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prejudices

prejudices Sentence Examples

  • There were prejudices in favor of genuine Communist politics.

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  • His whole life was spent in unlearning the prejudices in which he was educated.

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  • She cast away every regard for the feelings and prejudices of her people.

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  • The end ditch within the limits of the space is, according to Scottish laws, regarded as part of the green, a regulation which prejudices the general acceptance of those laws.

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  • If the poor were ardent nationalists who would not intermingle with the Greeks, the rich had long outgrown and now could humour such prejudices; and the title of their party was capable of recalling at any rate the sound of the national ideal of righteousness, i.e.

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  • The placing of her on the throne meant a final victory over ancient prejudices, a vindication of the new ideas of progress.

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  • The pulpit of St Mary's was no longer closed to him, but the success of Balliol in the schools gave rise to jealousy in other colleges, and old prejudices did not suddenly give way; while a new movement in favour of " the endowment of research " ran counter to his immediate purposes.

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  • His contributions to the press, and his Addresses to the Lord Mayor and other political pamphlets made him one of the most popular writers in Ireland of his time, although he was anticatholic in his prejudices, and although, as Lecky observes,.

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  • A similar influence was exerted by him in other branches of the common law; and although, after his retirement, a reaction took place, and he was regarded for a while as one who had corrupted the ancient principles of English law, these prejudices passed rapidly away, and the value of his work in bringing the older law into harmony with the needs of modern society has long been fully recognized.

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  • Descartes was an expert; Bacon was the prophet of a great, if half comprehended, future; and the science they loved was struggling for its infant life against a mass of traditional prejudices, which sought to foreclose every question by confident assertions about the purposes of God and Nature.

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  • He grouped around him all the leading writers, publicists and progressive young men of the day; declaimed against prejudices; stimulated the timid; inspired the lukewarm with enthusiasm; and never rested till the constitution of the 3rd of May 1791 had been carried through.

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  • The judges were not so by profession; they were merely members of the official class (chinovniks), the prejudices and vices of which they shared.

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  • The cordial and gentle manners of Mrs Gibbon, however, and her unremitting care for his happiness, won him from his first prejudices, and gave her a permanent place in his esteem and.

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  • Whatever his natural prejudices or natural resentments, he never allowed these to influence his policy.

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  • On account of the prejudices of her mother, who did not desire her to know more than was necessary for being useful in the family, she received in youth only the first elements of education.

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  • His appreciations of his contemporaries throw more light on his own prejudices than on their aims and ideas.

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  • The truth was indeed obscured for a time by persistent prejudices in favour of certain alien Mediterranean races long known to have been in relation with the Aegean area in prehistoric times, e.g.

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  • His fears and prejudices melted away as he discerned that this was the very method needed for reaching the multitudes living in almost heathen darkness.

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  • In 1684 he commenced the career of professor of natural law at Leipzig, and soon attracted attention by his abilities, but particularly by his daring attack upon traditional prejudices, in theology and jurisprudence.

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  • The national jealousy of foreigners, was at first a source of annoyance to him; but such prejudices were gradually disarmed by the inoffensiveness of his demeanour.

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  • and Piauhy in colonial times, and small flocks are still to be seen in the latter state, but no use is made of their wool, and the market for mutton is extremely limited because of popular prejudices.

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  • But systematic zoology is now entirely free from any such prejudices, and the Linnaean taint which is apparent even in Haeckel and Gegenbaur may be considered as finally expunged.

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  • Representatives of the Zealots would probably have protested against his pro-Roman prejudices.

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  • Cyrus appears in the unassailably authentic cylinder inscription "as a complete religious indifferentist, willing to go through any amount of ceremonies to soothe the prejudices of a susceptible population."

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  • Bestuzhev's violent political prejudices at first prevented him from properly recognizing this change.

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  • If he failed in his wider schemes of reform, this was only one more illustration of a truth of which other " enlightened " sovereigns besides himself had experienced the force, namely, that it is impossible to impose any system, however admirable, from above on a people whose deepest convictions and prejudices it offends.

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  • It was also complicated by racial and religious prejudices, a large proportion of the factory operatives being foreigners and Roman Catholics, and most of the country people native Protestants.

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  • In 1806 and 1807 he delivered a course of lectures at the Athenee on the language and literature of France from the earliest years; and in 1808 at the emperor's request, he prepared his Tableau historique de l'etat et du progres de la littrature francaise depuis 1789 jusqu'd 1808, a book containing some good criticism, though marred by the violent prejudices of its author.

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  • Born of a family of priest-physicians, and inheriting all its traditions and prejudices, Hippocrates was the first to cast superstition aside, and to base the practice of medicine on the principles of inductive philosophy.

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  • He was unwilling to excite the prejudices of modern politics which seemed to him to run back through the whole period of the reign of George III.

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  • This novel device has the advantage of toning down, if not of eliminating, personal and national prejudices by which controversy is frequently embittered.

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  • There were at first murmurings among his clergy against what they deemed his harsh control, but his real kindness soon made itself felt, and, during the sixteen years of his tenure of the see, his sound and vigorous rule dissipated the prejudices against him, so that when, on the death of Dr John Jackson in 1885, he was translated to London, the appointment gave general satisfaction.

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  • Forneron (Paris, 1881), contains many references to authorities and is exhaustive, but the author has some violent prejudices.

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  • The author of the Apocalypse has cast aside all national religious prejudices."

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  • He maintained that old prejudices would disappear with the progress of knowledge, and that superstition and mechanical devices of salvation would be insensibly abandoned.

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  • The first requisite of real progress, after dogmatic prejudices had been broken through, was to get a living conception of the history in which the prophets moved; and this again called for a revision of all traditional notions as to the age of the various parts of Hebrew literature - criticism of the sources of the history, among which the prophetical books themselves take the first place.

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  • The overthrow of Spanish rule in Mexico was the beginning of a new period, and efforts were made to introduce educational reforms, but the colonists and ecclesiastics were still governed by their fears and prejudices, and little was accomplished.

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  • It gives too much weight to Aristotle's logic, and too little to his metaphysics, on account of two prejudices of the commentators which led them to place both logic and physics before metaphysics.

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  • He was at his best in his generous protests against all privileges, social, political and religious, and in the self-sacrificing patriotism which enabled him to fling aside his personal prejudices, and so to make Federation possible.

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  • The realist, then, ought to begin with metaphysics without psychological prejudices.

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  • This illogical hypothesis, which consists of incautiously passing from the truth that the sensible object perceived is not external but within the organism to the non-sequitur that therefore it is within the mind, derived what little plausibility it ever possessed from three prejudices: the first, the scholastic dogma that the sensible object is a species sensibilis, or immaterial sensible form received from the external thing; the second, the Cartesian a priori argument that the soul as thinking thing can perceive nothing but its own ideas; the third, the common assumption of a sense of sensations.

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  • Le Clerc's commentary had a great influence in breaking up traditional prejudices and showing the necessity for a more scientific inquiry into the origin and meaning of the biblical books.

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  • 1 In this perhaps we may behold one of the most ancient of British insular prejudices, for on the Continent the importance of cavalry in warfare was already abundantly understood.

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  • Though full of prejudices which affect his accuracy, Daniel had the advantage of consulting valuable original sources.

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  • Even after the removal of the edicts the old prejudices remained, and the missionaries were regarded as political emissaries, the forerunners of military aggression.

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  • The king had good intentions, but his mind was warped by Dutch prejudices, and he was ill-advised and acted unadvisedly.

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  • The numerous editions of the various portions - for, despite Hume's wrath and grumblings, the book was a great literary success - gave him an opportunity of careful revision, which he employed to remove from it all the ' villainous seditious Whig strokes," and " plaguy prejudices of Whiggism " that he could detect.

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  • Its success greatly helped to break down the old prejudices, and to bring home to the minds of ordinary men the truth of the new ideas propounded by Galileo and Torricelli.

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  • His Jacobite prejudices had been exhibited with little disguise both in his works and in his conversation.

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  • The whole dispute seems, to-day, entirely uncalled-for, but the marriage aroused some of Johnson's strongest prejudices.

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  • Rudolph had all the sympathies and prejudices of the noble class, and the supreme object of his life was not to increase the power of the state but to add to the greatness of his !Iabsburg own family, a policy which was perhaps justified by family, the condition of the German kingdom, the ruler of which had practically no strength save that which he derived from his hereditary lands.

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  • The Military Bill had offended the prejudices of conservative military critics; the British treaty had alienated the colonial party; the commercial treaties had only been carried by the help of Poles, Radicals and Socialists; but it was just these parties who were the most easily oflended by the general tendencies of the internal legislation, as shown in.

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  • Besides, intellectual and social prejudices required a strong Conservative party.

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  • Like anti-Semites elsewhere, the Christian Socialists were reckless and irresponsible, appealing directly to the passions and prejudices of the most ignorant.

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  • But he opposed the revolutionary innovations dictated by ignorant and popular prejudices.

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  • The alliance concluded by him with France reveals him at once as rising superior to the narrow prejudices of his race and faith, which rejected with scorn any union with the unbeliever, and as gifted with sufficient political insight to appreciate the advantage of combining with Francis I.

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  • His Jewish friends, first Jason and then Menelaus, had been enlightened enough to throw off their prejudices, and, so far as he could know, they represented the majority of the Jews.

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  • Fj olnir had in the beginning a hard struggle against old prejudices, but as the years went by its influence became enormous; and when it at last ceased, its programme and spirit still lived in N5' Filagsrit and other patriotic periodicals which took its place.

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  • Such a gross violation of their caste prejudices would alone be sufficient to account for the outbreak that followed.

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  • But where no theological nor local prejudices were involved, the tendency to a faithful reproduction of the earlier texts prevailed.

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  • This material also reflects the knowledge, beliefs, and prejudices of its time.

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  • But her ambition and strong personal prejudices often led her to actions injurious to the realm.

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  • Of the French it is admitted that in their colonial possessions they displayed an unusual faculty for conciliating the prejudices of native races, and even for assimilating themselves to the latter.

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  • In 1527 he had been declared a rebel by the Signoria on account of his well-known Medicean prejudices; and in 1530, deputed by Clement to punish the citizens after their revolt, he revenged himself with a cruelty and an avarice that were long and bitterly remembered.

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  • To escape from these preoccupations and prejudices except upon the path of conscious and deliberate sin was impossible for all but minds of rarest quality and courage; and these were too often reduced to the recantation of their supposed errors no less by some secret clinging sense of guilt than by the church's iron hand.

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  • In spite of certain prejudices against the import of luxuries and the export of gold, there is little indication of the influence of mercantilist or protectionist ideas.

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  • Paley, though an excellent expositor and full of common sense, had the usual defect of common-sense people in philosophy - that of tame acquiescence in the prejudices of his age.

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  • He became a warm supporter of Washington's administration, and his prejudices against the constitution were largely removed by its working in practice.

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  • At this time (c. 1815-1840) numbers of persons brought discredit on the missionary cause by their illiteracy, narrow-minded prejudices his advice it was decided to create a band of native states on the northern and eastern frontiers of the colony.

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  • In matters of domestic legislation, such as taxation and excise, Rhodes fell in to a considerable extent with Dutch prejudices.

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  • His inquiry into manuscript and printed authorities was most laborious, but his lively imagination, and his strong religious and political prejudices, made him regard all things from a singularly personal point of view.

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  • If the view of the satirist is owing to this circumstance more limited in some directions, and his taste and temper less conformable to the best ancient standards of propriety, he is also saved by it from prejudices to which the traditions of his class exposed the historian.

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  • In 1831 he published a tract on tithes, "to correct the prejudices of the lower order of farmers," and in the following year a collection of hymns for use in his parish, which had a large general circulation; a small volume of stories entitled the Note Book of a Country Clergyman; and a sermon, The Apostolical Ministry.

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  • Avignon, at a distance from the party strife and somewhat parochial politics of the Italian commonwealths, impressed his mind with an ideal of civility raised far above provincial prejudices.

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  • These contradictions were, moreover, due, not merely to an incapacity or an unwillingness to argue strictly, but also to the presence in his mind of a large number of inconsistent tastes and prejudices which he either could not or would not co-ordinate into an intelligible creed.

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  • The introduction The of the Minie rifle, with its greased cartridges, was accompanied by no consideration of the religious prejudices of the Bengal sepoys, to whom, whether Hindus or Mahommedans, the fat of cows and pigs was anathema.

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  • mostly men who after 1848 immigrated from Transylvania and brought with them their own prejudices and narrow intolerance.

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  • - Recognizing the difficulties of the position, Cecil Rhodes from the outset of his political career showed his desire to conciliate Dutch sentiment by considerate treatment and regard for Dutch prejudices.

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  • "Ammianus is an accurate and faithful guide, who composed the history of his own times without indulging the prejudices and passions which usually affect the mind of a contemporary" (Gibbon).

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  • Although Ammianus was no doubt a heathen, his attitude towards Christianity is that of a man of the world, free from prejudices in favour of any form of belief.

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  • Taking Pomponius Atticus as his political model, he was persuaded that a man, a lawyer and a judge could best serve his country and benefit his countrymen by holding aloof from partisanship and its violent prejudices, which are so apt to distort and confuse the judgment.

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  • Hamilton (Discussions, p. 541), one of his most resolute opponents, described Cousin as "A profound and original thinker, a lucid and eloquent writer, a scholar equally at home in ancient and in modern learning, a philosopher superior to all prejudices of age or country, party or profession, and whose lofty eclecticism, seeking truth under every form of opinion, traces its unity even through the most hostile systems."

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  • He had become such a thorough Englishman in his views and prejudices, that by 1250 he was esteemed the natural exponent of all the wrongs of the realm.

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  • Finding them no less accommodating than their rivals, he gratified the prejudices of his subjects and himself by forcing the Hebrews to quit England.

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  • The ignoring of the feelings and prejudices Shi of large classes has a deeper effect.

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  • prejudices.

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  • He was a man of weak character and narrow intellect, whose main claim to succeed Pitt was that he shared to Addingion the full the Protestant prejudices of king and people.

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  • to be loathed as well as despised, he lacked also the sense of personal dignity that had been the saving grace of George, while he shared the conservative and Protestant prejudices of his predecessors.

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  • The advocacy of Hasan ibn Haidara Fergani was without avail; but in 1017 (408 A.H.) the new religion found a more successful apostle in the person of Hamza ibn Ali ibn Ahmed, a Persian mystic, felt-maker by trade, who became Hakim's vizier, gave form and substance to his creed, and by an ingenious adaptation of its various dogmas to the prejudices of existing sects, finally enlisted an extensive body of adherents.

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  • Here we see at their sharpest the social prejudices that Disraeli had to fight against, provocation of them carried to its utmost in every way open to him, and complete conquest in a company of young men less likely to admit superiority in a wit of their own years, probably, than any other that could have been brought together at that time.

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  • So far he d i d well; and when in 1852 he took office as chancellor of the exchequer in Lord Derby's first administration, the prospect was a smiling one for a man who, striving against difficulties and prejudices almost too formidable for imagination in these days, had attained to a place where he could fancy them all giving way.

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  • New difficulties were to arise and old prejudices to revive in full force.

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  • the instincts of many Englishmen, and, for the time, revived the prejudices against its author.

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  • When men heard that there were propositions that could not be doubted, it was a short and easy way to assume that what are only arbitrary prejudices are " innate " certainties, and therefore must be accepted unconditionally.

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  • As a free-thinking republican, his prejudices often biassed his judgment on the political and religious history of the ancien regime.

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  • It was in the calm, resolute, skilful culling of such pleasures as circumstances afforded from moment to moment, undisturbed by passion, prejudices or superstition, that he conceived the quality of wisdom to be exhibited; and tradition represents him as realizing this ideal to an impressive degree.

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  • Among the prejudices from which the wise man was free he included all regard to customary morality beyond what was due to the actual penalties attached to its violation; though he held, with Socrates, that these penalties actually render conformity reasonable.

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  • There is, however, in the Cynic notion of wisdom, no positive criterion beyond the mere negation of irrational desires and prejudices.

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  • The Cynics made no attempt to solve this difficulty; they were content to mean by virtue what any plain man meant by it, except in so far as their sense of independence led them to reject certain received precepts and prejudices.

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  • The traveller who is not a missionary may either have the same prejudices, or he may be a sceptic about revealed religion.

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  • The great common institution of the church, common enthusiasms, prejudices and envies, were available for the second.

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  • His place was taken by Caballero, an ardent opponent of reform, who restored all the abuses of the old bureaucratic administration and pandered to the bigoted prejudices of the clergy and the court.

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  • Although no obstinate adherent of antiquated forms and prejudices, he firmly upheld the fundamental truths of Christianity.

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  • Her father, possibly influenced by Cowper's melancholy tendencies, perhaps possessed by prejudices against the marriage of cousins, interposed, and the lovers were separated - as it turned out for ever.

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  • For the Roman Church his conversion secured great prestige and the dissipation of many prejudices.

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  • Thucydides, a man of strong oligarchical prejudices, had also been prosecuted for military incapacity and exiled by a decree proposed by Cleon.

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  • These were the chief printed media of his anti-Government propaganda; but he took every advantage of public activities, such as membership of the local municipality and the organizing of Shivaji and Ganpati celebrations, to work upon the prejudices and passions both of the masses and of the educated minority.

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  • Much more important than logic was his unfailing ability to appeal to deeply ingrained prejudices and beliefs.

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  • In feeling so affectionate toward them, are we also compensating for our prejudices?

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  • The writer, both in text and photographs, frankly avows the prejudices and selectivity inevitable in any account of controversial and divisive events.

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  • Admittedly, he brought to his study all the prejudices, both good and bad, of French classicism.

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  • Where prejudices do continue they are more likely to be based on class consciousness than on racial grounds.

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  • doctrinaire prejudices, no class inhibitions and no sectional interests.

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  • Malcolm X harbored these racist prejudices until he made the hajj in 1964.

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  • ingrained prejudices.

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  • It was the childish innocence of kids - untainted by politics, prejudices or principles, ignorant of everything except the here and now.

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  • outdated prejudices rather than a proper analysis of the relevant statistics.

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  • For most people too much psychological stress is associated with giving up long held beliefs, values or prejudices.

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  • rearrangea great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices?

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  • venerable prejudices and opinions are swept away ' .

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  • 2 " The greatest of all the prejudices we have retained from our infancy is that of believing that the beasts think."

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  • Apparently his birth was humble, but when the obscure figure of the young Artamon emerges into the light of history we find him equipped at all points with the newest ideas, absolutely free from the worst prejudices of his age, a ripe scholar, and even an author of some distinction.

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  • Thus one reform led to another; but Peter was not dismayed by the magnitude of the task, and worked vigorously in all departments with a sublime disregard for the clamour of reactionary opponents and for the feelings and prejudices of his subjects in general.

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  • Writers with none of the prejudices of the historical school, but with the cold and remorseless regard for logic of the purely objective critic, have pointed out serious inconsistencies here, the omission of important factors there, until very little of the " old Political Economy " is left unscathed.

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  • From the beginning he was determined never to allow himself to be misled, in his search for truth, by those theories and prejudices by which nearly every other historian was influenced - Hegelianism, Liberalism, Romanticism, religious and patriotic prejudice; but his superiority to the ordinary passions of the historian could only be attained by those who shared his elevation of character.

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  • What in her sometimes seemed irresolution and procrastination, was, most often, a wise suspense of judgment under exceptionally difficult circumstances; and to this may be added that she was ever ready to sacrifice the prejudices of the woman to the duty of the sovereign.

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  • With all his breadth and liberality of mind Bodin was a credulous believer in witchcraft, the virtues of numbers and the power of the stars, and in 1580 he published the Demonomanie des sorciers, a work which shows that he was not exempt from the prejudices of the age.

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  • He displayed his freedom from ecclesiastical prejudices, if also his utter ignorance of ecclesiastical history, by agreeing, on the payment of a large bribe, to grant to the patriarch of Constantinople the title of an ecumenical bishop, but the general indignation which the proposal excited throughout the church compelled him almost immediately to withdraw from his agreement.

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  • The literature of the later republic reflects the sympathies and prejudices of an aristocratic class, sharing in the conduct of national affairs and living on terms of equality with one another; that of the Augustan age, first in its early serious enthusiasm, and then in the licence and levity of its later development, represents the hopes and aspirations with which the new monarchy was ushered into the world, and the pursuit of pleasure and amusement, which becomes the chief interest of a class cut off from the higher energies of practical life, and moving in the refining and enervating atmosphere of an imperial court.

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  • Hardyng's testimony is, moreover, suspicious as reflecting the prejudices of the Percys after they had turned against Henry IV., for Hardyng himself expressly says that the earl of Northumberland was the source of his information (see note, p. 353 of his Chronicle).

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  • The man who could manage to rule a congeries of jealous factions, including Irish Catholics and Orangemen, French and English anti-federationists and agitators for independence, Conservatives and Reformers, careful economists and prodigal expansionists, was manifestly a man of unusual power, superior to small prejudices, and without strong bias towards any creed or section.

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  • 2 The prejudice, however, which meets us in Kant is, in a somewhat different form, the same prejudice which Prejudices is found in the tropes of antiquity - what Lotze calls which the " inadmissible relation of the world of ideas to scepticism a foreign world of objects."

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  • Hallam, who has collected all the passages from Grotius's letters in which the prejudices and narrow tenets of the Reformed clergy are condemned, thought he had a "bias towards popery" (Lit.

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  • At the end of his scheme, probably in deference to theological prejudices, he added an element which was utterly alien, namely, a higher impulse, a soul superimposed by God, in virtue of which we strive beyond the world of sense.

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  • During his exile he had surrounded himself with young men of the same spirit as himself, such as Buckingham and Bennet, who, without having any claim to statesmanship, inattentive to business, neglectful of the national interests and national prejudices, became Charles's chief advisers.

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  • To facilitate this reform, to overcome the ecclesiastical prejudices of the Roman Catholic Croats against the Eastern Orthodox Servians, and vice versa, certain Croatian patriots, led by Ljudevit Gaj, proposed that all the Slavonic peoples in the north-western part of the Balkan Peninsula should call themselves Illyri and their language Illyrian (see Croatia-Slavonia: Language and Literature and History).

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  • After that he forced a quarrel on a trivial bit of hearsay (that Hamilton had said he had a " despicable " opinion of Burr); and Hamilton, believing as he explained in a letter he left before going to his death - that a compliance with the duelling prejudices of the time was inseparable from the ability to be in future neither wanted war; and indeed Jefferson, throughout life, was the more peaceful of the two.

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  • He wanted a system strong enough, he would have said, to overcome the anarchic tendencies loosed by war, and represented by those notions of natural rights which he had himself once championed; strong enough to overbear all local, state and sectional prejudices, powers or influence, and to control - not, as Jefferson would have it, to be controlled by - the people.

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  • It is never too late to give up our prejudices.

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  • Why do a great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices?

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  • Eight young people confront their fears, hurts and prejudices on the rooftop of a block of flats.

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  • Through such proliferation, as Marx observed, ' ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions are swept away '.

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  • Prejudice reduction: Teachers must work to shift students' prejudices regarding race and ethnicity.

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  • In addition to societal pressures and prejudices, interracial couples still face other challenges associated with their union.

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  • Most prejudices are born out of fear of the unknown-so make your partner and your relationship known to them.

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  • However, sometimes parents will disapprove based on their own prejudices.

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  • Singles who have herpes often have a hard time dating because of common prejudices and fears about the sexually transmitted disease.

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  • The Internet offers some relief from these social prejudices, however.

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  • All my petty prejudices should disappear..."

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  • Hallam's prejudices, so far as he had any, belong to the same character.

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  • 498) writes - "free from the law, free from national prejudices, universal and yet a Christianity which is independent of Paul..

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  • The prejudices which he brought up to London were scarcely less absurd than those of his own Tom Tempest.

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  • Bismarck would not assent to these conditions, and, even if he had been willing to do so, could hardly have overcome the prejudices of the emperor.

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