Prey Sentence Examples

prey
  • The town had become a prey to anarchy.

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  • Dean felt it might be better if she talked instead of letting the silence and the upcoming events prey on her mind.

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  • She looked around, the prey she'd been stalking in the forest before dawn now lost.

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  • He was a man of war and battle, but he had never been a man to prey on those unable to defend themselves.

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  • At the very moment when she would have seized her prey, the hare moved and darted along the balk between the winter rye and the stubble.

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  • Instead of going through the drive through every day to eat, it's like hunting your prey down.

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  • All the song-birds and birds of prey of the temperate zone are plentiful.

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  • Deer are the mountain lion's natural prey.

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  • Birds of prey are numerous.

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  • Unusually dissatisfied at the idea of releasing a potentially fun prey into the wild, Xander remained a moment longer.

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  • Many of our native species spend the day lurking beneath stones, and sally forth at night in pursuit of their prey, which consistsof small insects, earthworms and snails.

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  • During the 18th century many works of art, which still remained in situ, fell a prey to foreign collectors.

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  • With his choice of prey, he narrowed in on a gorgeous blonde who seemed out of place, one of the few not wearing fangs or dressed from head-to-foot in black.

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  • He was, however, a prey to the most terrible pains of body and agony of mind.

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  • On that occasion Jules Favre had recognized the September convention to be dead, and, while refusing explicitly to denounce it, had admitted that unless Italy went to Rome the city would become a prey to dangerous agitators.

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  • It feeds on mackerel, pilchards and herrings and, following the shoals, is often caught by fishermen in the nets along with its prey.

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  • Natural prey animals for cats are rodents, birds, insects, and sometimes amphibians.

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  • Romagna had continued a prey to anarchy ever since 1831; the government organized armed bands called the Centurioni (descended from the earlier Sanfedisti), to terrorize the Liberals, while the secret societies continued their propaganda by deeds.

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  • Wolves do not catch their prey by lying in ambush, or stealing up close and making a sudden spring, but by fairly running it down in open chase, which their speed and remarkable endurance enable them to do.

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  • He bought wild lands, took stock in mining companies, desiccated egg companies, patent looms, photo-lithographic companies, gave away profusely, lent to plausible rascals, and was the ready prey of every new inventor who chanced to find him with money or with property that he could readily convert into money.

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  • Game, birds of prey and fish are plentiful.

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  • The Afghan is by breed and nature a bird of prey.

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  • Vultures and other birds of prey are met with.

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  • As for the underworld, I prey on depravity.

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  • Nearly all spiders are venomous, as they must use their venom to paralyze their prey.

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  • Included in their meal would be things like the stomach on the prey animal or even its dung.

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  • Among birds of prey may be mentioned the eagle and various species of hawk, and among game-birds the partridge and pheasant.

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  • The members of this group are always carnivorous or parasitic, and prey upon both vertebrates and invertebrates.

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  • Their government, effective enough when dealing with natives, breaks down in all departments concerned with Europeans, and becomes the prey of designing traders.

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  • But the Peckhams' careful observations and experiments show that, with the American wasps, the victims stored in the nests are quite as often dead as alive; that those which are only paralysed live for a varying number of days, some more, some less; that wasp larvae thrive just as well on dead victims, sometimes dried up, sometimes undergoing decomposition, as on living and paralysed prey; that the nerve-centres are not stung with the supposed uniformity; and that in some cases paralysis, in others death, follows when the victims are stung in parts far removed from any nerve-centre.

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  • By constructing an entrenched camp at Ulm and concentrating all the available food within it, he expected to compel Napoleon to invest and besiege him, and he anticipated that in the devastated country his adversary would be compelled to separate and thus fall an easy prey to the Russians.

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  • From the 10th to the 13th Napoleon lay at Duben, again a prey to the most extraordinary irresolution, but on that day he thought he saw his opportunity.

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  • The scorpions use their large chelae for seizing prey and for fighting with one another.

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  • When the prey comes into contact with the tentacles it is paralysed, and at the same time held firmly, by the barbed threads shot out from the stinging organs or nematocysts.

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  • The birds of prey, 45 species, of which 22 are peculiar to the group, vary in size from a tiny falcon not larger than a sparrow (Microhierax), to an immense monkey-catching eagle (Pithecophaga gefferyi, Grant), which is strong enough to seize monkeys as they leap from tree to tree.

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  • The larger species prey fiercely on other kinds of birds, while the smaller content themselves with a diet of small animals, often insects and worms. But however diverse be the appearance, structure or habits of the extremities of the series of species, they are so closely connected by intermediate forms that it is hard to find a gap between them that would justify a generic division.

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  • The blockade lasted more than six months, during which the city was a prey to all the horrors of siege and famine.

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  • The larger beasts of prey are not met with, and little check is therefore put on the natural fecundity of the graminivorous species.

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  • In Italy there was a great mortality in 543, but the most notable epidemic was in 565, which so depopulated the country as to leave it an easy prey to the Lombards.

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  • Too jealous of each other to combine, and too demoralized by luxury to resist, they fell an easy prey to Lydia; and when the Lydian kingdom ended with the capture of Sardis by Cyrus, 546 B.C. they passed, almost without resistance, to Persia.

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  • It was sacked by Perugia and the papal troops in 1442, and even after that continued to be the prey of factions.

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  • Its prey is said to consist largely of gazelles, small deer, hares and peafowl and other birds.

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  • Swift of flight, powerfully armed, but above all endowed with extraordinary courage, they pursue their weaker cousins, making the latter disgorge their already swallowed prey, which is nimbly caught before it reaches the water; and this habit, often observed by sailors and fishermen, has made these predatory, and parasitic birds locally known as "Teasers," "Boatswains," 2 and, from a misconception of their 1 Thus written by Hoier (circa 1604) as that of a Faeroese bird (hodie Skuir) an example of which he sent to Clusius (Exotic. Auctarium, p. 367).

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  • The passage of a bill proposed by him (November 1 775) to arm and equip ships to prey upon British commerce, and for the establishment of a prize court, was, according to his biographer, Austin, " the first actual avowal of offensive hostility against the mother country, which is to be found in the annals of the Revolution."

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  • The dissensions of the turbulent princes of Gwynedd, Powys and Deheubarth, and of their no less quarrelsome chieftains, now rent the country, which was continually also a prey to Saxon incursions by land and to Scandinavian attacks by sea.

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  • Birds of prey are, unjustly enough, regarded with so little favour that few attempts have been made to naturalize them; the continental little owl (Athene noctua), however, has for some time been well established in England, where it has hardly, if ever, appeared naturally.

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  • The regular "man-eater" is generally an old tiger whose vigour is past, and whose teeth are worn and defective; it takes up its abode in the neighbourhood of a village, the population of which it finds an easier prey than wild animals.

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  • This is an enormous boa-constrictor of great length and weight, which drops upon his prey from the branch of a tree, or steals upon it in the thick grass.

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  • After spending the winter at Florence and Rome, he left in the spring of 1823 for Munich, where he stayed for nearly a year, the prey of illness and isolation.

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  • In the coniferous forests the black grouse, hazel grouse and willow grouse, capercailzie and woodcock are the principal game birds; the crane is found in marshy clearings, birds of prey are numerous, and the Siberian jay in the north and the common jay in the south are often heard.

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  • But it was as a future prey, not as a possible ally, that Russia regarded her ancient rival in the north.

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  • Birds of prey are represented by the condor, vulture, two species of the carrion-hawk (Polyborus), and owl.

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  • As soon as ten or a dozen eggs are laid, the cock begins to brood, always taking his place on them at nightfall surrounded by the hens, while by day they relieve one another, more it would seem to guard their common treasure from jackals and small beasts of prey than directly to forward the process of hatching, for that is often left wholly to the sun.'

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  • Ultimately, however, the Buyid dynasty grew weaker under the quarrels of its members and fell an easy prey to the Ghaznevids.

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  • In 1064 it was taken by Alp Arslan, sultan of the Seljuk Turks, and in the 13th century it fell a prey to the Mongols of Jenghiz Khan.

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  • In 1312 the Mahommedan arms were triumphant through the Mahratta country; and seven years later the whole of Malabar fell a prey to the invaders.

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  • All round its head and also along the body the skin bears fringed appendages resembling short fronds of sea-weed, a structure which, combined with the extraordinary faculty of assimilating the colour of the body to its surroundings, assists this fish greatly in concealing itself in places which it selects on account of the abundance of prey.

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  • It is probable enough that smaller fishes are attracted in this way, but experiments have shown that the action of the jaws is automatic and depends on contact of the prey with the tentacle.

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  • It was not till late in the 4th century that civil dissension became a danger to the state, leaving it a prey to Idrieus, the dynast of Caria (346), and to the Persian admiral Memnon (333).

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  • Nevertheless, in 1778 Vincennes fell an easy prey to agents sent to occupy it by George Rogers Clark, and although again occupied a few months later by General Henry Hamilton, the lieutenantgovernor at Detroit, it passed finally into American control in February 1779 as a result of Clark's remarkable march from Kaskaskia.

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  • At any rate England was as helpless as the Empire when first the Danish and Norwegian galleys began to cross the North Sea, and to beat down both sides of Britain seeking for prey.

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  • The enemy had suffered so much in the year of the six battles that they held off for some space from Wessex, seeking easier prey on the continent and in northern England.

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  • Edward, though only in his fifty-seventh year, was entering into a premature and decrepit old age, in which he became the prey of unworthy favorites, male and female.

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  • The Alabama was allowed to prey on Federal commerce, and undoubtedly inflicted a vast amouuit of -injury on the trade of the United States.

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  • Such teeth are adapted only for catching slippery living prey, like fish.

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  • Many mammals have, between these two sets, a tooth at each corner of the mouth, longer and more pointed than the others, adapted for tearing or stabbing, or for fixing struggling prey.

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  • In the omnivorous type, as exemplified in man and monkeys, and to a less specialized degree in swine, the incisors are of moderate and nearly equal size; the canines, if enlarged, serve for other purposes than holding prey, and such enlargement is usually confined to those of the males; while the cheek-teeth have broad flattened crowns surmounted by rounded bosses, or tubercles.

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  • Similarly the various cities were divided in their allegiance between the Achaean and the Aetolian leagues, with the result that Arcadia became the battleground of these confederacies, or fell a prey to Sparta and Macedonia.

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  • The birds of prey include the red-shouldered, redtailed, broad-winged, Cooper's, sharp-shinned and sparrow hawk and the bald eagle; the great horned, barred, barn, snowy, shorteared and screech owls.

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  • During the last thirty-two years of the century the house fell a prey to one of those bitter and unappeasable family feuds which are the ruin of great Indian families.

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  • In the wild state they never defend themselves, and if approached from different points, according to the Indian fashion of hunting, get completely bewildered and fall an easy prey.

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  • But his health was failing, his reputation was on the wane, his works did not sell, and he gradually sank a prey to illness and disappointment.

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  • Birds of prey are few; the parrot and pigeon tribes are better represented.

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  • Common among birds of prey are owls, hawks and kites, and there are many turkey buzzards.

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  • While Death is cruel and merciless, and never lets go his prey once seized, Sleep is gentle and kindly, the bestower of rest and pleasant dreams, the soother of care and sorrow.

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  • War having broken out in this year between the United States and Great Britain the islands were largely used as a base by American cruisers sent to prey on British merchant ships.

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  • A prey to perpetual alarm, the people entrenched themselves behind those high walls of the oppida which Roman security had razed to the ground, but imperial impotence had restored, and where life in the middle ages was destined to vegetate in unrestful isolation.

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  • Aquitaine, hitherto the common prey of all the Frankislh kings, having in vain tried to profit by the struggles between Fredegond and Brunhilda, and set up an independent king, Gondibald, now finally burst her bonds in 670.

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  • Tuscany was governed by a series of foreign regents and was a prey to adventurers from Lorraine and elsewhere; although the administration was not wholly inefficient and introduced some useful reforms, the people were ground by taxes to pay for the apanage of Francis in Vienna and for Austrian wars, and reduced to a state of great poverty.

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  • Among the birds of prey may be mentioned, besides the cinereous and bearded vultures, the Spanish vulture(Gyps occidentalis), the African or Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopteras), which is found among all the mountains of the Peninsula, the Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila Adalberti), the short-toed eagle (Circaetus gallicus), the southern eagle-owl (Bubo atheniensis), and various kites and falcons.

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  • During the absence of the papal court in Avignon it was a prey to the struggles between Guelphs and Ghibellines, until in 1354 Cardinal Albornoz brought it once more under the authority of the Church.

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  • It is a most expert swimmer and diver, easily overtaking and seizing fish in the water; but when it has captured its prey it brings it to shore to devour.

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  • There are no large beasts of prey, and neither the elephant, the rhinoceros nor the tapir is represented.

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  • There was no more I could accomplish in dreary Lynn thought I felt a closeness to my prey.

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  • Thankfully, the immortal was more pissed at him than concerned about its prey.

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  • He approached with a slow, steady gait, like a predator inspecting its disabled prey before going for the kill.

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  • If he wants access to my domain, he will deal with me directly, not prey on your weaknesses.

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  • The Dark One never missed an opportunity to prey on someone.

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  • He was watching her, a predator who'd either figured out his prey wasn't edible or needed more study to kill.

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  • He'd pursue her like a predator its prey, and he'd consume her.

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  • From all indications, they were people who went rabbit hunting with machine guns, blazing away at any obstacle in their path with total disregard for the subtleties of life, like seeking out records under assumed names and following their prey from afar.

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  • The twisted, abusive man who had fallen prey to the same curse in his blood that she carried in hers.

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  • It was his size – combined with a prey's instinctive sixth sense warning it of a predator – that caused people to move away from him.

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  • She loved the idea of vampires, but he didn't think she really understood what it meant to view humans as prey.

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  • Laurencio had perfectly captured the moment when the prey realized it was being stalked.

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  • One farmer recently witnessed a Sparrowhawk take a Fieldfare and was then accosted on the ground by a Buzzard which then stole the prey.

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  • Their flat body enables them to squeeze into extremely narrow cracks and crevices, where they prey on small arthropods and worms.

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  • The diets were dominated by pelagic and benthopelagic prey and relatively little use was made of the benthic biota.

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  • When the body falls prey to sickness, the mind is never totally blameless.

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  • Dogs and cats on the other hand have well developed canines reflecting their natural food in the wild - live prey.

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  • They are ferocious carnivores equipped with huge jaws to capture prey.

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  • Such frenzied attacks are typical behavior for many small carnivores faced with abundant ' prey ' .

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  • Canines are fang teeth at the front of mouths which carnivores use to rip chunks of meat from their prey.

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  • Slightly larger flagellates and small ciliates prompt the spines to bend and curl so as to entangle the prey more thoroughly.

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  • The Hawk conservancy This award winning and internationally acclaimed conservancy for birds of prey is situated in the village.

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  • Stalking and catching prey is very much a learned behavior 4 and can initially lead the young cuttlefish into many problems.

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  • The extra food has also attracted scores of aggressive seagulls, who also prey on young ducklings.

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  • Birds of prey are often to be seen hovering over motorway embankments.

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  • At their worst they are still trying to kill foxes perhaps by flushing to guns or by using a bird of prey.

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  • Folly Farm includes rare animals, birds of prey and an old time funfair.

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  • The dwarf remained seeing the faint glow from torches onboard their prey long against the cold backdrop of night.

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  • Other birds of prey include peregrine, goshawk, merlin and barn owl.

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  • In the spring and summer fish prey, especially sandeels are important, particularly for the larger haddock.

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  • The wild hawk is accustomed to prey on tame birds; the domestic hawk on wild.

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  • To understand the techniques it is necessary to know ho the sail fish or marlin takes its prey.

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  • Ground-dwelling prey such as centipedes and the dipteran muscid Scatophaga stercoraria appeared to be common dietary components.

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  • Male and female ospreys look similar, but - as with most birds of prey - the female is bigger.

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  • Hunting with birds of prey was one of the prime leisure pastimes of the Tudor courts.

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  • They also prey heavily on the eggs and chicks of penguins and small petrels.

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  • The palps are always greatly enlarged, with the terminal segments modified into strong pincers used for catching and crushing prey.

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  • Their fangs are for injecting poison into the prey.

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  • The outlook for cats which fall prey to the severe disease is very poor.

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  • Whatever emotion they experience when finding and devouring prey we can be certain it isn't remorse.

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  • Like hunted prey, their eyes brim with fear.

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  • They do not use their tongues to catch prey in water, relying instead on their minute teeth to grab onto the prey.

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  • The palps are developed into strong pincers equipped with sharp teeth and spines, which are used for catching and crushing prey.

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  • Water is expelled through the gills creating a vacuum, which sucks the unsuspecting prey in to its doom.

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  • Predicting the effects of marine climate change on the invertebrate prey of the birds of rocky shores.

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  • Vise versa, the basic Dutch channels are still easy prey for pirate satellite tv.

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  • Their aerial flying displays they catch their insect prey on the wing are amazing to watch.

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  • A talk which looks at population dynamics, predator prey relationships and factors (biotic and abiotic) affecting animal populations.

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  • Smugglers were the " Hound's " principal prey, but she took several small enemy privateers during the French war.

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  • They commonly prey on other insects, but large dragonfly nymphs are also capable of catching and eating tadpoles or small fish.

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  • They have sharp talons (claws) with which they catch their prey.

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  • The jaguar's major prey includes tapirs, deer, monkeys, and capybara, but it will eat almost any vertebrate.

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  • In the wild, pink Chilean tarantulas kill prey such as toads, frogs and mice painlessly.

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  • They detect their prey by movement and have a long sticky tongue which can shoot out to grab the prey.

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  • Her northern regions fell easy prey to the expansive missions of the invading Russian tsars in 1715 under Peter the Great.

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  • Spiders use webs to trap their victims, then using their potent venom, they slowly digest their prey.

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  • The tentacles have stinging cells which they use to capture prey like small water fleas.

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  • They also have extremely sensitive, bristly whiskers for sensing the movements of their prey underwater.

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  • Angie Dickinson plays the accomplice who uses her seductive wiles to ensnare one of Walker's prey.

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  • Leeches without biting jaws possess a protrusible proboscis, and generally engulf their prey, as does the horse leech when it attacks earthworms. But some of them are also ectoparasites.

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  • Many points in the development and mechanism of the nematocyst are disputed, but it is tolerably certain (I) that the cnidocil is of sensory nature, and that stimulation, by contact with prey or in other ways, causes a reflex discharge of the nematocyst; (2) that the discharge is an explosive change whereby the in-turned thread is suddenly everted and turned inside out, being thus shot through the opening in the outer wall of the capsule, and forced violently into the tissues of the prey, or, it may be, of an enemy; (3) that the thread inflicts not merely a mechanical wound, but instils an irritant poison, numbing and paralysing in its action.

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  • The nomad not only domesticates and turns to his own use the gentler and more powerful animals, such as sheep, cattle, horses, camels, but even turns some predatory creatures, like the dog, into a means of defending their natural prey.

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  • New Zealand has also yielded many flightless birds, notably the numerous species and genera of Dinornithidae, some of which survived into the 19th century (see M0A); Pseudapteryx allied to the Kiwi; Cnemiornis, a big, flightless goose; Aptornis and Notornis, flightless rails; and Harpagornis, a truly gigantic bird of prey with tremendous wings and talons.

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  • In certain species of Myrmeleonidae, such as Dendroleon pantheormis, the larva, although resembling that of Myrmeleon structurally, makes no pitfall, but seizes passing prey from any nook or crevice in which it shelters.

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  • The blood of the victim may be drunk by the priest as a means of inducing inspiration, its entrails may be employed in divination, its flesh consumed in a common meal, exposed to the birds and beasts of prey or buried in the earth.

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  • Amongst the threads, which entangle the wings and legs of intercepted prey, the spiders are perfectly at home and can pounce on the struggling victim at once if it be small and harmless or keep at a respectful distance, checking all efforts at escape, if it be poisonous or strong.

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  • Examples of Selenops (Clubionidae) lie flat and absolutely still on the bark of trees, to which their coloration assimilates, and spring like a flash of light upon any insect that touches their legs; the Lycosidae dart swiftly upon their prey; and the Salticidae, which compared with other spiders have keen powers of vision, stealthily stalk it to within leaping distance, then, gathering their legs together, cover the intervening space with a spring and with unerring aim seize it and bury their fangs in its body.

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  • Indeed its owl-like visage, its short wings and soft plumage, do not indicate a bird of very active habits, but the weapons of offence with which it is armed show that it must be able to cope with vigorous prey.

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  • The death by small-pox of his favourite child was followed by that of his wife, who, long a prey to melancholy, was on the 3rd of July carried off by typhus.

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  • Of the insects which infest dwellings and prey upon their human inmates, such as fleas, bed-bugs, roaches, &c., Ecuador has more than a bountiful supply.

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  • The confirmed man-eater, which is generally an old beast, disabled from overtaking his usual prey, seems to accumulate his tale of victims in sheer cruelty rather than for food.

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  • The claims of family attachment, of religion, of duty, of patriotism and of interest, had dragged her in opposite directions, and her whole life had been a prey to jealousies and factions which closed around her at her accession to the throne, and surged to their height when she lay on her deathbed.

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  • Characteristic of the high mountainous region are the arctic fox, the glutton and the lemming, whose singular intermittent migrations to the lowlands have a considerable temporary influence on the distribution of beasts and birds of prey.

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  • Many, perhaps the majority, of the Crustacea are omnivorous or carrion-feeders, but many are actively predatory in their habits, and are provided with more or less complex and efficient instruments for capturing their prey, and there are also many planteaters.

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  • Each inheritance is a prey for the vilest passions to quarrel over.

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  • I do n't like these people, because unlike the traditional tin rattlers - they are very aggressive and prey on the vulnerable.

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  • They are skilled hunters and their teeth and retractile claws are well designed for capturing and killing their prey.

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  • Like all the other octopods it has eight arms but also has a pair of retractile tentacles for catching its prey.

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  • All general exemptions to display or sell diurnal birds of prey were revoked with effect from 31 March 1998.

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  • Live prey is preferred at this time (especially young crows, rooks, magpies, voles and rabbits).

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  • A mild toxin secreted into the saliva in the mouth helps to stun the prey.

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  • Many species of sea slug that eat sea anemones or hydroids, do it without activating their prey 's stinging cells.

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  • They wait for passing prey, which they detect by laying down silken threads radiating from the top of the tunnel across the ground.

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  • The League Against Cruel Sports, for example clearly state that " Foxes are not a natural prey species ".

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  • Now and then there also small herons here, once more ridiculously tame, and only concerned about their chances of stalking prey.

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  • Its prey could have been 3-spined Sticklebacks, which are commonly seen in the shallows from the vantage point of the bridge.

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  • Up to 57 House Sparrows fed on sunflower hearts, with two sparrows falling prey to a female Sparrowhawk.

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  • Ignorance of natural law, they argue, causes us to fall prey to superstitious thinking, inventing supernatural causes where none exist.

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  • Giant bird swooping low Quickly darting, hovering slow, Eye glaring, beak tearing, Prey eaten out of sight.

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  • It 's about time we got tough in our community on the anti social thieving scum who prey on us.

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  • The mole 's long canine teeth are sharp and pierce the hard outer skeleton of insect prey.

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  • Air superiority was essential for glider ops; slow moving aircraft towing gliders made easy prey for enemy planes.

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  • Like funnel web spiders, they live in burrows, often with a trapdoor entrance, from which they ambush prey.

    0
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  • Despite their underslung mouths, they are quite capable of feeding upon drifting prey, which they tip up to capture.

    0
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  • Pythons only eat once a week, but their huge unhinged jaws mean they can gobble prey much larger than themselves.

    0
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  • Many became homeless, wandering the country, prey to the vicious Tudor vagrancy laws.

    0
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  • The young leave the nest after weaning when they are at their most vulnerable to predators such as birds of prey and desert foxes.

    0
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  • Angie Dickinson plays the accomplice who uses her seductive wiles to ensnare one of Walker 's prey.

    0
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  • Due to the process of natural selection, prey that blend in to their environments are more likely to survive and pass on those genes that allowed survival.

    0
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  • Clothes made specifically for hunting will keep you warm in cold weather and camouflage you from your prey.

    0
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  • Although bonds are free of call risk and event risk, they do fall prey to inflation risk and interest rate risk.

    0
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  • Good cat food must have the same nutrients in the same proportions as whole prey.

    0
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  • Because the nutrients that cats need are already present in whole prey, their systems do not convert and produce necessary nutrients from their foods, but rely on the prey's digestive system to do this for them.

    0
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  • Natural prey is sixty-five to seventy-five percent water.

    0
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  • Domesticated cats evolved from desert cats where little water is available, so their bodies are adapted to extracting water from prey as their primary source of hydration.

    0
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  • The best diet for cats consists of exactly what they would eat in the wild - whole prey.

    0
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  • Other prey animals, such as birds and insects, should occasionally be included in a whole prey diet.

    0
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  • A Wild Tail Motorized Ball Cat Toy is the next-best-thing to live prey, and is certainly a more humane toy for your cat to entertain itself with.

    0
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  • If you're typically a sucker for great packaging, chances are you'll fall prey right away.

    0
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  • Guys participating in weight-focused sports like wrestling may be most at risk, but anyone can fall prey to a poor body image.

    0
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  • Teens will smell your fear and prey upon it.

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  • However, when pro shooters can't capture their prey, then some turn to faking it.

    0
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  • Tourism is one of the biggest economic pillars of Nassau, and the locals know how to prey on unsuspecting visitors.

    0
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  • Although you may not think of these items as traditional dog foods, a dog living in the wild would have naturally consumed these foods when it consumed prey animals that existed on them.

    0
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  • Giving your dog preventative medication for heartworm eliminates the danger of your canine companion falling prey to the debilitating parasites that cause heartworm disease.

    0
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  • The young leaves are a favourite prey of slugs and snails.

    0
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  • Beneficial insects help pollinate your plants, aid in breaking down organic material in the soil, and prey on the harmful insects in your garden.

    0
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  • They do possess a certain amount of venom for paralyzing prey, but it hasn't nearly enough potency to do any harm to a healthy human.

    0
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  • Rather than spinning webs, these catlike spiders stalk and pounce on their prey, their leaps reaching distances of up to 16 times their own length.

    0
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  • Crab spiders, rather than spinning a web or hunting on foot, employ camouflage to catch their prey.

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  • When the temperatures begin to soar, men's cutoff shorts can be a cool way to sport your favorite denim without falling prey to the mercury rising.

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  • Smokey branch camouflage is another one that is often used for hunting because it helps the hunters blend in with their surroundings, successfully hiding from their prey.

    0
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  • Because the prey animal is normally an herbivore, the contents of these seemingly unappetizing tidbits include vegetation.

    0
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  • A natural diet for a dog would consist in a variety of raw meats and some partially digested cereal and vegetable products similar to what would be found in the stomachs of the dog's prey.

    0
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  • After a dog ate his fill of prey, he might spend time gnawing on the bones.

    0
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  • Don't, however, fall prey to the dreaded oversize jacket.

    0
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  • Unfortunately, there are individuals who prey on the weak, ill, or vulnerable.

    0
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  • Identity theft protection for seniors is a growing concern as seniors too often fall prey to scams and thieves.

    0
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  • The Eagles Claw will make you wonder if you've fallen prey to a giant bird as it tosses you through the air with your legs dangling.

    0
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  • Some scams that individuals fall prey to include fake tickets and coupons and individuals not reading the small print in their vacation package contracts.

    0
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  • You spend the brunt of the game drawing the line between justice and vengeance, turning fear back onto those who would normally prey upon it.

    0
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  • You have an adrenaline meter that depletes, but you can fill it back up with power-ups and stalking prey.

    0
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  • You heard me right, you can actually stalk prey.

    0
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  • Although it was announced nearly a decade ago, Prey finally found its way to the PC computer.

    0
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  • If you get attacked or fall prey to a trap you start to bleed.

    0
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  • The game also had a rich storyline placing Samus Aran alone on planet Zebes to defeat a race of metroids, large jellyfish-like creatures that siphon life energy from their prey.

    0
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  • Rather than hunt items on one planet, Samus must travel across several planets to find artifacts and hunt down her prey.

    0
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  • However, both PlayStation and Xbox have suffered the same fate, cracked by deft programmers and by allowing their founding companies to fall prey to piracy.

    0
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  • There are larger predators and weaker prey.

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  • Without help, these teenagers often never go on to college, do not find good jobs if they find jobs at all, and become prey to bad influences on the street.

    0
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  • Of course, like any prey, the birds began to learn to lift their legs out of the bamboo before it snapped shut, and that movement became the basis for the Tinikling dance.

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  • Many unscrupulous lenders exist who look to prey on unsuspecting first time home buyers.

    0
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  • While it is true that there had been indigenous tribes living in the area, Portolá's visit marked the beginnings of foreign visitors coming and falling prey to San Francisco's charms.

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  • An old man was able to convince Nian to eat beasts of prey instead of people.

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  • For fishers or divers who don't want to scare away their prey or wildlife, camo wetsuits help them blend into their aquatic environment.

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  • Another button flaps the dragon’s wings up and down as it descends on its prey.

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  • Villagers scatter when this roaring red dragon flaps its orange wings as it stomps forward, flaunting the wild fur on the top of its head and using his fuzzy body to bully its intended prey.

    0
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  • Shiny beads and sequins are also great elements, but remember to steer clear of falling prey to the too much factor - you don't want to look like a disco ball.

    0
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  • In return for the help of the landowners they are given financial compensation when the endangered animals kill livestock as prey.

    0
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  • They prey on the unrealistic emotions these types display.

    0
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  • Unfortunately, games like this fall prey to one very large problem of relying on stereotypes, and the odds that they actually resemble anyone you would actually meet are slim.

    0
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  • Scammers prey on your sympathies to the tune of fifty or a hundred dollars.

    0
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  • In a day and age where fakes are prevalent, it is far too easy to fall prey to a scam.

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  • Many people who purchase their designer merchandise online fall prey to the replica industry.

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  • Unfortunately, the demand for Chanel products has caused this amazing brand to become prey to the replica industry.

    0
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  • Disorganization is an extension of being a heavy packer, but even women who don't necessarily stow their lives in their bags can fall prey to the curse of the chaotic purse.

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  • Numerous stings by television news crews and law enforcement agencies have revealed adults-- both men and women-- who prey on youths in chat rooms and online communities.

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  • The last few years have seen a rise in stories about this blood-sucking creature with red eyes and blue skin that waits in the dark to attack its prey.

    0
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  • Every year a large number of consumers fall prey to fake or replica products.

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  • Usually, these occasions are marred by catastrophe of some sort - even the happiest moments inevitably fall prey to tragedy.

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  • These birds catch their prey by swooping down and grasping fish or small animals in their talons.

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  • A popular format has the eagle swooping down, wings spread and talons stretched, ready to grasp its prey.

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  • Or how about a tiger gnawing on the skull of its prey - say another wild animal?

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  • You are stalking your prey, setting up your shot and then taking it.

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  • If you're looking for an Internet startup, be careful not to fall prey to the many scams out there offering to send you a list of home business ideas via the Internet.

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  • It's sad to say, but there are people out there ready to prey on the overweight person's desire to lose weight.

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  • When you're desperate to lose weight, you can sometimes fall prey to unhealthy diet plans or unscrupulous business people.

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  • This way, you can dial it in nice and slow -- aim for losing a pound of bodyfat per week -- without falling prey to the classic yo-yo dieting fallacies.

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  • Liability Coverage - You never know when you could fall prey to a lawsuit, whether it's because you damage your rental property or because someone gets injured on the property due to your negligence.

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  • The show follows a group of fishermen based in New England, who hunt deadly prey in the ocean.

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  • Disillusioned, he sees his prey, a coven of witches as food, except for one.

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  • The later Bird of Prey was a smaller version of the Battlecruiser with some modifications.

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  • Although adults fall prey to mosquitoes, young children and babies are most often the victims of mosquito bites.

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  • Along with crimes such as burglary, social networking site users may fall prey to stalking and other threats to their safety.

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  • Propaganda - This doesn't have to be a bad word - it is simply advertising for a country, and the exciting lines of the bird of prey combined with a dynamic waving American flag is a common theme that inspires patriotism.

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  • Unscrupulous coders use JavaScript to prey on unshielded browsers and computers to spread viruses and malware and cause many other problems.

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  • The strange calm she felt around Zamon remained, and she recalled more clearly Darkyn's words about how the original Dark One lured in his prey.

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  • Rhyn watched her, unmoving, like a predator watches its prey.

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  • Much as Dean had misgivings and knew he was being manip­ulated, Fred's suggestion made sense, and he reluctantly agreed to let the old man lead the prey to him.

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  • Dean lost his convoy of younger bikers on the short uphill and he paused momentarily at the crest to wipe his eyes and scan the roadway below him for his prey.

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  • It was only late afternoon and if Dean was right, he had plen­ty of time to find his prey.

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  • It was his size – combined with a prey's instinctive sixth sense warning it of a predator – that caused people to move away from him.

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  • He was, indeed, the first to show clearly the relationship of the heron-like birds with the Steganopodes; of storklike birds with the American vultures; the great difference between the latter and the other birds of prey; the connexion of the gulls and auks with the plovers, and that of the sand-grouse with the From Newton's FIG.

    8
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  • New Zealand has also yielded many flightless birds, notably the numerous species and genera of Dinornithidae, some of which survived into the 19th century; Pseudapteryx allied to the Kiwi; Cnemiornis, a big, flightless goose; Aptornis and Notornis, flightless rails; and Harpagornis, a truly gigantic bird of prey with tremendous wings and talons.

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  • It has been thought that it refers to the fact that ants form a large percentage of the prey of the insect, the suffix "lion" merely suggesting destroyer or eater.

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  • Such a typically "campodeiform" grub, moving actively about in pursuit of prey, is the one extreme of larval structure to be noticed among the Coleoptera.

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  • The Nitidulidae are a large family with 1600 species, among which members of the genus Meligethes are often found in numbers feeding on blossoms, while others live under the bark of trees and prey on the grubs of boring beetles.

    9
    9
  • But while the province in many parts presents a landscape of luxuriant beauty, it is a prey to the ravages of disease, principally malarial fevers due to the extensive swamps formed by waters stagnating in the forests, and to the frequent incursions of the Goklan and Yomut Turkomans, who have their camping-grounds in the northern part of the province, and until about 1890 plundered caravans sometimes at the very gates of Astarabad city, and carried people off into slavery and bondage.

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  • The odontophore also is remarkably developed, its lateral teeth being mobile, and it serves as an efficient organ for attacking the other pelagic forms on which the Heteropoda prey.

    0
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  • The following year, 1808, being aided by Temminck of Amsterdam, of whose son we shall presently hear more, Le Vaillant brought out the sixth volume of 1 This is especially observable in the figures of the birds of prey.

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  • Some are nocturnal, some diurnal; some catch their prey by speed of foot, some by cunningly lying hid, some by means of silken nets.

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  • The methods of catching prey adopted by spiders are extremely varied.

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  • Spiders which spin no snare are dependent for capturing prey for the most part upon their quickness or powers of lying concealed.

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  • The primary function of this poison is to kill the prey upon which they feed, its action being very rapid upon insects.

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  • They are merely practising the inherited instinct to lie motionless, movement being the only indication of the presence of living prey known to many insectivorous animals.

    2
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  • Since the adoption of an aquatic mode of life by Desis and Argyroneta involves no increased facilities in getting food, and merely substitutes for ordinary terrestrial enemies fishes and crustaceans in the former case, and fishes, amphibians, and insectivorous water-insects in the latter, the supposition is justified that the change in environment is due to the unremitting persecution of Pompilidae and Ichneumonidae, which would not venture to pursue their prey beneath the water's surface.

    7
    7
  • In the early periods of their history the Greeks depended too much on their nets to capture game, and it was not until later times that they pursued their prey with dogs, and then not with greyhounds, which run by sight, but with beagles, the dwarf hound which is still very popular.

    2
    2
  • Birds of prey are numerous and include eagles, vultures, kites, ravens and the carrion stork.

    5
    5
  • What in popular usage are spoken of as the instincts of animals, for example, the hunting of prey by foxes and wolves, or the procedure of ants in their nests, are generally joint products of hereditary and acquired factors.

    4
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  • It is noteworthy, however, that although the manner in which the prey is stung (for example) is on the whole similar in the case of the members of any given species - that is to say, all the wasps of the species behave in very much the same manner - yet there are minor variations in detail.

    4
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  • Romanes thought that the manner of stinging and paralysing their prey might be justly deemed the most remarkable instinct in the world.

    3
    3
  • During the reigns of Ostojic (Stephen IV., 1418-14 21) and Tvrtkovic (Stephen V., 1421-1444) Bosnia was thus left an easy prey to the Turks, who exacted a yearly tribute, after again ravaging the country, and carrying off many thousands of slaves, with a vast store of plunder.

    4
    4
  • Radde, among which the most numerous are migratory birds and the birds of prey which pursue them.

    3
    3
  • It is very probable that in Scorpio they do not serve merely to secrete a digestive fluid (shown in other Arthropoda to resemble the pancreatic fluid), but that they also become distended by the juices of the prey sucked in by the scorpion - as certainly must occur in the case of the simple unbranched gastric caeca of the spiders.

    1
    1
  • Spiders form at least two kinds of constructions - snares for the capture of prey and nests for the preservation of the young.

    4
    4
  • Flesh that has become tainted appears to be specially acceptable; but it is a curious fact that on no account will a fox eat any kind of bird of prey.

    3
    3
  • Two species of vultures, twenty-three of falcons and eight of owls represent the birds of prey.

    1
    1
  • After his death in 289 comes another miserable and obscure period of revolution and despotism, in which Greek life was dying out; and but for the brief intervention of Pyrrhus in 278 Syracuse, and indeed all Sicily, would have fallen a prey to the Carthaginians.

    3
    3
  • But of late years the beauties of the Rhine have become sadly marred; the banks in places, especially between Coblenz and Bonn, disfigured by quarrying, the air made dense with the smoke of cement factories and steam-tugs, commanding spots falling a prey to the speculative builder and villages growing into towns.

    3
    3
  • Its habits much resemble those of the rest of the group to which it belongs; and, like the leopard, when it happens to come within reach of an abundant and easy prey, as the sheep or calves of an outlying farming station, it kills far more than it can eat, either for the sake of the blood only or to gratify its propensity for destruction.

    1
    1
  • In the cultivated parts of Yemen and Tehama small birds are very numerous, so also are birds of prey, vultures, kites and hawks.

    1
    1
  • On the decline of the Roman empire Vindobona became the prey of successive barbarian invaders.

    1
    1
  • With the help of Louis the Bavarian, Castruccio became lord of Lucca and Pisa, and was victorious over the Florentines; but his premature death in 1328 again left the city a prey to the conflicts of opposing factions.

    1
    1
  • The Spaniards remained at Goletta and made it a strong fortress, they also occupied the island of Jerba and some points on the south-east coast; but the interior was a prey to anarchy and civil war, until in 1570 'Ali-Pasha of Algiers utterly defeated IIamid, the son and successor of Masan, and occupied Tunis.

    1
    1
  • Along with high intellectual powers in certain directions, he had a simplicity of nature charming in itself, but often calculated to render him the easy prey of sharpers.

    1
    1
  • Most of the external ornamentation is usually concentrated on the western front, which often has a lofty arched porch on marble columns, resting on griffins or lions devouring their prey.

    1
    1
  • The latter commemorates, according to tradition, the fowl which was the first living being to cross the bridge and thus fell a prey to the devil, who in hope of a nobler victim had sold his assistance to the architect.

    1
    1
  • In the innocuous snakes the teeth are simple and uniform in structure, thin, sharp like needles, and bent backwards; their function consists merely in seizing and holding the prey.

    1
    1
  • Snakes are carnivorous, and as a rule take living prey only; a few feed habitually or occasionally on eggs.

    1
    1
  • The prey is always swallowed entire, and, as its girth generally much exceeds that of the snake, the progress of deglutition is very laborious and slow.

    1
    1
  • They are all more or less poisonous, paralysing their prey before, or during the act of swallowing; the poison-fangs standing so far back in the mouth, these snakes cannot easily inflict wounds with them on man; moreover, the poison is not very strong and not available in large quantities.

    1
    1
  • They prey upon every kind of arboreal animal - birds, tree-frogs, tree-lizards, &c. All seem to be diurnal, and the larger kinds attain to a length of about 4 ft.

    1
    1
  • As all these animals are killed by the poison of the snake before they are swallowed, and as their muscles are perfectly relaxed, their armature is harmless to the snake, which begins to swallow its prey from the head, and depresses the spines as deglutition proceeds.

    0
    1
  • Accordingly the Dual State was involved in a common downfall, and in the three partitions of 1772, 1792 and 1795 to which it was subjected at the hands of Russia, Prussia and Austria, Lithuania fell a prey to Russia and Prussia.

    1
    1
  • They live in woods and rocky places, and spend most of their time in trees, although descending to the ground in quest of prey.

    1
    1
  • As regards the fauna, the Carpathians still contain numerous bears, wolves and lynxes, as well as birds of prey.

    1
    1
  • On the outbreak of the French Revolution he sided with the royalists and was eventually brought into conflict with the French republic. The army being demoralized and the treasury empty, the kingdom The fell an easy prey to the republican forces.

    1
    1
  • The description is particularly noteworthy for the sudden appearance of birds of prey, which attempted to carry off the victims of the sacrificial covenant.

    1
    1
  • A diggingwasp hunts for insect prey and buries it with the egg, while a true wasp feeds her brood with captured insects, as a bird her fledglings.

    1
    1
  • The prey is sometimes stung in the neighbourhood of the nerve ganglia, so that it is paralysed but not killed, the grub of the fossorial wasp devouring its victim alive; but this instinct varies in perfection, and in many cases the larva flourishes equally whether its prey be killed or not.

    1
    1
  • The Sapygidae are parasitic on bees, while the Scoliidae are large, robust and hairy insects, many of which prey upon the grubs of chafers.

    1
    1
  • Great diversity is shown in the details of structure, habits and nature of the prey.

    1
    1
  • The habit of some genera is to catch the prey before making their tunnel, but more frequently the insect digs her nest, and then hunts for prey to put into it.

    1
    1
  • His rule, which lasted till 1770, brought great prosperity to the Dun; but on his death it became a prey to the surrounding tribes, its desolation being completed after its conquest by the Gurkhas in 1803.

    1
    1
  • It finally became a prey to the malaria which arose when the plain fell out of cultivation, and under Turkish rule disappeared altogether.

    1
    1
  • Though Berar was no longer oppressed by its Mahratta taskmasters nor harried by Pindari and Bhil raiders, it remained long a prey to the turbulent elements let loose by the sudden cessation of the wars.

    4
    4
  • Among birds of prey a bald eagle and a golden eagle are occasionally seen in secluded places.

    1
    1
  • Barley is liable to smut and the other fungus diseases which attack wheat, and the insect pests which prey on the two plants are also similar.

    1
    1
  • The wild dogs and pigs which now sometimes prey on the sheep-farmers' lambs in outlying districts are the descendants of domestic animals which have escaped into the "bush."

    4
    4
  • Her perpetual intrigues and her political incapacity made Naples a prey to anarchy and foreign invasions, destroying all sense of patriotism and loyalty both in the barons and the people.

    1
    1
  • In the whiteness of its fur also, it shows such an assimilation in colour to that of surrounding nature as must be of considerable service in concealing it from its prey.

    5
    5
  • The climate is so arid, and precipitation so extremely rare, that the fine powdery material falls a helpless prey to the winds.

    5
    5
  • It is generally found on or near the surface of the ground, but it can not only pursue its prey through holes and crevices of rocks and under dense tangled herbage, but follow it up the stems and branches of trees, or even into the water, swimming with perfect ease.

    1
    1
  • Unmolested by enemies (Harpagornis, a tremendous bird of prey, died out with the Pleistocene), living in an equable insular climate, with abundant vegetation, the moas flourished and seem to have reached their greatest development in specialization, numbers, and a bewildering variety of large and small kinds, within quite recent times.

    1
    1
  • On his death in 1580, after a brief reign of seventeen months, the male line of the royal family which traced its descent from Henry, first count of Portugal (c. i ioo), came to an end; and all attempts to fix the succession during his lifetime having ignominiously failed, Portugal became an easy prey to Philip II.

    1
    1
  • This partitional period, as Polish historians generally call it, lasted from 1138 to 1305, during which Poland lost all political significance, and became an easy prey to her neighbours.

    1
    1
  • The Livs and Letts were as much the prey of the Lithuanians "as sheep are the prey of wolves."

    0
    1
  • Henceforth the influence of Russia over Poland was steadily to increase, without any struggle at all, the Republic being already stricken with that creeping paralysis which ultimately left her a prey to her neighbours.

    0
    1
  • The truly happy man must have Opovna es (prudence), which alone can save him from falling a prey to mere passion.

    0
    1
  • The more powerful creatures in a state of nature are accustomed to kill a prey too large to be devoured at once, and to return to it again and again, long after it has become putrid; the smaller forms, for the most part, devour nothing but small creatures immediately after they have been captured and killed, and consequently in an absolutely fresh condition.

    0
    1
  • By repeated discharges upon these they gradually expend this marvellous force; after which, being defenceless, they become timid, and approach the edge for shelter, when they fall an easy prey to the harpoon.

    2
    2
  • The occurrence of this process can be predicted exactly for one day, before sunrise, in October and November, and as both the worm and the fish which prey on it are appreciated by the natives as food the occasions of its appearance