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preferment

preferment

preferment Sentence Examples

  • His own hopes of preferment had been strengthened by the death of many of the higher clergy at Flodden.

  • The best proof of his not being ambitious of such a doubtful piece of preferment is that he made no attempt to get himself made king, regent or lieutenant-general of the kingdom at the time of the flight to Varennes in June 1791.

  • But it only applies to clerks holding preferment.

  • He died shortly after this last preferment at Croydon, Surrey, where he was buried on the 10th of June 1552.

  • Possibly the freedom of his opinions may have put obstacles in the way of his preferment.

  • His ecclesiastical preferment he owed to the influence of an uncle, Cardinal Oliviero Caraffa.

  • Under the Commonwealth he faced both ways, keeping his ecclesiastical preferment, but publishing from time to time pamphlets on behalf of the Church of England.

  • His reception by the king was flattering enough; but his hopes of preferment were dashed by the opposition of the Anglican clergy to the promotion of a papist.

  • The right of preferment to that see had been given to the Richelieu family by Henry III.

  • Retz received no preferment of importance during Richelieu's life, and even after the minister's death, though he was presented to Louis XIII.

  • His first important preferment was as dean of Westminster (1605); afterwards he held successively the bishoprics of Rochester (1608),(1608), Lichfield (161o), Lincoln (1614),(1614), Durham (1617) and Winchester (1628),(1628), and the archbishopric of York (1631).

  • In 1810 he became professor extraordinarius in theology, and in 1811 ordinarius, at the university of Halle, where, in spite of many offers of high preferment elsewhere, he spent the rest of his life.

  • The children of this marriage came to England in 1247 in the hope of obtaining court preferment.

  • The newspaper press being almost entirely in the hands of men whose interests suggested wider opening of the door to official preferment, nearly all editorial pens were directed against the governme~nt.

  • His preferment was rapid.

  • His theological sensitiveness appears in his refusal of a preferment offered to him in 1635 by Sir Thomas Coventry, lord keeper of the great seal.

  • The death of his patrons, the duke of Richmond and the marquess of Hamilton, and of King James put an end to his hopes of political preferment; moreover he probably distrusted the conduct of affairs under the new reign.

  • England showed itself better able than other countries to defend itself against the papal control of church preferment.

  • Personal experience of the inconveniences and dangers of the prevailing system of preferment, the so-called myestnichestvo, or rank priority, which had paralysed the Russian armies for centuries, induced him to propose its abolition, which was accomplished by Tsar Theodore III.

  • Otherwise the visit to England gave no hope of preferment; and in the summer Erasmus prepared to leave.

  • In Cambridge he completed his work on the New Testament, the Letters of Jerome, and Seneca; and then in 1514, when there seemed no prospect of ampler preferment, he determined to transfer himself to Basel and give the results of his labours to the world.

  • Early in 1643 he was chosen chancellor of the cathedral of Salisbury, but of this preferment he was soon deprived as a "malignant."

  • From sheer weariness and disgust the king refrained from any intervention in public affairs for nearly ten years, looking on indifferently while the ever shorter and stormier diets wrangled perpetually over questions of preferment and the best way of dealing with the extreme dissenters, to the utter neglect of public business.

  • The king was indeed the president of the permanent council, but he could not summon the diet without its consent, and in all cases of preferment was bound to select one out of three of the council's nominees.

  • Eberhard stated the arguments for the broader view with dignity, acuteness and learning, but the liberality of the reasoning gave great offence to the strictly orthodox divines, and is believed to have obstructed his preferment in the church.

  • After an education at St Andrews, and acting as tutor to the children of Lord Darcy, the English warden of the North, he became a Dominican, but was soon in trouble as a heretic. In 1536 he made his way to England, but failing to obtain the preferment he desired at Cambridge, he went on to Italy, where the influence of Cardinal Pole, who was himself accused of heresy, secured him the post of master of the novices in the Dominican convent at Bologna.

  • frequently subordinated the Father of Christendom to the Italian prince, that he passed all bounds in the preferment of his own family, and in many ways deviated into all too worldly courses.

  • His next preferment was that of advocate-general of the fisc for the provinces of Holland and Zeeland.

  • The ecclesiastical preferment was merely intended to provide a salary not at Henry's expense; for Fox never saw either Exeter or the diocese of Bath and Wells to which he was translated in 1492.

  • Loftus was constantly occupied in attempts to improve his financial position by obtaining additional preferment.

  • This secular preferment, however, he absolutely refused.

  • Their motives were purely selfish; not God's cause but their own, not religion but power and preferment, were what they sought.'

  • In 1650, having regained his full liberty, Hammond betook himself to the friendly mansion of Sir John Pakington, at Westwood, in Worcestershire, where he died on the 25th of April 1660, just on the eve of his preferment to the see of Worcester.

  • The third clause required him, in all cases of preferment, to be guided not " principally," as heretofore, but " solely " by merit,, thus striking at the very root of aristocratic privilege.

  • The severe but dignified letter to Walpole, in which Butler accepted the preferment, showed that the slight was felt and resented.

  • obtained preferment for him in the church, and from 1361 to 1368 he was employed in France in responsible positions.

  • The book brought Warburton into favour at court, and he probably only missed immediate preferment by the death of Queen Caroline.

  • His work had rendered great service to the government, and he might have had high preferment in the Church but for the Puritan views which he consistently maintained.

  • In the latter year, Morton offered the poet certain preferment in the Church, if he would only consent to take holy orders.

  • About this time Donne became intimate with Robert Ker, then Viscount Rochester and afterwards the infamous earl of Somerset, from whom he had hopes of preferment at court.

  • In the spring of 1616, Donne was presented to the living of Keyston, in Hunts., and a little later he became rector of Sevenoaks; the latter preferment he held until his death.

  • ad eundem at Oxford) quitted Temple, who had, he considered, delayed too long in obtaining him preferment.

  • He had every claim to the highest preferment that ministers could give him, but his own pride and prejudice in high places stood in his way.

  • The secular clergy marry before ordination; and only regular clergy (kalugari) are eligible for high preferment.

  • The same process was carried out with regard to abbacies, and indeed with all important places of ecclesiastical preferment.

  • When the church was a landholder their conduct was even more unwarrantable; every clerk installed in a new preferment was forced to pay a large sum downwhich in that age was considered a clear case of simony by all conscientious men.

  • In a moment of sickness, when his conscience was for a space troub~ ling him or his will was weak, he nominated the saintly Anseim (q.v.) to the archbishopric. When enthroned the new primate refused to make the enormous gift which the king expected from every recipient of preferment.

  • He was surrounded and supported, moreover, by a group of brothers and cousins, to whom he gave most of his confidence, and most of the preferment that came to his hands.

  • Two appointments, one to a judicial office, the other to an ecclesiastical preferment, in which Gladstone, about the same time, showed more disposition to obey the letter than the spirit of the law, confirmed the impression which the abolition of purchase had made.

  • He soon received a more important piece of preferment than any which he could ever have procured through Hamilton.

  • After holding this preferment for nearly two years, he exchanged it in July 1529 for the cure of Pont L'Eveque, a village 1 The family name of Calvin seems to have been written indifferently Cauvin, Chauve, Chauvin, Calvus, Calvinus.

  • But though the career of ecclesiastical preferment was thus early opened to him, Calvin was destined not to become a priest.

  • His first preferment was the small vicarage of Cannock in Staffordshire; but he leapt into notice when holding a preachership at St Saviour's, Southwark.

  • There, refusing the pension which had been offered him and all ecclesiastical preferment, he lived frugally, and spent his days and nights as at Brussels in literary labour.

  • In consequence, the author was violently attacked and his inevitable, preferment was delayed.

  • All other preferment he refused, with one exception.

  • 1188), English statesman and prelate, was born in the diocese of Bath, where he obtained preferment.

  • His first preferment of importance was the chancellorship of the university.

  • In 1885 he became vicar of St Nicolas, Strassburg, and in 1889, declining an offer of preferment which was conditional on his becoming a German subject, he was expelled.

  • The only academic preferment received by him during the lengthy probation was the post of underlibrarian (1766).

  • ecclesiastical preferment - how does this affect the whole story?

  • It is unwise to trust those who seek preferment, status or a seat on the security council.

  • Several others are north countrymen; others held preferment in the diocese before they became bishops thereof.

  • But again I've no doubt that membership is abused to give or obtain personal preferment.

  • There have been many examples of freemasons using their membership to gain preferment in their careers and avoid due punishment for their misdemeanors.

  • Balderston published nothing and received no preferment except for a canonry at Peterborough in 1681: he was buried in the cathedral there.

  • As we have already noted, wealth alone, no matter how it was acquired, could not buy official preferment.

  • Simony is the buying of ecclesiastical preferment - how does this affect the whole story?

  • Well, my decision is that you had better look for some other preferment.

  • Urban IV. repeatedly offered him high ecclesiastical preferment, which he in his humility declined.

  • Fidelity to his own spirituality was always his, but political preferment went to those who followed the dictates of self-interested prudence.

  • In any matter touching church preferment you would of course be listened to.

  • He was, therefore, well able to promote the preferment of his brother George, who went to Ireland as chaplain to the duke of Dorset when that nobleman became lord-lieutenant in 1731.

  • His own hopes of preferment had been strengthened by the death of many of the higher clergy at Flodden.

  • In those deliberations Gavin Douglas took an active part, and for this reason stimulated the opposition which successfully thwarted his preferment.

  • The best proof of his not being ambitious of such a doubtful piece of preferment is that he made no attempt to get himself made king, regent or lieutenant-general of the kingdom at the time of the flight to Varennes in June 1791.

  • He received a good deal of ecclesiastical preferment from the Lancastrian party, was present, if he did not fight on the losing side, at the battle of Towton in 1461, and was subsequently attainted by the victorious Yorkists.

  • But it only applies to clerks holding preferment.

  • He died shortly after this last preferment at Croydon, Surrey, where he was buried on the 10th of June 1552.

  • Possibly the freedom of his opinions may have put obstacles in the way of his preferment.

  • His ecclesiastical preferment he owed to the influence of an uncle, Cardinal Oliviero Caraffa.

  • Under the Commonwealth he faced both ways, keeping his ecclesiastical preferment, but publishing from time to time pamphlets on behalf of the Church of England.

  • His reception by the king was flattering enough; but his hopes of preferment were dashed by the opposition of the Anglican clergy to the promotion of a papist.

  • The right of preferment to that see had been given to the Richelieu family by Henry III.

  • Retz received no preferment of importance during Richelieu's life, and even after the minister's death, though he was presented to Louis XIII.

  • His first important preferment was as dean of Westminster (1605); afterwards he held successively the bishoprics of Rochester (1608),(1608), Lichfield (161o), Lincoln (1614),(1614), Durham (1617) and Winchester (1628),(1628), and the archbishopric of York (1631).

  • In 1810 he became professor extraordinarius in theology, and in 1811 ordinarius, at the university of Halle, where, in spite of many offers of high preferment elsewhere, he spent the rest of his life.

  • The children of this marriage came to England in 1247 in the hope of obtaining court preferment.

  • The newspaper press being almost entirely in the hands of men whose interests suggested wider opening of the door to official preferment, nearly all editorial pens were directed against the governme~nt.

  • His preferment was rapid.

  • Dingli, the Crown advocate, who was the interpreter of the law, and largely its maker, as well as the principal depository of local knowledge, able to prevent the preferment of rivals, and to countenance the barrier which difference of language created between governors and governed.

  • A benefice is avoided or vacated - (1) by death; (2) by resignation, if the bishop is willing to accept the resignation: by the In cumbents' Resignation Act 1871, Amendment Act 188 7, any clergyman who has been an incumbent of one benefice continuously for seven years, and is incapacitated by permanent mental or bodily infirmities from fulfilling his duties, may, if the bishop thinks fit, have a commission appointed to consider the fitness of his resigning; and if the commission report in favour of his resigning, he may, with the consent of the patron (or, if that is refused, with the consent of the archbishop) resign the cure of souls into the bishop's hands, and have assigned to him, out of the benefice, a retiring-pension not exceeding one-third of its annual value, which is recoverable as a debt from his successor; (3) by cession, upon the clerk being instituted to another benefice or some other preferment incompatible with it; (4) by deprivation and sentence of an ecclesiastical court; under the Clergy Discipline Act 1892, an incumbent who has been convicted of offences against the law of bastardy, or against whom judgment has been given in a divorce or matrimonial cause, is deprived, and on being found guilty in the consistory court of immorality or ecclesiastical offences (not in respect of doctrine or ritual), he may be deprived or suspended or declared incapable of preferment; (5) by act of law in consequence of simony; (6) by default of the clerk in neglecting to read publicly in the church the Book of Common Prayer, and to declare his assent thereto within two months after his induction, pursuant to an act of 1662.

  • His theological sensitiveness appears in his refusal of a preferment offered to him in 1635 by Sir Thomas Coventry, lord keeper of the great seal.

  • The death of his patrons, the duke of Richmond and the marquess of Hamilton, and of King James put an end to his hopes of political preferment; moreover he probably distrusted the conduct of affairs under the new reign.

  • England showed itself better able than other countries to defend itself against the papal control of church preferment.

  • Personal experience of the inconveniences and dangers of the prevailing system of preferment, the so-called myestnichestvo, or rank priority, which had paralysed the Russian armies for centuries, induced him to propose its abolition, which was accomplished by Tsar Theodore III.

  • Otherwise the visit to England gave no hope of preferment; and in the summer Erasmus prepared to leave.

  • In Cambridge he completed his work on the New Testament, the Letters of Jerome, and Seneca; and then in 1514, when there seemed no prospect of ampler preferment, he determined to transfer himself to Basel and give the results of his labours to the world.

  • Early in 1643 he was chosen chancellor of the cathedral of Salisbury, but of this preferment he was soon deprived as a "malignant."

  • Finally the poorer clergy, neglected by their bishops, and excluded from all preferment, took part with the szlachta against their own spiritual rulers and eagerly devoured and imparted to their flocks, in their own language, the contents of the religious tracts which reached them by divers ways from Goldberg and Konigsberg.

  • From sheer weariness and disgust the king refrained from any intervention in public affairs for nearly ten years, looking on indifferently while the ever shorter and stormier diets wrangled perpetually over questions of preferment and the best way of dealing with the extreme dissenters, to the utter neglect of public business.

  • The king was indeed the president of the permanent council, but he could not summon the diet without its consent, and in all cases of preferment was bound to select one out of three of the council's nominees.

  • Eberhard stated the arguments for the broader view with dignity, acuteness and learning, but the liberality of the reasoning gave great offence to the strictly orthodox divines, and is believed to have obstructed his preferment in the church.

  • After an education at St Andrews, and acting as tutor to the children of Lord Darcy, the English warden of the North, he became a Dominican, but was soon in trouble as a heretic. In 1536 he made his way to England, but failing to obtain the preferment he desired at Cambridge, he went on to Italy, where the influence of Cardinal Pole, who was himself accused of heresy, secured him the post of master of the novices in the Dominican convent at Bologna.

  • frequently subordinated the Father of Christendom to the Italian prince, that he passed all bounds in the preferment of his own family, and in many ways deviated into all too worldly courses.

  • His next preferment was that of advocate-general of the fisc for the provinces of Holland and Zeeland.

  • On the 6th of July 1653 he took the degree of B.D., and became a tutor and chaplain of Corpus Christi, preferring this to a fellowship. In 1654 he had offers of high preferment in the state, which he declined; but in 1655 George Newton, of the great church of St Mary Magdalene, Taunton, sought him for assistant and Alleine accepted the invitation.

  • The ecclesiastical preferment was merely intended to provide a salary not at Henry's expense; for Fox never saw either Exeter or the diocese of Bath and Wells to which he was translated in 1492.

  • Loftus was constantly occupied in attempts to improve his financial position by obtaining additional preferment.

  • This secular preferment, however, he absolutely refused.

  • Their motives were purely selfish; not God's cause but their own, not religion but power and preferment, were what they sought.'

  • In 1650, having regained his full liberty, Hammond betook himself to the friendly mansion of Sir John Pakington, at Westwood, in Worcestershire, where he died on the 25th of April 1660, just on the eve of his preferment to the see of Worcester.

  • In spite, however, of the marked improvement in the conditions and behaviour of the Welsh people, owing to this strictly orthodox revival within the pale of the Church, Griffith Jones and his system of education were regarded with indifference by the English prelates in Wales, who offered no preferment and gave little encouragement to the founder of the circulating schools.

  • The third clause required him, in all cases of preferment, to be guided not " principally," as heretofore, but " solely " by merit,, thus striking at the very root of aristocratic privilege.

  • The severe but dignified letter to Walpole, in which Butler accepted the preferment, showed that the slight was felt and resented.

  • obtained preferment for him in the church, and from 1361 to 1368 he was employed in France in responsible positions.

  • The father of the bridegroom objected not to his son's choice, but to the time he chose to marry; for it was a blight on his son's prospects, depriving him of his fellowship and his chance of church preferment.

  • The book brought Warburton into favour at court, and he probably only missed immediate preferment by the death of Queen Caroline.

  • His work had rendered great service to the government, and he might have had high preferment in the Church but for the Puritan views which he consistently maintained.

  • In the latter year, Morton offered the poet certain preferment in the Church, if he would only consent to take holy orders.

  • About this time Donne became intimate with Robert Ker, then Viscount Rochester and afterwards the infamous earl of Somerset, from whom he had hopes of preferment at court.

  • In the spring of 1616, Donne was presented to the living of Keyston, in Hunts., and a little later he became rector of Sevenoaks; the latter preferment he held until his death.

  • ad eundem at Oxford) quitted Temple, who had, he considered, delayed too long in obtaining him preferment.

  • He had every claim to the highest preferment that ministers could give him, but his own pride and prejudice in high places stood in his way.

  • The secular clergy marry before ordination; and only regular clergy (kalugari) are eligible for high preferment.

  • The same process was carried out with regard to abbacies, and indeed with all important places of ecclesiastical preferment.

  • When the church was a landholder their conduct was even more unwarrantable; every clerk installed in a new preferment was forced to pay a large sum downwhich in that age was considered a clear case of simony by all conscientious men.

  • In a moment of sickness, when his conscience was for a space troub~ ling him or his will was weak, he nominated the saintly Anseim (q.v.) to the archbishopric. When enthroned the new primate refused to make the enormous gift which the king expected from every recipient of preferment.

  • He was surrounded and supported, moreover, by a group of brothers and cousins, to whom he gave most of his confidence, and most of the preferment that came to his hands.

  • Two appointments, one to a judicial office, the other to an ecclesiastical preferment, in which Gladstone, about the same time, showed more disposition to obey the letter than the spirit of the law, confirmed the impression which the abolition of purchase had made.

  • He soon received a more important piece of preferment than any which he could ever have procured through Hamilton.

  • After holding this preferment for nearly two years, he exchanged it in July 1529 for the cure of Pont L'Eveque, a village 1 The family name of Calvin seems to have been written indifferently Cauvin, Chauve, Chauvin, Calvus, Calvinus.

  • But though the career of ecclesiastical preferment was thus early opened to him, Calvin was destined not to become a priest.

  • His first preferment was the small vicarage of Cannock in Staffordshire; but he leapt into notice when holding a preachership at St Saviour's, Southwark.

  • There, refusing the pension which had been offered him and all ecclesiastical preferment, he lived frugally, and spent his days and nights as at Brussels in literary labour.

  • In consequence, the author was violently attacked and his inevitable, preferment was delayed.

  • All other preferment he refused, with one exception.

  • 1188), English statesman and prelate, was born in the diocese of Bath, where he obtained preferment.

  • His first preferment of importance was the chancellorship of the university.

  • In 1885 he became vicar of St Nicolas, Strassburg, and in 1889, declining an offer of preferment which was conditional on his becoming a German subject, he was expelled.

  • The only academic preferment received by him during the lengthy probation was the post of underlibrarian (1766).

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