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prayer

prayer

prayer Sentence Examples

  • His companion's prayer is forgotten.

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  • After a brief prayer, she opened her eyes and glanced up.

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  • She closed her eyes and said another prayer before she clamped a sweaty hand around the cold door handle.

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  • The Lord's prayer in signs is not the Lord's prayer in English.

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  • She did not venture to ask any questions, and shut the door again, now sitting down in her easy chair, now taking her prayer book, now kneeling before the icon stand.

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  • I don't have a prayer of beating you.

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  • He closed his eyes and said a prayer of thanks.

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  • Collier preferred the version of the Book of Common Prayer issued in 1549, and regretted that certain practices and petitions there enjoined were omitted in later editions.

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  • There's no prayer meeting tonight.

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  • He paused and said a silent prayer for the spirit of this person who had brought so much grief to Bird Song and his previously contented life.

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  • In the first case prayer will 'be accompanied with disinterested homage, praise and thankgiving, and will in fact tend to lose its distinctive character of entreaty or petition, passing into a mystic communing or converse with God.

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  • I can't deny the power of prayer, or the virtue of tenacity.

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  • She was finishing her last prayer: "Can it be that this couch will be my grave?"

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  • So when Lori picked him up again Easter Sunday morning, Carmen said nothing - except a prayer that Josh wouldn't catch him.

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  • There was a pathetic expression of sorrow, prayer, and hope in it.

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  • She assumed an attitude of prayer, looked at the icons, repeated the words of a prayer, but she could not pray.

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  • I said a silent prayer the young lady hadn't fallen into the hands of someone like our stalker.

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  • She knew that the sole weapon against him was prayer, and she tried to pray.

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  • Sighs were heard, words of prayer, and the sobbing of the count's old valet.

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  • Several times he addressed a prayer to God that the wolf should come his way.

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  • In any event, she's got one story and she's sticking to it like a nightly prayer, at least for now.

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  • It took me a couple of years to realize God had answered my prayer the first time.

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  • the prayer, Deut.

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  • In such moments of baffled inquiry he would leave his books, perform the requisite ablutions, then hie to the mosque, and continue in prayer till light broke on his difficulties.

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  • Passing from pride to humility he added "servant of the apostle," and "servant of Jesus Christ" to the imperial title, spent a fortnight in prayer in the grotto of St Clement and did penance in various Italian monasteries.

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  • (1) Only if the deity be regarded as altogether superior is there room for prayer proper, that is, reverent entreaty.

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  • In 1718 was published a new Communion Office taken partly from Primitive Liturgies and partly from the first English Reformed Common Prayer Book,..

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  • The term is used in this general sense in certain rubrics of the English Book of Common Prayer, in which it is applied equally to rectors and vicars as to perpetual curates.

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  • Prayer was his main prop. By it men became controllers of the earthly world and reached God.

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  • Only at prayer did she feel able to think clearly and calmly of Prince Andrew and Anatole, as men for whom her feelings were as nothing compared with her awe and devotion to God.

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  • In Natasha's receptive condition of soul this prayer affected her strongly.

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  • She closed her eyes and said a prayer of thanks before she answered him.

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  • But neither could she doubt the righteousness of the prayer that was being read on bended knees.

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  • After a silent prayer, I telephoned the tip line.

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  • It used to be customary among Presbyterians to stand during public prayer, and to remain seated during the acts of praise, but this peculiarity is no longer maintained.

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  • After prayer the company constituted themselves into a church: chose Jean le Macon to be their minister, and others of their number to be elders and deacons.

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  • 14 it is ordained that, if any believer is sick, he shall call for the elders of the church; and they shall pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer of faith shall save him that is sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, it shall be forgiven him.

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  • Prayer in the latter sense is a characteristic feature of the higher religions, and we might even say that Christianity or Mahommedanism, ritually viewed, is in its inmost essence a service of prayer.

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  • On the other hand, there is reason to believe that the magical spell proper is a self-contained and selfsufficient form of utterance, and that it lies at the root of much that has become address, and even prayer in the fullest sense.

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  • It is noticeable that even the more highly developed forms of liturgical prayer tend, in the recitation of divine titles, attributes and the like, to present a survival of this magical use of potent names.

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  • In advanced religion, indeed, prayer is the chosen vehicle of the free spirit of worship. Its mechanism is not unduly rigid, and it is largely autonomous, being rid of subservience to other ritual factors.

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  • In more primitive ritual, however, set forms of prayer are the rule, and their function is mainly to accompany and support a ceremony the nerve of which consists in action rather than speech.

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  • In advanced religion, indeed, prayer is the chosen vehicle of the free spirit of worship. Its mechanism is not unduly rigid, and it is largely autonomous, being rid of subservience to other ritual factors.

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  • Then came the prayer just received from the Synod--a prayer for the deliverance of Russia from hostile invasion.

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  • Sonya's letter written from Troitsa, which had come as an answer to Nicholas' prayer, was prompted by this: the thought of getting Nicholas married to an heiress occupied the old countess' mind more and more.

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  • "What prayer was that you were saying?" asked Pierre.

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  • In some of the early books of order a few forms of prayer were given, but their use was not compulsory.

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  • On the whole, the preponderating preference has always been in favour of so-called extemporaneous, or free prayer; and the Westminster Directory of Public Worship has to a large extent stereotyped the form and order of the service in most Presbyterian churches.

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  • The enforcement of the first Book of Common Prayer had also been part of his official duties; and the fact that Bonner made no such protest against the burning of heretics as he had done in the former case shows that he found it the more congenial duty.

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  • She shared with all her heart in the prayer for the spirit of righteousness, for the strengthening of the heart by faith and hope, and its animation by love.

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  • " Calme, toujours plus de calme," was her last prayer, and her dying words, `` Ne detruisez pas la verdure."

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  • Yes, prayer can move mountains, but one must have faith and not pray as Natasha and I used to as children, that the snow might turn into sugar-- and then run out into the yard to see whether it had done so.

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  • Carmen brushed them away and returned to her prayer.

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  • I blurted out my suspicions to Detective Jackson and said a prayer.

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  • She doesn't have a prayer.

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  • She mumbled something he could not understand until he forced concentration, eventually discerning the thin voice whispering The Lord's Prayer.

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  • He squinted and folded his hands in prayer.

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  • In the next session, November 1548-March 1549, he was a leading opponent of the first Act of Uniformity and Book of Common Prayer.

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  • It was now that he began to frequent the ruined little chapel of St Mary of the Angels, known as the Portiuncula, where much of his time was passed in prayer.

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  • In the Church of England since the Reformation matins is used for the order of public morning prayer.

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  • From Spell to Prayer.

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  • - Of course to address and entreat a fellow-being is a faculty as old as that of speech, and, as soon as it occurred to man to treat sacred powers as fellow-beings, assuredly there was a beginning of prayer.

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  • The prayer itself tends to be slurred over, or even omitted.

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  • A small point in tie history of prayer, but one that has an interesting bearing on the subject of its relation to magic, is concerned with the custom of praying silently.

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  • Thus it is quite in accordance with the outlook of the classical period that Plato in his Laws (909-910) should prohibit all possession of private shrines or performance of private rites; "let a man go to a temple to pray, and let any one who pleases join with him in the prayer."

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  • Finally we may note in this connexion that in advanced religion, at the point at which prayer is coming to be conceived as communion, silent adoration is sometimes thought to bring man nearest to God.

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  • When we come to consider the moral quality of the act of prayer, this contrast between the spirit of public and private religion is fundamental for all but the most advanced forms of cult.

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  • We may therefore assume that, in acts of public worship at any rate, prayer and its magico-religious congeners are at all stages resorted to as a "means of grace," even though such grace do not constitute the expressed object of petition.

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  • A favourite contrast for which there is more to be said is that drawn between the m k agico-religious spell-ritual, that says in effect, "My will be done," and the spirit of "Thy will be done" that breathes through the highest forms of worship. Such resignation in the face of the divine will and providence is, however, not altogether beyond the horizon of primitive faith, as witness the following prayer of the Khonds of Orissa: "We are ignorant of what it is good to ask for.

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  • - The following works deal generally with the subject of prayer from the comparative standpoint: E.

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  • For special points the following may be consulted: Prayer in relation to magic: R.

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  • Marett, "From Spell to Prayer," in Folk-Lore (June, 1904); W.

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  • Silent prayer: S.

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  • Beginnings of Prayer in Australia: A.

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  • Prayer and spell in North American religion: W.

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  • Matthews, "The Prayer of a Navajo Shaman," in American Anthropologist, i.; idem, "The Mountain Chant; a Navajo Ceremony," in Fifth Report of Bureau of American Ethnology; J.

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  • Christian prayer: E.

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  • Cheyne, article "Prayer," in Ency.

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  • Book of Common Prayer >>

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  • At morning worship the service consists of a litany, scripture lessons, sermon, singing, extempore prayer.

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  • His successful prayer to Zeus for rain at a time of drought (Isocrates, Evagoras, 14) was commemorated by a temple at Aegina (Pausanias ii.

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  • Trypho, c. 117); "We honour God in prayer, and offer this as the best and holiest sacrifice with righteousness to the righteous Word" (Clem.

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  • It was a further and perhaps much later development of the same idea that the good works of those who had previously enjoyed the favour of God were invoked to give additional weight to the prayer of the offerer.

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  • Then after a prayer for sanctification, or for worthy reception, followed the Lord's Prayer, and after the Lord's Prayer the communion.

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  • We do not lie down at table until prayer has been offered to God, as it were a first taste.

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  • Prayer ends, as it began, the banquet; and we break up not in bands of brigands, nor in groups of vagabonds, nor do we burst out into debauchery..

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  • This prayer as you break the bread, and are about to eat, you must say.

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  • But after dinner (or breakfast), and when we rise from table, we use the prayer given above, viz.

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  • x., and the prayer is nearly the same as that which the teaching of the Apostles assigns for the eucharistic rite.

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  • This element of public confession for sin became more prominent in the days when synagogal worship developed, and prayer took the place of the sacrificial offerings which could only be offered in the Jerusalem temple.

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  • In the same temple stands the altar of prayer for good harvests, which is surmounted by a triple-roofed circular structure 99 ft.

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  • He wrote articles on free will, the philosophy of theism, on science, prayer and miracles for the Dublin Review.

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  • Ultimately a cycle of 19 years was accepted, and it is the use of this cycle which makes the Golden Number and Sunday Letter, explained in the preface to the Book of Common Prayer, necessary.

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  • - Bingham, Antiquities of the Christian Church;: Bede, Ecclesiastical History of England; Procter and Frere, A New History of the Book of Common Prayer (London, 1901); Surtees Society, Rites of Durham, ed.

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  • Lastly, the mitre, though a liturgical vestment, differs from the others in that it is never worn when the bishop addresses the Almighty in prayer - e.g.

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  • On the practical side, mysticism maintains the possibility of direct intercourse with this Being of beings - intercourse, not through any external media such as an historical revelation, oracles, answers to prayer, and the like, but by a species of ecstatic transfusion or identification, in which the individual becomes in very truth " partaker of the divine nature."

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  • He was three times imprisoned: in 16J4-5 for an injudicious preface to his Golden Grove; again in Chepstow castle, from May to October 1655, on what charge does not appear; and a third time in the Tower in 1657-8, on account of the indiscretion of his publisher, Richard Royston, who had adorned his "Collection of Offices" with a print representing Christ in the attitude of prayer.

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  • The approach of the " Monitor " and the Union gunboats up the James river caused a partial and temporary panic; President Davis appointed a day for prayer, and the families of some of the cabinet secretaries and many citizens fled the city precipitately; but confidence, restored by " Bacon's Rebellion," was auditor-general of the colony from 1687 until his death, and was a member of the committee which founded the College of William and Mary.

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  • The other also dates from the Caesarean period; it mentions many interesting details, and concludes with a fine exposition of the Lord's Prayer.

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  • Primal Life, who is properly speaking the Mandaean god, has the same predicates as the primal spirit, and every prayer, as well as every section of the sacred books, begins by invoking him.

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  • Others of his works (all in French) were his treatise on purgatory (1534), on the Lord's Prayer (1543), on the Supper (1555).

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  • He "was remarkable for boldness and energy both in preaching and prayer" (M.

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  • Her prayer was granted, and on the expiration of the time allotted she returned with him to the nether world.

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  • oratorium, sc. templum, a place of prayer, comes the use of the word for a small chapel or place of prayer for the use of private individuals, generally attached to a mansion and sometimes to a church.

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  • The hymn has been used in Christian worship since at least the 9th century, and was adopted into the Anglican Order of Morning Prayer from the Roman service of matin-lauds.

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  • At nightfall, "sobbing for excess of joy," the crusaders came to the Sepulchre from their treading of the winepress, and put their blood-stained hands together in prayer.

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  • Old Roman formula of prayer mention a Hora Quirini, his female cult associate, afterwards identified with Hersilia, the wife of Romulus.

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  • He withdrew, therefore, into solitude, and passed the rest of his life in retirement and prayer on the island of St Come near Tours.

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  • His open-air preaching was accompanied by prayer and singing, a departure from Wesley's practice and the forerunner of the well-known "Camp Meeting."

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  • Few are found to observe the law concerning the Five Hours of Prayer, and many fail to put in an appearance at the Friday congregational services in the mosques.

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  • So far as we are informed, prayer and study were the sole occupations of the Therapeutae.

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  • Seven hours a day he spent on his knees in prayer and three times a day he scourged his emaciated body.

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  • In a certain church, a few miles before Rome, whilst in prayer he was aware of a stirring and a change in his soul; and so openly did he see God the Father placing him with Christ, that he could not dare to doubt that God the Father had so placed him.

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  • He gives various methods of prayer; methods of making an election; his series of rules for the discernment of spirits; rules for the distribution of alms and the treatment of scruples; tests of orthodoxy.

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  • Having always had an attraction for a life of prayer and retirement, in 1547 he tried to resign the generalship, and again in 1550, but the fathers unanimously opposed the project.

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  • masjid, sajada, to adore), the house of prayer in the FIG.

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  • Mahommedan religion, consisting generally of a large open court (sahn) surrounded by arcades (liwan), with a fountain (mida-a) in the centre of the court, for the ablutions necessary before prayer.

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  • The court was surrounded with arcades, all of which constituted the prayer chamber, so that its plan is necessarily different to the normal type; the existing buildings date only from the first half of the 17th century, as the whole mosque was destroyed by a torrent in 1626.

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  • 705 on the foundations of the basilican church of St John: its plan differs therefore from the normal type in that its arcades run east and west, and the transept in the centre becomes the prayer chamber.

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  • ft., and its prayer chamber is 150 ft.

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  • 780; the earliest portion of the mosque is the prayer chamber (135 ft.

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  • The most beautiful portion of the mosque, however, still exists in the prayer chamber of Hakim, where are to be found the earliest examples of the cusped arch and the origin of many of the geometrical patterns in stucco at the Alhambra.

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  • The prayer chamber is a lofty structure, quite unlike those of Egypt and Kairawan, with a dome 75 ft.

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  • Sophia: they have courts in front with a range of arcades round, and the centre portion forms the prayer chamber, the side aisles serving as passages.

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  • 1420) and the Queen's mosque at Mirzapur, the pointed arch exists only in the façades of the prayer chambers; in the mosques built 30 to 40 years later the whole is constructed without a single arch, all the pillars have bracket-capitals, and the domes, which are of very slight elevation, are all built in the trabeated style.

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  • As a rule, the mosques of India followed the normal plan, with a great central court and aisles round and a prayer chamber in front of the Mecca wall, which in India is always at the west end.

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  • In an ordinary Greek letter (as the papyri show) we should find the salutation followed by an expression of gratification over the correspondent's good health and of prayer for its continuance.

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  • 14, and in cases of sickness seek no medical aid but rely on oil, prayer and nursing.

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  • woman to offer vocal prayer, to read the Scriptures, p or to utter such exhortation or teaching as may seem to be called for.

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  • In many places Friends have felt the need of bringing spiritual help to those who are unable to profit by the somewhat severe discipline of their ordinary manner of worship. To meet this need they hold (chiefly on Sunday evenings) meetings which are not professedly " Friends' meetings for worship," but which are services conducted on lines similar to those of other religious bodies, with, in some cases, a portion of time set apart for silent worship, and freedom for any one of the congregation to utter words of exhortation or prayer.

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  • The company in Savannah met every Wednesday evening "in order to a free conversation, begun and ended with singing and prayer.

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  • It proved more convenient to meet together and this gave opportunity for religious conversation and prayer.

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  • In the age of the Father all that was necessary was obedience; in the age of the Son reading is enjoined; but the age of the Spirit was to be devoted to prayer and song.

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  • " The mystics accorded the first place to prayer, which was considered as a mystical progress towards God, demanding a state of ecstasy."4 As a result, some of the finest specimens of Jewish devotional literature and some of the best types of Jewish individual character have been Kabbalist.

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  • Solomon reminds kings and rulers that they will be held to strict account by God, and, urging them to learn wisdom from his words, proceeds to give his own experience: devoting himself from his youth to the pursuit of wisdom he had found her to be a treasure that never failed, the source and embodiment of all that is most excellent and beautiful in the world - through her he looks to obtain influence over men and immortality, and he concludes with a prayer that God would send her out of his holy heavens to be his companion and guide.

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  • While the first has the form of a treatise, the second is an address to God; the first, though it has the Jewish people in mind, does not refer to them by name except incidentally in Solomon's prayer; the second is wholly devoted to the Jewish national experiences (this is true even of the section on idolatry).

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  • His earliest conquest was Karaja Hissar (1295),(1295), where first the name of Osman was substituted for that of the sultan in the weekly prayer.

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  • a Mussulman quarter, add to allow Bayezid to be named in the weekly prayer, Manuel succeeded in inducing Bayezid to raise the siege.

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  • The other mosques, of which there are about thirty within the walls, excluding the chapels and places of prayer, are all of recent erection.

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  • Ecclesiastical vestments, with which the present article is solely concerned, are the special articles of costume worn by the officers of the Christian Church "at all times of their ministration" - to quote the Ornaments Rubric of the English Book of Common Prayer, i.e.

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  • This restriction of the term has some historical justification: in the First Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • the word "vestment" is used as synonymous with but one liturgical garment - the chasuble, the "mass vestment" par excellence; in the Prayer Book of 1559 "vestments" are eliminated altogether, "ornaments" being substituted as a more comprehensive term.

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  • The attitude of the second group is based on a mistake as to the technical meaning of "the second year of Edward VI.," the second Prayer Book not having come into use till the third year.

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  • The wording of this was taken from the last section of Elizabeth's Act of Uniformity, prefixed to the Prayer Book of 1559.

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  • The Rubric in the Prayer Book of 1559 ran: "...

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  • The first Prayer Book passed parliament on the 21st of January 1549, but did not receive the royal assent till later, probably March, and was not in compulsory use till Whitsunday, June 9th, 2549.

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  • The evidence is now clear that the Rubric refers to the first Prayer Book.

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  • 24 and 58), and argued convincingly that the revisers of the Prayer Book in 1662, in restoring the Tomlinson (The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies, p. 122 seq.) argues that this was a "fraud rubric" inserted without authority, and utterly perverting the meaning of the proviso in the Act of Uniformity.

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  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • Even if this be so, the question arises, what vestments were prescribed in the Prayer Book of 1 549 ?

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  • He gives reasons for believing that in the Church of England, under the first Prayer Book, as in the Lutheran Churches, while chasuble and alb were retained, stole, maniple, amice and girdle were discontinued.

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  • 4 In 1 9 10 the question of the "permissive use of vestments," in connexion with that of the revision of the Prayer Book generally, was still under discussion in the convocations of the two provinces.

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  • Tomlinson, The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies (1897), a polemical work from the Protestant point of view, but scholarly and based on a mass of contemporary authorities to which references are given; the bishop of Exeter, The Ornaments Rubric (London, 1901), a pamphlet.

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  • Its most striking characteristic lies in the superscription ("A prayer of Habakkuk the prophet, set to Shigionoth"), the subscription ("For the chief musician, on my stringed instruments"), and the insertion of the musical term "Selah" in three places (v.

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  • which carries no more intrinsic weight than the Davidic titles of the Psalms. The poem begins with a prayer that God will renew the historic manifestation of the exodus, which inaugurated the national history and faith; a thunderstorm moving up from the south is then described, in which God is revealed (3-7); it is asked whether this manifestation, whose course is further described, is against nature only (8-ii); the answer is given that it is for the salvation of Israel against its wicked foes (12-15); the poet describes the effect in terror upon himself (16) and declares his confidence in God, even in utter agricultural adversity (17-19).

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  • The whole of the books in question, with the exception of 1st and 2nd Esdras, and the Prayer of Manasses, were declared canonical at Trent.

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  • The Apocrypha Proper, or the apocrypha of the Old Testament as used by English-speaking Protestants, consists of the following books: 1 Esdras, 2 Esdras, Tobit, Judith, Additions to Esther, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, Epistle of Jeremy, Additions to Daniel (Song of the Three Holy Children, History of Susannah, and Bel and the Dragon), Prayer of Manasses, i Maccabees, 2 Maccabees.

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  • It should further be observed that the Vulgate adds the Prayer of Manasses and 3 and 4 Ezra after the New Testament as apocryphal.

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  • There is no hope save in repentance and prayer; and in ch.

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  • The second part of the book is Yahweh's answer to the people's prayer.

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  • He wrote a number of war songs, including "The Soldiers' Battle Prayer" and "The Stars and Stripes."

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  • He fell under the suspicion of the Inquisition; his mystical teaching was said to be heretical, and his most famous book, the Guia de Peccadores, still a favourite treatise and one that has been translated into nearly every European tongue, was put on the Index of the Spanish Inquisition, together with his book on prayer, in 1559 His great opponent was the restless and ambitious Melchior Cano, who stigmatized the second book as containing grave errors smacking of the heresy of the Alumbrados and manifestly contradicting Catholic faith and teaching.

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  • Among the literary relics of the 12th century are the Latiatuc " or Halotti Beszed funeral discourse and prayer in Hungarian, to which Dobrentei in his Regi Magyar Nyelvemlekek assigns as a probable date the year 1171 (others, however, 1182 or 1183).

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  • - cl., of which the former was sung at the three great feasts - the encaenia, and the new moon, and the latter at the daily morning prayer.

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  • His description of the Temple ritual is not strictly accurate, but he speaks of the worshippers as passing the night in gazing at the stars and calling on God in prayer; his words, if they do not exactly fit anything in the later ritual, are well fitted to illustrate the original liturgical use of Ps.

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  • It did not, however, obtain ecclesiastical currency - the old versions holding their ground, just as English churchmen still read the Psalms in the version of the " Great Bible " printed in their Prayer Book.

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  • It is difficult to understand a much-discussed passage of Origen (De oratione, 14), except as applying to prayer addressed to the saints.

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  • in an encyclical of 553,1 where he condemns those "who share with Nestorians in belief and prayer, and take their breadofferings to their shrines and receive communion from them, as if from the ministers of the oblations of the Paulicians."

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  • They called their meetings the Catholic Church, and the places they met in places of prayer, lrpoo-euxai.

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  • The Christ is an elect one, who, as the Cathars (q.v.) put it, having been consoled or become a Paraclete in the flesh, stands in prayer with his hands outspread in the form of a cross, while the congregation of hearers or audientes adore the Christ in him.

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  • That it was proper to wear special garments (or at least to rearrange one's weekday clothes) on the Jewish sabbath was recognized in the Talmud, and Mahommedans, after discussing at length the most suitable raiment for prayer, favoured the use of a single simple garment (Bukhari, viii.).

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  • A small community (about 130) in Bombay, known as the Prarthna (Prayer) Samaj, was founded in 1867 through Keshub Chunder's influence; they have a similar creed to that of the Brahma Samaj, but have broken less decisively with orthodox and ceremonial Hinduism.

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  • The last reference to him, as living, is in 1208, when an order for payment to him is on record, but Giraldus Cambrensis, in the second edition of his Hibernica, redacted in 1210, utters a prayer for his soul, "cujus animae propitietur Deus," a proof that he was no longer alive.

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  • The sick person, or his representative, after ablution, prayer and sacrifice, was made to sleep on the hide of the sacrificed animal, or at the feet of the statue of the god, while sacred rites were performed.

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  • All phenomena, moral as well as material, are contemplated by him in their relation to one great organic whole, which he acknowledges under the name of "Natura daedala rerum," and the most beneficent manifestations of which he seems to symbolize and almost to deify in the "Alma Venus," whom, in apparent contradiction to his denial of a divine interference with human affairs, he invokes with prayer in the opening lines of the poem.

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  • It was the precursor of the Prayer Book, and supplemented the accustomed Latin service by additions in English to provide for the communion of the people in both kinds.

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  • But on Whitsunday 1549 the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • The first Prayer Book does not contain any direction to use or any mention of incense.

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  • It has been and still is a keenly controverted question whether incense did or did not continue to be in ceremonial use under the first Prayer Book or during the rest of Edward VI.'s reign.

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  • The second Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • 2) abolished the Prayer Book, repealed the Acts of Uniformity and restored "divine service and administration of sacraments as were most commonly used in England in the last year of Henry VIII."

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  • On the 24th of June 1559 the second Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • There is no evidence of the ceremonial use of incense under Elizabeth's Prayer Book, or under the present Prayer Book of 1662 (established by the fourth Act of Uniformity, 13 and 14 Charles II.

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  • Clement of Alexandria expresses this in his well-known words: "The true altar of incense is the just soul, and the perfume from it is holy prayer."

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  • The Egyptians understood the use of incense as symbolical of the purification of the soul by prayer.

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  • His being engaged in prayer is mentioned several times where there is no parallel in those Gospels (iii.

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  • Visions are vouchsafed only to those who to prayer have added fasting.

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  • Prayer of Joseph.

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  • The Prayer of Joseph is quoted by Origen [In Joann.

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  • bede, prayer, from O.

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  • biddan, to pray; literally "a man of prayer"), generally a pensioner or almsman whose duty it was to pray for his benefactor.

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  • Nowell is believed to have composed the Catechism inserted before the Order of Confirmation in the Prayer Book of 1549, which was supplemented in 1604 and is still in use; but the evidence is not conclusive.

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  • 12), and to whom he taught special forms of prayer (Luke v.

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  • Gamaliel devoted special attention to the regulation of the rite of prayer, which after the cessation of sacrificial worship had become all-important.

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  • About the same time he published a pamphlet advocating the reform of the Prayer Book, while a tract issued on the 15th of July, Sundry reasons against the new intended Bill for governing and reforming Corporations, was declared illegal, false, scandalous and seditious; Prynne being censured, and only escaping punishment by submission.

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  • The continued attacks upon the Presbyterians led him to publish his Short, Sober, Pacific Examination of Exuberances in the Common Prayer, as well as the Apology for Tender Consciences touching Not Bowing at the Name of Jesus.

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  • The other institution, relating to land, was that known to the Roman law as the precarium, a name derived from one of its essential features through all its history, the prayer of the suppliant by which the relationship was begun.

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  • The marks, however, were at her prayer not made visible.

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  • With the Reformation' faith healing proper reappears among the Moravians and Waldenses, who, like the Peculiar People of our own day, put their trust in prayer and anointing with oil.

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  • He was full of doubt and self-distrust; disgust for the world did not seem to him a sufficient qualification for the religious life, and his daily prayer was, "Lord!

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  • In dealing with nonconformity he was tolerant, and even advocated a revision of the Prayer Book if that would allay the scruples of dissenters.

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  • This was similar to the view now held by Cranmer and Ridley, but it is difficult to prove that Vermigli had any great influence in the modifications of the Book of Common Prayer made in 1552.

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  • Its inhabitants were saved from massacre by the devotion of Eustache de St Pierre and six of the chief citizens, who were themselves spared at the prayer of Queen Philippa.

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  • To him, as to the Deuteronomic legislation, the forms of legal observance are of value only as the fitting expression of Israel's peculiar sonshin and service, and he shows himself a true prophet when he contrasts the worthless ministry of unwilling priests with the pure offering of prayer and praise that rises from the implicit monotheism of even Gentile worship 2 (i.

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  • They are not conceived of in any anthropomorphic form, their sex even may often be indeterminate ("sive mas, sive femina" is the constantly recurring formula of prayer), but the sphere of action of each is clearly marked and an appeal to a spirit outside his own special sphere would never even be thought of.

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  • But the practical mind of the Roman gives this relation a legal turn: the ius sacrum, which regulates the dealings of men with the divine powers, is an inseparable part of ius publicum, the body of civil law, and the various acts of worship, prayer and thanksgiving are conceived of under the legal aspect of a contract.

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  • All-important, too, is the order of ceremonial and the formula of prayer: a mistake or omission or an unpropitious interruption may vitiate the whole ritual, and though such misfortunes may occasionally be expiated by the additional offering of a piaculum, in more serious cases the whole ceremony must be recommenced ab initio.

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  • In the popular mind the hosts of exciting oriental cults, which in the 3rd and 4th centuries of the Empire filled Rome with the rites of mysticism and initiation, held undisputed sway; and with the more educated a revived philosophy, less accurate perhaps in thought, but more satisfying to the religious conscience, gave men a clearer monotheistic conception, and a notion of individual relations with the divine in prayer and even of consecration.

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  • None of his sermons, however, unless we regard his book on the Lord's Prayer as a homily, has come down to us.

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  • The Religions of the World (1847); Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy (at first an article in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana, 1848); The Church a Family (1850); The Old Testament (1851); Theological Essays (1853); The Prophets and Kings of the Old Testament (1853); Lectures on Ecclesiastical History (1854); The Doctrine of Sacrifice (1854); The Patriarchs and Lawgivers of the Old Testament (1855); The Epistles of St John (1857); The Commandments as Instruments of National Reformation (1866); On the Gospel of St Luke (1868); The Conscience: Lectures on Casuistry (1868); The Lord', Prayer, a Manual (1870).

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  • And since we must reckon praise as the highest form of prayer, such an early Christian hymn as is found in I Tim.

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  • The tradition which St Paul received included, so to speak, the germ of the central prayer in the Eucharist (r Cor.

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  • In 1870 the controversy on the use of the creed in the Book of Common Prayer led to fresh investigation of the MSS., and a theory known as the " Two-portion theory " was started by C. A.

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  • In the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • it was " sung or said " after the Benedictus on the greater feasts, and this use was extended in the second Prayer Book.

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  • The priests were the Arval Brothers, who conducted the victims - ox, sheep and pig (suovetaurilia) - in procession with prayer to Ceres round the boundaries of the ager Romanus.

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  • Upon the bishop having satisfied himself of the sufficiency of the clerk, he proceeds to institute him to the spiritual office to which the benefice is annexed, but before such institution can take place, the clerk is required to make a declaration of assent to the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion and to the Book of Common Prayer according to a form prescribed in the Clerical Subscription Act 1865, to make a declaration against simony in accordance with that act, and to take and subscribe the oath of allegiance according to the form in the Promissory Oaths Act 1868.

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  • But in Englishspeaking countries the word " liturgy " has come to be used in a more popular sense to denote any or all of the various services of the Church, whether contained in separate volumes or bound up together in the form of a Book of Common Prayer.

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  • A prayer or prayers said at the conclusion of the Offertory.

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  • Introductory prayer for acceptance.

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  • Prayer for acceptance and consecration of offering.

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  • Lord's Prayer, with a short introduction and the expansion of the last petition into a prayer known as the " Embolismus."

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  • a concluding prayer.

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  • i is noteworthy, and with the prayer in i.

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  • 6 sqq.) compare the prayer in Neh.

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  • The great event of this visit took place on the succeeding Christmas Day, when Charles on rising from prayer in St Peter's was crowned by Leo and proclaimed emperor and Augustus amid the acclamations of the crowd.

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  • No prayer arises within his work on their behalf, and nothing but unalloyed triumph is displayed over their doom.

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  • During his last illness the prophet indicated Abu-Bekr as his successor by desiring him to offer up prayer for the people.

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  • Through all this runs the train of thought resulting naturally from Bruno's fundamental principles, and familiar in modern philosophy as Spinozism, the denial of particular providence, the doctrine of the uselessness of prayer, the identification in a sense of liberty and necessity, and the peculiar definition of good and evil.

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  • Before the year was out, yielding to the prayer of six or eight persons who had freed themselves from the Munster spell, he agreed to become their minister, and was set apart (January 1537) to the eldership at Groningen, with imposition of hands by Obbe Philipsz, who is regarded as the actual founder of the Mennonite body.

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  • Silent prayer was a feature of the worship; sermons were without texts.

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  • Among his publications, besides many sermons, were A Brief Review of the Episcopal Church in Virginia (1845); Wilberforce, Cranmer, Jewett and the Prayer Book on the Incarnation (1850); Reasons for Loving the Episcopal Church (1852); and Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia (1857); a storehouse of material on the ecclesiastical history of the state.

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  • The sentence he expected was pronounced on the 6th of July in the presence of Sigismund and a full sitting of the council; once and again he attempted to remonstrate, but in vain, and finally he betook himself to silent prayer.

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  • " And conceiving God to be the fountain of wisdom," he " thought it right and necessary to solicit His assistance for obtaining it," and drew up the following prayer for daily use: " O powerful Goodness!

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  • In the medieval Church there were seven "corporal" and seven "spiritual works of mercy" (opera misericordiae); these were (a) the giving of food to the hungry and drink to the thirsty, the clothing of the naked, the visitation of the sick and of prisoners, the receiving of strangers, and the burial of the dead; (b) the conversion of sinners, teaching of the ignorant, giving of counsel to the doubtful, forgiveness of injuries, patience under wrong, prayer for the living and for the dead.

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  • Or again the following prayer for baptism over the water from the Ethiopic Statutes of the Apostles as translated by the Rev. G.

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  • But in that case how can the creed and ritual of baptism, the Lord's Prayer and the Eucharistic formulae, have been kept secret?

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  • A conservative Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and other Rites and Ceremonies after the Use of the Church of England - commonly called the First Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • It was followed, however, in 1552 by the second Prayer Book, which was destined to be, with some modifications, the permanent basis of the English service.

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  • The royal supremacy was reasserted, the title being modified into " supreme governor "; and a new edition of Edward VI.'s second Prayer Book, with a few changes, was issued.

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  • By the Act of Uniformity (1559) a uniform ritual, the Book of Common Prayer, was imposed upon clergy and laity alike, and no liberty of public worship was permitted.

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  • Massachusetts had excluded the English Book of Common Prayer, she had restricted the franchise, laid the death penalty, on religious opinions, and passed various other laws repugnant to the Crown, notably to Charles II.

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  • His body was removed to Rouen, and a magnificent tomb, on which he is represented kneeling in the attitude of prayer, was erected to his memory in the cathedral of that town.

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  • After this we find him at the head of a convent near Arnesi in Pontus, in which his mother Emilia, now a widow, his sister Macrina and several other ladies, gave themselves to a pious life of prayer and charitable works.

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  • Dorsey, again, draws a distinction between lore narratives, which can be rehearsed without fasting or prayer, and rituals which require the most rigid preparation.

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  • After a residence in the north as chaplain to Henry Hastings, earl of Huntingdon, President of the North, he was made vicar of St Giles's, Cripplegate, in 1588, and there delivered his striking sermons on the temptation in the wilderness and the Lord's prayer.

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  • The early Christians continued the Jewish practice of making such an ascription at the close of public prayer (Origen, Hopi Ekijs, 3 3) and introduced it after the sermon also.

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  • 21; and to the last clause of the Lord's Prayer as found in Matt.

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  • 0 Lord God, heavenly king, God the Father Almighty; 0 Lord, the only begotten Son, Jesus Christ; 0 Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us; Thou that takest away the sins of the world, receive our prayer; Thou that sittest at the right hand of the Father, have mercy upon us; For Thou alone art holy.

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  • Procter, Book of Common Prayer, p. 212; W.

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