graduated at Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1820, and at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823, was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey (1825-1830) and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia(1830-1867).

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  • LEONARD WOODS (1774-1854), American theologian, was born at Princeton, Massachusetts, on the 19th of June 1774.

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  • He studied at Yale and Princeton, graduating from the latter in 1766, studied theology for a year, then law, and began to practise at Hartford in 1771.

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  • from Princeton, New Jersey, in 1841, was chosen by the Assembly of the Free Church to succeed Chalmers in the chair of divinity in the New College, Edinburgh.

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  • C. Butler of Princeton University undertook the task of excavation.

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  • He then lived for two years in Italy and Greece, was a student in the Union Theological Seminary in New York city from 1853 to 1855, and in 1856 graduated at the Princeton Theological Seminary.

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  • He was a tutor for four years in the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and from 1859 until his death was professor of Greek language and literature in New York University.

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  • The New Englander (1843-1892), the Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review (1825), the Ncitional Quarterly Review (1860) and the New York International Review (1874-1883), may also be mentioned.

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  • After graduating at Princeton in 1841 he practised law in St Louis, and later served in the Mexican War.

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  • PRINCETON, a city and the county-seat of Gibson county, Indiana, U.S.A., about 27 m.

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  • Princeton was first settled in 1814, and was chartered as a city in 1884.

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  • Princeton, New Jersey >>

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  • He graduated as valedictorian in 1808 at the college of New Jersey (Princeton); studied theology under the Rev. Walter Addison of Maryland, and in Princeton; was ordained deacon in 1811 and priest in 1814; and preached both in the Stone Chapel, Millwood, and in Christ Church, Alexandria, for some time.

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  • Scott, Mammalia of the Santa Cruz Beds, Edentata, Rep., Princeton Exped.

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  • Cleveland's second term expired on the 4th of March 1897, and he then retired into private life, universally respected and constantly consulted, in the university town of Princeton, New Jersey, where he died on the 24th of June 1908.

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  • He was a trustee of Princeton University and Stafford Little lecturer on public affairs.

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  • He published Presidential Problems (New York, 1904), made up in part of lectures at Princeton University, and Fishing and Hunting Sketches (1906).

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  • Dr Smith contributed articles on Calvin, Kant, Pantheism, Miracles, Reformed Churches, Schelling and Hegel to the American Cyclopaedia, and contributed to McClintock and Strong's Cyclopaedia; and was editor of the American Theological Review (1859 sqq.), both in its original form and after it became the American Presbyterian and Theological Review and, later, the Presbyterian Quarterly and Princeton Review.

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  • He was educated at the Philadelphia Latin School, the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), and Princeton, where he graduated in 1793.

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  • The College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, was situated here from 1747 to 1756, for all but the first few months under the presidency of the Rev. Aaron Burr, who published in 1752 the well-known Newark Grammar, long used in Princeton and originally prepared for Burr's very successful boys' school in Newark.

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  • His father, the Rev. Aaron Burr (1715-1757), was the second president (1748-1757) of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; his mother was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the well-known Calvinist theologian.

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  • To the evidence advanced by a great number of authors comes the clinching testimony of the existence of a number of varieties of Australian marsupials in Patagonia, as originally discovered by Ameghino and more exactly described by members of the Princeton Patagonian expedition staff; while the fossil shells of the Eocene of Patagonia as analysed by Ortmann give evidence of the existence of a continuous shoreline, or at least of shallow-water areas, between Australia, New Zealand and South America.

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  • This brilliant exploit was followed by another on the 3rd of January, when Washington, again crossing the Delaware, outmarched Cornwallis at Trenton, and marching to his rear defeated three British regiments and three companies of light cavalry at Princeton, New Jersey.

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  • William Stryker's Battles of Trenton and Princeton (Boston, 1898); and others mentioned in Winsor and Van Tyne.

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  • WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE (1774-1833), commodore in the United States navy, was born on the 7th of May 1774 in Princeton, New Jersey.

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  • The son graduated at Princeton in 1849, studied under Franz in Berlin, under Friedrich Ritschl at Bonn and under Schneidewin at Göttingen, where he received his doctor's degree in 1853.

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  • The two Continental Congresses (1774, and 1 7751 781) met in Philadelphia, except for the months when Philadelphia was occupied by the British army and Congress met in Lancaster and York, Pennsylvania, and then in Princeton, New Jersey.

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  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1810.

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  • He studied law at Princeton, New Jersey, in the office of Richard Stockton, whose sister Hannah he married in 1762, and in November 1760 he was licensed as a counsellor and attorney-at-law, afterwards practising at Elizabethtown, New Jersey.

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  • He was a trustee and a benefactor of the college of New Jersey (afterwards Princeton University).

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  • Battles of Trenton and Princeton >>

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  • Princeton and Germantown.

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  • Excavations were begun by the Princeton Syrian Expedition (H.

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  • In 1904 it was stated that the system was gaining favour in the east,' and that it had been adopted more or less by all the eastern colleges and universities with the exception of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Columbia.

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  • He graduated at the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) at the head of a class of thirty-five in 1766, and immediately afterwards removed to Maryland, teaching at Queenstown in that colony until 1770, and being admitted to the bar in 1771.

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  • Both Princeton and Yale, U.S.A., conferred on him the degree of D.

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  • His Son James Donald Cameron (1833-) was born at Middletown, Pennsylvania, on the 14th of May 1833, graduated at Princeton in 1852, became actively interested in his father's banking and railway enterprises, and from 1863 to 1874 was president of the Northern Central railway.

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  • In 1769 the son entered the college of New Jersey (nor Princeton University), where, in the same year, he founded the well-known literary club, "The American Whig Society."

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  • He graduated in 1771, but remained for another year at Princeton studying, apparently for the ministry, under the direction of John Witherspoon (1722-1794).

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  • in height; it was begun in 1848, but the work was abandoned in 1855-1877, but was completed in 1884 at a cost of $1,300,000.2 Among statues of Washington are the half-nude seated figure (1843) by Greenough in the Smithsonian Institution, and an equestrian statue (1860) of Washington at the Battle of Princeton by Clark Mills in Washington Circle.

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  • A volume of lectures given in America, The Sea in English Poetry, was published in 1913, and in 1914 he was elected to a professorship of modern English literature at Princeton University.

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  • Washington's retreat through New Jersey; the manner in which he turned and struck his pursuers at Trenton and Princeton, and then established himself at Morristown, so as to make the way to Philadelphia impassable; the vigour with which he handled his army at the Brandywine and Germantown; the persistence with which he held the strategic position of Valley Forge through the dreadful winter of 1777-1778, in spite of the misery of his men, the clamours of the people and the impotence and meddling of the fugitive Congress - all went to show that the fibre of his public character had been hardened to its permanent quality.

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  • Princeton (14,196, Hayden), Mt.

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  • 1855), of Princeton University; it was climbed again in 1897 by a party led by F.

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  • This enabled Professor Tiele to arrange the chief religions in certain groups, starting from the primitive conception of the common life of the objects of the surrounding scene:-3 1 Princeton Review, May 1881, quoted by Tiele, Elements of the Science of Religion (1897), i p. 42.

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  • James Manning (1738-1791), who had just been graduated from Princeton with high honours, was thought of as a suitable leader in the enterprise, and was sent to Rhode Island (1763) to confer with leading men, Baptist and other.

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  • Here, with Manning as president and Hezekiah Smith (1737-1805), his class-mate at Princeton, as financial agent and influential supporter, the institution (since 1804 known as Brown University) was for many years the only degree-conferring institution controlled by Baptists.

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  • With a view to a legal career he graduated (1773) at Princeton, but soon afterwards, on the outbreak of the War of Independence, he became an officer in the patriot forces.

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  • His uncles, John Breckinridge (1797-1841), professor of pastoral theology in the Princeton Theological Seminary in1836-1838and for many years after secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871), for several years superintendent of public instruction in Kentucky, an important factor in the organization of the public school system of the state, a professor from 18J3 to 1871 in the Danville Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Danville, Kentucky, and the temporary chairman of the national Republican convention of 1864, were both prominent clergymen of the Presbyterian Church.

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  • John Cabell Breckinridge graduated in 1838 at Centre College, Danville, Kentucky, continued his studies at Princeton, and then studied law at Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky.

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  • He studied at the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) from 1774 to 1776, when the institution was closed on account of the outbreak of the War of Independence; served for a short time in a New Jersey militia company; studied law at Bute Court-house, North Carolina, in 1 7771 7 80, at the same time managing his tobacco plantation; was a member of a Warren county militia company in 1780-1782, and served in the North Carolina Senate in 1781-1785.

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  • In 1832 he was elected to the chair of natural philosophy in the New Jersey college at Princeton.

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  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton) in 1815, and in 1819 at the Princeton Theological seminary, where he became an instructor in 1820, and the first professor of Oriental and Biblical literature in 1822.

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  • In 1825 he established the quarterly Biblical Repertory, the title of which was changed to Biblical Repertory and Theological Review in 1830 and to Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review in 1837.

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  • With it, in 1840, was merged the Literary and Theological Review of New York, and in 1872 the American Presbyterian Review of New York, the title becoming Presbyterian Quarterly and Princeton Review in 1872 and Princeton Review in 1.877.

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  • His more important essays were republished under the titles Essays and Reviews (1857), Princeton Theological Essays, and Discussions in Church Polity (1878).

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  • The 24th of April 1872, the fiftieth anniversary of his election to his professorship, was observed in Princeton as his jubilee by between 400 and 500 representatives of his 2700 pupils, and $50,000 was raised for the endowment of his chair.

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  • He died at Princeton on the 19th of June 1878.

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  • Besides his articles in the Princeton Review, he published a Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (1835, abridged 1836, rewritten and enlarged 1864, new ed.

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  • His SOn, Archibald Alexander Hodge (1823-1886), also famous as a Presbyterian theologian, was born at Princeton on the 18th of July 1823.

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  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1841, and at the Princeton Theological seminary in 1846, and was ordained in 1847.

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  • In 1878 he succeeded his father as professor of didactic theology at the Princeton seminary.

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  • Among the prominent institutions not receiving state aid are Princeton University, at Princeton; Rutgers College (excluding its agricultural school), at New Brunswick; and the Stevens Institute of Technology, at Hoboken.

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  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

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  • Important events in the period of royal government were the preaching of George Whitefield in 1739 and the following years, and the chartering of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1746, and of Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1766.

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  • With about 2500 men he recrossed the Delaware on the night of the 25th of December, surprised three regiments of Hessians at Trenton the next morning, and took 1000 prisoners and 1000 stands of arms. In a series of movements following up this success he outgeneraled the British commander, Lord Cornwallis, and on the 3rd of January 1776, defeated a detachment of his army at Princeton (q.v.).

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  • The Congress of the Confederation met in Princeton, in Nassau Hall, which still stands, from June to November 1783.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1797, and was admitted to the bar in 1800.

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  • In 1757, on the death of President Burr, who five years before had married Edwards's daughter Esther, he reluctantly accepted the presidency of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he was installed on the 16th of February 1758.

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  • Almost immediately afterwards he was inoculated for smallpox, which was raging in Princeton and vicinity, and, always feeble, he died of the inoculation on the 28th of March 1758.

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  • He was buried in the old cemetery at Princeton.

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  • He lived in Stockbridge in1751-1755and spoke the language of the Housatonic Indians with ease, for six months studied among the Oneidas, graduated at Princeton in 1765, studied theology at Bethlehem,Connecticut, under Joseph Bellamy,was licensed to preach in 1766, was a tutor at Princeton in 1766-1769, and was pastor of the White Haven Church, New Haven, Connecticut, in 1769-1795, being then dismissed for the nominal reason that the church could not support him, but actually because of his opposition to the Half-Way Covenant as well as to slavery and the slave trade.

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  • Gardiner (Boston, 1901); Exercises Commemorating the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of Jonathan Edwards, held at Andover Theological Seminary, October 4-5, 1903 (Andover, 1904); and among the addresses delivered at Stockbridge in October 1903, John De Witt, " Jonathan Edwards: A Study," in the Princeton Theological Review (January, 1904).

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  • Scott, "Mammalia of the Santa Cruz Beds - Edentata," Rep. Princeton Exped.

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  • 1865), graduated in 1886 at Princeton (from which he received the degree of LL.D.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1879, studied law at the University of Virginia in 1879-1880, practised law in Atlanta in 1882-1883, and received the degree of Ph.D.

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  • He was associate professor of history and political economy at Bryn Mawr in1885-1888and at Wesleyan University in 1888-1890; professor of jurisprudence and political economy at Princeton in 1890-1895, of jurisprudence in 1895-1897, and subsequently of jurisprudence and politics; and in 1902 he became president of Princeton University, being the first layman to hold that office.

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  • He graduated at Princeton in 1781, was admitted to the bar in 1785, and began to practise law in New York City, rapidly rising to distinction.

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  • On Franklin's recommendation he was made a doctor of divinity by the university of Edinburgh in 1765; he had received a master's degree at Harvard in 1754, and was made doctor of divinity in 1780 by Dartmouth and in 1784 by the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) .

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  • to the S., John Witherspoon (1722-1794), president of the,College of New Jersey (Princeton), and Charles Nisbet (1736-1804), president of Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, were born.

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  • He was present at Princeton; was chiefly responsible for the mistake in attacking the "Chew House" at Germantown; urged New York as the objective of the campaign of 1778; served with efficiencylat Monmouth and at Yorktown; and after the surrender of Cornwallis was promoted major-general, and served as a commissioner on the exchange of prisoners.

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  • In the home of the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson (1688-1747), its first president, the first sessions of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) were held in 1747, but immediately afterwards the college removed to Newark.

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  • Crosby, "The Topography of Sparta," in American Journal of Archaeology (Princeton, 1893), viii.

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  • He graduated at Union College in 1821; studied theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823-1828, being in1826-1828in charge of the classes of Charles Hodge; was licensed to preach by the Carlisle Presbytery in 1828; and in1830-1840was professor of Biblical literature in the newly founded Western Theological Seminary of Allegheny, Pennsylvania.

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  • Nevin characterized his critics as pseudo-Protestants, urged (with Dr Charles Hodge, and against the Presbyterian General Assembly) the validity of Roman Catholic baptism, and defended the doctrine of the "spiritual real presence" of Christ in the Lord's Supper, notably in The Mystical Presence: a Vindication of the Reformed or Calvanistic Doctrine of the Holy Eucharist (1846); to this the reply from the point of view of rationalistic puritanism was made by Charles Hodge in the Princeton Review of 1848.

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  • He studied at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, and after graduating from Princeton in 1873 and from the Princeton Theological School in 1877, he spent two years at the university of Berlin.

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  • From 1900 he was professor of English literature at Princeton.

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  • After attending Princeton High School in Sharonville, Ohio, she studied at the School for Creative and Performing Arts in Cincinnati.

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  • After attending the prestigious Collegiate School for Boys in New York (he was class valedictorian), he graduated from Princeton University and later from Yale University with bachelor and master's degrees in English Literature.

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  • Princeton, New Jersey is the home of Princeton University, established in 1746.

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  • For instance, in U.S. News and World Report's America's Best Colleges 2006, Harvard and Princeton are tied for first, followed by Yale and University of Pennsylvania.

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  • The same U.S. News and World Report rankings list Yale, Harvard, Columbia, and Princeton as the schools with the lowest acceptance rates, ranging from 10 to 13 percent.

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  • Princeton University is located in Princeton, New Jersey.

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  • For instance, in U.S. News and World Report's America's Best Colleges, Harvard and Princeton are tied for first, followed by Yale and University of Pennsylvania.

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  • The same U.S. News and World Report rankings list Yale, Harvard, Columbia, and Princeton as the schools with the lowest acceptance rates, ranging from 10 to 13 percent.

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  • Princeton recently changed its financial aid rules to provide grants, which do not need to be repaid, instead of loans to students from low and middle income families.

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  • The first college to field its own cheerleaders was a little school by the name of Princeton University in the 1880s.

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  • A Princeton graduate by the name of Thomas Peebles took the crowd chanting idea to a new level in 1884 at the University of Minnesota.

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  • US News and World Report provides a famous ranking of American colleges, and sites like The Princeton Review and The College Board also provide similar rankings online.

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  • USA Today and The Princeton Review teamed up to present the "100 Best Value Colleges for 2010".

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  • Two of the most popular are the Princeton Review rankings and the Playboy rankings.

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  • In 2010, the Princeton Review ranked the University of Texas, Austin as the top party school in the nation.

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  • Clemson University located in Clemson, South Carolina, and its MBA program are highly ranked by the U.S. News and World Report and The Princeton Review, so if you choose this program you are assured that the curriculum is of high quality.

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  • Princeton Review - you have heard the name, but do you really know what the company does?

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  • Most importantly, how can Princeton Review help you get ready for college?

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  • The Princeton Review is a non-profit educational company established in 1987 to help serve underprivileged students needing additional help in preparing for school and college admissions.

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  • The Princeton Review offers a variety of tools, courses, and resources to that end.

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  • The Princeton Review touts some specific strategies for helping students with their test scores and to help them get into the higher education institutions of their choice.

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  • In addition to these techniques, The Princeton Review offers free after-school tutoring in over 100 school districts throughout the U.S. to meet the specific needs of various students.

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  • The Princeton Review has come to understand that highly qualified, hard-working students can still struggle when taking standardized tests, and that testing is as much a skill as anything else.

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  • The Princeton Review specifically works with underprivileged communities to help bridge the gap between wealthy and impoverished children and their ability to take standardized tests and test well enough to enter into college.

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  • Princeton Review party school rankings appear annually in a guide that is published by Random House and The Princeton Review.

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  • Of course, if an applicant is looking for a quieter institution that boasts a more studious environment, that student may be inspired to avoid those places on The Princeton Review party school list.

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  • Prospective students and parents who are investigating schools that have made The Princeton Review's list should be aware of both the positives and negatives that the colleges have to offer.

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  • Princeton Review student surveys go out every year to thousands of college students at hundreds of universities around America.

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  • After tallying the results of the surveys, The Princeton Review uses them to determine and share information with current and prospective students about the "best" academic institutions in the country.

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  • During the 2009-2010 academic year, The Princeton Review surveyed more than 120,000 students at almost 400 public and private colleges and universities.

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  • The results are published in The Best 373 Colleges, an annual Princeton Review book printed in conjunction with Random House.

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  • Princeton Review's surveys ask students more than 80 questions about dozens of different topics.

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  • The numeric scale allows The Princeton Review to efficiently and accurately calculate average answers among all students at a single school and also among students nationwide.

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  • Traditionally, well-known colleges have achieved their reputations based purely on academics, but The Princeton Review considers other factors as well.

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  • According to The Princeton Review, staff members also cultivate relationships with university administrators, parents, educators, college counselors, and advisors, and use their feedback and resources to help figure rankings.

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  • The Best 373 Colleges isn't the only book that The Princeton Review publishes.

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  • For most of its history, the Princeton Review has distributed paper copies of its survey to school administrators around America, and administrators give students the survey.

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  • However, more than 99 percent of respondents now complete The Princeton Review student survey online.

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  • The Princeton Review goes to great pains to make sure that it surveys a very broad section of students from all kinds of institutions.

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  • In The Princeton Review surveys, students most certainly do have a voice, and it's collectively heard in hundreds of outlets around the country and the world.

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  • The Princeton Review: This is one of the more popular college search websites, The Princeton Review provides bountiful information on schools and features a simple customized search.

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  • There are many organizations that rank college degree programs and colleges themselves on an academic scale, but the best known is perhaps the Princeton Review.

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  • Princeton compiles a long list of liberal arts institutions, public and private colleges and universities and ranks them according to several academic factors, including how much homework students do.

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  • Fender Princeton Lap Steel - Not to be confused with the Fender Princeton amplifier, this lap steel was manufactured in the 1940s and featured a single pickup, single knob and simple body styling.

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  • For example, the Princeton Courtney Sport Coat is a classically styled blazer that's made in medium-wale corduroy with woven leather buttons.

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  • The Princeton Chambray Sport Coat is done in a lightweight chambray and has slim lapels.

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  • Located in Johnson City in the Tri-Cities region in the upper east area of Tennessee, Princeton Gardens is a lovely community of newly built Craftsmen-style cottages.

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  • Princeton snoring and sleep apnea solutions are readily available for people in the region.

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  • Resources range from dentists who fit a stop snoring mouthpiece to studies conducted by Princeton University about the sleep problem.

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  • Professionals in the Princeton New Jersey area that can help address the specific causes of snoring.

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  • Princeton snoring treatments include lifestyle changes and products which can help reduce snoring patterns.

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  • Dentists can be wonderful Princeton snoring resources because they can determine whether a mouthpiece could be fitted for a patient to alleviate their snoring.

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  • Princeton New Jersey dentists are very easy to find.

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  • Some Princeton snoring treatment options are designed for very troublesome conditions including severe sleep apnea.

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  • Many other ENT specialists are in the Princeton New Jersey area.

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  • Health Grades has a detailed list of otolaryngology doctors in Princeton.

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  • Princeton snoring solutions include sleep centers that are dedicated to helping people analyze various sleeping problems and conditions.

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  • Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2005.

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  • Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2002.

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  • National Alliance for Autism Research. 99 Wall Street, Research Park, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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  • Princeton, NJ: Harvest House Publishers, 2004.

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  • National Alliance for Autism Research (NAAR). 99 Wall Street, Research Park, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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  • Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press 2003.

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  • To determine if you can use your current birth control pills as emergency contraception, visit the Princeton University, Office of Population Research website.

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  • Princeton University developed a wonderful recycling program that offers departing students the option to donate furniture, bikes, clothing, books, or even food, in order to help local charities.

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  • Princeton leads the way for other Universities around the nation to follow in order to reduce waste during student moves, and instead to tremendously help the charities in surrounding communities.

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  • Princeton Online-This site offers kids, parents, and teachers an opportunity to participate in lots of fun activities, such as discovering wildlife art, becoming an art detective, and exploring paintings.

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  • Blaxill is a graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Business School.

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  • He eventually obtained a computer science and engineer degree from Princeton and worked on Wall Street and for several major corporations.

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