Preposition sentence example

preposition
  • The pattern is built around a number followed by a preposition.
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  • To control your balloon, use the correct preposition from the top to go forward and the correct preposition from the bottom to stop.
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  • If they are preceded by a preposition they also are referred to as prepositional phrases.
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  • The preposition pra was prefixed, and you get pramantha.
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  • Even the most fluent speakers and writers would probably confess to an occasional uncertainty as to the most appropriate preposition.
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  • "Now this verb, especially when compounded with the preposition pra, gained the signification to tear off, snatch to oneself, rob."
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  • What the grammarians called " tmesis," the separation of the preposition from the verb with which it is compounded, is peculiar to Homer.
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  • A prepositional phrase has a preposition and an object.
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  • Thus, since the Hebrew eth, which marks the accusative, is also the preposition " with," Deut.
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  • It is true that the preposition " to " O may denote authorship, as it does apparently in Isaiah xxxviii.
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  • dealings with men; (2) the insertion of the preposition " before " (c1p) when God is the object of any action; (3) the use of the passive for the active voice, e.g.
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  • In English th represents both the unvoiced sound J as in thin, &c., and the voiced sound 5, which is found initially only in pronominal words like this, that, there, then, those, is commonest medially as in father, bother, smother, either, and is found also finally in words like with (the preposition), both.
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  • adverbial particle - preposition.
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  • Mesopotamia seems to imply the view that beth is the preposition "amid," which has the same form,' but need not imply the meaning "between," that is, the idea that there were precisely two rivers.
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  • Syriac is not, like Arabic and Hebrew, confined to the use of the construct for the ordinary expression of the genitive or possessive relation: for it has a preposition (d) which expresses " of," " belonging to."
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  • The noun preceding this preposition may be in the emphatic state or may (as is usually the case when the noun is definite) have a pleonastic suffix.
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  • nnp for yii' or mtn; "p y'aw for ynr'; ' uni for -Inv, ras', in', tin; n'nn for i:i; (4) the use of periphrasis for the more pronounced anthropomorphisms, such as " to smell," " to taste," or when the use of the status constructus might seem to bring God into too close connexion with men or things; (5) the use of different expressions, or the insertion of a preposition before the divine name, when God is compared to man, or the same action is predicated of God and man; (6) the use of " for non' and n'n5rr, and the rendering R i ni or r;Iya when a'n (21.
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  • If the relative is the object of a preposition, the latter is put at the end of the clause, and has a personal ending, thus y ty y b12m ynddo, literally, " the house which I-was in-it."
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  • This notion has died out in England by the dropping of the preposition; but it long lived on wherever Latin or French was used.
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  • Only here in the Old Testament does it stand as a simple isolated noun; elsewhere it is the definition of a noun (in" everlasting covenant,"&c.), or it is preceded by a preposition, in the phrases" for ever," of old,"or it stands alone (sing.
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  • The true account of the matter is that in Homer the place of the preposition is not rigidly fixed, as it was afterwards.
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  • For instance, the well-known description (in chap. xlvii.) of the preposition " in " occurring in a theological dogma as a " momentous particle which the memory rather than the understanding must retain " is taken directly from the first Provincial Letter.
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  • The more important rules for initial mutation are the following: the soft mutation occurs in a feminine singular noun after the article, thus y fam, " the mother " (radical mam); in an adjective following a feminine singular noun, as in mam dda, " a good mother " (da, " good "); in a noun following a positive adjective, as in hen dd9n, " old man," because this order represents what was originally a compound; in a noun following dy, " thy," and ei, " his," thus dy ben," thy head," ei ben, " his head " (pen," head "); in the object after a verb; in a noun after a simple preposition; in a verb after the relative a.
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