Prelude sentence example

prelude
  • Obviously his remark was merely a prelude to a lecture.

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  • This song forms a prelude to the chapters that follow.

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  • The episode forms the prelude to family rivalries.

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  • On the other hand, Chronicles has a different story with a novel prelude.

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  • Many online games seem like a teaser and a prelude to get you to purchase a monthly subscription to feed your gaming frenzy.

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  • I currently live in Bexley, but would like to rent a houseboat as a prelude to buying one.

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  • The orchestral prelude begins with hushed strings presenting the ' Judgment ' theme.

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  • On Thursday, large numbers of American and British aircraft were destroying Iraqi air defenses as a prelude to ground incursions.

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  • That became the prelude to Pat Finucane's killing.

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  • Against Everton even that might prove the prelude to a riot.

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  • I like the G minor prelude and fugue, tho and few other bits and pieces.

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  • They declare that this constitution is the necessary prelude to full political union.

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  • All were silent, expectant of what was to follow, for this was clearly only a prelude.

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  • Ahh, but there was another fate destined for this rocky isle in the middle of bay, its previous history being just an inconsequential prelude.

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  • Cambon's proud and vehement reply was the signal of the resistance to Robespierre's tyranny and the prelude to his fall.

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  • It is true, nevertheless, that love as a prelude to marriage finds only a small place in Japanese ethics.

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  • I forms the prelude to Samuel's great victory and belongs to the history of Shiloh and the priesthood of Eli.

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  • As a prelude to exit and to pay off bank borrowings we decided to float on the Stock Exchange.

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  • Even if minority families agree to accept Arab nationality, their compliance is often only a prelude to further persecution.

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  • All too often, the time spent as a deacon is seen simply as the prelude to priestly ordination.

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  • This 5th century ' economic boom ' formed a prelude to the most remarkable phase of Byzantine history.

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  • We're going to use a prelude by Bach, who usually sounds quite good on electronic instruments.

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  • In late seventeenth-century London, life might truly be described as a mere prelude to death.

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  • The sudden, erratic swings of the pendulum during the 1990s were, therefore, the perfect prelude to the 2000 campaign.

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  • When reopening a callback window or code prelude window, it shows the previous contents of the window.

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  • The game starts in traditional Bond style, with a high action prelude except this time you're in control from the get-go.

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  • After resisting every attempt of the French court to draw him into the antiHabsburg league, Sobieski signed the famous treaty of alliance with the emperor Leopold against the Turks (March 31, 1683), which was the prelude to the most glorious episode of his life, the relief of Vienna and the liberation of Hungary from the Ottoman yoke.

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  • All along mathematics was regarded by Descartes rather as the envelope than the foundation of his method; and the " universal mathematical science " which he sought after was only the prelude of a universal science of all-embracing character.2 The method of Descartes rests upon the proposition that all the objects of our knowledge fall into series, of which the members are more or less known by means of one another.

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  • Consequently the efforts of Crispi and his envoy, Colonel Piano, to conclude a new treaty with Menelek in June 1894 not only proved unsuccessful, but formed a prelude to troubles on the Italo-Abyssinian frontier.

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  • Some vague recollection of known historical events (§ 3 end) might be claimed among the traditions ascribed to the closing centuries of the second millennium, but the view that the prelude to the monarchy was an era when individual leaders " judged " all Israel finds no support in the older narratives, where the heroes of the age (whose correct sequence is uncertain) enjoy only a local fame.

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  • Britain, it was true, acting on the initiative of George Canning, had seized the Danish fleet, thus forestalling an action which Napoleon certainly contemplated; but on the other hand Denmark now allied herself with him; and while in Lombardy he heard of the triumphant entry of his troops into Lisbon - an event which seemed to prelude his domination in the Iberian Peninsula and thereafter in the Mediterranean.

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  • Full closes and repeated sentences no longer confuse the issue, but in their absence we begin to notice the incessant squareness of the ostensibly free rhythms. The immense amount of pageantry, though (as in Tannhauser) good in dramatic motive and executed with splendid stage-craft, goes far to stultify Wagner's already vigorous attitude of protest against grand-opera methods; by way of preparation for the ethereally poetic end he gives us a disinfected present from Meyerbeer at the beginning of the last scene, where mounted trumpeters career round the stage in full blast for three long minutes; and the prelude to the third act is an outburst of sheer gratuitous vulgarity.

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  • Where the orchestra shows that Parsifal is becoming half-conscious of his quest while Kundry is beguiling him with memories of his mother, - and also during the two changes of scene to the Hall of the Grail, where the orchestra mingles the agony of Amfortas and the sorrow of the knights with the tolling of the great bells, - the polyphony is almost as dramatic as in Tristan; while the prelude and the Charfreitagszauber are among the clearest examples of the sublime since Beethoven.

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  • The theorems on the composition of forces in circular motion with which it concluded formed the true prelude to Newton's Principia, and would alone suffice to establish the claim of Huygens to the highest rank among mechanical inventors.

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  • But this belongs to a later scheme (see Samuel), and the introduction in its earlier form must have been the prelude to earlier narratives.'

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  • Most promise rings are worn on the left hand, particularly if they are a prelude to a more elaborate engagement ring.

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  • He appreciates romance as the prelude to passion and masterfully creates any romantic setting, be it a country picnic or an evening of fine dining.

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  • His reconquest of Babylon in 520 may, in particular, have seemed the prelude to the Messianic age (Wellhausen, Gesch., p. 161 n.).

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  • The only two points on which he departed from the orthodox Lutheran faith of his day were the requirement of regeneration as the sine qua non of the true theologian, and the expectation of the conversion of the Jews and the fall of Papacy as the prelude of the triumph of the church.

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  • With all these precautions the best seed time is often missed, and this usually proves the prelude to a scanty crop, or to a late and disastrous harvest.

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  • Astrolatry was, in Egypt, the prelude to astronomy.

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  • These are symptoms of the immediate prelude to quantum change.

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  • Beethoven's Nine Symphonies; Berlioz's " Symphonie fantastique," " Harold en Italie "; Benediction et Serment (Benvenuto Cellini); Danse des Sylphes (Damnation de Faust); Weber's overtures, Der Freischiitz, Euryanthe, Oberon, Jubilee; Beethoven's and Hummel's Septets; Schubert's Divertissement a la Hongroise; Beethoven's Concertos in C minor, G and E flat (orchestra for a second piano); Wagner's Tannhauser overture, march, romance, chorus of pilgrims; Lohengrin, Festzug and Brautlied, Elsa's Brautgang, Elsa's Traum, Lohengrin's Verweiss an Elsa; Fliegender Hollander, Spinnlied; Rienzi, Gebet; Rheingold, Walhall; Meistersinger, " Am stillen Herd "; Tristan, Isolde's Liebestod; Chopin's six Chants Polonais; Meyerbeer's Schillermarsch; Bach's six organ Preludes and Fugues; Prelude and Fugue in G minor; Beethoven, Adelaide; 6 miscellaneous and 6 Geistliche Lieder; Liederkreis; Rossini's Les Soirees musicales; Schubert, 59 songs; Schumann, 13 songs; Mendelssohn, 8 songs; Robert Franz, 13 songs.

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  • It was not worth while to master and economize the resources of this earth, to utilize the good and ameliorate the evils of this life, while every one agreed, in theory at any rate, that the present was but a bad prelude to an infinitely worse or infinitely better future.

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  • Sonya struck the first chord of the prelude.

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  • As a prelude to the match we went to Lodge Farm on Saturday to suss things out (see Stuart's match report).

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  • The first work using the twelve-tone method, the Prelude of the Piano Suite, Op.

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  • When the dog's internal organs begin to slow their functions in prelude to shutting down, the hunger impulse disappears completely.

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  • In the 1990s, couples began to exchange diamond promise rings as a direct prelude to engagement rings, and other types of rings have become fashionable to represent different oaths.

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  • Incidentally they are hastening the assimilation of the written and the spoken languages (genbun itchi) which may possibly prelude a still greater reform, abolition of the ideographic script.

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  • Before, however, dealing with the relations between the British and the Boers subsequent to 1881 brief reference may be made to affairs in which other powers were concerned; affairs which were the prelude to the era of expansion associated with the career of Cecil Rhodes.

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  • The Flemings, however, soon wearying of the oppressive administration of the French governor, Jacques de Chtillon, and the recrudescence of patrician domination, rose and overwhelmed the French chivalry at Courtrai (1302) a prelude to the coming disasters of the Hundred Years War.

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  • As a prelude to our work on manganite tunnel junctions we explored the role of strain and interfaces on the properties of the manganite tunnel junctions we explored the role of strain and interfaces on the properties of the manganites.

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  • Flirting can prelude seduction, but it does not have to be sexual or even romantic.

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  • Once before he had used that logic, and it had been a prelude to a fiasco.

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  • In the demand for the reinstatement of the dismissed ministers were found the means of humiliation, and the prelude to the dethronement, of the king.

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  • The critical investigation of these records is the indispensable prelude to all serious biblical study, and hasty or sweeping deductions from monumental or archaeological evidence, or versions compiled promiscuously from materials of distinct origin, are alike hazardous.

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  • The failure of the war, which intensified popular hatred of the Austrian queen, involved the king; and the invasion of the Tuileries on the 10th of June 1792 was but the prelude to the conspiracy which resulted, on the 10th of August, in the capture of the palace and the "suspension" of royalty by the Legislative Assembly until the convocation of a national convention in September.

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  • His emoluments as treasurer at war, together with his wife's fortune, provided him with ample means, which he lost by rash speculations, a circumstance regarded by his son as the prelude to his own good fortune; for had he been rich, he used to say, he might never have known mathematics.

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  • But there is no historical continuity between the two situations, and the immediate prelude to the achievements of Saul and Jonathan is lost.

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  • The events of 1775, though favourable to America, were but a prelude to the real struggle to come.

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  • This brilliant feat of arms was the prelude to peace negotiations, which led to a lengthy exchange of diplomatic notes.

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  • The two parts were separated by the Reichstag; the second, which was the necessary prelude to the other, was passed in 1883.

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  • Besides the Palingenesie, Ballanche wrote a poem on the siege at Lyons (unpublished); Du sentiment considers dans la littrature et dans les arts (i 80 i); Antigone, a prose poem (1814); Essai sur les institutions sociales (1818), intended as a prelude to his great work; Le Vieillard et le jeune homme, a philosophical dialogue (1819); L'Homme sans nom, a novel (1820).

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  • At the same time they are not treated as mere tales for children, for Livy never forgets the dignity that belongs to them as the prelude to the great epic of Rome, and as consecrated by the faith of generations.

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  • This was the first time that the voice of Demosthenes himself had been heard on the public concerns of Athens, and the utterance was a worthy prelude to the career of a statesman.

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  • Thus the book of Genesis represents the result of efforts to systematize the earliest history, and to make it a worthy prelude to the Mosaic legislation which formed the charter of Summary.

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  • The treaties of Blois occasioned a vast amount of diplomacy, and projects of marriage between Claude of France and Charles of Austria, which came to nothing but served as a prelude to the later quarrels between Bourbons and Habsburgs.

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  • The retractation imposed upon Cardinal de Noailles, and his replacement in the archbishopric of Paris by Vintimille, an unequivocal Molinist, excited among the populace a very violent agitation against the court of Rome and the Jesuits, the prelude to a united Fronde of the Sorbonne and the parlement.

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  • This change was a prelude to the more or less complete subjection of the papacy to French influence which took place in the following century at the period of the " Babylonish Captivity," the violent reaction personified by Boniface VIII.

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  • These simple elementary ideas were eminently capable of development and investigation, and were not only true but the prelude to further truth; while those they superseded defied inquiry by their vagueness and obscurity.

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  • Such a charge as prelude to the advance of a great infantry bayonet attack must have swept the exhausted Prussians down the hill like sheep, but the opportunity passed, and the gunners finding their position untenable, limbered up, not without severe losses, and retired to a second position in rear.

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  • The story of Vortigern and Rowena takes its final form in the Historia Britonum; and Merlin makes his first appearance in the prelude to the Arthur legend.

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  • At the end of 1588 he went to Padua, to take his degree in canon and civil law, a necessary prelude in Savoy at that time to distinction in a civil career.

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  • The important T Lents of 1617 and 1618 at Grenoble were a prelude to a still more important apostolate in Paris, "the theatre of the world," as St Vincent de Paul calls it.

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  • But this concession was illusory, and as the statute prevented Jews from engaging in finance - the only occupation which had been open to them - it was a prelude to their expulsion in 1290.

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  • The antinomies with which it concludes are more naturally taken as a prelude to the discussion of the Sophistes than as an unnecessary retreatment of the doctrine of the one and the many in a more negative form.

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  • Sonya was sitting at the clavichord, playing the prelude to Denisov's favorite barcarolle.

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  • As now, it was usually a prelude to lovemaking.

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  • This incident caused a considerable sensation, and was the prelude to a long crisis in Hungarian affairs, during which the emperor-king, while quick to repair the unfortunate impression produced by his momentary pique, held inflexibly to his resolve in the matter of the common army.

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  • The bloody tragedies which disfigured the end of his reign bear sad witness to this; they were a fit prelude to that period during the course of which, as Gregory of Tours said, barbarism was let loose.

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