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president

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president

president Sentence Examples

  • Hayes, president of the United States from 1877 to 1881.

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  • That's a bold statement, coming from a sitting president and former general.

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  • The president or moderator of each church court was Primus inter pares.

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  • But the president needed his services in the House, and he was not elected to the Senate until 1880.

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  • 1863), became president of the college in 1908.

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  • Unfortunately, the new president was unequal to the task of composing the differences in his party.

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  • I'm evacuating with the President and others to the West Coast site.

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  • God is only the president of the day, and Webster is his orator.

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  • An act of the New Jersey legislature in 1895 created the office of township president, with power of appointment and veto.

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  • Hayes by a majority of less than 3000 votes; but the Democrats gained a majority in both branches of the state legislature, and Thurman was elected to the United States Senate, where he served from 1869 until 1881 - during the 46th Congress (1879-1881) as president pro tempore.

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  • In 1921, a dozen years before he would be sworn in as president, Franklin Roosevelt was diagnosed with polio.

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  • JAMES ABRAM GARFIELD (1831-1881), twentieth president of the United States, was born on the 19th of November 1831 in a log cabin in the little frontier town of Orange, Cuyahoga county, Ohio.

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  • We've seen this: If you are running for president of the United States, merely using the words "freeze" and "Social Security" in the same sentence has the retirees of the nation heating up pots of tar and emptying their down pillows.

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  • He was elected to Congress, he was chosen judge of the supreme court of Tennessee, he was appointed general in the army, and lastly he was for eight years the president of the United States.

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  • President Garfield's writings, edited by Burke A.

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  • He was soon after received at the French Academy; and, to the disgrace of the French clergy, he was named president of their assembly.

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  • During his later years he served as commissioner of the navy, and was president of the board of naval commissioners from 1833 till his death at Washington on the 27th of February 1840.

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  • All maintained a solemn silence, listening to the words of the President, who held a mallet in his hand.

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  • The President of the Exposition gave her this letter:

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  • Hayes, the new president, having chosen John Sherman to be his secretary of the treasury, an effort was made to send Garfield to the United States Senate in Sherman's place.

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  • Much change was due to the efforts of William Jennings Bryan, who received the Democratic Party nomination for president three times, in 1896, 1900, and 1908.

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  • In April 1772 Warren Hastings took his seat as president of the council at Fort William.

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  • Mr. Higinbotham, President of the World's Fair, kindly gave me permission to touch the exhibits, and with an eagerness as insatiable as that with which Pizarro seized the treasures of Peru, I took in the glories of the Fair with my fingers.

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  • Application for admission to the Union was now made to Congress, and on the 31st of December 186 2 an enabling act was approved by President Lincoln admitting the state on the condition that a provision for the gradual abolition of slavery be inserted in the Constitution.

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  • President Roosevelt had little difficulty last spring in making Miss Keller understand him, and especially requested Miss Sullivan not to spell into her hand.

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  • Weyrother, who was in full control of the proposed battle, by his eagerness and briskness presented a marked contrast to the dissatisfied and drowsy Kutuzov, who reluctantly played the part of chairman and president of the council of war.

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  • President Dwight Eisenhower, lifelong military man and five-star general, had much to say on the waging of war.

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  • Thirteen M.A.'s and seven bachelors, besides the president, John Hornley, B.D., were named in the charter.

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  • She thought of Elise's security detail and then of the Vice President, the President's staff, the renowned scholars and businessmen taking refuge there.

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  • He received formal leave of absence in January 1908, when he received the title of president of the board of customs. Both the Chinese and the British governments from time to time conferred honours upon Sir Robert Hart.

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  • The administrator scan, which only the President or Vice President could run, came back with half a dozen errors.

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  • I got her access to everything, even shit the President didn't have access to, Tim said with a shake of his head.

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  • On the 2nd of July, while on his way to attend the commencement exercises at Williams College, the new president was shot in a Washington railway station by a disappointed office-seeker named Charles J.

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  • In 1869 and 1871 he was president of the first and second Jewish Synods at Leipzig and Augsburg.

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  • (2) The president of a decuria, a subdivision of the curia.

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  • The chief events of the year 1893 were my trip to Washington during the inauguration of President Cleveland, and visits to Niagara and the World's Fair.

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  • His attention to all trade questions was close and constant; he was a member of the council of trade and plantations appointed in 1670, and was its president from 1672 to 1676.

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  • The minister 'is' ex officio president or moderator.

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  • In the spring of 1893 a club was started in Tuscumbia, of which Mrs. Keller was president, to establish a public library.

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  • Dubrovin, president of the Union of the Russian People and organizer of pogroms, having written a letter of congratulation to the tsar on the occasion of the coup d'etat, received a gracious reply; the hideous reign of terror of the " Black Hundred " in Odessa did not prevent the Grand-duke Constantine from accepting the badge of membership of the Union.

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  • President Harper was selected by him to organize the university, and it was his will that the president and two-thirds of the trustees should be " always " Baptists.

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  • Guiteau, whose mind had no doubt been somewhat influenced by the abuse lavished upon the president by his party opponents; and on the 19th of September 1881, he died at Elberon, New Jersey, whither he had been removed on the 6th.

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  • According to Allan Goodman, president and CEO of the Institute of International Education, The United States continues to host more international students than any other country in the world.

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  • A new paper was started, to which was given the name of Kossuth Hirlapia, so that from the first it was Kossuth rather than the Palatine or the president of the ministry whose name was in the minds of the people associated with the new government.

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  • So he went to the other hotel, where he found the vice president sitting with some friends in the parlor.

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  • The court designates one of its members as president.

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  • The president and vicepresident are voted for by separate tickets.

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  • They are appointed by and may be removed by the president.

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  • There it was agreed that France should supply 200,000 men and Piedmont 100,000 for the expulsion of the Austrians from Italy, that Piedmont should be expanded into a kingdom of North Italy, that central Italy should form a separate kingdom, on the throne of which the emperor contemplated placing one of his own relatives, and Naples another, possibly under Lucien Murat; the pope, while retaining only the Patrimony of St Peter (the Roman province), would be president of the Italian confederation.

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  • from 1660) was knighted in 1673, and was elected president of the Royal Society in 1681.

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  • After a year he returned to Norwich and identified himself with the movement to organize local printers in a branch of the Typographical Association, of which he became president and ultimately secretary.

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  • He also became president of the Norwich and District Trades and Labour Council.

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  • A new and important act was signed by the President on the 18th of June 1910.

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  • It created a Commerce Court (composed of five judges nominated by the president of the United States from the Federal circuit judges), transferred to it jurisdiction in cases instituted to enforce or set aside orders of the Inter-State Commerce Commission, and made the United States instead of the Commission a party in all such actions.

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  • Towards the end of 1901 a departmental committee of the Board of Trade was formed to consider the Light Railways Act, and in 1902 the president of the Board of Trade (Mr Gerald Balfour) stated that as a result of the deliberations of this committee, a new bill had been drafted which he thought would go very far to meet all the reasonable objections that had been urged against the present powers of the local authorities.

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  • In 1904 the president of the Board of Trade brought in a bill on practically the same lines as the amending bill of 1903.

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  • (5) It was offered in the assembly by the hands of the president; this is stated by Justin Martyr (Apol.

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  • BENJAMIN HARRISON (1833-1901), the twenty-third president of the United States, was born at North Bend, near Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 20th of August 1833.

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  • His grandfather, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), was ninth president of the United States.

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  • Garfield as president, and was offered by him a place in his cabinet; but this he declined, having been elected a member of the United States Senate, in which he took his seat on the 4th of March 1881.

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  • It was Boston commerce that was most sorely hurt by the embargo and non-importation policy of President Jefferson.

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  • The President advocated a declaration of peace with Germany by resolution, and the immediate negotiation of a treaty.

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  • solicitor-general of the republic. The judges and solicitor-general are appointed by the president with the approval of the senate, but the tribunal chooses its own presiding officers and secretaries and, nominally, is independent of executive control.

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  • The president is nominally commander-in-chief of the army, but the actual command is vested in a general staff in the national capital, and in the general commanding each of the seven military districts into which the republic is divided.

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  • Virtually, this was a republican government like that of the United States, for no difference existed in the mode of election of the regent from that of a president.

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  • General da Fonseca and General Floriano Peixoto were elected to fill the offices of president and vice-president until the 15th of November 1894.

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  • In view of the discontent, conspiracies and revolutionary movements, President da Fonseca declared himself dictator.

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  • Concessions and subsidies were given broadcast for worthless undertakings in order to benefit the friends of the president.

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  • Nevertheless President Peixoto made no effort to reform the methods of administration.

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  • Admiral Custodio de Mello took command of the naval forces, and demanded the resignation of the president.

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  • The foreign ministers then arranged a compromise between the contending parties, according to which President Peixoto was to place no artillery in the city, while Admiral Mello was to refrain from bombarding the town, which was thus saved from destruction.

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  • They named as their umpire and president M.

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  • The president is charged with the duties (among others) of commanding the armed forces.

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  • Having obtained a papal bull, he founded it by deed of the 12th of June 1458, converting the hospital into a college with a president and six fellows, to which college two days later Magdalen Hall surrendered itself and its possessions, its members being incorporated into "the New College of St Mary Magdalen."

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  • On the 23rd of August 1480, the college being completed, the great west window being contracted to be made after the fashion of that at All Souls' College, a new president, Richard Mayhew, fellow of New College, was installed on the 23rd of August 1480, and statutes were promulgated.

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  • He was one of the founders of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), was a member of the New York Council for some years before the War of Independence, a member and president of the First Provincial Congress of New York (1775), and a member of the Second Provincial Congress (1775-1776).

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  • The Bengal Asiatic Society was established under his auspices, though he yielded the post of president to Sir W.

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  • As a member of the council of Madras he helped to defend the city against the French in 1759, and in July 1760 he went to Bengal as president of the council and governor of Fort William.

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  • In case of the death, resignation or other disability of the governor, the president of the Senate acts as governor, and in case of his incapability the Speaker of the House of Delegates; and these two failing, the legislature on joint ballot elects an acting governor.

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  • The Senate elects a president, confirms or rejects the nominations of the governor, and acts as a court of impeachment for the trial of public officers, besides sharing in legislative functions.

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  • Then came the scandal of the decorations in which President Grevy's son-in-law Daniel Wilson figured, and the Rouvier cabinet fell in the attempt to screen the president.

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  • Combes; and on the fall of the Combes ministry in January 1905 he was invited by the president to form a new ministry.

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  • He was putting up a framed twenty dollar bill on the wall next to a picture of him with the president.

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  • That's all the times he ran for president!

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  • Franklin Roosevelt wasn't like that, at least when he was running for president.

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  • With the former Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces and the Special Assistant to the VP, not to mention the biofields, electromagnetic fields, and other beefed security measures, the compound at the top of the mountain was a fortress commanded by the President's own right-hand man.

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  • Brady recognized him—he was another high-ranking politician in the President's cabinet.

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  • Randy, a science buff, was in the top third of the grad­uates and was also his class president.

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  • This university was founded in 1621 and the university of Buenos Aires in 1821, but although Bonpland and some other European scientists were members of the faculty of Buenos Aires in its early years, neither there nor at Cordoba was any marked attention given to the natural sciences until President Sarmiento (official term, 1868-1874) initiated scientific instruction at the university of Cordoba under the eminent German naturalist, Dr Hermann Burmeister (1807-1892), and founded the National Observatory at Cordoba and placed it under the direction of ' There are two distinct statistical offices compiling immigration returns and their totals do not agree, owing in part to the traffic between Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

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  • In 1881 President Roca offered for public purchase by auction the lands in the southwest of the province of Buenos Aires, the Pampa Central, and the Neuquen district, these lands having been rendered habitable after the campaign of 1878 against the Indians.

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  • All laws are sanctioned and promulgated by the president, who is invested with the veto power, which can be overruled only by a two-thirds vote.

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  • The president, with the advice and consent of the senate, appoints judges, diplomatic agents, governors of territories, and officers of the army and navy above the rank of colonel.

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  • In 1906 the president announced that permission had been given by the German emperor for 30 Argentine officers to enter the German army each year and to serve eighteen months, and also for five officers to attend the Berlin Military Academy.

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  • The normal schools, maintained by the state on a secular basis, were founded by President Sarmiento, who engaged experienced teachers in the United States to direct them; their work is excellent; notably, their model primary schools.

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  • An attempt of the Spanish party to make Balthasar de Cisneros president of the junta failed, and the ex-viceroy retired to Montevideo.

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  • In 1826 Bernardo Rivadavia was elected president of the confederation.

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  • A constituent congress, in which each province had equal representation, was duly gress had (May 1, 1853) appointed Urquiza president of the confederation, and he established the seat of government at Parana.

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  • Urquiza at this juncture resigned the presidency, and Doctor Santiago Derqui was elected president of the fourteen provinces with the seat of government at Parana; while Urquiza became once more governor of Entre Rios, and Mitre was appointed governor of Buenos Aires.

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  • Causes of friction still remained, but they did not develop into open quarrels, for Mitre was content to leave Urquiza in his province of Entre Rios, and the other administrators (caudillos) in their several governments, a large measure of autonomy, trusting that the position and growing commercial importance of Buenos Aires would inevitably tend to make the federal capital the real centre of power of the republic. In 1865 the Argentines were forced into war with Paraguay through the overbearing attitude of the president Francisco Solano Lopez.

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  • It was evident that the president intended to use all the influence which the party in power could exercise, to secure the return of General Julio Roca, who had distinguished himself in 1878 by a successful campaign against the warlike Indian tribes bordering on the Andes.

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  • President Avellaneda was frightened at the results of his action, and to avoid a collision ordered the troops to be withdrawn.

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  • In the month of June 1880, President Avellaneda and his ministers left Buenos Aires, and this act was considered by the porteno leaders equivalent to a declaration of war.

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  • No sooner had President Juarez Celman come into power towards the close of 1886, than the respectable portion of the community began to feel alarmed at the methods practised by the new president in his conduct of public affairs.

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  • clear that the president would listen to no prudent counsels, from Roca or from any one else.

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  • President Celman underrated the strength of the new opposition, and relied upon his armed forces promptly to suppress any signs of open hostility.

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  • Much satisfaction was shown in Europe at the fall of President Celman, for investors had suffered heavily by the way in which the resources of Argentina had been dissipated by that the uprising of public opinion against his financial methods signified a more honest conduct of the national affairs in the future.

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  • Great expectations were entertained of the ability of President Pellegrini to establish a sound administration, and he succeeded in forming a ministry which gave general satisfaction throughout the country.

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  • Instead of facing the difficulties, the president preferred to put off the day of reckoning by flooding the country with inconvertible notes, with the result that the financial crisis became more and more aggravated.

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  • The president was for some time in doubt whether he had any right to intervene in provincial affairs, but eventually troops were despatched to La Plata.

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  • During the whole of the 1894 session, the attitude of senators and deputies alike was one of pronounced hostility to the president.

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  • The president had made up his mind that the sentence must be carried out; the congress by a great majority were resolved not to permit the death penalty to be inflicted.

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  • It was a one-sided struggle, for without the consent of the congress the president could not raise any money for supplies, and congress refused to vote the budget.

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  • Congress, however, had now got their opportunity, and they used the time of national stress to bring increased pressure to bear upon the president.

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  • In March 1895 President Cleveland gave his decision, which was wholly favourable to the contention of Brazil.

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  • During the last months of President Uriburu's administration, matters had reached a climax, especially in connexion with the delimitation in a district known as the Puna de Atacama.

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  • One of the first steps of President Roca, after his accession to office, was to arrange a meeting with the president of Chile at the Straits of Magellan.

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  • By the powerful influence of the president, government measures were sanctioned by the legislature dealing with the abuses.

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  • On the 31st of August of the same year a series of proposals upon the currency question was submitted to congress by the president, whose real object was to counteract the too rapid appreciation of the inconvertible paper money.

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  • In October 1900 Dr Manuel Campos Salles, president of Brazil, paid a visit to Buenos Aires, and was received with great demonstrations of friendliness.

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  • He proved a hard-working progressive president, who did much for the development of communications and the opening up of the interior of the country.

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  • Bills may be proposed either by ministers (in the name of the president of the republic), or by private members, and may be initiated in either chamber, but money-bills must be submitted in the first place to the Chamber of Deputies.

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  • When a change of Government occurs the president chooses a prominent parliamentarian as premier and president of the council.

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  • At the head of each department is a prefect, a political official nominated by the minister of the interior and appointed by the president, who acts as general agent of the government and renresentative of the central authority.

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  • In such cases the prefect must approve them, and in some cases the sanction of the general council or even ratification by the president is necessary.

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  • The court consists of a president, one or more vice-presidents and a variable number of judges.

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  • First there is the office or cabinet of the prefect for the general police (la police gnrale), with bureaus for various objects, such as the safety of the president of the republic, the regulation and order of public ceremonies, theatres, amusements and entertainments, &c.; secondly, the judicial police (la police judiciaire), with numerous bureaus also, in constant communication with the courts of judicature; thirdly, the administrative police (la police administrative) including bureaus, which superintend navigation, public carriages, animals, public health, &c. Concurrently with these divisions there is the municipal police, which comprises all the agents in enforcing police regulations in the streets or public thoroughfares, acting under the orders of a chief (chef de la police municipale) with a central bureau.

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  • When the budget has passed both chambers it is promulgated by the president under the title of Loi des finances.

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  • It consists of a president and 110 other officials, assisted by 25 auditors.

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  • All these are nominated for life by the president of the republic. Besides the accounts of the state and of the communes, those of charitable institutionsi and training collegesi and a great variety of other public establishments are scrutinized by the Cour des Comptes.

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  • But in communes the revenues of which exceed 120,000, the budget is always submitted to the president of the republic. The ordinary revenues include the produce of additional centimes allocated to communal purposes, the rents and profits of communal property, sums produced by municipal taxes and dues, concessions to gas, water and other companies, and by the octroi or duty on a variety of articles imported into the commune for local consumption.

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  • The president of the Republic has a military household, and the minister a cabinet, both of which are occupied chiefly with questions of promotion, patronage and decorations.

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  • A lyce is founded in a town by decree of the president of the republic, with the advice of the superior council of public instruction.

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  • department from 1779 to 1782, and lord president of the council in 1783, and again from 1794 until his death.

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  • N.) is a cottage shown by an inscription to have been the home of the ancestors of William McKinley, president of the United States.

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  • some 300 inhabitants living in low thatched or iron-roofed huts, under the supervision of a police commissioner and other officials of Ecuador, by which country the group was annexed in 183 2, when General Villamil founded Floreana on Charles Island, naming it in honour of Juan Jose Flores, president of Ecuador.

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  • His opposition to President Lincoln's policy was mainly in respect to emancipation, military arrests and conscription.

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  • The president tried to win him over early in 1863, but Seymour disapproved of the arrest of C. S.

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  • Vallandigham in May, and, although he responded immediately to the call for militia in June, he thought the Conscription Act unnecessary and unconstitutional and urged the president to postpone the draft until its legality could be tested.

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  • Lord Rayleigh had an interest in abnormal psychological investigations, and became a member and vice president of the Society for Psychical Research.

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  • In 1904 he was awarded a Nobel prize, and at the end of 1905 he became president of the Royal Society, of which he had been elected a fellow in 1873, and had acted as secretary from 1885 to 1896.

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  • He remained president till 1908, in which year he was chosen to succeed the 8th duke of Devonshire as chancellor of Cambridge University.

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  • He went to Italy as president of the commission, carrying to the prince at Florence the official news of his election.

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  • During a long and active life, he played many parts: professor of mathematics at the Elphinstone college (1854) founder of the Rast Goftar newspaper; partner in a Parsi business firm in London (1855); prime minister of Baroda (1874); member of the Bombay legislative council (1885); M.P. for Central Finsbury (1892-1895), being the first Indian to be elected to the House of Commons; three times president of the Indian National Congress.

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  • Sir Henry Parkes was elected president, and he moved a series of resolutions embodying the principles necessary to establish, on an enduring foundation, the structure of a federal government.

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  • The Senate would choose its own president, and the House of Representatives its speaker; each house would make its own rules of procedure; in each, one-third of the number of members would form a quorum; the members of each must take oath, or make affirmation of allegiance; and all alike would receive an allowance of £400 a year.

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  • This tribunal differs from similar courts in the states inasmuch as it consists of a single member, called the " president," an officer appointed by the governor-general from among the justices of the High Court of Australia.

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  • The president has the power to appoint assessors to advise him on technical points; and considerable powers of devolution of authority for the purpose of inquiry and report are conferred upon the court, the main object of which is to secure settlement by conciliatory methods.

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  • He was president of the mathematical and physical section of the British Association at Bradford in 1873 and of the London Mathematical Society in 18 741876.

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  • He was descended in the sixth generation from Jonathan Dickinson, first president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and his ancestors had been closely connected with the Presbyterian church.

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  • In the first Gladstone administration he held a variety of public offices, finally becoming, in 1871, the first president of the local government board.

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  • In the same year Stansfeld again became president of the local government board.

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  • The regent was president of the council of state, of which the knights of the Golden Fleece were members.

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  • three councils - the Council of State, the Privy Council and the Council of Finance, but in reality all power had been placed by Philip in the hands of three confidential councillors styled the Consulta - Barlaymont, president of the Council of Finance, Viglius, president of the Privy Council, and Antony Perrenot, bishop of Arras, better known by his later title as Cardinal Granvelle.

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  • The duke himself was president and all sentences were submitted to him.

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  • "WALTER RATHENAU (1867-), German industrialist and political economist, president of the Allgemeine ElektricitatsGesellschaf t, was born Sept.

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  • The first British factory in the peninsula was established in the native state of Patani on the east coast in 1613, the place having been used by the Portuguese in the 16th century for a similar purpose; but the enterprise came to an untimely end in 1620 when Captain Jourdain, the first president, was killed in a naval engagement in Patani Roads by the Dutch.

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  • Of the three sons of Count Franz, the eldest, Friedrich (1810-1881), entered the diplomatic service; after holding other posts he was in 1850 appointed president of the restored German Diet at Frankfort, where he represented the anti-Prussian policy of Schwarzenberg, and often came into conflict with Bismarck, who was Prussian envoy.

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  • After serving under Stadion in Galicia, he was in 1848, after the outbreak of the revolution, appointed president of the administration and acting Stadthalter in Bohemia.

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  • The new president was a man comparatively little known outside the state of Illinois, and many of his supporters, doubtful of his ability to deal with the difficult problems of 1861, looked to Seward as the most experienced man of the administration and the one who should direct its policy.

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  • Seward himself, apparently sharing these views, although not out of vanity, at first possessed an unbounded confidence in his ability to influence the president and his cabinet.

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  • Seward gradually regained his health, and remained in the cabinet of President Johnson until the expiration of his term in 1869.

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  • After the close of the war with Mexico Green was sent to that country in 1849 by President Taylor to negotiate concerning the moneys which, by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the United States had agreed to pay; and he saved his country a considerable sum by arranging for payment in exchange instead of in specie.

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  • On the outbreak of the South African War in 1899 Grant was at first disposed to be hostile to the policy of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain; but his eyes were soon opened to the real nature of President Kruger's government, and he enthusiastically welcomed and supported the national feeling which sent men from the outlying portions of the Empire to assist in upholding British supremacy in South Africa.

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  • In 1907 he was president of the British Association.

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    0
  • The plot was, however, discovered; and Bedmar, protected by his position from arrest, left Venice and went to Flanders as president of the council.

    0
    0
  • Each college is founded by royal decree, and consists of a president, with not fewer than ten and not more than twenty members.

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  • Even the first president of the Rome court of cassation only receives f6o0 a year.

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  • Venice; but on the 7th of July the assembly declared in favor of fusion with Piedmont, and Manin, who had been elected president resigned his powers to the royal com- Danicle Mania and missioners.

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  • Empire, Crmieux, as president of the government delegation at Tours, hastened to offer his congratulations to Italy.

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    0
  • Though aware of Bismarcks hostility towards Italy, of the conclusion of the Austro-German alliance of 1879, and of the undisguised ill-will of France, Italy not only made no attempt to crush an agitation as mischievous as it was futile, but granted a state funeral to General Avezzana, president of the Irredentist League.

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    0
  • Meanwhile the enthusiastic reception accorded to the young German emperor on the occasion of his visit to Rome in October 1888, and the cordiality shown towards King Humbert and Crispi at Berlin in May 1889, increased the tension of FrancoItalian relations; nor was it until after the fall of Prince Bismarck in March 1890 that Crispi adopted towards the Republic a more friendly attitude by sending an Italian squadron to salute President Carnot at Toulon.

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  • Loubet, the French president, came to Rome; this action was strongly resented by the pope, who, like his predecessor since 1870, objected to the presence of foreign Catholic rulers in Rome, and led to the final rupture between France and the Vatican.

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    0
  • He was, however, still greatly disliked by the Whigs, and William, instead of reinstating him in the lord treasurership, only appointed him president of the council in February 1689.

    0
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  • On this second visit he became acquainted with some of the leading Abolitionists, and founded later in Paris a Societe des Amis des Noirs, of which he was president during 1790 and 1791.

    0
    0
  • The metropolitan of Athens is president, and there are four other members appointed by the government in annual rotation from the senior bishops.

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  • In 1867 he was made lord justice general of Scotland and lord president of the court of session, taking the title of Lord Glencorse.

    0
    0
  • Ayala was nominated to the post of president of congress shortly before his death, which occurred unexpectedly on the 30th of January 1879.

    0
    0
  • The first settlement here was made about 1659 in a part of Marlboro called Chauncy (because of a grant of Soo acres here to Charles Chauncy, president of Harvard College, made in 1659 and revoked in 1660 by the General Court of Massachusetts).

    0
    0
  • By this time he had made his peace with the duke of York, and when in February 1685 James became king, he retained his position of secretary, to which was soon added that of lord president of the council.

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    0
  • The first president of the institution (from 1873 to 1881) was the distinguished geologist, Edward Orton (1829-1899), who was professor of geology from 1873 to 1899.

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    0
  • He resigned in 1894, and in 1900 was appointed president of the House of Magnates, an office which he resigned on the fall of the Liberal party in 1906.

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    0
  • Under the Khuen-Heclvary Government he became on June 18 1910 once more president of the House of Magnates.

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    0
  • He was minister to Great Britain in1796-1803and again in 1825-1826, and was the Federalist candidate for vicepresident in 1804 and 1808, and for president in 1816, when he received 34 electoral votes to 183 cast for Monroe.

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    0
  • Another son, Charles King (1789-1867), was also educated abroad, was captain of a volunteer regiment in the early part of the war of 1812, and served in 1814 in the New York Assembly, and after working for some years as a journalist was president of Columbia College in 1849-1864.

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    0
  • After the war he was sent on a special diplomatic mission to France, on account of the presence of French troops in Mexico; and from June 1868 to March 1869 he served as secretary of war under President Andrew Johnson, after the retirement of E.

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    0
  • He became prefect of police in November 1887, at the critical moment of President Grevy's resignation.

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    0
  • In 1902 and 1903 he was elected president of the chamber.

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    0
  • In 1553, on the recommendation of the Cardinal of Lorraine, he was named master of the requests, and afterwards president of the chambre des comptes.

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    0
  • It has a chamber of commerce, the president of which has a seat on the superior council of Indo-China; a chamber of the court of appeal of Indo-China, a civil tribunal of the first order, and is the seat of the chamber of agriculture of Tongking.

    0
    0
  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1836, its president in 1871, and received both the Copley and Royal medals.

    0
    0
  • He was five times president of the Royal Astronomical Society, was correspondent of the French Academy and belonged to many other foreign and American societies.

    0
    0
  • The military element, moreover, has frequently conspired to elect a president amenable to its demands.

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    0
  • In the following year Latorre caused himself to be elected president, but political unrest caused him to resign in March 1880.

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  • The president of the senate, Dr Vidal, nominally administered the government for two years, when General Santos, who had held the real power, became president: His administration was so vicious and tyrannical that the opposition organized a revolution.

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    0
  • The Colorados now made General Tajes president, the practical direction of the administration being in the hands of Julio Herrera y Obes.

    0
    0
  • The country was at this period conducted practically as if it were the private estate of the president, and no accounts of revenue or expenditure were vouchsafed to the public. In 1894 the Colorados nominated Senor Idiarte Borda for the presidency.

    0
    0
  • The president made no attempt to conciliate them, and in March 1897 a body of government troops suffered a reverse.

    0
    0
  • The president of the senate, Juan Cuestas, in accordance with the constitution, assumed the duties of president of the republic. He arranged that hostilities should cease on the conditions that representation of the Blancos was allowed in Congress for certain districts where their votes were known to predominate; that a certain number of the jefes politicos should be nominated from the Blancos; that free pardon be extended to all who had taken part in the revolt; that a sufficient sum in money be advanced to allow the settlement of the expenses contracted by the insurgents; and that the electoral law be reformed on a basis allowing the people to take part freely in e1ctions.

    0
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  • Claudio Williman became president in 1907.

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    0
  • Near the city is the important United States army post, Fort Benjamin Harrison, named in honour of President Benjamin Harrison, whose home was in Indianapolis.

    0
    0
  • Reports of territorial encroachments aroused much sympathy with Liberia in America and led in February 1909 to the appointment by President Roosevelt of a commission which visited Liberia in the summer of that year to investigate the condition of the country.

    0
    0
  • Until the accession to power of President Barclay in 1904 (he was re-elected in 1907), the AmericoLiberian government on the coast had very uncertain relations with the indigenous population, which is well armed and tenacious of local independence.

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  • The president is now elected for a term of four years.

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    0
  • In 1763 he visited Berlin, and on that occasion finally refused the office of president of the Academy of Berlin, which had been already offered to him more than once.

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  • In 1879 he was appointed president of the Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften (Academy of Sciences) at Vienna, and in 1896 succeeded von Sybel as chairman of the historical commission at Munich.

    0
    0
  • Thus in 1910 the honorary president of the council was the grand-duke Michael Nicolaievich, the actual president M.

    0
    0
  • If by a two-thirds majority the action of a minister be arraigned, the president of the Imperial Council lays the case before the emperor, who decides.

    0
    0
  • In the complimentary speeches delivered by the president of the French Republic and the tsar, France and Russia were referred to as allies, and the term " nations alliees " was afterwards repeatedly used on occasions of a similar kind.

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  • The " Cadets " refused to accept this action and, in imitation of the famous meeting in the tennis-court at Versailles, adjourned to Vyborg in Finland, where, under the ex- The president of the Duma, M.

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    0
  • Golovin, was elected president of the House.

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    0
  • Its president, M.

    0
    0
  • Indian affairs, the committee on foreign relations and others, was prominent in the discussion of matters brought before the Senate from these committees, advocated the enlargement of the navy and the reform of the civil service, and opposed the pension veto messages of President Cleveland.

    0
    0
  • Among the measures and events distinguishing his term as president were the following: The meeting of the Pan-American Congress at Washington; the passage of the McKinley Tariff Bill and of the Sherman Silver Bill of 1890; the suppressing of the Louisiana Lottery; the enlargement of the navy; further advance in civil service reform; the convocation by the United States of an international monetary conference; the establishment of commercial reciprocity with many countries of America and Europe; the peaceful settlement of a controversy with Chile; the negotiation of a Hawaiian Annexation Treaty, which, however, before its ratification, his successor withdrew from the Senate; the settlement of difficulties with Germany concerning the Samoan Islands, and the adjustment by arbitration with Great Britain of the Bering Sea fur-seal question.

    0
    0
  • President Harrison was twice married; in 1853 to Miss Caroline Lavinia Scott, by whom he had a son and a daughter, and in 1896 to Mrs Mary Scott Lord Dimmock, by whom he had a daughter.

    0
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  • A conference between the three powers was thereupon held at Berlin, and a treaty was executed by those powers and by Samoa, on the 14th of June 1889, by virtue of which the independence and autonomy of the islands were guaranteed, Malietoa was restored as king, and the three powers constituted themselves practically a protectorate over Samoa, and provided a chief justice and a president of the municipality of Apia, to be appointed by them, to aid in carrying out the provisions of the treaty.

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  • in 1897, and acted as president of the British Association in 1903-1904.

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  • to be president of the council for Italian affairs.

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    0
  • On the 31st of October President Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring Nevada a state.

    0
    0
  • He was mayor of Northampton, 1910 - TI, and sat in the state Senate from 1912 to 1915, being its president during his last year.

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    0
  • At the Republican National Convention in 1920 he received a few votes on all ten ballots for president.

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    0
  • In the chamber he was president of the group of the left centre, standing strongly for the republic but against anti-clericalism.

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    0
  • In February 1898 Sampson, then a captain, was president of Board of Inquiry as to the cause of destruction of the "Maine."

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT (1857-), the twenty-seventh President of the United States, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 15th of September 1857.

    0
    0
  • He served as judge of the Superior Court (1865-72), as secretary of war (1876) and as attorneygeneral of the United States (1876-77) in President Grant's cabinet; and as minister to Austria-Hungary (1882-84) and to Russia (1884-85) .

    0
    0
  • He was elected by the people in the next year and served until 1800, when he was appointed solicitor-general of the United States by President Benjamin Harrison.

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    0
  • Debs, president of the American Railwa y Union, sent one Frank W.

    0
    0
  • A movement to elect Mr Taft president of Yale University gained some strength in 1898-99, but was promptly checked by him, on the ground that the head of a great university should be primarily an educationalist.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 he was asked by President McKinley to accept the presidency of the Philippine Commission charged with the administration of the islands.

    0
    0
  • Yielding, however, to the urgent request of the president and his cabinet, he accepted and served from the 13th of March 1900 to the 1st of February 1904.

    0
    0
  • Mr Taft gained great influence among the more conservative Filipinos, and their entreaties to him to remain influenced him to decline the offer of a place upon the Supreme bench offered by President Roosevelt in 1902.

    0
    0
  • With the approach of the presidential election of 1908, President Roosevelt reiterated his pledge not to accept another nomination, and threw his immense influence in favour of Mr Taft.

    0
    0
  • The final Payne-Aldrich Act was approved by the President on the 5th of August 1909, though in many respects it was not the measure he desired.

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    0
  • The wish to meet people of the different sections of the country and to explain his position upon the questions of the day led the President to begin (14th September 1909), a tour which included the Pacific coast, the South-west, the Mississippi Valley and the South Atlantic states, and during which he travelled 13,000 miles and made 266 speeches.

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    0
  • He was made president of the council in February 1660, and in the Convention Parliament sat for Carmarthen borough.

    0
    0
  • He was twice president of the London Chemical Society, in 1863-1865, and again in 1869-1871.

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    0
  • He was secretary of the navy in President Tyler's cabinet (1844-1845), and was attorney-general (1845-1846) and secretary of the navy (1846-1849), succeeding George Bancroft, under President Polk.

    0
    0
  • He was president of the Virginia constitutional convention of 1851, and from 1853 until his death at Paris on the 3rd of October 1859, was United States minister to France.

    0
    0
  • He became president of a consumers' food council in Dec. 1917, so that the office might keep in regular touch with the needs of the public. When Lord Rhondda died, in June 1918, he succeeded him to the general satisfaction.

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    0
  • He supported the Reform party steadily by his vote, and in 1830 was made president of the Board of Trade and master of the Mint.

    0
    0
  • What gave Bennigsen his importance not only in Hanover, but throughout the whole of Germany, was the foundation of the National Verein, which was due to him, and of which he was president.

    0
    0
  • For the next thirty years he was president of the party, and was the most influential of the parliamentary leaders.

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    0
  • At the close of the war he was appointed by President Johnson secretary of Montana Territory, and there, in the absence of the territorial governor, he acted as governor from September 1866 until his death from accidental drowning in the Missouri River near Fort Benton, Montana, on the 1st of July 1867.

    0
    0
  • In 58 431844 he was president of the council of ministers, and he subsequently held the post of ambassador at Constantinople from 1850 to 1854.

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    0
  • He was also the author of many papers on general statistics and on life-tables for insurance, some read before the Royal Statistical Society, of which he was president in 1871 and 1872, some contributed to the Lancet and other periodicals.

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    0
  • Questions received from various quarters were discussed and the final decision of the Kallah was signed by the Resh-Kallah or president of the general assembly, who was only second in rank to the Resh-Metibta, or president of the scholastic sessions.

    0
    0
  • In addition to his political activity, he was president of the literary section of the Hungarian Academy, and director of the National.

    0
    0
  • After the departure of the Greek troops the Cretan leaders, who had hitherto demanded annexation to Greece, readily acquiesced in the decision of the powers, and the insurgent Assembly, under its president Dr Sphakianakis, a man of good sense and moderation, co-operated with the international commanders in the maintenance of order.

    0
    0
  • When Mr. Asquith formed the first Coalition Ministry in 1915, he included Mr. Henderson in the Cabinet as President of the Board of Education, and also adviser of the Government on Labour questions arising out of the World War.

    0
    0
  • In 1920 Mr. Hoover was mentioned as a possible candidate for president.

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    0
  • In March he entered the Cabinet of President Harding as Secretary of Commerce, stipulating that he be allowed to carry out his European relief work, already begun.

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    0
  • His speculations in gold, during which he attempted through President Grant's brother-in-law, A.

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    0
  • 1864), was prominent also as an owner and manager of railways, and became president of the Little Rock & Fort Smith railway (1888), the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern railway (1893), the International & Great Northern railway (1893), the Missouri Pacific railway (1893), the Texas & Pacific railway (1893), and the Manhattan Railway Company (1892); he was also vice-president and director of the Western Union Telegraph Company.

    0
    0
  • The state subscribed $5,000,000, which was raised on bonds sold to Nicholas Biddle, president of the United States Bank of Pennsylvania.

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    0
  • In 1865 President Johnson appointed as provisional governor William Lewis Sharkey (1797-1873), who had been chief justice of the state in 1832-1850, and a convention which assembled on the 14th of August recognized the "destruction" of slavery and declared the ordinance of secession null and void.

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  • ..1854-1857William McWillie1857-1859John Jones Pettus1859-18634 Under the constitution of 1832 the president of the senate succeeded the governor in case of a vacancy.

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    0
  • On the 4th of November the term for which Guion had been elected as a senator expired and he was succeeded in the governorship by Whitfield, elected by the senate to be its president.

    0
    0
  • Liberal support was given to the Confederacy, both in men and supplies, but Governor Vance, one of the ablest of the Southern war governors, engaged in acrimonious controversies with President Jefferson Davis, contending that the general government of the Confederacy was encroaching upon the prerogatives of the separate states.

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  • John Jenkins, president of the council .

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    0
  • Thomas Miller, president of the council.

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    0
  • John Harvey, president of the council.

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    0
  • Henderson Walker, president of the council .

    0
    0
  • William Glover, president of the council .

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    0
  • Thomas Carey contestants (Carey's rebellion) William Glover Edward Hyde, deputy-governor Thomas Pollock, president of the council.

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    0
  • Thomas Pollock, president of the council William Reid, president of the council.

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    0
  • George Burrington Edward Mosely, president of the council.

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    0
  • Nathaniel Rice, president of the council .

    0
    0
  • Nathaniel Rice, president of the council.

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    0
  • Matthew Rowan, president of the council Arthur Dobbs .

    0
    0
  • William Tryon James Hasell, president of the council Josiah Martin.

    0
    0
  • Either Everard held over or the president of the council was acting-governor from 1729-1731.

    0
    0
  • In 1921 he entered the Cabinet of President Harding as Secretary of War.

    0
    0
  • In 1861 he was a member of the Texas secession convention, served in the Confederate provisional Congress, and on the 6th of March was appointed postmaster-general in President Davis's cabinet.

    0
    0
  • From 1899 until his death he was president of the Texas State Historical Association.

    0
    0
  • He was a Whig member of the United States senate in 1831-1837, and as such took a prominent part in the legislative struggle over the United States Bank, whose rechartering he favoured and which he resolutely defended against President Jackson's attack, opposing in able speeches the withdrawal of deposits and Secretary Woodbury's " Specie Circular of 1836.

    0
    0
  • In March 1841 he became secretary of the treasury in President W.

    0
    0
  • When, however, after President Tyler's accession, the relations between the President and the Whig Party became strained, he retired (September 1841) and was succeeded by Walter Forward (1786-1852).

    0
    0
  • Subsequently from March 1849 to July 1850 he was a member of President Taylor's cabinet as the first secretary of the newly established department of the interior.

    0
    0
  • He was subsequently a delegate to the Peace Congress in 1861, and was a loyal supporter of President Lincoln's war policy.

    0
    0
  • Among the public offices held by the earl were those of lordlieutenant of Aberdeenshire, president of the society of Antiquaries from 1812 to 1846 and fellow of the Royal Society.

    0
    0
  • 1919, Stamboliiski became President of the Council and Minister for Foreign Affairs; on Nov.

    0
    0
  • In 1815, when the Dartmouth board of trustees was rent by factions, the majority, who were Federalists and Congregationalists, removed the president, John Wheelock, who was a Presbyterian, and appointed Francis Brown in his place.

    0
    0
  • President Jackson responded with a proclamation denying the right of nullification, and asked Congress for authority to collect the revenue in South Carolina by force if necessary.

    0
    0
  • President Harrison appointed Webster secretary of state but died one month after taking office.

    0
    0
  • He refused, for a time, to be driven, but because of their continued attacks, together with his ambition to become president, and because Tyler favoured the annexation of Texas while he was opposed to it, he resigned in May 1843.

    0
    0
  • In July 1859 Webster again became secretary of state, in the cabinet of President Fillmore.

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    0
  • In 1690 he became president of the bailliage of Rouen, a post which he retained almost until his death, leaving it to his son.

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    0
  • In 1849 he acted as president of the British Association and was elected one of the eight foreign associates of the Institute of France in succession to J.

    0
    0
  • Trointsky, president of the Russian Census Committee for 1897.

    0
    0
  • He published his Avis sur l'assiette et la repartition de la taille (1762-1770), and as president of the Societe d'agriculture de Limoges offered prizes for essays on the principles of taxation.

    0
    0
  • The Executive Mansion of the Confederate States of America, built in 1819, purchased by the city in 1862, and leased to the Confederate government and occupied by President Jefferson Davis in 1862-65, was acquired in 1890 by the Confederate Memorial Library Society, and is now a Confederate Museum with a room for each state of the Confederacy and a general library in the " Solid South " room; it has valuable historical papers, collected by the Southern Historical Society, and the society has published a Calendar of Confederate Papers (1908).

    0
    0
  • The approach of the " Monitor " and the Union gunboats up the James river caused a partial and temporary panic; President Davis appointed a day for prayer, and the families of some of the cabinet secretaries and many citizens fled the city precipitately; but confidence, restored by " Bacon's Rebellion," was auditor-general of the colony from 1687 until his death, and was a member of the committee which founded the College of William and Mary.

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  • grouped mainly round President Square.

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    0
  • 1848) stands in the principal square, and a monument to President Carnot was erected in 1895.

    0
    0
  • The town is a fashionable summer resort, and during the season the president of the Republic frequently resides in the palace.

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    0
  • In addition, quaternions was one of the themes of his address as president of the mathematical section of the British Association in 1871.

    0
    0
  • The 5th duke was lord privy seal 1842-1846, and president of the council 1846.

    0
    0
  • He was president of the Highland and Agricultural Society, the Society of Antiquaries and of the British Association.

    0
    0
  • The situation was saved solely by the skill of his brother Lucien, then president of the Council.

    0
    0
  • It soon appeared that the real aim of the meeting was to make Bonaparte president.

    0
    0
  • The words rang hollow, as was seen when, on the 3rd of June, the deputies chose, as president of their chamber, Lanjuinais, the staunch liberal who had so often opposed the emperor.

    0
    0
  • On the 25th of June he received from Fouche, the president of the newly appointed provisional government, an intimation that he must leave Paris.

    0
    0
  • In June 17 51 he became president of the council, and was still liked and trusted by the king, but his share in government did not go beyond giving advice, and endeavouring to forward ministerial arrangements.

    0
    0
  • Granville remained in office as president till his death.

    0
    0
  • It was named in honour of President Monroe and was first regularly garrisoned in 1823; in 1824 the Artillery School of Practice (now called the United States Coast Artillery School) was established to provide commissioned officers of the Coast Artillery with instruction in professional work and to give technical instruction to the non-commissioned staff.

    0
    0
  • Throughout the war, too, he was so intensely concerned about states' rights and civil liberty that he opposed the exercise of extra-constitutional war powers by President Jefferson Davis lest the freedom for which the South was fighting should be destroyed.

    0
    0
  • JOHN ADAMS (1735-1826), second president of the United States of America, was born on the 30th of October 1735 in what is now the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.

    0
    0
  • These qualities were particularly manifested at a later period - as, for example, during his term as president.

    0
    0
  • In 1796, on the refusal of Washington to accept another election, Adams was chosen president, defeating Thomas Jefferson; though Alexander Hamilton and other Federalists had asked that an equal vote should be cast for Adams and Thomas Pinckney, the other Federalist in the contest, partly in order that Jefferson, who was elected vice-president, might be excluded altogether, and partly, it seems, in the hope that Pinckney should in fact receive more votes than Adams, and thus, in accordance with the system then obtaining, be elected president, though he was intended for the second place on the Federalist ticket.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, factional strife broke out within the party itself; Adams and Hamilton became alienated, and members of Adams's own cabinet virtually looked to Hamilton rather than to the president as their political chief.

    0
    0
  • President John Quincy Adams was their eldest son.

    0
    0
  • If he die in office, resign or be impeached, the officers standing next in succession are the lieutenant-governor, the president of the Senate, and the speaker of the House of Representatives in the order named.

    0
    0
  • A municipal civil service commission of three members (holding office for three years) is chosen by the president of the board of education, the president of the city council, and the president of the board of sinking fund commissioners; the pay (if any) of these commissioners is set by each city.

    0
    0
  • Dissatisfaction with the President's emancipation programme resulted in the election of a Democratic Congressional delegation in 1862, but the tide turned again after Gettysburg and Vicksburg; Clement L.

    0
    0
  • from Brussels, where in spite of the great efforts of the English merchants and the appeal of Thomas Cromwell to Archbishop Carandolet, president of the council, and to the governor of the castle, he was tried for heresy and condemned.

    0
    0
  • He refused calls to churches in Dublin and Rotterdam, and in 1766 declined an invitation brought him by Richard Stockton to go to America as president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); but he accepted a second invitation and left Paisley in May 1768.

    0
    0
  • His close relation with the Scotch Church secured important material assistance for the college of which he now became president, and he toured New England to collect contributions.

    0
    0
  • His collected works, with a memoir by his son-in-law, Samuel Stanhope Smith (who succeeded him as president of the college), were edited by Dr Ashbel Green (New York, 1801-1802).

    0
    0
  • ELISHA KENT KANE (1820-1857), American scientist and explorer, was born in Philadelphia on the 10th of February 1820, the son of the jurist John Kintzing Kane (1795-1858), a friend and supporter of Andrew Jackson, attorney-general of Pennsylvania in 1845-1846, U.S. judge of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania after 1846, and president of the American Philosophical Society in 1856-1858.

    0
    0
  • The government was vested in the council (1 30uXii) and people (8rl/20s), and administered by civil officers with Greek titles, the proedros (president), the grammateus (secretary), the archons, syndics and dekaprotoi (a fiscal council of ten), following the model of a Greek municipality under the Roman Empire.

    0
    0
  • In June 1906 he was preferred to a canonry at Westminster, and when in December he resigned the wardenship of Toynbee Hall the position of president was created so that he might retain his connexion with the institution.

    0
    0
  • The president of the order, whose office was elective and who enjoyed the dignity for life, had supreme authority among them.

    0
    0
  • "WARREN GAMALIEL HARDING (1865-), 29th President of the United States, was born at Corsica (then Blooming Grove), Morrow co., Ohio, Nov.

    0
    0
  • In the campaign of 191 2 his paper supported President Taft.

    0
    0
  • He voted for the Lodge reservations and also for the Reed reservation that the United States alone should judge whether matters of direct interest to it should be brought before the League; and finally he voted against ratification of the Treaty as submitted by President Wilson.

    0
    0
  • At the Republican National Convention in 1920 he was not at first among the prominent candidates for president.

    0
    0
  • On the eighth ballot he received 1331 votes, on the ninth 3742 votes, and on the tenth he secured the nomination with 6922 votes, the result being due largely to the support of certain influential U.S. Senators, delegates to the convention, who hoped that as president he would be amenable to the Senate.

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  • The sweeping character of his victory was due less to his own personal strength or to the weakness of Cox than to the national reaction against the Democratic party and the popular feeling against President Wilson.

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  • Mr. Harding resigned from the U.S. Senate in Dec. 1920, and was inaugurated March 4 1921, the sixth President to come from Ohio.

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  • Various elements in the Republican party, nevertheless, had stoutly opposed their appointment, so that the President's choice showed that he was prepared to exert his independence of party managers and to insist upon administrative efficiency.

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  • President Harding's first budget was presented Dec. 5 1921.

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  • The President was insistent upon the need of repealing the excess profits taxes and reducing transportation taxes and income surtaxes.

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  • As regards the tariff he advocated, as a temporary stop-gap, the passing of the emergency tariff, which had been vetoed by President Wilson, but which with slight alteration was approved by Mr. Harding on May 27 1921.

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  • As regards domestic legislation, the President, in general, assumed the role of moderator.

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  • The President, however, frequently played an active role in the conferences necessary to secure general agreement, as on Aug.

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  • President Harding made plain in his first message that the United States would not enter the League of Nations.

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  • 25 1921, a treaty with Germany was signed, embodying the President's plan of including most of the stipulations of the Versailles Treaty, but repudiating adherence by the United States to any clause referring to the League of Nations.

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  • The most important step taken by President Harding during the first year of his administration was the calling of an international conference on the limitation of armaments.

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  • On May 25 1921 the Senate had adopted an amendment of Senator Borah to the Navy bill, authorizing and inviting the President to call such a conference.

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  • President Harding avoided the example set by his predecessor, and did not himself participate as a delegate.

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  • The policy drafted by the President and Mr. Hughes was direct and vigorous.

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  • The President made it clear that he regarded the conference merely as a step in securing international understanding and good will; he advocated the convening of succeeding conferences as a possible means of securing an international association for the promotion of peace, and he approved the principle of substituting an understanding between the United States, Great Britain, France and Japan regarding Far-Eastern problems, for the existing Anglo-Japanese Treaty.

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  • Despite his youth he was made stadtholder of those two provinces and president of the council of state.

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  • He was a strong Lutheran and exercised a powerful influence in that direction as court preacher in Dresden and as president of the Protestant consistory at Munich.

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  • The estates of the county had the bishop of Cahors for president; other members were the bishop of Montauban and other ecclesiastics, four viscounts, four barons and some other lords and representatives of eighteen towns.

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  • In 1851 he was elected president of the chamber, and In the same year minister of justice, being the first Catholic who had held so high an office in Hanover.

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  • On the 27th of October President James Madison, acting on a theory of Robert R.

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  • In 1865 a provisional governor was appointed by President Andrew Johnson, and a new state government was organized.

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  • He was a member of the lower house of the Ohio legislature in 1821, 1822 and 1829, and of the national House of Representatives from 1831 to 1840; was governor of Ohio in 1840-1842; served in the United States Senate from 1845 to 1850; was secretary of the treasury in the cabinet of President Fillmore in 1850-1853; was again a member of the national House of Representatives from 1859 to 1861; and from 1861 to 1864 was minister of the United States to Mexico - a position of peculiar difficulty at that time.

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  • When the president's address had been duly applauded, there followed the singing of hymns ancient and modern.

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  • In the course of the year 1795, as president of the Committee of Public Safety, and as responsible especially for foreign affairs, he was largely instrumental in bringing about peace with Spain.

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  • PETER DENS (1690-1775), Belgian Roman Catholic theologian, was born at Boom near Antwerp. Most of his life was spent in the archiepiscopal college of Malines, where he was for twelve years reader in theology and for forty president.

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  • When, after this contest, Jefferson became president (1801), there were two men whose commanding abilities marked them for the first places in the cabinet.

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  • Taking up his residence in New York, he was in 1832-1839 president of the National Bank (afterwards the Gallatin Bank) of New York, but his duties were light, and he devoted himself chiefly to the congenial pursuits of science and literature.

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  • A former member of the board, Asa Mahan (1800-1889), who had strongly disapproved of the action of the trustees, came to Oberlin, and became the first president of the college.

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  • The modern theological position of Oberlin college is reflected in the writings of President King and of Dean Edward I.

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  • 1861) of the Theological Seminary, especially in President King's Reconstruction in Theology (1901); Theology and the Social Consciousness (1902); The Seeming Unreality of the Spiritual Life (1908) and The Laws of Friendship - Human and Divine (1909).

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  • For an international commission of lawyers he prepared Draft Outlines of an International Code (1872), the submission of which resulted in the organization of the international Association for the Reform and Codification of the Laws of Nations, of which he became president.

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  • Its last act in national politics was to nominate William Henry Harrison for president and John Tyler for vice-president at a convention in Philadelphia in November 1838.

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  • JOSE ANTONIO PAEZ (1790-1873), Venezuelan president, was born of Indian parents near Acarigua in the province of Barinas on the 13th of June 1790.

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  • He was again president in 1839-1843, and dictator in 1846; but soon afterwards headed a revolution against his successor and was thrown into prison.

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  • Gowen (1836-1889), president of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, sent James McParlan, an Irish Catholic and a Pinkerton detective (who some thirty years later attracted attention in the investigation of the assassination of Governor Steunenberg of Idaho), to the mining region in 1873; he joined the order, lived among the "Molly Maguires" for more than two years, and even became secretary of the Shenandoah division, one of the most notoriously criminal lodges of the order.

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  • The governor is appointed by the president of the United States with the advice and consent of the Senate for a term of four years, and associated with the governor is an executive council consisting of the secretary, treasurer, auditor, attorney-general, commissioner of the interior, commissioner of education, and five other members, all appointed in the same manner and for the same term as the governor.

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  • Railway, street railway, telegraph and telephone franchises can be granted only by the Executive Council with the approval of the governor, and none can be operative until it has been approved by the President of the United States.

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  • The judge of the United States district court and the chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court are appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate, and the judges of the district courts by the governor with the consent of the Executive Council.

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  • The following year he was elected president of Marshall College, West Virginia, and one year later was admitted to the bar.

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  • His son, Galactoire, who was president of the parlement of Navarre, died on the 10th of February 1689.

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  • An appointive board of public service consists of a president and four directors of divisions, public welfare, public safety, public utilities, and streets and sewers.

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  • The president of the board has charge of public work and improvements.

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  • Among them were President William Henry Harrison, William H.

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  • Cabell (1772-1853), president of the Virginia Court of Appeals; George M.

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  • Bibb (1772-1859), secretary of the treasury (1844-1845) in President Tyler's cabinet; William B.

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  • After the Jameson raid and the Emperor's telegram to President Kruger, in the drafting of which Baron Marschall, according to the later testimony now available, bore a leading part, it was he who declared in the Reichstag that the maintenance of the independence of the Boer republics was a " German interest."

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  • 1855), a prominent political leader, secretary of the interior in President Cleveland's cabinet in 1893-1896, and later governor of Georgia, was long the proprietor; and the Georgian (evening), founded in 1906 as a Prohibition organ.

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  • In 1819 the place was renamed Monroe, in honour of President James Monroe, and in the following year the town was incorporated.

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  • Most of the measures were rejected and the whole plan seemed likely to fail, when the situation was changed by the death of President Taylor and the accession of Millard Fillmore on the 9th of July 1850.

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  • Under a tacit understanding of the moderates to vote together, five separate bills were passed, and were signed by the president between 9th and 10th September 1850.

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  • He maintained his liberal and independent attitude in the Conseil des Anciens, the Senate and the Chamber of Peers, being president of the upper house during the Hundred Days.

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  • In 1886 he was made under secretary for foreign affairs; in 1892 he joined the cabinet as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster; in 1894 he was president of the Board of Trade, and acted as chairman of the royal commission on secondary education; and in Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (1905) he was made chief secretary for Ireland; but in February 1907 he was appointed British ambassador at Washington, and took leave of party politics, his last political act being a speech outlining what was then the government scheme for university reform in Dublin - a scheme which was promptly discarded by his successor Mr Birrell.

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  • In earlier life he was a notable mountain-climber, ascending Mount Ararat in 1876, and publishing a volume on Transcaucasia and Ararat in 1877; in1899-1901he was president of the Alpine Club.

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  • He specially devoted himself to finance, being for a short time president of the customs commission before his appointment as minister of agriculture and commerce in March 1879 in the Waddington cabinet.

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  • When Carnot became president of the Republic in 1887 he asked Tirard to form a ministry.

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  • He had to deal with the Wilson scandal which had led to President Grevy's downfall, and with the revisionist agitation of General Boulanger.

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  • Another, Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), who was, with one interval, a member of parliament from 1780 to 1818, and for a few months during 1806 and 1807 president of the board of control and first lord of the admiralty, is perhaps more famous as a book-collector than as a statesman; he bequeathed his large and valuable library to the British Museum.

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  • In 1881 he organized and became president of Bliss, Fabyan & Company, one of the largest wholesale dry-goods houses in the country.

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  • A consistent advocate of the protective tariff, he was one of the organizers, and for many years president, of the American Protective Tariff League.

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  • He was treasurer of the Republican national committee from 1892 to 1904, and was secretary of the interior in President McKinley's cabinet from 1897 to 1899.

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  • FRANCOIS FELIX FAURE (1841-1899), President of the French Republic, was born in Paris on the 30th of January 1841, being the son of a small furniture maker.

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  • In the January following he was unexpectedly elected president of the Republic upon the resignation of M.

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  • With all his faults, and in spite of no slight amount of personal vanity, President Faure was a shrewd political observer and a good man of business.

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  • Maillard, Le President F.

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  • Shirley, who, after acting as its chairman for many years, was elected the president, and occupied that position until his death in March 1904.

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  • A secretary or " clerk," as he is called, acts as chairman or president; there are no formal resolutions; and there is no voting or applause.

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  • He served as a Free Soiler in the Massachusetts house of representatives from 1849 to 1853, and was speaker in 1851 and 1852; he was president of the state Constitutional Convention of 1853, and in the same year was elected to the national House of Representatives as a coalition candidate of Democrats and Free Soilers.

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  • McClellan as president of the Illinois Central railway.

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  • A personal quarrel with President Grant led in 1872, however, to his joining the Liberal-Republican revolt in supportof Horace Greeley, and as the Liberal-Republican and Democratic candidate he was defeated for re-election.

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  • See eulogy by his friend Dr David Hosack (Essays, i., New York, 1824), with biographical details taken from a letter of Rush to President John Adams; also references in the works of Thacker, Gross and Bowditch on the history of medicine in America.

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  • Perouse, Le Cardinal Louis Aleman, president du concile de Bole (Paris, 1904).

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  • The president was Condorcet, and amongst the members were the duc de la Rochefoucault, the Abbe Gregoire, Brissot, Claviere, Petion and La Fayette; Mirabeau was an active sympathizer.

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  • The election of Abraham Lincoln as president in November 1860 was the signal for the rising of the South.

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  • Immediately after her return the princess was appointed "directeur" of the St Petersburg Academy of Arts and Sciences; and in 1784 she was named the first president of the Russian Academy, which had been founded at her suggestion.

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  • He named one hundred preachers who after his death were to meet once a year, fill up vacancies in their number, appoint a president and secretary, station the preachers, admit proper persons into the ministry, and take general oversight of the societies.

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  • SAMUEL FINLEY BREESE MORSE (1791-1872), American artist and inventor, was born at Charlestown, Massachusetts, on the 27th of April 1791, son of Jedidiah Morse (1761-1826), Congregational minister there and a writer on geography, and a grandson of Samuel Finley, president of the college of New Jersey.

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  • In 1825 he was one of the founders of the National Academy of Design, and was its first president, from 1826 until 1845.

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  • A considerable portion of the abbey was employed for the erection of the king's manor, a palace for the lord president of the north, now occupied as a school for the blind.

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  • Meanwhile he served, with conspicuous ailbity, in the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1827 to 1833 and in the Massachusetts Senate from 1833 to 1837, for the last two years as president.

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  • From 1853 until his death, on the second of August 1859, he was president of the newly established Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he taught political economy, intellectual and moral philosophy, and natural theology.

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  • 1 President VanHise (b.

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  • At the revolution of 1848 Dupont de l'Eure was made president of the provisional assembly as being its oldest member.

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  • Sir Alfred Milner reached the Cape in May 1897, and after the difficulties with President Kruger over the Aliens' Law had been patched up he was free by August to make himself personally acquainted with the country and peoples before deciding on the lines of policy to be adopted.

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  • Hofmeyr a conference was held (May 31 - June 5) at Bloemfontein between the high commissioner and the president of the Transvaal.

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  • As early as December 1862 the Union military government, at President Lincoln's direction, had ordered elections for Congress, and the men chosen were admitted in February 1863.

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  • In March 1864 also a state government to supersede the military rule was established under the president's auspices.

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  • But in 1864 the opposition of Congress to presidential reconstruction had clearly developed, so that the electoral votes of Louisiana (like those of Tennessee) for president were not counted.

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  • This incident raised the crucial question of national politics in 1866: namely, whether the states reconstructed by the president should not again be reconstructed.

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  • Civil war being threatened within the state President Hayes sent to Louisiana a commission composed of Wayne McVeagh, Gen.

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  • The president ordered the withdrawal of Federal troops from the capitol on the 20th of April 1877, and the white party was thus left in control.

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  • Thiers, who was then president of the Republic, persuaded them to reconsider this decision.

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  • The president of the Republic, who is elected for four years by an electoral college, and cannot hold office for more than two successive terms, has a cabinet whose members he may appoint and remove freely, their number being determined by law.

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  • The senate is the court of trial for the president, officers of the cabinet, and provincial governors when accused of political offences.

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  • It also acts jointly with the president in political appointments and treaty making.

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  • The house of representatives, whose members are chosen directly by the citizens for four years, one-half retiring every two years, has the special power of impeaching the president and cabinet officers.

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  • Its powers are extensive, including, in addition to ordinary legislative powers, control of financial affairs, foreign affairs, the power to declare war and approve treaties of peace, amnesties, electoral legislation for the provinces and municipalities, control of the electoral vote for president and vice-president, and designation of an acting president in case of the death or incapacity of these officers.

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  • Justice is administered by courts of various grades, with a supreme court at Havana as the head; the members of this being appointed by the president and senate.

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  • The president may interfere if necessary in the municipality as in the province; and so may the governor of the province.

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  • In 1801, when the audiencia - of which the captain-general was ex officio president - began its functions at that point, the governor of Santiago became subordinated in political matters as much as in military.

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  • The American people had sent food to the reconcentrados; President McKinley, while opposing recognition of the rebels, affirmed the possibility of intervention; Spain resented this attitude; and finally, in February 1898, the United States battleship " Maine " was blown up - by whom will probably never be known - in the harbour of Havana.

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  • Tomas Estrada Palma (1835-1908) became the first president of the Republic.

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  • After repeated petitions from President Palma for intervention by the United States, commissioners (William H.

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  • The president resigned (on the 28th of September), Congress dispersed without choosing a successor, and as an alternative to anarchy the United States was compelled to proclaim on the 29th of September 1906 a provisional government, - to last " long enough to restore order and peace and public confidence," and hold new elections.

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  • These laws strictly defined the powers of the president; more clearly separated the executive departments, so as to lessen friction and jealousies; reformed the courts; reformed administrative routine; and increased the strength of the provinces at the expense of the municipalities.

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