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prince

prince

prince Sentence Examples

  • Whatever the reason, the kiss had awakened her as effectively as the prince did sleeping beauty.

  • Not that she would know a drug lord from a prince.

  • The Greek prince withdrew the gun at the small of his back, whipping it towards her.

  • The man looked like an ancient Greek prince with blond hair and chiseled features.

  • The Deans couldn't hear the conversation but assumed it was one more lady in waiting for the senior Prince Charming's favor.

  • "Do you prefer a prince or his servant?" he asked.

  • He had a feeling Kisolm, the crown prince of Qatwal, would not even hear him out but would view his attempt to barter peace as a sign of weakness and keep him as a trophy.

  • Romas was all business by the time they rounded the corner; he even released Evelyn's hand and quickened his step into one that befitted a warrior prince.

  • Romas was detached and unreadable, the supreme warrior prince.

  • But he'd won her as Kisolm's younger brother, Romas, had decreed, which should alleviate any accusations brought on by their clan, if Kisolm's father talked some sense into the arrogant crown prince.

  • It seems you finally found your prince charming.

  • Our friend here, is Prince David of Dean, vacationing incognito.

  • Jonathan was a prince to behold, suave beyond description, and with silver-tongued oratory, he calmed the fears of an entire city.

  • The prince shifted in his seat, his large frame tense.

  • There was no one he trusted more than the Landis prince.

  • "We need to act soon," the green-eyed prince urged again.

  • The prince of Dierdirien himself has come!

  • Taran quickly assessed he was the prince despite his subdued appearance.

  • Jaylon, Prince of Dierdirien, Vara said.

  • At his flat tone, the prince glanced at Vara.

  • Jaylon bowed to him again, and Vara took the Dierdirien prince's arm, leading him away.

  • Well, if it isn't the reluctant prince of Medena Castle.

  • I just love to do the Cha Cha and Alex is a Prince!

  • Lillie was the second woman to call him a prince this evening.

  • Whether it was love or blood that made his father insist that Alex inherit the estate, Alex was as trapped as a prince.

  • Papa was fixing to be disappointed in his little prince.

  • BORIS ALEKSYEEVICH GOLITSUIN (1654-1714), Russian statesman, came of a princely family, claiming descent from Prince Gedimin of Lithuania.

  • On the 30th of November 1411 Chicheley, with two other bishops and three earls and the -4 prince of Wales, knelt to the king to receive public thanks for their administration.

  • The only point of interest on the banks is the cavern, near the mouth of the Alder, in which Prince Charles Edward concealed himself for a time after the battle of Culloden.

  • These various sources of wealth and influence had rendered Rudolph the most powerful prince in S.W.

  • on the 1st of January 1515, was an enthusiastic young prince, dominated by the ambition of recovering Milan and Naples.

  • The new duke of Urbino was the Lorenzo de' Medici to whom Machiavelli addressed The Prince.

  • while really working for the election of some minor German prince.

  • The conspirators endeavoured to obtain the co-operation of the prince of Carignano, afterwards King Charles Albert, who was known to share their patriotic aspirations.

  • On the 6th of March 1821 Santarosa and three associates had an interview with the prince, and on the 10th they carried out the military "pronunciamiento" which proclaimed the Spanish constitution.

  • On the 28th of May 1644, however, it was attacked by Prince Rupert and Lord Derby, and stormed with great slaughter.

  • To a prince of his temperament the vehement activity of his abnormally energetic father was very offensive.

  • Edward, prince of Wales, was born on the 13th of October 1453 and baptized by Waynflete the next day.

  • The principal thoroughfare is comprised in Prince's Street and George Street, running straight from S.W.

  • He then abandoned himself to pleasure; he often visited London, and became an intimate friend of the prince of Wales (afterwards George IV.); he brought to Paris the "anglo-mania," as it was called, and made jockeys as fashionable as they were in England.

  • In order to undertake the crusade Godfrey sold the castle of Bouillon to the prince bishop of Liege, and the title of duke of Bouillon remained the appendage of the bishopric till 1678, or for 580 years.

  • When that passionate young prince, in revenge for a fancied wrong, resolved to drive the English out of Bengal, his first step was to occupy the fortified factory at Cossimbazar, and make prisoners of Hastings and his companions.

  • Louis, who soon became the most powerful prince in southern Germany, was called "the Stern," because in a fit of jealousy he caused his first wife, Maria of Brabant, to be executed in '256.

  • After studying law at the universities of Leipzig and Göttingen, he entered the service of the prince of Nassau-Weilburg, whom in 1791 he represented at the imperial diet.

  • He was afterwards appointed the prince's envoy at Paris, where he remained till the decree of Napoleon, forbidding all persons born on the left side of the Rhine to serve any other state than France, compelled him to resign his office (IS'I).

  • In 1814 he was appointed administrator of the Orange principalities; and, when the prince of Orange became king of the Netherlands, Baron Gagern became his prime minister.

  • Towards the end of the 12th century the town was in the hands of the Servian prince Stephen Nemanya, who there received hospitably the German emperor Frederic Barbarossa and his Crusaders.

  • Godollo is the summer residence of the Hungarian royal family, and the royal castle, built in the second half of the 18th century by Prince Anton Grassalkovich, was, with the beautiful domain, presented by the Hungarian nation to King Francis Joseph I.

  • The prince of Orange married the grand duchess Anna Paulowna, sister of Tzar Alexander I.

  • 936, when Hywel Dda, prince of South Wales, enacted a law for their protection.

  • Accordingly, in May 1617, Descartes set out for the Netherlands and took service in the army of Prince Maurice of Orange.

  • What might have happened we cannot tell; but Descartes threw himself on the protection of the French ambassador and the prince of Orange, and the city magistrates, from whom he vainly demanded satisfaction in a dignified letter,2 were snubbed by their superiors.

  • Grand seigneurs, like the prince of Conde, the duc de Nevers and the marquis de Vardes, were glad to vary the monotony of their feudal castles by listening to the eloquent rehearsals of Malebranche or Regis.

  • Near Palo is the modern sea-bathing resort Ladispoli, founded by Prince Odescalchi.

  • The death of his deeply beloved consort Anastasia and his son Demetrius, and the desertion of his one bosom friend Prince Kurbsky, about the same time, seem to have infuriated Ivan against God and man.

  • In November 1580 Ivan in a fit of ungovernable fury at some contradiction or reproach, struck his eldest surviving son Ivan, a prince of rare promise, whom he passionately loved, a blow which proved fatal.

  • An abortive expedition to reinstate a Thessalian prince probably also belongs to this year; there is also evidence that Athens interfered in a war between Selinus and Segesta in Sicily about this time.

  • recommended a moderate indulgence to his son, Prince Henry, and Charles I.

  • Larissa was the headquarters of Ali Pasha during the Greek War of Independence, and of the crown prince Constantine during the Greco-Turkish War; the flight of the Greek army from this place to Pharsala took place on the 23rd of April 1897.

  • I Kings vi., vii.), the sacrifices and festivals and the functions of priests and prince are prescribed, a stream issuing from under the temple is to vivify the Dead Sea and fertilize the land (this is meant literally), the land is divided into parallel strips and assigned to the tribes.

  • ANNE GENEVIEVE, Duchesse de LONGUEVILLE (1619-1679), was the only daughter of Henri de Bourbon, Prince de Conde, and his wife Charlotte Marguerite de Montmorency, and the sister of Louis, the great Conde.

  • She was the guiding spirit of the first Fronde, when she brought over Armand, Prince de Conti, her second brother, and her husband to the malcontents, but she failed to attract Conde himself, whose loyalty to the court overthrew the first Fronde.

  • The Troy-book, undertaken at the command of Henry V., then prince of Wales, dates from 1412-1420; the Story of Thebes from 1420-1422; and the Falls of Princes towards 1430.

  • They were opposed to James II., though they had benefited by his Declaration of Indulgence, and they were the first to congratulate the Prince of Orange on his arrival in England.

  • in 1854, his widow, Marie Louise (daughter of Ferdinand, prince of Artois and duke of Berry), became regent for her son Robert.

  • In the course of his travels in Brazil (1815-1817), Prince Max of Wied met with this bird, and in 1823 there appeared from his pen N.

  • Prince Arthur was in 1920 appointed governor-general of the Union of S.

  • The Duke of Connaught's elder daughter, Princess Margaret (1882), was married in 1905 to the Crown Prince of Sweden, and died at Stockholm May 1 1920.

  • On the 10th of June 1688 she was present at the birth of the prince of Wales and gave evidence before the council in favour of the genuineness of the child.

  • ALEXANDER (ALEXANDER OF BATTENBERG) (1857-1893), first prince of Bulgaria, was the second son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and the Rhine by his morganatic marriage with Julia, countess von Hauke.

  • Prince Alexander, who was born on the 5th of April 1857, was nephew of the tsar Alexander II., who had married a sister of Prince Alexander of Hesse; his mother, a daughter of Count Moritz von Hauke, had been lady-in-waiting to the tsaritsa.

  • When Bulgaria under the Berlin Treaty was constituted an autonomous principality under the suzerainty of Turkey, the tsar recommended his nephew to the Bulgarians as a candidate for the newly created throne, and Prince Alexander was elected prince of Bulgaria by unanimous vote of the Grand Sobranye (April 29, 1879).

  • (For the political history of Prince Alexander's reign, see Bulgaria.) Without any previous training in the art of government, the young prince from the outset found himself confronted with difficulties which would have tried the sagacity of an experienced ruler.

  • After attempting to govern under these conditions for nearly two years, the prince, with the consent of the tsar Alexander III., assumed absolute power (May 9, 1881), and a suspension of the ultra-democratic constitution for a period of seven years was voted by a specially convened assembly (July 13).

  • The prince, after vainly endeavouring to obtain the recall of the generals, restored the constitution with the concurrence of all the Bulgarian political parties (September 18, 1883).

  • A serious breach with Russia followed, which was widened by the part which the prince subsequently played in encouraging the national aspirations of the Bulgarians.

  • In the anxious year which followed, the prince gave evidence of considerable military and diplomatic ability.

  • Although Servia was protected from the consequences of defeat by the intervention of Austria, Prince Alexander's success sealed the union with Eastern Rumelia, and after long negotiations he was nominated governor-general of that province for five years by the sultan (April 5, 1886).

  • Prince Alexander possessed much charm and amiability of manner; he was tall, dignified and strikingly handsome.

  • Walmer Castle was for long the official residence of the lord warden, but has, since the resignation of Lord Curzon in 1903, ceased to be so used, and those portions of it which are of historic interest are now open to the public. George, prince of Wales (lord warden, 1903-1907), was the first lord warden of royal blood since the office was held by George, prince of Denmark, consort of Queen Anne.

  • Of these the most remarkable is the Pavilion, built as a residence for the prince regent (afterwards George IV.) and remodelled in 1819 by the architect, John Nash, in a grotesque Eastern style of architecture.

  • Brighton refused a charter offered by George, prince of Wales, but was incorporated in 1854.

  • In 1890 Prince Bismarck received the title of duke of Lauenburg.

  • He went to Italy as president of the commission, carrying to the prince at Florence the official news of his election.

  • GABRIEL BETHLEN (GABOR) (1580-1629), prince of Transylvania, the most famous representative of the Iktari branch of a very ancient Hungarian family, was born at Illye, and educated at Szarhegy, at the castle of his uncle Andras Lazar.

  • Bethlen also supported Bocskay's successor Gabriel Bathory (1608-1613), but the prince became jealous of Bethlen's superior abilities, and he was obliged to take refuge with the Turks.

  • In 1613 he led a large army against his persecutor, on whose murder by two of his officers that year Bethlen was placed on the throne by the Porte, in opposition to the wishes of the emperor, who preferred a prince who would incline more towards Vienna than towards Constantinople.

  • For himself Bethlen secured the title of prince of the Empire, the seven counties of the Upper Theiss, and the fortresses of Tokaj, Munkacs and Ecsed.

  • Having nominally become king in 1799, that prince created the estate of Ile-Jourdain a duchy, under the title of Avaray, in favour of the comte d'Avaray,, whom he termed his "liberator."

  • But a son Charles, called, as heir of Navarre, prince of Viana, had been born of the marriage.

  • There followed a long conflict, with alternations of success and defeat, which was not terminated till the death of the prince of Viana, perhaps by poison given him by his stepmother, in 1461.

  • In 1755 he inherited from his elder brother, Louis Auguste de Bourbon (170o-1755), prince de Dombes, great estates, part of which he sold to the king.

  • Between the Swan and North-West Cape the principal rivers are the Greenough, Murchison and Gascoyne; on the north-west coast, the Ashburton, Fortescue and De Grey; and in the Kimberley district, the Fitzroy, Panton, Prince Regent and the Ord.

  • south of Prince Regent's river, are representations of human heads and bodies, apparently of females clothed to the armpits, but all the faces are without any indication of mouths.

  • The first parliament under the constitution was elected on the 29th and 30th of March 1901, and was opened by the prince of Wales on the 9th of May following.

  • Under the latter prince the country prospered greatly, and having introduced the principle of primogeniture, he died and was succeeded by his infant son, Bernard Ernest Freund (1800-1882), whose mother, Eleanora of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, governed in his name until 1821.

  • Among several military memorials, one in the Academy grounds was erected to the Prince Imperial of France, for two years a student in the Academy.

  • The most serious difficulty with which Margaret had to deal arose from the attitude of the great nobles, and among these especially of William (the " Silent ") of Nassau, prince of Orange, Lamoral, count of Egmont, and Philip de Montmorency, count of Hoorn.

  • In 1569 William in his capacity as sovereign prince of Orange issued letters-of-marque to a number of vessels to prey upon the Spanish commerce in the narrow seas.

  • The principal towns gave in their submission to the prince of Orange, and acknowledged him as their lawful stadtholder.

  • The prince of Orange was publicly declared an outlaw and his property confiscated (January 24, 1568).

  • The prince now took up his permanent residence at Delft, and a regular government was established, in which he exercised almost dictatorial authority.

  • The prince of Orange, Don Requesens, who had now formally entered the Calvinist communion, governor- was inexorable in laying down three conditions as general.

  • The Spaniards laid siege to Leiden, and though stricken down by a fever at Delft the prince spared no exertion to save the town.

  • By this compact the prince was invested with all the prerogatives belonging to the sovereign.

  • He also had authority to confer the protectorate of the federated provinces upon a foreign prince.

  • A treaty establishing a firm alliance between the provinces, represented by the states-general, assembled at Brussels on the one part, and on the other by the prince of Orange, and the states of Holland and Zeeland, was agreed upon and ratified under the title of the " Pacification of Ghent."

  • It was stipulated that there was to be toleration for both Catholics and Protestants; that the Spanish king should be recognized as de jure sovereign, and the prince of Orange as governor with full powers in Holland and Zeeland.

  • On the advice of the prince of Orange the states-general refused to receive him as governor-general unless he accepted the " Pacification of Ghent."

  • " The prince of at Orange," he informed the king, " has bewitched the Orange Brussels.

  • The eyes of all men turned to the prince of Orange.

  • He was but twenty years of age, and his sudden intrusion was as embarrassing to the prince of Orange as to Don John.

  • Never did the diplomatic talents of the prince of Orange shine brighter than at this difficult crisis.

  • He took part in the desperate defence of Warsaw against Prince Paskievich (September 6-7,1831).

  • It was destroyed in 1260 by Llewellyn ab Gruffydd, prince of Wales, with the supposed connivance df Mortimer, but its site was reoccupied by the earl of Lincoln in 277, and a new castle at once erected.

  • War followed, in which Turkey was easily successful and gained a small rectification of frontier; then a few months later Crete was taken over "en depot" by the Four Powers - Germany and Austria not participating, - and Prince George of Greece was appointed their mandatory.

  • in exchange for the bishopric of Bamberg; and it continued to be a papal possession until 1806, when Napoleon granted it to Talleyrand with the title of prince.

  • SARPEDON, in Greek legend, son of Zeus and Laodameia, Lycian prince and hero of the Trojan war.

  • It was on this occasion that he earned the nickname of "Ironsides," applied to him now by Prince Rupert, and afterwards to his soldiers, "from the impenetrable strength of his troops which could by no means be broken or divided."

  • He delayed supporting the infantry till too late, and was repulsed; he allowed the royal army to march past his outposts; and a fortnight afterwards, without any attempt to prevent it, and greatly to Cromwell's vexation, permitted the moving of the king's artillery and the relief of Donnington Castle by Prince Rupert.

  • He returned on the 19th of April, and on the 23rd was sent to Oxfordshire to prevent a junction between Charles and Prince Rupert, in which he succeeded after some small engagements and the storming of Blechingdon House.

  • This alliance, though the exact terms were not known to Cromwell - "the attempt to vassalize us to a foreign nation," to use his own words - convinced him of the uselessness of any plan for maintaining Charles on the throne; though he still appears to have clung to monarchy, proposing in January 1648 the transference of the crown to the prince of Wales.

  • the prince of Monaco, the German " Valdivia " expedition under Professor Chun (1898), and the combined Antarctic expeditions (1903-1904).

  • In 1550 a castle was built here by the prince of Kiev, and various privileges were bestowed upon the inhabitants.

  • The last years of Bela's life were embittered by the ingratitude of his son Stephen, who rebelled continuously against his father and ultimately compelled him to divide the kingdom with him, the younger prince setting up a capital of his own at Sarospatak, and following a foreign policy directly contrary to that of his father.

  • of Spain, who ceded it in 1597 to Maurice, prince of Orange.

  • In Africa the Moorish prince, Firmus, raised the standard of revolt, being joined by the provincials, who had been rendered desperate by the cruelty and extortions of Count Romanus, the military governor.

  • In the Golden Book of the Capitol (Li bro dOro del Cam fsidoglio) are inscribed 321 patrician families, and of these 28 have the title of prince and 8 that of duke, while the others are marquesses, counts or simply patricians.

  • The kings uncle is duke of Aosta, his son is prince of Piedmont and his cousin is duke of Genoa.

  • Three years afterwards he died, leaving a son, Frederick, to the care of Constance, who in her turn died in 1198, bequeathing the young prince, already crowned king of Germany, to the guardianship of Innocent III.

  • There was no prince greater or more formidable in the habitable globe.

  • The only prince who could, with any probability of success, have established the German rule in Italy, his ruin proved the impossibility of that long-cherished scheme.

  • During the earlier days of the republic the doge had been a prince elected by the people, and answerable only to the popular assemblies.

  • To be a prince was tantamount to being the mark of secret conspiracy and assassination.

  • much wrangling between the French and Spanish parties, the duchy was confirmed in 1586 to Ottaviano Farnese and his son Alessandro, better known as Philip II.s general, the prince of Parma.

  • Emmanuel Philibert, duke of Savoy, represented the oldest and not the least illustrious reigning house in Europe, and his descendants were destined to achieve for Italy the independence which no other power or prince had given her since the fall of ancient Rome.

  • The French armies were more than once defeated by Prince Eugene of Savoy, who drove them out of Italy in 1707.

  • Not only did she govern Lombardy and Venetia directly, but Austrian princes ruled in Modena, Parma and Tuscany; Piacenza, Ferrara and Comacchio had Austrian garrisons; Prince Metternich, the Austrian chancellor, believed that he could always secure the election of an Austrophil pope, and Ferdinand of Naples, reinstated by an Austrian army, had bound himself, by a secret article of the treaty of June 12, 1815, not to introduce methods of government incompatible with those adopted in Austrias Italian possessions.

  • Both King Victor Emmanuel and his brother Charles Felix had no sons, and the heir presumptive to the throne was Prince Charles Albert, of the Carignano branch of the house of Savoy.

  • The mission of Gaetano Castiglia and Marquis Giorgio Pallavicini to Turin, where they had interviewed Charles Albert, although without any definite resultfor Confalonieri had warned the prince that Lombardy was not ready to risewas accidentally discovered, and Confalonieri was himself arrested.

  • The author was Giuseppe Mazzini, then a young man of twenty-six years, who, though in theory a republican, was ready to accept the leadership of a prince of the house of Savoy if he would guide the nation to freedom.

  • On the 23rd of May Prince Napoleon, with a French army corps, landed at Leghorn, his avowed object being to threaten the Austrian flank; and in June these troops, together with a Tuscan contingent, departed for Lombardy.

  • Although he had resigned, he remained In reality the emperor was contemplating an Etrurian kingdom with the prince at its head.

  • The king having formally accepted the voluntary annexation of the duchies, Tuscany and Romagna, appointed the prince of Carignano viceroy with Ricasoli as governor-general (22nd of March), and was immediately afterwards excommunicated by the pope.

  • Zanichellis Scritti del Conte di Cavour (Bologna, 1892) are very important, and so are Prince Metternichs 7ff moires (7 vols., Paris, f881).

  • Early in the year the crown prince Humbert with the Princess Margherita took up their residence in the Quirinal Palace, which, in view of the Vatican refusal to deliver up the keys, had to be opened by force.

  • Towards Prince Bjsmarck Robilant maintained an attitude of dignified independence, and as, in the spring of 1886, the moment for the renewal of the triple alliance drew near, he profited by the development of the Bulgarian crisis and the threatened Franco-Russian understanding to secure from the central powers something more than the bare territorial guarantee of the original treaty.

  • Meanwhile the enthusiastic reception accorded to the young German emperor on the occasion of his visit to Rome in October 1888, and the cordiality shown towards King Humbert and Crispi at Berlin in May 1889, increased the tension of FrancoItalian relations; nor was it until after the fall of Prince Bismarck in March 1890 that Crispi adopted towards the Republic a more friendly attitude by sending an Italian squadron to salute President Carnot at Toulon.

  • In November he occupied York in the prince's interest, returning to London to meet William on the 26th of December.

  • Halifax and the Commons in declaring the prince and princess joint sovereigns.

  • Cranmer suggested that if the canonists and the universities should decide that marriage with a deceased brother's widow was illegal, and if it were proved that Catherine had been married to Prince Arthur, her marriage to Henry could be declared null and void by the ordinary ecclesiastical courts.

  • Becoming more violent Thistlewood formed other plots, talked of murdering the prince of Wales, and was sentenced to a year's imprisonment for challenging the home secretary, Lord Sidmouth, to a duel.

  • [[Thokoly, Imre (Emerich), Prince]] (1657-1705), Hungarian statesman, was born at Kesmark on the 25th of September 1657.

  • In 1670, fleeing from the dangers of Upper Hungary, where the Protestants and Imperialists were constantly in arms against each other, he took refuge with his kinsman Michael Teleki, the chief minister of Michael Apafy, prince of Transylvania.

  • On the 15th of June 1682 he married Helen Zrinyi, the widow of Prince Francis Rakoczy I.

  • ThbkOly's distrust of the emperor now induced him to turn for help to the sultan, who recognized him as prince of Upper Hungary on condition that he paid an anuual tribute of 40,000 florins.

  • promises that his hostages and his charters shall be restored to Llewellyn, prince of Wales.

  • commissioned him to arrange a reconciliation between the prince of Wales and himself, but the attempt was unsuccessful.

  • Maas, Medusee, in Prince of Monaco's series.

  • This prince, a brother of the emperor Henry VII., ruled from 1307 to 1354, and was the real founder of the power of Trier.

  • At Madrid he preached a sermon which pleased Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., and the latter on his accession appointed Frewen one of his chaplains.

  • Coercive temporal authority over their bodies or estates could only be given by concession from the temporal prince.

  • In Catalonia " Pragmatics," letters from the prince, issued to restrain jurisdiction assumed by ecclesiastical judges contrary to the customs of the principality.

  • Recourse to the secular prince by way of appel comme d'abus, or otherwise, became more frequent and met with greater encouragement.

  • Hence, even in countries where the Roman Church is established, such as Belgium, Italy, the Catholic states of Germany and cantons of Switzerland, most of the Latin republics of America, and the province of Quebec, and a fortiori where this Church is not established, there is now no discipline over the laity, except penitential, and no jurisdiction exercised in civil suits, except possibly the matrimonial questions of princes (of which there was an example in the case of the reigning prince of Monaco).

  • In 1584, however, the city had to surrender on onerous terms to the prince of Parma.

  • On the other hand Boleslaus's ally, the fugitive Magyar prince Bela, succeeded with Polish assistance in winning the crown of Hungary.

  • Prince Charles Edward slept in it the night following the fight at Prestonpans (1745).

  • Seized by the invaders, castle and town were later retaken in 1231 by Prince Llewelyn ap Iorwerth, who burned the fortress and slew its garrison.

  • The Mansfeld family became extinct in 1780 on the death of Josef Wenzel Nepomuk, prince of Fondi, the lands being divided between Saxony and Prussia.

  • ALBERT (1522-1557), prince of Bayreuth, surnamed THE WARLIKE, and also Alcibiades, was a son of Casimir, prince of Bayreuth, and a member of the Franconian branch of the Hohenzollern family.

  • Born at Ansbach on the 28th of March 1522, he lost his father in 1527 and came under the guardianship of his uncle George, prince of Ansbach, a strong adherent of the reformed doctrines.

  • famous for the attempts of that prince to extend the diplomatic relations of Spain to the remotest parts of the earth.

  • ploration- Portugal took the lead along this new path, and foremost Prince among her pioneers stands Prince Henry the Navigator Henry the (1394-1460), who was a patron both of exploration and Navigator.

  • had addressed to Prester John to the Negus Alexander of Abyssinia, but he was detained by that prince and never allowed to leave the country.

  • The Portuguese, following the lead of Prince Henry, continued to look for the road to India by the Cape of Good Hope.

  • This was unquestionably the greatest of the voyages which followed from the impulse of Prince Henry, and it was rendered possible only by the magnificent courage of the commander in spite of rebellion, mutiny and starvation.

  • In February 1770 he set out again from Fort Prince of Wales; but, after great hardships, he was again forced to return to the fort.

  • He voted for the exclusion of James, duke of York, from the throne, and made overtures to William, prince of Orange, and consequently in 168r he lost both his secretaryship and his seat on the privy council.

  • According to Melville he had designs on the life of the young prince.

  • 1880); Pieces et documents relatifs au comte de Bothwell, by Prince A.

  • James was a cultured prince with a taste for music and architecture, but was a weak and incapable king.

  • About 1330 B.C. Khurba-tila was captured by Kuri-galzu III., the Kassite king of Babylonia, but a later prince Kidin-Khutrutas avenged his defeat, and Sutruk-Nakhkhunte (1220 B.C.) carried fire and sword through Babylonia, slew its king Zamama-sum-iddin and carried away a stela of Naram-Sin and the famous code of laws of Khammurabi from Sippara, as well as a stela of Manistusu from Akkuttum or Akkad.

  • In 750 B.C. Umbadara was king of Elam; Khumbanigas was his successor in 742 B.C. In 720 B.C. the latter prince met the Assyrians under Sargon at Dur-ili in Yamutbal, and though Sargon claims a victory the result was that Babylonia recovered its independence under Merodach-baladan and the Assyrian forces were driven north.

  • He was finally released through the mediation of Prince Adam Czartoryski, and returned to Poland utterly discredited.

  • of Hungary in 1480, and before Prince Eugene of Savoy in 1697.

  • Still there was a wide difference between the duke of the Normans and the duke of Apulia, between an hereditary prince of a hundred and fifty years' standing and an adventurer who had carved out his duchy for himself.

  • GORCHAKOV, or Gortchakoff, a noble Russian family, descended from Michael Vsevolodovich, prince of Chernigov, who, in 1246, was assassinated by the Mongols.

  • Prince Andrey Ivanovich (1768-1855), general in the Russian army, took a conspicuous part in the final campaigns against Napoleon.

  • Prince Mikhail Dmitrievich (1795-1861), brother of the last named, entered the Russian army in 1807 and took part in the campaigns against Persia in 1810, and in 1812-1815 against France.

  • In 1854 he crossed the Danube and besieged Silistria, but was superseded in April by Prince Paskevich, who, however, resigned on the 8th of June, when Gorchakov resumed the command.

  • In 1855 he was appointed commander-in-chief of the Russian forces in the Crimea in place of Prince Menshikov.

  • In 1856 he was appointed governor-general of Poland in succession to Prince Paskevich.

  • Prince Gorchakov, Alexander Mikhailovich (1798-1883), Russian statesman, cousin of Princes Petr and Mikhail Gorchakov, was born on the 16th of July 1798, and was educated at the lyceum of Tsarskoye Selo, where he had the poet Pushkin as a school-fellow.

  • His first diplomatic work of importance was the negotiation of a marriage between the grand duchess Olga and the crown prince Charles of Wurttemberg.

  • The appointment was hailed with enthusiasm in Russia, and at that juncture Prince Chancellor Gorchakov was unquestionably the most powerful minister in Europe.

  • Prince Gorchakov devoted himself entirely to foreign affairs, and took no part in the great internal reforms of Alexander II.'s reign.

  • The Great Council of Venice was anything but a primitive institution; it was the artificial institution of a late age, which grew at the expense of earlier institutions, of the prince on the one side and of the people on the other.

  • All political power was vested in the noble class; the prince sank to a magistrate, keeping only some of the outward forms of sovereignty; the mass of the people were shut out altogether.

  • But at Venice neither prince nor people could open the door of the Great Council; only the Great Council itself could do that.

  • He shows a tendency - a tendency whose growth will be more or less checked according to the strength of the central power - to grow into something of a lord or even a prince on his own account, a growth which may advance to the scale of a German elector or stop at that of an English lord of a manor.

  • In other words, the king or other prince can ennoble.

  • In the modern states of western Europe the existing nobility seems to have for the most part had its origin in personal service to the prince.

  • The chief power of the state was placed neither in the prince nor in the nation at large; it was held by a noble class.

  • Under the fully-developed despotisms of the East a real nobility is impossible; the prince raises and thrusts down as he pleases.

  • He also took advantage of this meeting to have his son Ecgferth consecrated as his colleague, and that prince subsequently signed charters as Rex Merciorum.

  • His position was assured, at least temporarily, in 617, when he decided to espouse the cause of the Northumbrian prince Edwin, then a fugitive at his court, and defeated zEthelfrith of Northumbria on the banks of the Idle, a tributary of the Trent, in Mercian territory.

  • The palace of the prince, occupying the site of the Turkish konak was built by Prince Alexander in 1880-1882; it has been greatly enlarged by King Ferdinand.

  • A small -mausoleum contains the remains of Prince Alexander; there are monuments to the tsar Alexander II., to Russia, to the medical officers who fell in the war of 1877 and to the patriot Levsky.

  • Byzantine territory, threatened Constantinople with a fleet of small craft, obtained as consort for one of their princes, Vladimir I, (q.v.), a sister of the Byzantine emperor on condition of the prince becoming a Christian, adopted Christianity for themselves and their subjects, learned to hold in check the nomadic hordes of the steppe, and formed matrimonial alliances with the reigning families of Poland, Hungary, Norway and France.

  • Here new principalities were founded and new agglomerations of principalities came into existence, some of them having a grand prince who no longer professed allegiance to Kiev.

  • It always had a prince, no doubt, but he was engaged by formal contract without much attention being paid to hereditary rights, and he was merely leader of the troops, while all the political power remained in the hands of the civil officials and the Vetche, a popular assembly which was called together in the market-place, as occasion required, by the tolling of the great bell.

  • The principality which was to become the nucleus of the future Russian empire was not Novgorod with its democratic institutions, but its eastern neighbour Moscow, in which the popular assembly played a very insignificant part, and the supreme law was the will of the prince.

  • One of his successors, half a century later, married a daughter of the Byzantine emperor, and gave his own daughter in marriage to a Russian prince.

  • At the same time he took possession of Tver, on the ground that the: prince had allied himself with Lithuania.

  • In 1521 the prince, being suspected of forming an alliance with the Crimean Tatars, was summoned to Moscow and arrested.

  • Two years later the prince of NovgorodSeversk was accused of intriguing with the Poles and imprisoned for the rest of his life.

  • Having convoked his boyars he reproached them collectively with robbing the treasury and committing acts of injustice, and he caused one of them, a Prince Shuiski who happened to be in power at the moment, to be seized by his huntsmen and torn in pieces by a pack of hounds, as a warning to others.

  • His successor, Basil, tried to get himself elected grand-prince of Lithuania when the throne became vacant by the death of his brother-in-law in 1506, but the choice fell on the late prince's brother Sigismund, who was likewise elected king of Poland.

  • In the negotiations for peace the inordinate pretensions of the Muscovite prince were put forward boldly: he not only refused to restore Smolensk, but claimed Kiev and a number of other towns on the ground that in the old time of the independent principalities they had belonged to descendants of Rurik.

  • The severity of the crisis produced a remedy, in the form of a patriotic rising of the masses under the leadership of a butcher called Minin and a Prince Pozharski.

  • This gave Catherine a certain right to the throne at her husband's death, and her claims were supported by Peter's most influential coadjutors, especially by Prince Menshikov, an ambitious man of humble origin who had been raised by his patron to the highest offices of state.

  • Its attitude was graphically described in the famous declaration of Prince Gorchakov: " La Russie ne boude pas; elle se recueille."

  • It was not without secret satisfaction, therefore, that Prince Gorchakov watched the repeated defeats of the Austrian army in the Italian campaign of 1859, and he felt inclined to respond to the advances made to him by Napoleon III.; but the germs of a Russo-French alliance, which had come into existence immediately after the Crimean War, ripened very slowly, and they were completely destroyed in 1863 when the French emperor wounded Russian sensibilities deeply by giving moral and diplomatic support to the Polish insurrection.

  • The Bulgarian government, first under Prince Alexander and afterwards under the direction of M.

  • Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria had long been anxious to legalize his position by a reconciliation, and as soon as he got rid of Stamboloff he made advances to the Russian government.

  • They were well received, and a reconciliation was effected on certain conditions, the first of which was that Prince Ferdinand's eldest son and heir should become a member of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

  • As another means of opposing Western influence in south-eastern Europe, Prince Lobanov inclined to the policy of protecting rather than weakening the Ottoman empire.

  • After Prince Lobanov's death and the appointment of Count Muraviev as his successor in January 1897, this tendency of Russian policy became less marked.

  • It was clear that the system with which the murdered minister's name had been associated stood all but universally condemned, and in the appointment of the conciliatory Prince Sviatopolk-Mirski as his successor the tsar himself seemed to concede the necessity for a change of policy.

  • The day on which the deputation laid these views before Prince Mirski was hailed by public opinion as recalling the 5th of May 1789, the date of the meeting of the French states-general at Versailles.

  • Prince Mirski resigned, his resignation being immediately followed by a reactionary imperial manifesto reaffirming the principle of autocracy (February 18th).

  • On the 6th of June, in reply to a deputation of the second congress of zemstvos headed by Prince Trubetzkoi, the emperor promised the speedy convocation of a National Assembly.

  • Khomiakov, had been one of the founders of the " Union of 17 October," but even the Octobrists formed but a third of the House and were compelled to act with the reactionaries of the Right; and the vice-president, Prince Volkonsky, was a member of the Union of the Russian People.

  • Beaufort and his brother Henry, bishop of Winchester, were opposed to Arundel and supported by the prince of Wales.

  • For two years the real government rested with the prince and the council.

  • Under the prince's influence the English intervened in France in 1411 on the side of Burgundy.

  • However, in November 1411 Henry showed that he was still capable of vigorous action by discharging the prince and his supporters.

  • In 1218 he set sail for Esthonia with one of the largest fleets ever seen in northern waters, including a Wendish contingent led by Prince Vitsla y.

  • the role of the prince as a ruler is a very shadowy one.

  • The prince, it is true, has a central domain, but his functions are ecclesiastical and subordinate and his powers strictly limited (xlvi.

  • The emergence of Satan as a definite supernatural personality, the head or prince of the world of evil spirits, is entirely a phenomenon of post-exilian Judaism.

  • "I pray God save the king," Anne herself is reported to have said on the scaffold, "and send him long to reign over you, for a gentler nor a more merciful prince was there never; and to me he was ever a good, a gentle and sovereign lord."

  • and the emperor Titus, the history of the Black Prince, the life of Sir Philip Sidney, that of Montrose, and finally that of Sir W.

  • He was educated at King Edward's school, Birmingham, under James Prince Lee, afterwards bishop of Manchester, and had as contemporaries B.

  • He was made Hulsean professor in 1861, and shortly afterwards chaplain to the Prince Consort and honorary chaplain in ordinary to the queen.

  • On the other side the right wing was commanded by the duke of Ferrara, who had like Navarro organized a mobile field artillery (the artillery material of this prince was thought to be the best conditioned in Europe).

  • FREDERICK LOUIS (1707-1751), prince of Wales, eldest son of George II., was born at Hanover on the 10th of January 1707.

  • Soon after his father became king in 1727 Frederick took up his residence in England and in 1729 was created prince of Wales; but the relations between George II.

  • The prince's character was not attractive, and the king refused to make him an adequate allowance.

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