How to use Preoccupation in a sentence

preoccupation
  • This preoccupation with him was becoming an obsession that was beginning to affect her ability to take care of the house.

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  • Weakness in artillery was Cadorna's main preoccupation for many days.

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  • But under the influence of Thomas Thomson (1773-1852), the professor of chemistry, he developed a taste for experimental science and especially for molecular physics, a subject which formed his main preoccupation throughout his life.

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  • Her cheeks flushed again and in her desperate search for something to explain her preoccupation, she plunged into the subject of the curtains.

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  • The main preoccupation of all these popes was how best to repair the injury done to orthodox Europe and to Rome by the destruction of the Latin Empire.

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  • The war, while it lasted, was of course the main preoccupation of British ministers and of the British people.

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  • This review, which owed much of its success to Waller's energy, defended the intense preoccupation of the new writers with questions of style, and became the depository of the Parnassian tradition in Belgium.

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  • A visit to the Rhine, where new interests and the attractions of Maximiliane von Laroche, a daughter of Wieland's friend, the novelist Sophie von Laroche, brought partial healing; his intense preoccupation with literary work on his return to Frankfort did the rest.

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  • Cadorna's main preoccupation was now for the IV.

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  • A preoccupation with comparing yourself to others can only be an unwanted distraction.

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  • He asked God to forgive our society's preoccupation with material gain.

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  • The whole of the writings of this time are dominated by a preoccupation with the functions of the different tissues, in itself an excellent standpoint for investigation, but frequently leading in the case of these early investigators to one-sided and distorted views of the facts of structure.

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  • But his preoccupation about Corsica, the privations to which he and his family were then exposed, and his bad health, left him little energy to expend on purely French affairs.

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  • A more instructive subdivision must be one which corresponds to the separate currents of thought and mental preoccupation which have been historically manifested in western Europe in the gradual evolution of what is to-day the great river of zoological doctrine to which they have all been rendered contributory.

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  • The comparative inactivity of Bayezid in the direction of Europe was partly due to preoccupation elsewhere.

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  • It was Machiavelli's intense preoccupation with this problem - what a state is and how to found one in existing circumstances - which caused the many riddles of his speculative writings.

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  • To them, under the name of Lares, it was the solemn preoccupation of male descendants to offer food and sacrifice and to keep alight the hearth fire which cooked the offerings.

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  • John to declare war upon Great Britain, but this demand was not immediately pressed owing to the preoccupation of Napoleon with greater affairs, and in October 1805 Junot left Portugal.

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  • Antigonus' preoccupation during the Celtic invasions, Sparta's prostration after the Chremonidean campaigns, the wealth amassed by Achaean adventurers abroad and the subsidies of Egypt, the standing foe of Macedonia, all enhanced the league's importance.

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  • With the preoccupation of the Government in the war, Kurdistan remained for the time being untouched and indifferent.

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  • Jacob's main preoccupation was the reform of monastic life, the grave disorders of which he deplored, and to this end he wrote his Petitiones religiosorum pro reformatione sui status.

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  • Thus is explained Francis I.s preoccupation with Italian adventures in.

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  • Rostov looked inimically at Pierre, first because Pierre appeared to his hussar eyes as a rich civilian, the husband of a beauty, and in a word--an old woman; and secondly because Pierre in his preoccupation and absent-mindedness had not recognized Rostov and had not responded to his greeting.

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  • The Emperor rode through the streets to comfort the inhabitants, and, despite his preoccupation with state affairs, himself visited the theaters that were established by his order.

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  • Another preoccupation of the Chinese was the evaluation of π ,the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.

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  • That Leo did not do more to check the tendency toward heresy and schism in Germany and Scandinavia is to be partially explained by the political complications of the time, and by his own preoccupation with schemes of papal and Medicean aggrandizement in Italy.

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  • The Ottoman Empire thus remained outside the European concert; Russia maintained her claim to a special right of isolated intervention in its affairs; and the renewal of war between Russia and Turkey was only postponed by the preoccupation of Alexander with his dream of the " Confederation of Europe."

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  • Alexander was also an idealist, but his ideals were apt to centre in himself; his dislike and distrust of talents that overshadowed his own were disarmed for a while by the singular charm of Speranski's personality, but sooner or later he was bound to discover that he himself was regarded as but the most potent instrument for the attainment of that ideal end, a regenerated Russia, which was his minister's sole preoccupation.

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  • In foreign affairs his chief preoccupation was the maintenance of peace, which was shared by Sir Robert Walpole, and therefore led to a continuance of the good understanding between France and England.

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  • For many years extinct representatives of the Hyracoidea were unknown, partly owing to the fact that certain fossils were not recognized as really belonging to that group. The longest known of these was originally named Leptodon graecus, but, on account of the preoccupation of the generic title, the designation has been changed to Pliohyrax graecus.

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  • If Alexander is responsible for such doctrines as that of the intellectus acquisitus, it is to Porphyry, with his characteristically Platonist preference for the doctrine of universals, and for classification, that we owe the scholastic preoccupation with the realist controversy, and with the quinque votes, i.e.

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  • The time which elapsed between the foundation and completion of the colleges may be attributed to Wykeham's preoccupation with politics in the disturbed state of affairs, due to the papal schism begun in 1379, in which England adhered to Urban VI.

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  • Viewed in this light Petrarch anticipated the Italian Renaissance in its weakness - that philosophical superficiality, that tendency to ornate rhetoric, that preoccupation with stylistic trifles, that want of profound conviction and stern sincerity, which stamp its minor literary products with the note of mediocrity.

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  • The exclusive preoccupation of men's minds with the question of knowledge during the neo-Kantian revival in the 'seventies of the last century drew from Lotze the caustic criticism that "the continual sharpening of the knife becomes tiresome, if, after all, we have nothing to cut with it."

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  • Moreover, Hincmar would not have cited the forged letters of the popes in 852; above all, this theory would not explain the chief preoccupation of the forger, which is to protect bishops against unjust judgments and depositions.

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  • It was an irrational thing, and pointless to allow her mind to linger on the reason for his preoccupation.

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  • Death is also a preoccupation of eighteenth century classicism.

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  • A modern-day superhero has to contend with America's obsession with winners and the UK's preoccupation with not appearing too cocky.

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  • Or I may have an irresistible (and fairly abstract) preoccupation with something very deep-rooted.

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  • Discuss the Chinese literati 's preoccupation with exclusivity in connoisseurship during the late Ming, illustrating your argument with writings of the period.

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  • This group exhibition brings together a diverse mix of artists, both in terms of personal geography and artistic preoccupation.

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  • Hence our obsessive preoccupation with them this part pulls us obsessive preoccupation with them this part pulls us obsessively, wanting to emerge from hiding.

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  • This conventional wisdom reflects an outdated preoccupation with the current account which ignores offsetting capital movements.

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  • Botany became a major preoccupation of Darwin's during the course of 1861.

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  • Her recent paintings show an increasing preoccupation with the changing character of the land in Britain.

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  • Refugee children may display a preoccupation with powerful elements of their experiences in their play.

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  • Hence our obsessive preoccupation with them this part pulls us obsessively, wanting to emerge from hiding.

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  • Bacon's overriding preoccupation was with what he liked to call " the brutality of fact " .

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  • There is an unhealthy preoccupation with that kind of thing and an almost absent concern about being with Christ, seeing Christ.

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  • A constant preoccupation of supply siders was the need for an active regional policy.

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  • Reasons for the weakness of the treaty have been sought in Chamberlain's excessive preoccupation with French security interests.

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  • His work at on form 04 also shows his preoccupation with the varying textures of stone.

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  • The preoccupation of the sultan with Ali gave their opportunity to the Greeks whose disaffection had long been organized in the great secret society of the Hetaeria Philike, against which Metternich had in vain warned the Ottoman government.

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  • This cultural preoccupation with personal salvation stymies collective reform, and places an onerous burden on the individual.

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  • Releasing some of your thoughts will relieve you of some of the preoccupation you may feel throughout your day.

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  • Alcohol addiction can be defined as a preoccupation with the consumption of alcoholic beverages.

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  • It becomes BDD when the preoccupation is time consuming and contributes to considerable disruption in important area of someone's life, such as work, school and relationships.

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  • The biggest clue is the time-consuming preoccupation with a part(s) of the body.

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  • Body dysmorphic disorder-A psychiatric disorder marked by preoccupation with an imagined physical defect.

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  • People with obsessive-compulsive disorder may have an intense preoccupation with order and symmetry or may be unable to throw anything out.

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  • People who are able to alter their thought patterns in this way can lessen their preoccupation with the compulsive rituals.

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  • Other behaviors can include preoccupation with parts of objects, hand or finger flapping, and rocking.

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  • Taurus's preoccupation with money is compulsory since this sun sign rules the second house of the zodiac wheel, which is the house of finances.

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  • Preoccupation with certain subjects paired with a dependency on routine can lead to significant social impairments.

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  • These children often do not adjust well to change, and they may present an often unrealistic need for routine or a preoccupation with items that could also lead to inappropriate behavior.

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  • Preoccupation and focus of limited interests can interfere with the Aspie's ability to connect socially.

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  • The Victorian preoccupation with Renaissance art revival also extended to the resurgence of folklore beliefs, and these included fairies.

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  • The evidences of this travel (which are really incontestable, though a small minority of critics still decline to admit them) consist of (1) some fine drawings, three of them dated 1494 and others undated, but plainly of the same time, in which Diirer has copied, or rather boldly translated into his own Gothic and German style, two famous engravings by Mantegna, a number of the "Tarocchi" prints of single figures which pass erroneously under that master's name, and one by yet another minor master of the North-Italian school; with another drawing dated 1495 and plainly copied from a lost original by Antonio Pollaiuolo, and yet another of an infant Christ copied in 1495 from Lorenzo di Credi, from whom also Diirer took a motive for the composition of one of his earliest Madonnas; (2) several landscape drawings done in the passes of Tirol and the Trentino, which technically will not fit in with any other period of his work, and furnish a clear record of his having crossed the Alps about this date; (3) two or three drawings of the costumes of Venetian courtesans, which he could not have made anywhere but in Venice itself, and one of which is used in his great woodcut Apocalypse series of 1498 (4) a general preoccupation which he shows for some years from this date with the problems of the female nude, treated in a manner for which Italy only could have set him the example; and (5) the clear implication contained in a letter written from Venice in 1506 that he had been there already eleven years before; when things, he says, pleased him much which at the time of writing please him no more.

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