How to use President in a sentence

president
  • The president or moderator of each church court was Primus inter pares.

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  • That's a bold statement, coming from a sitting president and former general.

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  • But the president needed his services in the House, and he was not elected to the Senate until 1880.

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  • God is only the president of the day, and Webster is his orator.

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  • Unfortunately, the new president was unequal to the task of composing the differences in his party.

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  • An act of the New Jersey legislature in 1895 created the office of township president, with power of appointment and veto.

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  • The president and vicepresident are voted for by separate tickets.

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  • Hayes by a majority of less than 3000 votes; but the Democrats gained a majority in both branches of the state legislature, and Thurman was elected to the United States Senate, where he served from 1869 until 1881 - during the 46th Congress (1879-1881) as president pro tempore.

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  • The court designates one of its members as president.

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  • In the month of June 1880, President Avellaneda and his ministers left Buenos Aires, and this act was considered by the porteno leaders equivalent to a declaration of war.

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  • No sooner had President Juarez Celman come into power towards the close of 1886, than the respectable portion of the community began to feel alarmed at the methods practised by the new president in his conduct of public affairs.

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  • In 1907 he was president of the British Association.

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  • It created a Commerce Court (composed of five judges nominated by the president of the United States from the Federal circuit judges), transferred to it jurisdiction in cases instituted to enforce or set aside orders of the Inter-State Commerce Commission, and made the United States instead of the Commission a party in all such actions.

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  • His grandfather, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), was ninth president of the United States.

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  • After a regular term of office of six years of peace and moral and material progress Castilla resigned, and General Jose Echenique was elected president.

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  • They are appointed by and may be removed by the president.

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  • The president was for some time in doubt whether he had any right to intervene in provincial affairs, but eventually troops were despatched to La Plata.

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  • During the whole of the 1894 session, the attitude of senators and deputies alike was one of pronounced hostility to the president.

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  • In October 1900 Dr Manuel Campos Salles, president of Brazil, paid a visit to Buenos Aires, and was received with great demonstrations of friendliness.

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  • Bills may be proposed either by ministers (in the name of the president of the republic), or by private members, and may be initiated in either chamber, but money-bills must be submitted in the first place to the Chamber of Deputies.

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  • At the head of each department is a prefect, a political official nominated by the minister of the interior and appointed by the president, who acts as general agent of the government and renresentative of the central authority.

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  • In such cases the prefect must approve them, and in some cases the sanction of the general council or even ratification by the president is necessary.

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  • The court consists of a president, one or more vice-presidents and a variable number of judges.

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  • When the budget has passed both chambers it is promulgated by the president under the title of Loi des finances.

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  • Claudio Williman became president in 1907.

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  • Ulmanis was elected president.

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  • It consists of a president and 110 other officials, assisted by 25 auditors.

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  • All these are nominated for life by the president of the republic. Besides the accounts of the state and of the communes, those of charitable institutionsi and training collegesi and a great variety of other public establishments are scrutinized by the Cour des Comptes.

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  • But in communes the revenues of which exceed 120,000, the budget is always submitted to the president of the republic. The ordinary revenues include the produce of additional centimes allocated to communal purposes, the rents and profits of communal property, sums produced by municipal taxes and dues, concessions to gas, water and other companies, and by the octroi or duty on a variety of articles imported into the commune for local consumption.

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  • The president of the Republic has a military household, and the minister a cabinet, both of which are occupied chiefly with questions of promotion, patronage and decorations.

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  • A lyce is founded in a town by decree of the president of the republic, with the advice of the superior council of public instruction.

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  • His opposition to President Lincoln's policy was mainly in respect to emancipation, military arrests and conscription.

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  • Vallandigham in May, and, although he responded immediately to the call for militia in June, he thought the Conscription Act unnecessary and unconstitutional and urged the president to postpone the draft until its legality could be tested.

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  • Lord Rayleigh had an interest in abnormal psychological investigations, and became a member and vice president of the Society for Psychical Research.

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  • In 1904 he was awarded a Nobel prize, and at the end of 1905 he became president of the Royal Society, of which he had been elected a fellow in 1873, and had acted as secretary from 1885 to 1896.

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  • He remained president till 1908, in which year he was chosen to succeed the 8th duke of Devonshire as chancellor of Cambridge University.

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  • He went to Italy as president of the commission, carrying to the prince at Florence the official news of his election.

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  • Sir Henry Parkes was elected president, and he moved a series of resolutions embodying the principles necessary to establish, on an enduring foundation, the structure of a federal government.

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  • The Senate would choose its own president, and the House of Representatives its speaker; each house would make its own rules of procedure; in each, one-third of the number of members would form a quorum; the members of each must take oath, or make affirmation of allegiance; and all alike would receive an allowance of £400 a year.

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  • This tribunal differs from similar courts in the states inasmuch as it consists of a single member, called the " president," an officer appointed by the governor-general from among the justices of the High Court of Australia.

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  • The president has the power to appoint assessors to advise him on technical points; and considerable powers of devolution of authority for the purpose of inquiry and report are conferred upon the court, the main object of which is to secure settlement by conciliatory methods.

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  • The duke himself was president and all sentences were submitted to him.

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  • The first British factory in the peninsula was established in the native state of Patani on the east coast in 1613, the place having been used by the Portuguese in the 16th century for a similar purpose; but the enterprise came to an untimely end in 1620 when Captain Jourdain, the first president, was killed in a naval engagement in Patani Roads by the Dutch.

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  • Of the three sons of Count Franz, the eldest, Friedrich (1810-1881), entered the diplomatic service; after holding other posts he was in 1850 appointed president of the restored German Diet at Frankfort, where he represented the anti-Prussian policy of Schwarzenberg, and often came into conflict with Bismarck, who was Prussian envoy.

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  • After serving under Stadion in Galicia, he was in 1848, after the outbreak of the revolution, appointed president of the administration and acting Stadthalter in Bohemia.

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  • The new president was a man comparatively little known outside the state of Illinois, and many of his supporters, doubtful of his ability to deal with the difficult problems of 1861, looked to Seward as the most experienced man of the administration and the one who should direct its policy.

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  • Seward himself, apparently sharing these views, although not out of vanity, at first possessed an unbounded confidence in his ability to influence the president and his cabinet.

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  • Seward gradually regained his health, and remained in the cabinet of President Johnson until the expiration of his term in 1869.

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  • After the close of the war with Mexico Green was sent to that country in 1849 by President Taylor to negotiate concerning the moneys which, by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the United States had agreed to pay; and he saved his country a considerable sum by arranging for payment in exchange instead of in specie.

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  • On the outbreak of the South African War in 1899 Grant was at first disposed to be hostile to the policy of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain; but his eyes were soon opened to the real nature of President Kruger's government, and he enthusiastically welcomed and supported the national feeling which sent men from the outlying portions of the Empire to assist in upholding British supremacy in South Africa.

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  • The plot was, however, discovered; and Bedmar, protected by his position from arrest, left Venice and went to Flanders as president of the council.

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  • Each college is founded by royal decree, and consists of a president, with not fewer than ten and not more than twenty members.

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  • Even the first president of the Rome court of cassation only receives f6o0 a year.

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  • Venice; but on the 7th of July the assembly declared in favor of fusion with Piedmont, and Manin, who had been elected president resigned his powers to the royal com- Danicle Mania and missioners.

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  • Empire, Crmieux, as president of the government delegation at Tours, hastened to offer his congratulations to Italy.

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  • Though aware of Bismarcks hostility towards Italy, of the conclusion of the Austro-German alliance of 1879, and of the undisguised ill-will of France, Italy not only made no attempt to crush an agitation as mischievous as it was futile, but granted a state funeral to General Avezzana, president of the Irredentist League.

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  • Meanwhile the enthusiastic reception accorded to the young German emperor on the occasion of his visit to Rome in October 1888, and the cordiality shown towards King Humbert and Crispi at Berlin in May 1889, increased the tension of FrancoItalian relations; nor was it until after the fall of Prince Bismarck in March 1890 that Crispi adopted towards the Republic a more friendly attitude by sending an Italian squadron to salute President Carnot at Toulon.

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  • Loubet, the French president, came to Rome; this action was strongly resented by the pope, who, like his predecessor since 1870, objected to the presence of foreign Catholic rulers in Rome, and led to the final rupture between France and the Vatican.

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  • He was, however, still greatly disliked by the Whigs, and William, instead of reinstating him in the lord treasurership, only appointed him president of the council in February 1689.

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  • On this second visit he became acquainted with some of the leading Abolitionists, and founded later in Paris a Societe des Amis des Noirs, of which he was president during 1790 and 1791.

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  • The metropolitan of Athens is president, and there are four other members appointed by the government in annual rotation from the senior bishops.

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  • In 1867 he was made lord justice general of Scotland and lord president of the court of session, taking the title of Lord Glencorse.

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  • Ayala was nominated to the post of president of congress shortly before his death, which occurred unexpectedly on the 30th of January 1879.

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  • The first settlement here was made about 1659 in a part of Marlboro called Chauncy (because of a grant of Soo acres here to Charles Chauncy, president of Harvard College, made in 1659 and revoked in 1660 by the General Court of Massachusetts).

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  • By this time he had made his peace with the duke of York, and when in February 1685 James became king, he retained his position of secretary, to which was soon added that of lord president of the council.

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  • The first president of the institution (from 1873 to 1881) was the distinguished geologist, Edward Orton (1829-1899), who was professor of geology from 1873 to 1899.

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  • He resigned in 1894, and in 1900 was appointed president of the House of Magnates, an office which he resigned on the fall of the Liberal party in 1906.

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  • Under the Khuen-Heclvary Government he became on June 18 1910 once more president of the House of Magnates.

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  • He was minister to Great Britain in1796-1803and again in 1825-1826, and was the Federalist candidate for vicepresident in 1804 and 1808, and for president in 1816, when he received 34 electoral votes to 183 cast for Monroe.

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  • He became prefect of police in November 1887, at the critical moment of President Grevy's resignation.

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  • In 1902 and 1903 he was elected president of the chamber.

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  • In 1553, on the recommendation of the Cardinal of Lorraine, he was named master of the requests, and afterwards president of the chambre des comptes.

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  • It has a chamber of commerce, the president of which has a seat on the superior council of Indo-China; a chamber of the court of appeal of Indo-China, a civil tribunal of the first order, and is the seat of the chamber of agriculture of Tongking.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1836, its president in 1871, and received both the Copley and Royal medals.

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  • He was five times president of the Royal Astronomical Society, was correspondent of the French Academy and belonged to many other foreign and American societies.

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  • The military element, moreover, has frequently conspired to elect a president amenable to its demands.

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  • In the following year Latorre caused himself to be elected president, but political unrest caused him to resign in March 1880.

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  • The Colorados now made General Tajes president, the practical direction of the administration being in the hands of Julio Herrera y Obes.

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  • The country was at this period conducted practically as if it were the private estate of the president, and no accounts of revenue or expenditure were vouchsafed to the public. In 1894 the Colorados nominated Senor Idiarte Borda for the presidency.

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  • The president made no attempt to conciliate them, and in March 1897 a body of government troops suffered a reverse.

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  • The president of the senate, Juan Cuestas, in accordance with the constitution, assumed the duties of president of the republic. He arranged that hostilities should cease on the conditions that representation of the Blancos was allowed in Congress for certain districts where their votes were known to predominate; that a certain number of the jefes politicos should be nominated from the Blancos; that free pardon be extended to all who had taken part in the revolt; that a sufficient sum in money be advanced to allow the settlement of the expenses contracted by the insurgents; and that the electoral law be reformed on a basis allowing the people to take part freely in e1ctions.

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  • Near the city is the important United States army post, Fort Benjamin Harrison, named in honour of President Benjamin Harrison, whose home was in Indianapolis.

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  • Reports of territorial encroachments aroused much sympathy with Liberia in America and led in February 1909 to the appointment by President Roosevelt of a commission which visited Liberia in the summer of that year to investigate the condition of the country.

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  • Until the accession to power of President Barclay in 1904 (he was re-elected in 1907), the AmericoLiberian government on the coast had very uncertain relations with the indigenous population, which is well armed and tenacious of local independence.

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  • In 1763 he visited Berlin, and on that occasion finally refused the office of president of the Academy of Berlin, which had been already offered to him more than once.

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  • In 1879 he was appointed president of the Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften (Academy of Sciences) at Vienna, and in 1896 succeeded von Sybel as chairman of the historical commission at Munich.

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  • If by a two-thirds majority the action of a minister be arraigned, the president of the Imperial Council lays the case before the emperor, who decides.

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  • In the complimentary speeches delivered by the president of the French Republic and the tsar, France and Russia were referred to as allies, and the term " nations alliees " was afterwards repeatedly used on occasions of a similar kind.

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  • Golovin, was elected president of the House.

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  • Indian affairs, the committee on foreign relations and others, was prominent in the discussion of matters brought before the Senate from these committees, advocated the enlargement of the navy and the reform of the civil service, and opposed the pension veto messages of President Cleveland.

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  • President Harrison was twice married; in 1853 to Miss Caroline Lavinia Scott, by whom he had a son and a daughter, and in 1896 to Mrs Mary Scott Lord Dimmock, by whom he had a daughter.

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  • A conference between the three powers was thereupon held at Berlin, and a treaty was executed by those powers and by Samoa, on the 14th of June 1889, by virtue of which the independence and autonomy of the islands were guaranteed, Malietoa was restored as king, and the three powers constituted themselves practically a protectorate over Samoa, and provided a chief justice and a president of the municipality of Apia, to be appointed by them, to aid in carrying out the provisions of the treaty.

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  • On the 31st of October President Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring Nevada a state.

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  • He was mayor of Northampton, 1910 - TI, and sat in the state Senate from 1912 to 1915, being its president during his last year.

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  • At the Republican National Convention in 1920 he received a few votes on all ten ballots for president.

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  • In the chamber he was president of the group of the left centre, standing strongly for the republic but against anti-clericalism.

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  • In February 1898 Sampson, then a captain, was president of Board of Inquiry as to the cause of destruction of the "Maine."

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  • He served as judge of the Superior Court (1865-72), as secretary of war (1876) and as attorneygeneral of the United States (1876-77) in President Grant's cabinet; and as minister to Austria-Hungary (1882-84) and to Russia (1884-85) .

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  • He was elected by the people in the next year and served until 1800, when he was appointed solicitor-general of the United States by President Benjamin Harrison.

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  • A movement to elect Mr Taft president of Yale University gained some strength in 1898-99, but was promptly checked by him, on the ground that the head of a great university should be primarily an educationalist.

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  • Yielding, however, to the urgent request of the president and his cabinet, he accepted and served from the 13th of March 1900 to the 1st of February 1904.

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  • Mr Taft gained great influence among the more conservative Filipinos, and their entreaties to him to remain influenced him to decline the offer of a place upon the Supreme bench offered by President Roosevelt in 1902.

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  • With the approach of the presidential election of 1908, President Roosevelt reiterated his pledge not to accept another nomination, and threw his immense influence in favour of Mr Taft.

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  • The final Payne-Aldrich Act was approved by the President on the 5th of August 1909, though in many respects it was not the measure he desired.

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  • The wish to meet people of the different sections of the country and to explain his position upon the questions of the day led the President to begin (14th September 1909), a tour which included the Pacific coast, the South-west, the Mississippi Valley and the South Atlantic states, and during which he travelled 13,000 miles and made 266 speeches.

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  • He was made president of the council in February 1660, and in the Convention Parliament sat for Carmarthen borough.

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  • He was twice president of the London Chemical Society, in 1863-1865, and again in 1869-1871.

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  • He was secretary of the navy in President Tyler's cabinet (1844-1845), and was attorney-general (1845-1846) and secretary of the navy (1846-1849), succeeding George Bancroft, under President Polk.

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  • He was president of the Virginia constitutional convention of 1851, and from 1853 until his death at Paris on the 3rd of October 1859, was United States minister to France.

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  • He became president of a consumers' food council in Dec. 1917, so that the office might keep in regular touch with the needs of the public. When Lord Rhondda died, in June 1918, he succeeded him to the general satisfaction.

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  • He supported the Reform party steadily by his vote, and in 1830 was made president of the Board of Trade and master of the Mint.

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  • What gave Bennigsen his importance not only in Hanover, but throughout the whole of Germany, was the foundation of the National Verein, which was due to him, and of which he was president.

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  • For the next thirty years he was president of the party, and was the most influential of the parliamentary leaders.

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  • At the close of the war he was appointed by President Johnson secretary of Montana Territory, and there, in the absence of the territorial governor, he acted as governor from September 1866 until his death from accidental drowning in the Missouri River near Fort Benton, Montana, on the 1st of July 1867.

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  • In 58 431844 he was president of the council of ministers, and he subsequently held the post of ambassador at Constantinople from 1850 to 1854.

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  • He was also the author of many papers on general statistics and on life-tables for insurance, some read before the Royal Statistical Society, of which he was president in 1871 and 1872, some contributed to the Lancet and other periodicals.

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  • Questions received from various quarters were discussed and the final decision of the Kallah was signed by the Resh-Kallah or president of the general assembly, who was only second in rank to the Resh-Metibta, or president of the scholastic sessions.

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  • In addition to his political activity, he was president of the literary section of the Hungarian Academy, and director of the National.

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  • After the departure of the Greek troops the Cretan leaders, who had hitherto demanded annexation to Greece, readily acquiesced in the decision of the powers, and the insurgent Assembly, under its president Dr Sphakianakis, a man of good sense and moderation, co-operated with the international commanders in the maintenance of order.

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  • When Mr. Asquith formed the first Coalition Ministry in 1915, he included Mr. Henderson in the Cabinet as President of the Board of Education, and also adviser of the Government on Labour questions arising out of the World War.

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  • In 1920 Mr. Hoover was mentioned as a possible candidate for president.

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  • In March he entered the Cabinet of President Harding as Secretary of Commerce, stipulating that he be allowed to carry out his European relief work, already begun.

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  • The state subscribed $5,000,000, which was raised on bonds sold to Nicholas Biddle, president of the United States Bank of Pennsylvania.

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  • In 1865 President Johnson appointed as provisional governor William Lewis Sharkey (1797-1873), who had been chief justice of the state in 1832-1850, and a convention which assembled on the 14th of August recognized the "destruction" of slavery and declared the ordinance of secession null and void.

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  • On the 4th of November the term for which Guion had been elected as a senator expired and he was succeeded in the governorship by Whitfield, elected by the senate to be its president.

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  • Liberal support was given to the Confederacy, both in men and supplies, but Governor Vance, one of the ablest of the Southern war governors, engaged in acrimonious controversies with President Jefferson Davis, contending that the general government of the Confederacy was encroaching upon the prerogatives of the separate states.

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  • Either Everard held over or the president of the council was acting-governor from 1729-1731.

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  • For an international commission of lawyers he prepared Draft Outlines of an International Code (1872), the submission of which resulted in the organization of the international Association for the Reform and Codification of the Laws of Nations, of which he became president.

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  • Its last act in national politics was to nominate William Henry Harrison for president and John Tyler for vice-president at a convention in Philadelphia in November 1838.

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  • He was again president in 1839-1843, and dictator in 1846; but soon afterwards headed a revolution against his successor and was thrown into prison.

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  • Gowen (1836-1889), president of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, sent James McParlan, an Irish Catholic and a Pinkerton detective (who some thirty years later attracted attention in the investigation of the assassination of Governor Steunenberg of Idaho), to the mining region in 1873; he joined the order, lived among the "Molly Maguires" for more than two years, and even became secretary of the Shenandoah division, one of the most notoriously criminal lodges of the order.

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  • The governor is appointed by the president of the United States with the advice and consent of the Senate for a term of four years, and associated with the governor is an executive council consisting of the secretary, treasurer, auditor, attorney-general, commissioner of the interior, commissioner of education, and five other members, all appointed in the same manner and for the same term as the governor.

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  • Railway, street railway, telegraph and telephone franchises can be granted only by the Executive Council with the approval of the governor, and none can be operative until it has been approved by the President of the United States.

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  • The judge of the United States district court and the chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court are appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate, and the judges of the district courts by the governor with the consent of the Executive Council.

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  • From 1853 until his death, on the second of August 1859, he was president of the newly established Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he taught political economy, intellectual and moral philosophy, and natural theology.

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  • At the revolution of 1848 Dupont de l'Eure was made president of the provisional assembly as being its oldest member.

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  • Sir Alfred Milner reached the Cape in May 1897, and after the difficulties with President Kruger over the Aliens' Law had been patched up he was free by August to make himself personally acquainted with the country and peoples before deciding on the lines of policy to be adopted.

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  • Hofmeyr a conference was held (May 31 - June 5) at Bloemfontein between the high commissioner and the president of the Transvaal.

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  • As early as December 1862 the Union military government, at President Lincoln's direction, had ordered elections for Congress, and the men chosen were admitted in February 1863.

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  • In March 1864 also a state government to supersede the military rule was established under the president's auspices.

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  • But in 1864 the opposition of Congress to presidential reconstruction had clearly developed, so that the electoral votes of Louisiana (like those of Tennessee) for president were not counted.

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  • Civil war being threatened within the state President Hayes sent to Louisiana a commission composed of Wayne McVeagh, Gen.

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  • The president ordered the withdrawal of Federal troops from the capitol on the 20th of April 1877, and the white party was thus left in control.

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  • Thiers, who was then president of the Republic, persuaded them to reconsider this decision.

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  • The president of the Republic, who is elected for four years by an electoral college, and cannot hold office for more than two successive terms, has a cabinet whose members he may appoint and remove freely, their number being determined by law.

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  • The senate is the court of trial for the president, officers of the cabinet, and provincial governors when accused of political offences.

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  • It also acts jointly with the president in political appointments and treaty making.

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  • The house of representatives, whose members are chosen directly by the citizens for four years, one-half retiring every two years, has the special power of impeaching the president and cabinet officers.

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  • Its powers are extensive, including, in addition to ordinary legislative powers, control of financial affairs, foreign affairs, the power to declare war and approve treaties of peace, amnesties, electoral legislation for the provinces and municipalities, control of the electoral vote for president and vice-president, and designation of an acting president in case of the death or incapacity of these officers.

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  • Justice is administered by courts of various grades, with a supreme court at Havana as the head; the members of this being appointed by the president and senate.

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  • The president may interfere if necessary in the municipality as in the province; and so may the governor of the province.

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  • In 1801, when the audiencia - of which the captain-general was ex officio president - began its functions at that point, the governor of Santiago became subordinated in political matters as much as in military.

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  • The American people had sent food to the reconcentrados; President McKinley, while opposing recognition of the rebels, affirmed the possibility of intervention; Spain resented this attitude; and finally, in February 1898, the United States battleship " Maine " was blown up - by whom will probably never be known - in the harbour of Havana.

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  • Tomas Estrada Palma (1835-1908) became the first president of the Republic.

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  • The president resigned (on the 28th of September), Congress dispersed without choosing a successor, and as an alternative to anarchy the United States was compelled to proclaim on the 29th of September 1906 a provisional government, - to last " long enough to restore order and peace and public confidence," and hold new elections.

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  • These laws strictly defined the powers of the president; more clearly separated the executive departments, so as to lessen friction and jealousies; reformed the courts; reformed administrative routine; and increased the strength of the provinces at the expense of the municipalities.

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  • The latter office he had held for two terms when in 1916 he was appointed U.S. Secretary of War by President Wilson.

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  • He founded the " Allgemeiner Deutscher Arbeiterverein," was its president and almost single-handed champion, conducted its affairs, and carried on a vast correspondence, not to mention about a dozen state prosecutions in which he was during that period involved.

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  • In the heyday of his passion for Fraulein von DOnniges, his dream was to be enthroned as the president of the German republic with her seated at his side.

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  • Among its buildings are the cathedral, dating from 1553 and once noted for its wealth; the president's palace and halls of congress, which are no longer occupied as such by the national government; the cabildo, or town-hall; a mint dating from 1572; the courts of justice, and the university of San Xavier, founded in 1624, with faculties of law, medicine and theology.

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  • There is a pretty chapel called the " Rotunda," erected in 1852 at the lower end of the prado by President Belzu, on the spot where an attempt had been made to assassinate him.

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  • In 1840 the name Sucre was adopted in honour of the patriot commander who won the last decisive battle of the war, and then became the first president of Bolivia.

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  • The grand vizier (sadr-azam), who is nominated by the sultan, presides ex officio over the privy council (mejliss-i-khass), which, besides the Sheikh-ul-Islam, comprises the ministers of home and foreign affairs, war, finance, marine, commerce and public works, justice, public instruction and " pious foundations " (evkaf), with the grand master of ordnance and the president of the council of state.

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  • To overthrow the ecclesiastical hierarchy, to deprive the clergy of all their privileges, to reduce the pope to the rank of a kind of president of a Christian republic, which governs itself, or rather submits to the government of Caesar - such is the dream formed in 1324 by two masters of the university of Paris.

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  • According to its own ruling, the Convention elected its president every fortnight.

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  • The natural history collections (including the very large ichnological collection of President Hitchcock, and Audubon's collection of birds) are of exceptional richness.

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  • In a series of letters to The Times he exposed the policy of the chief justice, Mr Cedercrantz, and the president of the council, Baron Senfft.

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  • At the head of the system stands the state superintendent of public instruction, appointed by the governor; there are also county superintendents; and a state high school board, consisting of the governor, state superintendent and the president of the state university, has general supervision of the schools and apportions the state aid.

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  • It is governed by a board of twelve regents, of whom the president of the university, the governor of the state and the state superintendent of public instruction are members ex officio, and the other nine, holding office for six years, are appointed by .the governor with the advice and consent of the senate.

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  • This situation did not last long, however, for on the 3rd of March 1849 the bill organizing the territory of Minnesota was passed, and on the 19th President Zachary Taylor appointed Alexander Ramsey of Pennsylvania the first territorial governor.

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  • He was a founder and the first president of the Massachusetts Missionary Society, and was influential in the establishment of Andover Theological Seminary.

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  • In an attempt to break out in February 1815 Decatur's flagship the "President" was cut off and after a spirited fight forced to surrender to a superior force.

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  • He practised law in New York and Philadelphia, was chosen mayor of Philadelphia in 1828, and in 1829 was appointed by President Jackson, whom he had twice warmly supported for the presidency, United States attorney for the eastern district of Pennsylvania, a position long held by his father.

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  • On the bank question he was at first at variance with the president; in January 1832 he presented in the Senate a memorial from the bank's president, Nicholas Biddle, and its managers, praying for a recharter, and subsequently he was chairman of a committee which reported a bill re-chartering the institution for a fifteen-year period.

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  • He became financial secretary to the Treasury in 1907, president of the Board of Education in 1908, and was president of the Board of Agriculture from 1911 to 1914.

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  • From 1912 to 1914 he was also Commissioner of Woods and Forests, and from 1914 to 1916 president of the Board of Trade.

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  • One of them, Rev. Thomas Spurgeon, after some years of pastorate in New Zealand, succeeded his father as minister of the Tabernacle, but resigned in 1908 and became president of the Pastors' College.

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  • He was knighted in 1897, and received the Royal (1875), Davy (1888), and Copley (1904) medals of the Royal Society, besides filling the offices of president of the Chemical Society and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

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  • In 1749 he became a fellow of Magdalen, of which college he was elected president in 1768.

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  • In the election he received 189 electoral votes, while Jackson received 219 for President.

    1
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  • Jackson now determined to make Van Buren president in 1836, and bent all his energies to that end.

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  • He confidently expected to be nominated for president in 1844, and his famous letter of the 27th of April, in which he frankly opposed the immediate annexation of Texas, though doubtless contributing greatly to his defeat, was not made public until he felt practically sure of the nomination.

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  • In the election of 1860 he voted for the fusion ticket in New York which was opposed to Abraham Lincoln, but he could not approve of President Buchanan's course in dealing with secession, and later supported Lincoln.

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  • The president of this council, or ruling chief - chosen from among the members of the two recognized reigning families - is called the alake, a word meaning "Lord of Ake," Ake being the name of the principal quarter of Abeokuta, after the ancient capital of the Egbas.

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  • Bayamo was the birthplace and the home of Carlos Manuel de Cespedes (1819-1874), first president of the "first" Cuban republic, and was also the birthplace and home of Tomas Estrada Palma (1835-1908), first president of the present Cuban republic.

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  • In his father's second administration Lord Stanley held, at first, the office of secretary for the colonies, but became president of the Board of Control on the resignation of Lord Ellenborough.

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  • From 1875 to 1893 he was president of the Royal Literary Fund, and attended most closely to his duties then.

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  • He was secretary of state for war and for the colonies and president of the board of trade; and was governor-general of Canada from 1888 to 1893.

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  • The Democratic party was even more radically divided on the question of monetary policy than the Republican; and President Cleveland, by securing the repeal of the silver purchase clause in the Sherman Act by Republican votes, had alienated a great majority of his party.

    1
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  • The decisive defeat of Parker by President Roosevelt did much to bring back the Democrats to Mr Bryan's banner.

    1
    0
  • After a heated contest Mr Bryan again suffered a decisive defeat, President Taft securing 321 electoral votes to Mr Bryan's 162.

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  • At this memorable riksdag Wallqvist exhibited, moreover, financial ability of the highest order, and, as president of the ecclesiastical commission, assisted to equilibrate the budget and find the funds necessary for resuming the war with Russia.

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  • By a decree of the president he was made a senator of France in 1852, and on the death of Arago (1853) he was chosen perpetual secretary of the Academy of Sciences.

    1
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  • In November 1898 he was elected president of the senate, and in June 1900 succeeded in forming a "Cabinet of pacification" after the Obstructionist crisis which had caused the downfall of General Pelloux.

    1
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  • After his fall he resumed his functions as president of the senate; but on the advent of the third Giolitti cabinet, he was not reappointed to that position.

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  • Nominated president of the Academical commission for the reform of weights and measures, his services were retained when its "purification" by the Jacobins removed his most distinguished colleagues.

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  • When he is an emperor, a king, or a president of a republic, it is not expected that he will act personally; he may appoint a delegate or delegates to act on his behalf, and avail himself of their labours and views, the ultimate decision being his only in name.

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  • In the " Alabama " arbitration five arbitrators were nominated by the president of the United States, the queen of England, the king of Italy, the president of the Swiss Confederation, and the emperor of Brazil respectively.

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    0
  • In the Bering Sea arbitration there were seven arbitrators, two nominated by Great Britain, two by the United States, and the remaining three by the president of the French Republic, the king of Italy, and the king of Sweden and Norway respectively.

    1
    0
  • These four (none of whom, it will be observed, was of the nationality of either party in difference) chose for their umpire Professor Matzen, of Copenhagen, president of the Landsthing there.

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  • The hearing consists in the discussion of the matters contained in the several cases, and is conducted under the direction of the president who is either the umpire, or, if there is no umpire, one of the arbitrators.

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  • This line was defined by the treaty of 1857, and by the decision of President Cleveland in 1895 with regard to the small section between the Uruguay and Iguassu rivers.

    1
    0
  • As regards the Peruvian boundary, an agreement was reached in 1904 to submit the dispute to the arbitration of the president of Argentina in case further efforts to reach an amicable settlement failed.

    1
    0
  • Since the naval revolt of 1893-1894 the name of the capital of Santa Catharina has been changed from Desterro to Florianopolis in honour of President Floriano Peixoto.

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  • The supreme powers of the nation are vested in three partially independent branches of government - executive, legislative, and judicial - represented by the president and his cabinet, a national congress of two chambers, and a supreme tribunal.

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  • The executive power of the nation is vested in a president, elected for a term of four years by a direct vote of the electors.

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  • A vice-president is elected at the same time and under the same conditions, who is president of the senate ex officio, and succeeds to the presidency in case the office becomes vacant during the last two years of the presidential term.

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  • The president is advised and assisted by a cabinet of six ministers, viz.

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  • The ministers are appointed and removed by the president, take no part in the sessions of congress, and are responsible to the president alone for their advisory acts.

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  • Mean while, President Peixoto had fortified the approaches to the city of Rio de Janeiro, bought vessels of war in Europe and the United States and organized the National Guard.

    1
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  • In the meantime the ships bought by President Peixoto arrived off Rio de Janeiro and prevented da Gama from escaping.

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  • After the cessation of hostilities, the greatest barbarities were practised upon those who, although they had taken no part in the insurrection, were known to have desired the overthrow of President Peixoto.

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  • Some of the officers and students were promptly expelled, and the president closed the school for several months.

    1
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  • Much was done by President Moraes to correct abuses, but the task was of too herculean a nature to allow of accomplishment within the four years during which he was at the head of affairs.

    1
    0
  • The expense of these expeditions was very heavy, and prevented President Moraes from carrying out many of the retrenchments he had planned.

    1
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  • Soon after the Canudos affair a conspiracy was hatched to assassinate the president.

    1
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  • President Salles publicly promised political reform, economy in the administration, and absolute respect for civil rights, and speedily made efforts to fulfil these pledges.

    1
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  • President Campos Salles entered upon his tenure of office on the 15th of November 1898, and at once proceeded to initiate fiscal legislation for the purpose of reducing expenditure and increasing the revenue.

    1
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  • Before this decision was given Senhor Rodrigues Alves had been elected president in 1902.

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  • In July 1899 President Roca had visited Rio de Janeiro accompanied by an Argentine squadron, this being the first official visit that any South American president had ever paid to one of the adjoining states.

    1
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  • Negotiations were set on foot, and finally by treating the matter in a give-and-take spirit a settlement was reached and a treaty for an amicable exchange of territories in the district in question, accompanied by a pecuniary indemnity, was signed by President Alves at Petropolis on the 17th of November 1903.

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  • During the remainder of the term of this president internal and financial progress were undisturbed save by an outbreak in 1904 in the Cunani district, the very portion of disputed territory which had been assigned to Brazil by the arbitration with France.

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  • In 1906 Dr Affonso Penna, three times minister under Pedro II., and at that time governor of the state of Minas-Geraes, of which he had founded the new capital, Bello Horizonte, was elected president, a choice due to a coalition of the other states against Sao Paulo, to which all the recent presidents had belonged.

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  • In the latter case, the tribunal was to consist of bishops from the neighbouring provinces, assisted - if he so chose - by legates of the Roman bishop. The clauses thus made the bishop of Rome president of a revisionary court; and afterwards Zosimus unsuccessfully attempted to employ these canons of Sardica, as decisions of the council of Nice, against the Africans.

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  • The great hall, with its fine open-timbered oak roof, is adorned with a splendid stained-glass window and several statues of notable men, including one (by Louis Francois Roubiliac) of Duncan Forbes of Culloden, lord president of the court of session (1685-1747), and now forms the ante-room for lawyers and their clients.

    1
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  • Krugersdorp was founded in 1887 at the time of the discovery of gold on the Rand and is named after President Kruger.

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  • He was principal of the College for the Blind at Vinton after the war, and until his death was connected with the Iowa College of Agriculture at Ames, being military instructor and cashier in 1870-1882, acting president in 1876-1877, librarian in 1877-1878, vicepresident and professor of military tactics in 1880-1882, and treasurer in 1884-1887.

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  • He served in the Northern Campaign under his father-in-law, General Taylor, and was greatly distinguished for gallantry and soldierly conduct at Monterey and particularly at Buena Vista, where he was severely wounded early in the engagement, but continued in command of his regiment until victory crowned the American arms. While still in the field he was appointed (May 1847) by President Polk to be brigadier-general of volunteers; but this appointment Davis declined, on the ground, as he afterwards said, "that volunteers are militia and the Constitution reserves to the state the appointment of all militia officers."

    1
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  • Afterwards, Davis himself, as president of the Confederate states, was to appoint many volunteer officers.

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  • During all this time he was on terms of intimate friendship with the president, over whom he undoubtedly exerted a powerful, but probably not, as is often said, a dominating influence; for instance he is generally supposed to have won the president's support for the Kansas-Nebraska Bill of 1854.

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  • On the 9th of February he received the unanimous vote of the provisional congress of the seceded states as president of the "Confederate States of America."

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  • Factories sprang up in the South in a few months, supplying the army with arms and munitions of war, and the energy of the president was everywhere apparent.

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  • President Davis, however, acted as if he was assured of ultimate success.

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  • Campbell, representing President Davis, on the other, he instructed his representatives to insist on the recognition of the Confederacy as a condition to any arrangement for the termination of the war.

    1
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  • The last days of the Confederate Congress were spent in recriminations between that body and President Davis, and the popularity with which he commenced his administration had almost entirely vanished.

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  • In January 1865 the Congress proposed to supersede the president and make General Lee dictator, - a suggestion, however, to which the Confederate commander refused to listen.

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  • After the surrender of the armies of Lee and Johnston in April 1865, President Davis attempted to make his way, through Georgia, across the Mississippi, in the vain hope of continuing the war with the forces of Generals Smith and Magruder.

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  • He was indicted for treason by a Virginia grand jury, persistent efforts were made to connect him with the assassination of President Lincoln, he was unjustly charged with having deliberately and wilfully caused the sufferings and deaths of Union prisoners at Andersonville and for two years he was denied trial or bail.

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  • His correspondence with President Bouhier was published in 1885 by Ernest Petit; his other letters have been edited by the Societe des sciences historiqueset naturelles de l'Yonne (2 vols., 1866-1867).

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  • The provincial court, consisting of a judge president and three puisne judges, sits in Pietermaritzburg and has jurisdiction over all causes whether affecting natives or Europeans.

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  • Legislative power was vested, nominally, in the volksraad (consisting of twenty-four members),while the president and executive were changed every three months.

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  • Boshof (afterwards president of the Orange Free State), by far the ablest of the Dutch who had settled in Natal.

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  • In 1816 Monroe was chosen president of the United States; he received 183 electoral votes, and Rufus King, his Federalist opponent, 34.

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  • He was elected interim president in June 1820, on the death of Sir Joseph Banks; but he did not care to enter into competition with Sir Humphry Davy, and the latter was elected president at the anniversary meeting in November 1820.

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  • The executive power is vested in a responsible cabinet, consisting of ten ministers, namely, the president of the council, the minister of the interior, of national defence, of education and public worship, of finance, The franchise is " probably the most illiberal in Europe."

    1
    0
  • The news of this manifesto, arriving as it did simultaneously with that of Gdrgei's successes, destroyed the last vestiges of a desire of the Hungarian revolutionists to compromise, and on the 14th of April, on the motion of Kossuth, the diet proclaimed the independence of Hungary, declared the house of Habsburg as false and perjured, for ever excluded from the throne, and elected Kossuth president of the Hungarian Republic. This was an execrable blunder in the circumstances, and the results were fatal to the national cause.

    1
    0
  • A programme approved of by all the members of the committee was drawn up, and on the 3rd of November 1903, Count Istvan Tisza was appointed minister president to carry it out.

    1
    0
  • About ioo,000 people assembled, and a deputation handed to Mr Justh, the president of the Chamber, a monster petition in favour of universal suffrage.

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  • Finally, the prime minister, Dr Wekerle, mainly owing to the pressure put upon him by Mr Justh, the president of the Chamber, yielded to the importunity of the Independence party, and, in the name of the Hungarian government, laid the proposals for a separate bank before the king-emperor and the Austrian government.

    1
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  • He was one of the first members, and became president of the Bureau of Longitudes, took a prominent place at the Institute (founded in 1796), professed analysis at the Ecole Normale, and aided in the organization of the decimal system.

    1
    0
  • Laplace's first separate work, Theorie du mouvement et de la figure elliptique des planetes (1784), was published at the expense of President Bochard de Saron.

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  • He laboured for some time as a missionary priest in Staffordshire, held several positions as tutor to young Roman Catholic noblemen, and was finally appointed president of the English seminary at St Omer, where he remained till his death on the 15th of May 1773.

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    0
  • On Monument Hill, in West Lawn Cemetery, in a park of 26 acres - a site which President McKinley had suggested for a monument to the soldiers and sailors of Stark county - there is a beautiful monument to the memory of McKinley, who lived in Canton.

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    0
  • This memorial is built principally of Milford (Mass.) granite, with a bronze statue of the president, and with sarcophagi containing the bodies of the president and Mrs McKinley, and has a total height, from the first step of the approaches to its top, of 163 ft.

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    0
  • After the war he allied himself with the radical wing of his party, was a member of the joint committee that outlined the congressional plan of reconstructing the late Confederate States, and laboured for the impeachment of President Johnson.

    1
    0
  • During President Grant's administration he was a member of the senatorial coterie that influenced most of the president's policies, and in 1873 Grant urged him to accept an appointment as chief justice of the Supreme Court, but he declined.

    1
    0
  • Further causes for alarms were the secret meeting between General Smuts and Count Mensdorv, to discuss a separate peace between Austria and the Entente (Dec. 1917) and the public pronouncements of President Wilson and Mr. Lloyd George in favour of " autonomy " for the subject races, instead of the independence held out to them by the Allied pronouncement of Jan.

    1
    0
  • Clemenceau and Lloyd George found themselves between two irreconcilable standpoints - between Sonnino, who claimed the liberal fulfilment of their treaty pledges, with the addition of the port of Fiume, and President Wilson, 'who refused all cognizance of the secret treaties and regarded them as expressly abrogated by the Allies when they accepted his successive notes as the basis of the Armistice.

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  • This offer was made in the knowledge that the memorandum addressed by President Wilson two days previously to Orlando and Sonnino had met with rejection, and was indeed well calculated to heighten the contrast between the outlook of the two rival nations toward Wilsonian principles.

    1
    0
  • On April 23 President Wilson followed up this private memorandum by a public manifesto to the Italian nation, in which he repudiated the Pact of London and appealed for the application of the same principles on the Adriatic as those enforced against Germany.

    1
    0
  • It was not however till the autumn that direct negotiations could be resumed, and by that time the eclipse of President Wilson placed Italy at an advantage.

    1
    0
  • In 1907 he was president of the co-operative cor1gress at Cremona.

    1
    0
  • He was president of Hampden-Sidney College from 1796 to 1807, with a short intermission (in 1801-1802), and in 1807 became pastor of Pine Street Church, Philadelphia.

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  • He was an ardent humanist, was president.

    1
    0
  • There is a provincial division of the Supreme Court of South Africa sitting at Pretoria (consisting of a judge president and six puisne justices) with original and appellate jurisdiction in civil and criminal matters.

    1
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  • The administrative authority was to be vested in a president, aided by an executive council.

    1
    0
  • Pretorius, while still president of the Transvaal, had been elected, through the efforts of his partisans, president of the Orange Free State.

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    0
  • He had no sooner left the Transvaal than the -old Lydenburg party, headed by Cornelis Potgieter, landdrost of Lydenburg, protested that the union would be much more beneficial to the Free State than to the people of Lydenburg, and followed this up with the contention lions' that it was illegal for any one to be president of the South African Republic and the Free State at the same time.

    1
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  • Grobelaar, who had been appointed president during the temporary absence of Pretorius, was requested to remain in office.

    1
    0
  • This was followed by a new election for president, and once more Pretorius was called upon to fill that office.

    1
    0
  • The discovery of gold at Tati led President Pretorius in April 1868 to issue a proclamation extending his territories on the west and north so as to embrace the goldfield and all Efforts Bechuanaland.

    1
    0
  • The award caused a strong feeling of resentment among the Boers, and led to the resignation of President Pretorius and his executive.

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  • With this view they asked Mr (afterwards Sir John) Brand, president,, of the Free State, to allow them to nominate him for the presidency of the South African Republic. To this President Brand 1872.

    1
    0
  • Burgers accepted the offer, and in 1872 was elected president.

    1
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  • A commando was called out, which the president himself led.

    1
    0
  • Sir Theophilus went to Pretoria in January 1877, with an escort of twenty-five mounted police, and entered into conferences with the president and executive as to the state of the country.

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    0
  • The best evidence in favour of the step is to be found in the publicly expressed views of the state's own president, Burgers, already quoted.

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  • Moreover, apart from the attitude of President Burgers, which cannot be said to have been one of active opposition, a considerable number of the Boers accepted the annexation with complacency.

    1
    0
  • The government of the state was handed over to the triumvirate on the 8th of August and was continued in their name until May 1883, when Kruger was elected president.

    1
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  • Simultaneously with this " irresponsible " movement for expansion, President Kruger proceeded to London to interview Lord Derby and endeavour to induce him to dispense with the suzerainty, and to withdraw other clauses in the Pretoria Convention on foreign relations and natives, which were objectionable from the Boer point of view.

    1
    0
  • Notwithstanding the precise fixing of the boundaries of the republic by the London Convention, President Kruger endeavoured to maintain the Boer hold on Goshen and Stellaland, but the British government on Efforts.

    1
    0
  • At the same time President Kruger revived the project of obtaining a seaport for the state, one of the objects of Boer ambitions since 1860 (vide supra).

    1
    0
  • The wealth which was pouring into the Boer state coffers exceeded the wildest dreams of President Kruger and his followers.

    1
    0
  • Reitz as president of the Orange Free State (January 1889) on the death of Sir John Brand, Kruger recognized a new opportunity of endeavouring to cajole the Free State.

    1
    0
  • It soon became evident that one course, and one only, lay open to President Kruger if he desired to avert a catastrophe.

    1
    0
  • In the negotiations which followed, President Kruger at length agreed to extend " most favoured nation " privileges to British subjects in reference to compulsory military service, and five British subjects who had been sent as prisoners to the front were released.

    1
    0
  • This result was not, however, achieved before President Kruger had done his utmost to induce Sir Henry Loch to promise some revision in favour of the Transvaal of the London Convention.

    1
    0
  • Whether he deceived himself or not, he led President Kruger and the Boers to believe that Germany was prepared to go to almost any length in support of the Transvaal if any opportunity occurred.

    1
    0
  • Neither he (Jameson) nor Rhodes had any knowledge of a proposal, to which General Botha had publicly referred, that Charles Leonard should be president.

    1
    0
  • In the period which intervened between the Jameson raid and the outbreak of the war in October 1899 President Kruger's administration continued to be what it had been; that is to say, it was not merely bad, but it got progressively worse.

    1
    0
  • An industrial commission appointed during this year by President Kruger fared no better than the high court had done.

    1
    0
  • These recommendations made by President Kruger's own nominees were practically ignored.

    1
    0
  • In January 1899 Mr Chamberlain pointed out in a despatch to President Kruger that the dynamite monopoly constituted a breach of the London Convention.

    1
    0
  • Alfred Milner to meet President Kruger at Bloemfontein, hoping to be able to exert pressure on both parties and to arrange a settlement as favourable as possible to Bioem- the Transvaal.

    1
    0
  • But apart from the relief suggested being entirely inadequate, it was only to be given on certain conditions, one of which was that all future disputes which might arise between the Transvaal and the Imperial government should be referred to a court of arbitration, of which the president should be a foreigner.

    1
    0
  • President Kruger had every expectation of large reinforcements from the Dutch in the two British colonies; he believed that, whatever happened, Europe would not allow Boer independence to be destroyed; and he had assured himself of the adhesion of the Orange Free State, though it was not till the very last moment that President Steyn formally notified Sir Alfred Milner of this fact.

    1
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  • The second, the period of Boer organized resistance, may be said to have finished with the occupation of Komati Poort in October 1900 (a month after Lord Roberts's formal annexation of the Transvaal) and the flight of President Kruger.

    1
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  • Bloemfontein, President Kruger himself arriving on the scene to give confidence to his burghers; but the demoralization was so great that neither the military genius of the few nor the personal influence of the president could bolster up an adequate resistance, and on the 13th of March 1900 Lord Roberts's army marched into the Free State capital.

    1
    0
  • On the 30th of May President Kruger fled with the state archives, taking up his residence at Waterval Boven on the Komati Poort line.

    1
    0
  • Signs of weakness were now apparent, and as a result Louis Botha, acting with the authority of Schalk Burger, the representative of President Kruger, opened negotiations with Kitchener.

    1
    0
  • In 1751, seconded by Lord Macclesfield, president of the Royal Society, and Bradley, the eminent mathematician, he distinguished himself greatly in the debates on the calendar, and succeeded in making the new style a fact.

    1
    0
  • He now became president of the Education Committee and promptly abolished the system which had had Robespierre's support.

    1
    0
  • Under the Consulate he resumed his professional work, and after Waterloo retired to America, where he became president of the university of Louisiana.

    1
    0
  • His services at length procured him the post of president of the chambre des monnaies, and thus enabled him to resume his literary studies.

    1
    0
  • Under the administration of President Cipriano Castro this traffic was suspended for a long time, and trans-shipments were made at La Guaira.

    1
    0
  • The president and vice-presidents, who must be Venezuelans by birth and more than thirty years old, are elected by an electoral body or council composed of members of the national Congress, one member from each state and the Federal District.

    1
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  • The presidential term is four years (it was six years under the constitution of 1904), and the president cannot succeed himself.

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  • The governors of the federal territories are appointees of the president of the republic, and the jefe politico of each territorial municipio is an appointee of the governor.

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  • The power of granting citizenship to foreigners is vested in the president of the republic, who is also empowered to refuse admission to the country to undesirable foreigners, or to expel those who have violated the special law (April 11, 1903) relating to their conduct in Venezuelan territory.

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  • The president, however, is empowered to deny admission into the country of foreigners engaged in special religious work not meeting his approval.

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  • He evaded the clause in the constitution prohibiting the election of a president for successive terms of office by invariably arranging for the nomination of some adherent of his own as chief of the executive, and then pulling the strings behind this figurehead.

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  • The tenure of the presidential office was for two years, and at every alternate election Guzman Blanco was declared to be duly and legally chosen to fill the post of chief magistrate of the republic. In 1889 there was an open revolt against the dictatorial system so long in vogue; and President Rojas Paul, Blanco's locum tenens, was forced to flee the country and take refuge in the Dutch colony of Curacoa.

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  • An election was held and General Andueza Palacios was nominated president.

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  • A movement was set on foot for the reform of the constitution, the principal objects of this agitation being to prolong the presidential term to four years, to give Congress the right to choose the president of the republic, and to amend certain sections concerning the rights of persons taking part in armed insurrection arising out of political issues.

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  • All might have gone well for President Palacios had he not supposed that this extension of the presidential period might be made to apply to himself.

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  • General Crespo became all-powerful; but he did not immediately accept the position of president.

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  • The Guiana boundary question began now to assume an acute stage, the Venezuelan minister in Washington having persuaded President Cleveland to take up the cause of Venezuela in vindication of the principles of the Monroe doctrine.

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  • On the 18th of December 1895 a message was sent to the United States Congress by President Cleveland practically stating that any attempt on the part of the British Government to enforce its claims upon Venezuela as regards the boundary between that country and Guiana without resort to arbitration would be considered as a casus belli by his government.

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  • In 1898 General Crespo was succeeded as president by Senor Andrade, who had represented Venezuela in Washington during the most acute stage of the frontier question.

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  • A subsequent revolt overthrew President Andrade in 1900.

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  • General Cipriano Castro then became president.

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  • The president, however, sheltered himself behind the Monroe doctrine and appealed to the government of the United States to intervene.

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  • He was installed as president in June 1910.

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  • It has a gently sloping beach of fine sand and has been a popular bathing-place since the time of President Balta, although the country behind it is arid and absolutely barren.

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  • A park and sports ground at the western end of the town contains the pedestal for a statue of President Kruger.

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  • From that time until 1900 the dominating figure in the town was that of the president - Paul Kruger.

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  • After the advent of the Left he was elected (November 1876) president of the chamber.

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  • The development of rich gold and silver mines brought in more Spanish settlers, and then the record changes to one of partisan warfare, which continued down to the administration of President Porfirio Diaz.

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  • In 1826 Fourier became a member of the French Academy, and in 1827 succeeded Laplace as president of the council of the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • Fries and two others were twice tried for treason (the second time before Samuel Chase) and were sentenced to be hanged, but they were pardoned by President Adams in April 1800, and a general amnesty was issued on 21st May.

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  • He acted as president of the International Congress held at Geneva in 1892 for revising the nomenclature of the fatty acid series.

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  • Actively interested with Cyrus Field in the laying of the first Atlantic cable, he was president of the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Company, and his frequent cash advances made the success of the company possible; he was president of the North American Telegraph Company also, which controlled more than one-half of the telegraph lines of the United States.

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