This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

precocious

precocious

precocious Sentence Examples

  • He was educated privately and was so precocious a boy as to translate a Latin version of the Battle of the Frogs and Mice into French in 1796, which was published by his father in 1797.

  • was in every respect precocious; but from the first there was what we should now call a neurotic strain in his character.

  • The precocious lad quickly mastered the German, Latin and principal Slavonic languages, frequently acting as his father's interpreter at the reception of ambassadors.

  • To sum up, the entocodon is a precocious formation of the umbrella, closing over to protect the organs in the umbrellar cavity.

  • He found himself looked upon with curiosity as a precocious phenomenon, a "made man," an intellectual machine set to grind certain tunes.

  • over his son was, indeed, far greater than is commonly supposed, and it accounts for much in Charles XII.'s character which is otherwise inexplicable, for instance his precocious reserve and taciturnity, his dislike of everything French, and his inordinate contempt for purely diplomatic methods.

  • By the patient study of the behaviour of precocious young birds, such as chicks, pheasants, ducklings and moorhens, it can be readily ascertained that such modes of activity as running, swimming, diving, preening the down, scratching the ground, pecking at small objects, with the characteristic attitudes expressive of fear and anger, are so far instinctive as to be definite on their first occurrence - they do not require to be learnt.

  • He was a precocious child, but, as Graetz points out, his lack of stable character prevented his gifts from maturing.

  • According to his own account, he was the twenty-fourth of twenty-nine children, and was early remarkable for precocious talent.

  • Trained in a hard school, he showed a precocious aptitude for war and government.

  • One can imagine the interest and astonishment with which the great Greek would have been filled had some unduly precocious disciple shown to him the red-blood-system of the marine terrestrial Annelids; the red blood of Planorbis, of Apus cancriformis, and of the Mediterranean razor shell, Solen legumen.

  • A precocious student of the Law, he made trial of the three sects of Judaism - Pharisees, Sadducees and Essenes - before he reached the age of nineteen.

  • Girolamo was a precocious child, with an early passion for learning.

  • The boy came back to Eton a precocious rake.

  • The precocious immaturity of Lucan's career affords a marked contrast to the long preparation of Virgil and Horace for their high office.

  • He was a precocious boy, learning Latin at three, reading Greek at four, and writing sermons at seven.

  • 2 In the hymn to Hermes the god figures as a precocious child (a type familiar in folk-lore), who when a new-born babe steals the cows of Apollo.

  • He was a studious and precocious boy, more interested in religious matters, history and foreign politics than in boyish things.

  • His precocious maturity is strikingly evident from the first.

  • The glochidium is formed by the precocious development of the anterior adductor and the retardation of all the other organs except the shell.

  • And to one so precocious, stimulated by a parent of much culture, ample means and great ambition, this resulted in an almost unexampled aesthetic education.

  • He was an extremely precocious lad, and before he was ten had written several Latin odes, a history of the Jews and a series of homiletic outlines.

  • Aldo himself, though a precocious student, a scholar of no mean ability, and a publisher of some distinction, was the least remarkable of the three men who gave books to the public under the old Aldine ensign.

  • He was little attracted by the scholastic learning, though it would be wrong to take his words as evidence of a precocious insight into its weakness.

  • Nevertheless he has a distinguished place in the story of precocious children, and in the much more limited chapter of children whose precocity has been followed by great performance at maturity, though he never became what is called a learned man, perhaps did not know Greek, and was pretty certainly indebted for most of his miscellaneous reading to Montaigne.

  • In 1830 they came to Paris, where they sang in the streets, Rachel giving such patriotic songs as the Parisienne and the Marseillaise with a rude but precocious energy which evoked special admiration and an abundant shower of coppers.

  • Next year the Lancastrian revolution forced Henry into precocious prominence as heir to the throne.

  • She had shown precocious talent, and was sent to the school at Haddington where Edward Irving (q.v.) was a master.

  • At the age of sixteen young Bahrdt, a precocious lad whose training had been grossly neglected, began to study theology under the orthodox mystic, Christian August Crusius (1715-1775), who in 1 757 had become first professor in the theological faculty.

  • The Italians of the 14th century, more precocious than the other European races, were ripe for this emancipation of enslaved intelligence.

  • Clay's quick intelligence and sympathy, and his irreproachable conduct in youth, explain his precocious prominence in public affairs.

  • The patronage of his uncle galled him: he was dull and unhappy We find in Swift few signs of precocious genius.

  • He could trade upon Edwards precocious hatred of Marys religion, he could rely upon French fears of her Spanish inclinations, and the success which bad attended his schemes in England deluded him into a belief that he could supplant the Tudor with a Dudley dynasty.

  • The precocious eloquence and ardour of these early works made him famous before his time.

  • As a child he was remarkably precocious; at six he is said to have been able to repeat large parts of the Bible and of Pilgrim's Progress by heart.

  • assiduous observer of culture, he showed precocious artistic talent and fierce ambition.

  • initially dismissive of the precocious visitor, James ' is soon persuaded by a bag of dope from Harry's parents.

  • matter-of-fact attitude of precocious pre-adolescent boys.

  • precocious puberty hit us hard, feelings of guilt, " why did we not do anything earlier?

  • precocious talent of Stuart Green.

  • precocious genius born in 185 called it the'Ship of Jesus ' wherein the world is saved.

  • precocious young learners.

  • precocious readers ' performance by the age of eleven?

  • precocious son, Connor, carries unique items that resolve problems.

  • I was a very precocious child and started worrying about things like where all the water had come from for the Flood.

  • The appearance of her husband's sexually precocious Vietnamese love-child is nothing compared with the antics of their own children.

  • Was that a difficult balance, ensuring, as well, that they didn't become too precocious?

  • Extremely precocious, he won all the academy prizes.

  • He may be intellectually precocious yet emotionally stunted and amoral.

  • She is known for being somewhat precocious (what 17 year old isn't?

  • The initial diagnosis of precocious puberty hit us hard, feelings of guilt, " why did we not do anything earlier?

  • McCartney seems so shameless, and there isn't much worse than an old man try to act like a precocious and adorable youth.

  • He was educated privately and was so precocious a boy as to translate a Latin version of the Battle of the Frogs and Mice into French in 1796, which was published by his father in 1797.

  • was in every respect precocious; but from the first there was what we should now call a neurotic strain in his character.

  • The precocious lad quickly mastered the German, Latin and principal Slavonic languages, frequently acting as his father's interpreter at the reception of ambassadors.

  • Hence the entocodon represents a precocious formation of the sub-umbral surface, equivalent to the peristome of the polyp, differentiated in the bud prior to other portions of the organism which must be regarded as antecedent to it in phylogeny.

  • To sum up, the entocodon is a precocious formation of the umbrella, closing over to protect the organs in the umbrellar cavity.

  • He found himself looked upon with curiosity as a precocious phenomenon, a "made man," an intellectual machine set to grind certain tunes.

  • Metchnikoff observed (1866) in the development of the parthenogenetic eggs produced by the precocious larva of the gall-midge Cecidomyia that a large " polar-cell " appeared at one extremity during the primitive cellsegmentation.

  • over his son was, indeed, far greater than is commonly supposed, and it accounts for much in Charles XII.'s character which is otherwise inexplicable, for instance his precocious reserve and taciturnity, his dislike of everything French, and his inordinate contempt for purely diplomatic methods.

  • By the patient study of the behaviour of precocious young birds, such as chicks, pheasants, ducklings and moorhens, it can be readily ascertained that such modes of activity as running, swimming, diving, preening the down, scratching the ground, pecking at small objects, with the characteristic attitudes expressive of fear and anger, are so far instinctive as to be definite on their first occurrence - they do not require to be learnt.

  • He was a precocious child, but, as Graetz points out, his lack of stable character prevented his gifts from maturing.

  • According to his own account, he was the twenty-fourth of twenty-nine children, and was early remarkable for precocious talent.

  • Trained in a hard school, he showed a precocious aptitude for war and government.

  • One can imagine the interest and astonishment with which the great Greek would have been filled had some unduly precocious disciple shown to him the red-blood-system of the marine terrestrial Annelids; the red blood of Planorbis, of Apus cancriformis, and of the Mediterranean razor shell, Solen legumen.

  • A precocious student of the Law, he made trial of the three sects of Judaism - Pharisees, Sadducees and Essenes - before he reached the age of nineteen.

  • Girolamo was a precocious child, with an early passion for learning.

  • The boy came back to Eton a precocious rake.

  • The precocious immaturity of Lucan's career affords a marked contrast to the long preparation of Virgil and Horace for their high office.

  • He was a precocious boy, learning Latin at three, reading Greek at four, and writing sermons at seven.

  • Horace was a feeble and precocious lad, taking little interest in the ordinary sports of childhood, learning to read before he was able to talk plainly, and the prodigy of the neighbourhood for accurate spelling.

  • 2 In the hymn to Hermes the god figures as a precocious child (a type familiar in folk-lore), who when a new-born babe steals the cows of Apollo.

  • He was a studious and precocious boy, more interested in religious matters, history and foreign politics than in boyish things.

  • His precocious maturity is strikingly evident from the first.

  • The glochidium is formed by the precocious development of the anterior adductor and the retardation of all the other organs except the shell.

  • And to one so precocious, stimulated by a parent of much culture, ample means and great ambition, this resulted in an almost unexampled aesthetic education.

  • He was an extremely precocious lad, and before he was ten had written several Latin odes, a history of the Jews and a series of homiletic outlines.

  • In the annals of precocious genius there is no greater prodigy on record than Hugo Grotius, who was able to make good Latin verses at nine, was ripe for the university at twelve, and at fifteen edited the encyclopaedic work of Martianus Capella.

  • Aldo himself, though a precocious student, a scholar of no mean ability, and a publisher of some distinction, was the least remarkable of the three men who gave books to the public under the old Aldine ensign.

  • He was little attracted by the scholastic learning, though it would be wrong to take his words as evidence of a precocious insight into its weakness.

  • Nevertheless he has a distinguished place in the story of precocious children, and in the much more limited chapter of children whose precocity has been followed by great performance at maturity, though he never became what is called a learned man, perhaps did not know Greek, and was pretty certainly indebted for most of his miscellaneous reading to Montaigne.

  • In 1830 they came to Paris, where they sang in the streets, Rachel giving such patriotic songs as the Parisienne and the Marseillaise with a rude but precocious energy which evoked special admiration and an abundant shower of coppers.

  • Next year the Lancastrian revolution forced Henry into precocious prominence as heir to the throne.

  • She had shown precocious talent, and was sent to the school at Haddington where Edward Irving (q.v.) was a master.

  • At the age of sixteen young Bahrdt, a precocious lad whose training had been grossly neglected, began to study theology under the orthodox mystic, Christian August Crusius (1715-1775), who in 1 757 had become first professor in the theological faculty.

  • The Italians of the 14th century, more precocious than the other European races, were ripe for this emancipation of enslaved intelligence.

  • Clay's quick intelligence and sympathy, and his irreproachable conduct in youth, explain his precocious prominence in public affairs.

  • The patronage of his uncle galled him: he was dull and unhappy We find in Swift few signs of precocious genius.

  • He could trade upon Edwards precocious hatred of Marys religion, he could rely upon French fears of her Spanish inclinations, and the success which bad attended his schemes in England deluded him into a belief that he could supplant the Tudor with a Dudley dynasty.

  • The precocious eloquence and ardour of these early works made him famous before his time.

  • As a child he was remarkably precocious; at six he is said to have been able to repeat large parts of the Bible and of Pilgrim's Progress by heart.

  • I was much surprised to hear all this; for I judged from your letters that Katie was a very precocious girl....

  • They are not callow like the young of most birds, but more perfectly developed and precocious even than chickens.

  • McCartney seems so shameless, and there is n't much worse than an old man try to act like a precocious and adorable youth.

  • What you may not have realized is how quickly your angelic infant would become an adorable and precocious toddler!

  • Under the leadership of his father, Tiger began playing [golf] as soon as he could walk, and the precocious tot displayed incredible talent.

  • It is somewhat precocious to grow, and the sun must not reach the leaves, which are easily scorched and checked, but it delights in surrounding warmth, and requires moisture when growth starts in the spring and throughout the summer.

  • Precocious puberty is sexual development before the age of eight in girls, and age 10 in boys.

  • Precocious puberty often begins before age eight in girls, triggering the development of breasts and hair under the arms and in the genital region.

  • Between four to eight times more common in girls than boys, precocious puberty occurs in one out of every 5,000-10,000 U.S. children.

  • Precocious Puberty Causes and Symptoms Puberty begins when the brain secretes a hormone that triggers the pituitary gland to release gonadotropins, which in turn stimulate the ovaries or testes to produce sex hormones.

  • In about 15 percent of cases, there is an underlying cause for the precocious puberty, and it is important to search for these causes.

  • There is no way to prevent precocious puberty.

  • The vast majority of children experiencing precocious puberty become lost in the crowd of their peers when their age peers enter puberty.

  • Carel, J.C., et al. "Precocious puberty and statural growth."

  • Grosso, S., et al. "Central precocious puberty and abnormal chromosomal patterns."

  • "Clinical characteristics of 104 children referred for evaluation of precocious puberty."

  • "Accelerated versus slowly progressive forms of puberty in girls with precocious and early puberty."

  • "Cut-Off Age for Precocious Puberty Is Too Young."

  • Precocious Puberty Support Network. c/o MAGIC Foundation, 6645 W.

  • If a child masturbates frequently and appears to be relating to adults in a sexually precocious manner.

  • This precocious little star will be a handful for his parents!

  • The show mimics the look and speech of everyday youths than those of precocious teens found in most Hollywood film and TV shows.

  • The show's precocious students experience the same trials and tribulations as their real-life teen counterparts, and like high school students in the real world, the kids from Degrassi eventually graduate and move on with their lives.

  • Madonna has spoken of her mother in many of her lyrics, interviews, etc. Apparantly, she was always a precocious daughter.

  • Jake Lloyd plays the precocious and gifted nine-year-old Anakin in The Phantom Menace (Episode I, 1999).

Browse other sentences examples →