Practically sentence examples

practically
  • Jeez, you know, it's still practically dark out.

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  • They practically play baseball all year!

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  • You own a fancy place and drive a practically new jeep.

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  • The park's practically in town!

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  • Lots of the folks on the street had poor teeth and most of their clothes were practically rags.

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  • Quite young, I grieve to say; and all of my brothers and sisters that you see here are practically my own age.

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  • Yup. The fish are practically jumping in the boat.

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  • He practically made me call my brother and now I'm going up to Weston Priory in Vermont and spend the week with him.

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  • It's practically still dark out there, Dean answered.

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  • He was practically beating his chest.

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  • He practically accused you of causing the accident!

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  • She'll give up her husband who she practically calls stupid and this other Abbott person just so she can live.

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  • As she practically danced out of the room, and up the stairs, she shouted, "Later, Stud."

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  • Josh practically fell out of the truck and staggered toward the porch.

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  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.

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  • "Get your ass down here!" she practically screamed.

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  • We've practically got him!

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  • He practically raped her the night he first stayed in Bird Song.

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  • Katie practically spit the word out.

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  • If I didn't have a pregnant wife practically begging me, I wouldn't even be making this phone call.

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  • The chance of anyone believing the story was practically nil.

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  • As she was practically being dragged up the stairs, Elisabeth looked back at Jackson.

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  • It's practically halted distribution.

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  • Yes, but when he comes home, I practically attack him.

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  • We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity, or account of human experience.

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  • Molly asked, practically holding her breath.

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  • That, and Maria's presence, practically gave the Deans a holiday of their own.

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  • She nearly collided with Donald Ryland as she practically skipped from the room.

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  • It seems to me, that Edith had a very rapid mood change from flaunting her nakedness in front of Claire to...killing herself, practically minutes later.

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  • "We're not engaged," she cut him off sharply, "practically or otherwise."

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  • I confess, that practically speaking, when I have learned a man's real disposition, I have no hopes of changing it for the better or worse in this state of existence.

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  • Then she added, "Julie practically begged me to bring Molly out there and help the both of them to get back home, whatever it takes to do so."

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  • We've practically got a full house of ice climbers starting in a couple of days, Dean answered.

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  • Martha's aunt, Howie's mother, called and practically begged her to let him fly out for a couple of days.

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  • She was unable to pin him down on the cases of ours she'd documented earlier but he practically admitted he was personally responsible for all them and more.

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  • Now I've practically brought them into the fold.

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  • She narrowed her eyes and practically threw a plate at him.

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  • He practically flew down the stairs, but didn't make it out the door before Sarah asked where he was going.

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  • "Practically," she lied, dodging backwards and putting a stanchion between them.

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  • I practically made him go.

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  • You didn't want to go out to dinner with me, and just now you practically cringed when I touched you.

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  • She's so vulnerable and practically incapable of doing anything on her own about her problems.

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  • Half the cars down there have USA license plates, and the models are so new they practically still have the family pet in the back seat.

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  • Instead I listened to his harangue about the difficulty they encountered with the session I'd practically demanded, the break-ins in Boston.

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  • This aunt I never met... or maybe I did but don't know it... she thinks I'm like practically a priest and she wants me to do all this stuff at the memorial service, for our side of the family!

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  • You were practically the last person to see him before he fell.

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  • I thought maybe they had to think about it before they called, but then they practically beg me to pass on the information immediately.

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  • Howie thanked her while I practically jumped over the counter to read over the distressed clerk's shoulder as his fingers plodded over the computer keys.

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  • Westlake practically camps on it and even Pumpkin Green's has gotten in on the act, Dean said.

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  • You're supposed to be practically retired.

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  • It's one of the few times we've been without guests since we opened and we'll practically have a full house next week with the Ice Festival coming up.

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  • She pivoted around, as far as her seatbelt allowed, practically hanging over the seat as she looked out the back window.

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  • She threw herself at Ryland, practically under Shipton's nose.

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  • Then he knew she lied when she said they were practically engaged.

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  • There were ten cities serviced by Byrne, all on the eastern seaboard, and his itineraries were detailed on practically an hour­ by-hour basis.

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  • He practically oozed testosterone.

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  • The technical high school, which since 1899 has possessed the right to confer the degree of doctor of engineering, practically enjoys academic status and so do the veterinary high school and the school of art.

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  • Although some of these elephants are believed not to have been larger than donkeys, the height of others may be estimated at from 4 to 5 ft., or practically the same as that of the dwarf Congo race.

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  • However, practically speaking, it sometimes has a corrupting influence on those whom it empowers to act for the state.

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  • Practically speaking, governments often act as if their first duty is to protect the government, not the people.

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  • They make shift to live merely by conformity, practically as their fathers did, and are in no sense the progenitors of a noble race of men.

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  • Men say, practically, Begin where you are and such as you are, without aiming mainly to become of more worth, and with kindness aforethought go about doing good.

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  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.

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  • Betsy and Martha, now practically best friends, conspired together against the rest of us until they owned most of the board.

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  • When my aunt practically insisted he visit me, I was scared to death wondering what he knew or why he wanted to come.

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  • He was practically a priest and he seduced you?

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  • These rules were borrowed almost word for word from the project drawn up at the Brussels international conference of 1874, which, though never ratified, was practically incorporated in the army regulations issued by the Russian government in connexion with the war of 18 77-7 8.

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  • There are few trees on the island, for most of the valuable indigenous trees have been practically exterminated, such as the sandalwood, which the earlier navigators found one of the most valuable products of the island.

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  • It was thus practically a committee of the larger council, and assisted the king in his judicial work, its authority being as undefined as his own.

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  • When a water jet serves as collector, the pressure under which it issues should be practically constant.

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  • In an ordinary climate a building seems to be practically at the earth's potential; near its walls the equipotential surfaces are highly inclined, and near the ridges they may lie very close together.

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  • Simspon concluded that for a given wind velocity dissipation is practically a linear function of ionization.

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  • The resources of Matto Grosso are practically undeveloped, owing to the isolated situation of the state, the costs of transportation and the small population.

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  • " Lean-to," " shed," or " pent " roofs are practically developments of the flat roof, one end of the joists (which are now called " rafters ") being tipped up to form a decided slope, which enables slates, tiles, corrugated iron and other materials to be employed which cannot be used upon a " flat " roof.

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  • It is practically impossible to work with the sensitive film in contact with the reseau-film, not only because dust particles and contact would injure the silver film, but also because the plate-glass used for the photographic plates is seldom a perfect plane.

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  • But a little consideration will show that when the plate is reversed 180° the effects of errors of the screws produced by wear are practically eliminated.

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  • Despite their poverty begging is practically unknown.

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  • It seems possible that the road at first led to Tusculum, that it was then prolonged to Labici, and later still became a road for through traffic; it may even have superseded the Via Latina as a route to the S.E., for, while the distance from Rome to their main junction at Ad Bivium (or to another junction at Compitum Anagninum) is practically identical, the summit level of the former is 725 ft.

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  • Practically it came to be the theological dicta of the church, explained according to the philosophy of Aristotle and his Arabian commentators.

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  • The measure by which the archonship was opened to the third and (practically) to the fourth class of citizens (the Zeugitae and Thetes) may also be due to Pericles; the date is now known to be 457 (Const.

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  • From time to time the emperors of Trebizond paid tribute to the Seljuk sultans of Iconium, to the grand khans of the Mongols, to Timur the Tatar, to the Turkoman chieftains, and to the Ottomans; but by means of skilful negotiations they were enabled practically to secure their independence.

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  • Below the Shatt-el-Hai the country on both sides of the river is practically a swamp, except where the palm groves have formed land.

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  • Burton was the scene of several engagements in the Civil War, when its large trade in clothing and alabaster was practically ruined.

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  • Bernhardt Schmidt, better known in England as Father Smith, was invited about 1660 to build the organ for the Chapel Royal, Whitehall; two years later he built the organ in Durham Cathedral a' 474.1, difference a whole tone, and practically agreeing with the Cammerton of Praetorius.

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  • Rice cultivation and fishing occupy practically all the inhabitants of the district.

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  • Practically all the company's servants were traders in their private capacity, and as they claimed various privileges and exemptions this system was detrimental to the interests of the native princes and gave rise to an enormous amount of corruption.

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  • The mountains of Albania are said to be rich in minerals, but this source of wealth remains practically unexplored.

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  • fragment 3) describes as forming the boundary between the Illyrians and Epirots, practically corresponds with the course of the Shkumb, which now separates the Ghegs and the Tosks.

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  • In the vilayet of Scutari they form about 55% of the population; central Albania is almost entirely Moslem; in southern Albania, however, there is a considerable Christian population, whose limits practically coincide with those of the Greek-speaking districts.

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  • about 1750), an able, cruel and unscrupulous man, subdued the neighbouring pashas and chiefs, crushed the Suliotes and Khimarrhotes, and exercised a practically independent sovereignty from the Adriatic to the Aegean.

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  • The occupants of Edom during practically the whole period of Biblical history were the Bedouin tribes which claimed 1 A curious etymological speculation connects the name with the story of Esau's begging for Jacob's pottage, Gen.

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  • The theological interest which attaches to the idea of the preAaronic king-priest in these typical applications is practically independent of the historical questions suggested by the narrative of Gen.

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  • After the defeat of the king of Vijayanagar at Talikot (1565), Dharwar was for a few years practically independent under its Hindu governor; but in 1573 the fort was captured by the sultan of Bijapur, and Dharwar was annexed to his dominions.

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  • If the flue pipe be carried up a considerable distance inside the apartment to be warmed before being turned into the external air, practically the whole of the heat generated will be utilized.

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  • Lydgate's most doughty and learned apologist is Dr Schick, whose preface to the Temple of Glass embodies practically all that is known or conjectured concerning this author, including the chronological order of his works.

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  • The monastic buildings have practically disappeared, but the church was a splendid building of various dates from Norman to Decorated, the choir and Lady chapel representing the later period.

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  • Much damage was done to the tower, and the nave roof perished, for the fire reached practically every part of the building, though the stonework of the nave suffered comparatively little.

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  • Though higher in rank and larger than most presbyteries it is practically of less importance, not being, like the presbytery, a court of first instance, nor yet, like the general assembly, a court of final appeal.

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  • Practically the minister is regarded as of higher standing.

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  • Then with the Restoration came Episcopacy, and the persecution of all who were not Episcopalians; and the dream and vision of a truly Reformed English Church practically passed away.

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  • From the beginning of the 18th century the greater number of the Presbyterian congregations became practically independent in polity and Unitarian in doctrine.

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  • Lane and Auburn remained practically independent.

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  • Considering the circumstances in which General Roca assumed office, it must be admitted that he showed great moderation and used the practically absolute power that he possessed to establish a strong central government, and to initiate a national policy, which aimed at furthering the prosperity and development of the whole country.

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  • The administration of justice, he declared, had fallen to so low an ebb as to be practically non-existent.

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  • Every Frenchman therefore is a member of the army practically or potentially from the age of twenty to the age of forty-five.

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  • The net gain in the 1906 class is not far short of 5o,00o, and the proportion of the new contingent to the old is practically 5:4.

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  • The military government of Lyons is another independent and special command; it comprises practically the XIV.

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  • On the side of Belgium the danger of irruption through neutral territory, which has for many years been foreseen, is provided against by the fortresses of Lille, Valenciennes and Maubeuge, but (with a view to tempting the Germans to attack through Luxemburg, as is stated by German authorities) the frontier between Maubeuge and Verdun is left practically undefended.

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  • The history of Calatia is practically that of its more powerful neighbour Capua, but as it lay near the point where the Via Appia turns east and enters the mountains, it had some strategic importance.

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  • His power was formerly of great extent, but he has now practically no important duty to exercise except that of chairman of the Dover harbour board.

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  • After the restoration of the walls of Jerusalem by Nehemiah, a considerable number of Jews returned to the city, but we know practically nothing of its history for more than a century until, in 332 B.C., Alexander the Great conquered Syria.

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  • has practically justified Levi and Simeon from its standpoint of opposition to intermarriage, and in spite of Jacob's curse (Gen.

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  • Western Australia has practically only two seasons, the winter or wet season, which commences in April and ends in October, and Western the summer or dry season, which comprises the remainder of the year.

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  • The supposed continent extended across the south pole, practically joining Australia and South America.

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  • During the five years following the last year of the foregoing table, there was practically no increase in population by immigration.

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  • Practically the whole of the territory between the 145° meridian and the Great Dividing Range, as well as extensive tracts in the south and west, are a natural sheep pasture with climatic conditions and indigenous vegetation pre - eminently adapted for the growth of wool of the highest quality.

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  • Although the timbers of commercial value are confined practically to the eastern and a portion of the western coastal belt and a few inland tracts of Australia, they constitute an important national asset.

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  • Dr Jack, late government geologist of Queensland, considers the extent of the coal-fields of that state to be practically unlimited, and is of opinion that the carboniferous formations extend to a considerable distance under the Great Western Plains.

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  • The mines, however, are situated too far from the coast to permit of serious competition with Newcastle in an export trade, and the output is practically restricted to supplying local requirements.

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  • Again, while they differ physically from neighbouring races, while there is practically nothing in common between them and the Malays, the Polynesians, or the Papuan Melanesians, they agree in type so closely among themselves that they must be regarded as forming one race.

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  • After a ferocious contest, the Danes were practically annihilated.

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  • m.), as well as the much smaller islands of Boschplaat and Rottum, which are practically uninhabited.

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  • Here we are concerned only with their earlier history, which is put for convenience under this heading in order to separate the account of the period when they formed practically a single area for historical purposes from that of the time when Holland and Belgium became distinct administrative units.

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  • Its remoteness from the control of the authority of the German and French kings, together with its inaccessibility, gave special facilities in Lower Lorraine to the growth of a number of practically independent feudal states forming a group or system apart.

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  • Thus grew up a number of municipalities - practically self-governing republics - semiindependent feudatories in the feudal state.

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  • There are practically no branch roads in Turkestan, and the only means of transport in bulk is either by wagon on the few main roads, or by railway.

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  • At his accession spectators were struck by the fearless manner in which he rode, practically unattended, on his way to be girt with the sword of Eyub.

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  • The rivers on the east coast are practically the only highways, the Malays always travelling by boat in preference to walking, but they serve their purpose very indifferently, and their great beauty is their chief claim to distinction.

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  • The mistake of speaking of the Sakai tribes as practically identical with the Semang or Pangan has very frequently been made, but as a matter of fact the two races are absolutely distinct from one another.

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  • There are some porcupines, red foxes, minks and martens, but the moose, wolf and lynx are practically extinct.

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  • The state is practically free from debt, the only obligation of this character being $ 1 35,5 00 in 6% bonds, payable in 1910, which were issued in behalf of the Agricultural College.

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  • Political problems were not to be so resolved, but practically.

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  • Cromwell's policy in this instance was not overturned at the Restoration, and the great Jewish immigration into England with all its important consequences may be held to date practically from these first concessions made by Cromwell.

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  • The water-side village of Jaragua, the port of MaceiO, is practically a suburb of the city.

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  • In the central parts of the two high-pressure areas there is practically no surface circulation.

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  • The North Atlantic being altogether cut off from the Arctic regions, and the vertical circulation being active, this movement is here practically non-existent; but in the South Atlantic, where communication with the Southern Ocean is perfectly open, Antarctic water can be traced to the equator and even beyond.

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  • The experience gained on the northern survey under Argelander's direction enabled Schdnfeld to introduce some improvements in the methods employed, which increased the accuracy of this work, which was practically accomplished in March 1881, some revision only remaining to be done.

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  • This road was practically abandoned when the Indian government telegraph line, which ran along it, was removed to a road farther east in 1906.

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  • An illness brought on by toil and privation forced him to leave his work to others for nearly a year, but in August 1598 he returned to his field of labour, and in October of that year practically the whole country was Catholic again.

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  • It is practically important to consider the rate at which energy may be transformed into useful work, or the horse-power of the agent.

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  • Practically every law of harmony in 16th-century music may be equally well regarded as a law of vocal effect.

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  • By a bull of 1264 Urban made the festival, hitherto practically confined to the diocese of Liege, obligatory on the whole Church,' and a new office for the festival was written by Thomas Aquinas himself.

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  • Down to the closing decades of the 19th century hydraulic power was practically the only system available for working cranes from a power station.

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  • Sheer legs are generally built in very large sizes, and their use is practically confined to marine work.

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  • It is practically a traveller mounted on high legs, so as to permit of its being travelled on rails placed on the ground level, instead of on an elevated gantry.

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  • copper wires insulated with carefully dried paper of a special quality, has practically entirely superseded the use of wires insulated with gutta-percha.

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  • It is a well-ascertained fact that the insulator, gutta-percha, is, when kept under water, practically imperishable, so that it is only the original strength of the sheathing wires and the deterioration allowable in them that have to be considered.

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  • Normally a switch attached to the key cuts the battery off, and connects the line direct through the receiving relay; this switch is turned to " send " when transmission commences, and is moved back to " receive " when it ceases: this movement is done quite mechanically by the telegraphist, and as it is practically never forgotten, automatic devices (which have often been suggested) to effect the turning are wholly unnecessary.

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  • As many as 162 segments in eight groups are practically used.

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  • That now employed is, however, practically a development of his B 2 1 4 3 3 / ? ?

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  • In the receiver there is a strong electromagnet, excited by a local current, which has in its circuit two annular air gaps, across which the magnetic field is practically uniform and constant.

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  • The conductor of the cable is practically insulated, as the condensers in the bridge have a very high resistance; hence no appreciable current ever flows into or out of the line.

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  • James Bowman Lindsay of Dundee, between 1845 and 1854, reinvented and even patented Morse's method, and practically put the plan into operation for experimental purposes across the river Tay.

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  • Evershed, and has been practically adopted at Lavernock and Flat Holme.

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  • There is no evidence that this plan of Edison's was practically operative as a system of telegraphy.

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  • Many other more or less imperfect devices - such as those of Mahlon Loomis, put forward in 1872 and 1877, and Kitsee in 1895 - for wireless telegraphy were not within the region of practically realizable schemes.

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  • When the methods for effecting this had been worked out practically it finally led to the inventions of Slaby, Braun and others being united into a system called the Telefunken system, which, as regards the transmitter, consisted in forming a closed oscillation circuit comprising a condenser, spark gap and inductance which at one point was attached either directly or through a condenser to the earth or to an equivalent balancing capacity, and at some other point to a suitably tuned antenna.

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  • in length by any mirrors which can be practically constructed would be like attempting optical experiments with mirrors one-hundred-thousandth of an inch in diameter.

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  • A type of transmitter which has come to be invaluable in connexion with long distance telephony, and which has practically superseded all other forms, is the granular carbon transmitter.

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  • In America, on farmers' circuits, ten or more stations are frequently connected to one line; but in England ten is practically the maximum.

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  • In large towns telephone distribution by means of open wires is practically impossible, and the employment of cables either laid in the ground or suspended from poles or other overhead supports is necessary.

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  • In view of these differences from the domesticated breed, and the resemblance of the skull or lower jaw to that of the extinct European species, it becomes practically impossible to regard the wild camels as the offspring of animals that have escaped from captivity.

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  • Distributive co-operation is confined almost entirely to Piedmont, Liguria, Lombardy, Venetia, Emilia and Tuscany, and is practically unknown in Basilicata, the Abruzzi and Sardinia.

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  • Navigable canals had in 1886 a total length of abput 655 m.; they are principally situated in Piedmont, Lombardy and Venetia, and are thus practically confined to the P0 basin.

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  • Though the territorial authority of the papal see was practically abolished in 1870, the fact that Rome is the seat of the administrative centre of the vast organization of the church is not without significance to the nation.

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  • Parliament consists of two chambers, the senate and the Chamber of Deputies, which are nominally on an equal footing, though practically the elective chamber ~s the more important.

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  • These conditions made a territorial system of recruiting or organization, as understood in Germany, practically impossible.

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  • The men classed in it have to train for six months, and they are called up in the late summer to bridge the The 2nd category of the 1875 law had practically ceased to exist.

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  • .The victory in the conflict practically falls to the hitherto unenfranchised plebeians.

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  • Italy, intellectually first among the peoples, was now politically and practically last; and nothing to her historian is more heartrending than to watch the gradual extinction of her spirit in this age of slavery.

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  • was fain to sign terms of peace with Bonaparte at Tolentino, practically ceding the northern part of his states, known as the Legations.

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  • But he gave secret encouragement to the movement, and ended by practically directing its activity through La Farina.

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  • The terms of the treaty of peace signed at Zurich on the 10th of November were practically identical with those of the preT liminaries of Villafranca.

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  • The way was now open for the advance of the Pied- upi ntese, who, save at Isemnia, encountered practically no in istance.

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  • Practically, therefore, the law has remained a one-sided enactment, by which Italy considers herself bound, and of which she has always observed the spirit, even though the exigencies of self-defence may have led in some minor respects to non-observance of the letter.

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  • Practically, therefore, the Right, of which the Minghetti cabinet was the last representative administration, left Italian finance with a surplus of 80,000.

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  • Except in regard to an increase of the army estimates, urgently demanded by public opinion, the new ministry had practically no programme.

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  • By the end of September the idea had gained such ground in Italy that the visit was practically settled, and on the 7th of October Mancini informed Robilant (who was then in Italy) of the fact.

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  • Though kept in the dark as to the Skierniewice arrangement, the Italian government soon discovered from the course of events that the triple alliance had practically lost its object, European peace having been assured without Italian co-operation.

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  • On the 2gth of June 1881 the Chamber adopted a Franchise Reform Bill, which increased the electorate from oo,ooo to 2,000,000 by lowering the fiscal qualification from 40 to 19.80 lire in direct taxation, and by extending the suffrage to all persons who had passed through the two lower standards of the elementary schools, and practically to all persons able to read and write.

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  • When the Crispi cabinet fell in March 1896 Sonnino had the satisfaction of seeing revenue increased by ~3, 400,000, expenditure diminished by 2,800,000, the gold premium reduced from 16 to 5%, consolidated stock at 95 instead of 72, and, notwithstanding the expenditure necessitated by the Abyssinian War, financial equilibrium practically restored.

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  • From the 7th to the 9th of May Milan remained practically in Lhe hands of the mob.

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  • An appeal to the country might have brought about a different result, but it is said that opposition from the highest quarters rendered this course practically impossible.

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  • At the general parliamentary elections of 1904 a few Catholics had been elected as such, and the encyclical of the 11th of June 1905 On the political organization of the Catholics, practically abolished the non erpedit.

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  • The breach with Rome and the subjection of the church in England to the royal supremacy had been practically achieved before Cranmer's appointment as archbishop: and he had little to do with the other constitutional changes of Henry's reign.

    0
    0
  • He set practically no limits to the ecclesiastical authority of kings; they were as fully the representatives of the church as the state, and Cranmer hardly distinguished between the two.

    0
    0
  • He also gives us " natural law " 2 - a Stoic inheritance, preserving the form of an idealist appeal to systematic requirements of reason, while practically limiting its assumptions to those of intuitionalism.

    0
    0
  • Restoration of property is promised to them practically in the same way as to Englishmen.

    0
    0
  • Little Andaman, with the exception of the extreme north, is practically flat.

    0
    0
  • Very few experts are employed in supervision; practically everything is directed by the officials, who themselves have first to learn each trade.

    0
    0
  • caulus in the coenosarc; it 4 _; is practically all hydrorhiza.

    0
    0
  • It differs from Limnocodium in having practically no manubrium but a wide mouth two-thirds the diameter of the umbrella across.

    0
    0
  • The problem of the genesis of mind is practically solved by identifying the soul, 1 This is brought out by F.

    0
    0
  • - Practically, every botanical and zoological publication of recent date has its bearing on evolution.

    0
    0
  • A few years later, in 347, the council of Sardica, a council of practically the whole West save Africa, reversed Tyre and acquitted St Athanasius after a full judicial inquiry.

    0
    0
  • Canon Law as a study had been practically prohibited at the universities since 1536 (Merriman, Thomas Cromwell, i.

    0
    0
  • to the north, thus making Ghent practically a sea-port; while a second canal, from the Lys, connects the city via Bruges with Ostende.

    0
    0
  • He shows that in the 3rd century B.C. the language used throughout northern India was practically one, and that it was derived directly from the speech of the Vedic Aryans, retaining many Vedic forms lost in the later classical Sanskrit.

    0
    0
  • What characterizes a tadpole is the conjoined globular head and body, so formed that it is practically impossible to discern the limit between the two, sharply set off from the more or less elongate compressed tail which is the organ of propulsion.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, however divided in opinion as to his political conduct, his countrymen were practically unanimous in admiring his dramatic work; and his reputation, if it gained little by El Nuevo Don Juan, was greatly increased by El Tanto por Ciento and El Tejado de Vidrio.

    0
    0
  • A specialized conducting tissue of this kind, used mainly for transmitting organic substances, is always developed in plants where the region of assimilative activity is local in the plant-body, as it is in practically all the higher plants.

    0
    0
  • The subject was practically dormant for nearly a century and a half, largely owing to the dominance of classificatory botany under the in.fluen.ce of Linnaeus.

    0
    0
  • We come, accordingly, to regard it as practically an exoskeleton, and its functions as distinctly subordinate to those of the protoplasm which it clothes.

    0
    0
  • If we pass a little higher up the scale ot life we meet with forms consisting of two or more cells, each of which contains a similar minute mass of living substance, A study of them shows that each is practically independent of the others; in fact, the connection between them is so slight that they can separate and each becofne free without the slightest disadvantage to another.

    0
    0
  • It constitutes practically the exterior environment of the protoplasts, though it is ramifying through the interior of the plant.

    0
    0
  • The stems are frequently characterized by aeration channels, which connect the aerial parts with the parts which are buried in practically airless mud or silt.

    0
    0
  • The chromatin is practically identical with nuclein.

    0
    0
  • The genus Senecio, with some 1000 species, is practically cosmopolitan.

    0
    0
  • This is a flora which, thinned out by losses, practically exists to this day in the southern United States.

    0
    0
  • Each of these divisions is the home of a special fauna, many species of which are confined to it alone; in the Australian region, indeed, practically the whole fauna is peculiar and distinctive, suggesting a prolonged period of complete biological isolation.

    0
    0
  • The bishops, who were ex officio inquisitors in their own dioceses, had not succeeded in putting a stop to the evils, nor had the friars, by whom they had been practically superseded.

    0
    0
  • granted leave to Torquemada to rehabilitate the condemned, and withdrew practically all concessions hitherto made and paid for at Rome.

    0
    0
  • This and some of the other clauses amount practically to censures on the policy of William III.

    0
    0
  • The orbito-sphenoids diverge only posteriorly, otherwise they are practically unpaired and form the median interorbital septum, which is very large in correlation with the extraordinary size of the eyeballs.

    0
    0
  • 20), a long-billed, flightless rail, practically the same as Erythromachus of Rodriguez and Diaphorapteryx of Chatham Island.

    0
    0
  • His six main divisions - practically adopted by A.

    0
    0
  • The Cape York peninsula practically belongs to Papuasia.

    0
    0
  • Since then the transit trade has been practically nil.

    0
    0
  • The coast in the vicinity of Dives is fringed with small watering-places, those of Cabourg (to the west) and of Beuzeval and Houlgate (to the east) being practically united with it.

    0
    0
  • The experiment was so far successful that, with incredible difficulty, the two vessels did actually reach Meskene, but the result of the expedition was to show that practically the river could not be used as a high-road of commerce, the continuous rapids and falls during the low season, caused mainly by the artificial obstructions of the irrigating dams, being insurmountable by ordinary steam power, and the aid of hundreds of hands being thus required to drag the vessels up the stream at those points by main force.

    0
    0
  • The chefs-lieux of the tribes became practically, though not officially, municipalities, and many of these towns reached considerable size and magnificence of public buildings.

    0
    0
  • In 407 a multitude of Franks, Vandals, &c., burst over Gaul: Roman rule practically ceased and the three kingdoms of the Visigoths, Burgundians and Franks began to form.

    0
    0
  • On his return to France, a sadder and practically a wiser man, he settled down to very prosaic work.

    0
    0
  • By the adoption of a regular system of work, and a careful plan of reduction, he was able to keep his observations reduced practically up to date, and published them annually with a degree of punctuality which astonished his contemporaries.

    0
    0
  • To this quality is perhaps to be attributed the fact that a people who did so much, who settled and conquered in so large a part of Europe, has practically vanished from the face of the earth.

    0
    0
  • The country was at this period conducted practically as if it were the private estate of the president, and no accounts of revenue or expenditure were vouchsafed to the public. In 1894 the Colorados nominated Senor Idiarte Borda for the presidency.

    0
    0
  • Gower in 1772, practically demonstrated the registration of a vessel's speed by mechanical means.

    0
    0
  • If the outer races become worn, the complete cage and bearings are reversed; the strain of the line is then transferred to what had previously been the inner with practically unworn balls and races.

    0
    0
  • Yet practically the new nobility was a privileged class; it felt itself to be so, and it was felt to be so by others.

    0
    0
  • The Athenian eb rarpl8at, who were thus gradually brought down from their privileged position, seem to have been quite as proud and exclusive as the Roman patricians; but when they lost their privileges they lost them far more thoroughly, and they did not, as at Rome, practically hand on many of them to a new nobility, of which they formed part, though not the whole.

    0
    0
  • This was what the later nobility of Rome was always striving at, and what they did to a great extent practically establish.

    0
    0
  • Some practically stop here; the apologist proceeds.

    0
    0
  • The constitution was practically Presbyterian.

    0
    0
  • The shell heaps found on the coasts and elsewhere dispose of the theory that New Zealand was uninhabited or practically so six centuries back.

    0
    0
  • Until the advent of the modern synthetic products buchu was valued in diseases of the urinary tract, but its use is now practically obsolete.

    0
    0
  • The city of Panama was formerly a stronghold of yellow fever and malaria, which American sanitary measures have practically eradicated.

    0
    0
  • Occupying the southern slopes of a hill on the left bank of the Earn, here crossed by a bridge, it practically consists of a main street, with narrower streets branching off at right angles.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the procedure of the Houses practically places the control of legislation in the hands of ministers.

    0
    0
  • The corps of gendarmes was also incorporated in this department, the under-secretary of the interior being placed at its head and at that of the police generally, with practically unlimited jurisdiction in all cases which, in the judgment of the minister of the interior, required to be dealt with by processes outside the ordinary law.

    0
    0
  • The remedy they proposed was that the labourers should be prohibited from migrating from one estate to another, and an order to that effect was issued, with the result that the peasants, being no longer able to change their domicile and seek new employers, fell practically under the unlimited power of the proprietors on whose land they resided.

    0
    0
  • THE] were practically powerless, the more so as their political activity consisted mainly in " building theories for an imaginary world."

    0
    0
  • It would be practically impossible for a line thus used by different carriers to be operated either with safety, or with economy, or with the advantage to the public which a centralized management affords.

    0
    0
  • A reasonable period was afforded them, according to circumstances, to comply with these requirements, and at the present time the work is practically complete.

    0
    0
  • Most of them had power to impose schedules of maximum rates; practically all of them had authority to prescribe rates upon complaint of shippers; and they could all seek the aid of the courts to enforce their decrees.

    0
    0
  • In the first method, which is practically universal in Great Britain and is also employed to 1 See a full account of steel sleepers in a paper read by A.

    0
    0
  • This perfection of distribution is practically attained in present-day practice by the multiple control system of operating an electric train, where motors are applied to a selected number of axles in the train, all of them being under the perfect control of the driver.

    0
    0
  • For suburban traffic with a service at a few minutes' interval and short distances between the stations electric traction has proved itself to be superior in many respects to the steam locomotive, but for main line traffic and long distance runs it has not yet been demonstrated that it is commercially feasible, though it is known to be practically possible.

    0
    0
  • It is not economical to force the boiler to work at too high a rate, because it has been practically demonstrated that the boiler efficiency decreases after a certain point, as the rate of combustion increases.

    0
    0
  • For many years this was practically the only one used in America for all traffic, and it is often spoken of as the " American " type.

    0
    0
  • It has many advantages for heavy high-speed service, namely, large and well-proportioned boiler, practically unlimited grate area, fire-box of favourable proportions for firing, fairly low centre of gravity, short coupling-rods, and, finally, a combination of the safe and smooth riding qualities of the fourcoupled bogie type, with great steaming capacity and moderate axle loads.

    0
    0
  • The application of vestibules is practically limited to trains making long journeys, as it is an obstruction to the free ingress and egress of passengers on local trains that make frequent stops.

    0
    0
  • This hook swings on the pivot B, and has an arm which extends backwards, practically at right angles with the working face of the hook, FIG.

    0
    0
  • This form of automatic coupler has now gained practically universal acceptance in the United States.

    0
    0
  • This minimum was at first fixed at 50%, but on and after the 1st of August 1906 it was raised to 75%, with the result that soon after that date practically all the rolling stock of American railways, whether passenger or freight, was provided with compressed air brakes.

    0
    0
  • 35) marks a still further step in advance, in that there are practically two different railways in the same structure.

    0
    0
  • The fouling of the air that results from the steam-engine, owing to the production of carbonic acid gas and of sulphurous fumes and aqueous vapour, is well known, and its use is now practically abandoned for underground working.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 the president of the Board of Trade brought in a bill on practically the same lines as the amending bill of 1903.

    0
    0
  • of 0 70 m.; but as there is no example of type V., the classification is practically one of 1 '445 m.

    0
    0
  • A conference between the three powers was thereupon held at Berlin, and a treaty was executed by those powers and by Samoa, on the 14th of June 1889, by virtue of which the independence and autonomy of the islands were guaranteed, Malietoa was restored as king, and the three powers constituted themselves practically a protectorate over Samoa, and provided a chief justice and a president of the municipality of Apia, to be appointed by them, to aid in carrying out the provisions of the treaty.

    0
    0
  • After the king's final separation from his wife in July 1531, Anne's position was still more marked, and in 1532 she accompanied Henry on the visit to Francis I., while Catherine was left at home neglected and practically a prisoner.

    0
    0
  • Pavilliard appears to have known little of English, and young Gibbon knew practically nothing of French.

    0
    0
  • Practically all the revenue is derived from the taxation of real and personal property.

    0
    0
  • The Federalist Party, which may be regarded as definitely organized practically from 1791, was led, leaving Washington aside, by Alexander Hamilton and John Adams. A nationalization of the new central government to the full extent warranted by a broad construction of the powers granted to it by the constitution, and a correspondingly strict construction of the powers reserved to the states and the citizens, were the basic principles of Hamilton's policy.

    0
    0
  • It lost, more and more, its influence and usefulness, and by 1817 was practically dead as a national party, although in Massachusetts it lingered in power until 1823.

    0
    0
  • He was now one of the most powerful sovereigns of Europe, for besides ruling over Provence and Anjou and the kingdom of the Two Sicilies, he was imperial vicar of Tuscany, lord of many cities of Lombardy and Piedmont, and as the pope's favourite practically arbiter of the papal states, especially during the interregnum between the death of Clement IV.

    0
    0
  • There is quite a different method of considering the nebular origin of our system, which leads in a very striking manner to conclusions practically identical with those we have just sketched.

    0
    0
  • Force having ignominiously failed, Elizabeth consented to treat, and hostilities were stopped on terms that gave O'Neill practically the whole of his demands.

    0
    0
  • The law against blasphemy has practically ceased to be put in active operation.

    0
    0
  • In the United States the common law of England was largely followed, and in most of the states, also, statutes were enacted against the offence, but, as in England, the law is practically never put in force.

    0
    0
  • The beginnings of modern thermochemistry, though made independently of the doctrine of the conservation of energy, are practically contemporaneous with the recognition of that law, and without it the science could scarcely have reached the degree of development which it rapidly attained.

    0
    0
  • zinc with solutions of copper salts), the thermal effect is practically independent of the nature of the acid radical in the salt employed.

    0
    0
  • The problem of the profitable treatment of the sulphide ores has been practically solved here.

    0
    0
  • After this period Orvieto was peaceably ruled by papal governors, and had practically no history.

    0
    0
  • When he realized the strength of the national reaction, he allowed the patriotic fascisti free rein to reestablish order and practically exercise many functions of Government, while he assumed an attitude of Olympic calm and posed as being au dessus de la melee, so as to avoid compromising himself with any party.

    0
    0
  • It is uncertain whether Sennacherib invaded Judah again shortly before his death, never,- theless the land was practically under the control of Assyria.

    0
    0
  • It seems that the Zealots made more headwa y in Galilee than in Judaea - so much so that the terms Galilean and Zealot are practically interchangeable.

    0
    0
  • Little more than half a century after the overthrow of the Jewish nationality, the Mishnah was practically completed, and by this code of rabbinic law - and law is here a term which includes the social, moral and religious as well as the ritual and legal phases of human activity - the Jewish people were organized into a community, living more or less autonomously under the Sanhedrin or Synedrium and its officials.

    0
    0
  • The Babylonian Jews were practically independent, and the exilarch (reshgalutha) or prince of the captivity was an official who ruled the community as a vassal of the Persian throne.

    0
    0
  • In the 17th century a considerable number of Jews had made a home in the English colonies, where from the first they enjoyed practically equal Tights with the Christian settlers.

    0
    0
  • Agriculture was again barred; indeed the Vienna congress of 1815 practically restored the old discriminations against the Jews.

    0
    0
  • Yet the bird remained practically unknown to ornithologists until figured in 1825, from a specimen belonging to Leadbeater, 2 by C. J.

    0
    0
  • The system of municipal and communal government remains practically unchanged.

    0
    0
  • The tithe had been replaced by an export tax on exported agricultural produce levied at the custom-houses, and the smaller peasant proprietors and shepherds of the mountainous districts were practically exempt from any contribution to the state.

    0
    0
  • Emissaries of the society now appeared in Crete, large consignments of arms were landed, and at the beginning of 1897 the island was practically in a state of insurrection.

    0
    0
  • This step paralysed the movements of Colonel Vassos, who after a few slight engagements with the Turks remained practically inactive in the interior.

    0
    0
  • In 1847 another revolt followed, and the Indians were practically independent throughout the greater part of the peninsula until near the beginning of the Diaz administration.

    0
    0
  • As the tench is of comparatively uncommon occurrence in unenclosed waters, its place among the indigenous fishes of Great Britain has been denied, and it has been supposed to have been introduced from the Continent; a view which, however, is not supported by any evidence, and is practically disposed of by the fact that fossil remains of the fish are found in the Pleistocene deposits of Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • Pascagoula and Point aux Chenes bays; separated from it by the shallow and practically unnavigable Mississippi Sound is a chain of low, long and narrow sand islands, the largest of which are Petit Bois, Horn, Ship and Cat.

    0
    0
  • There seems practically no basis for the contention that a declaration of independence was adopted on the 10th other than the tradition that independence was declared by the Mecklenburg Committee on that date, and the occasional.

    0
    0
  • territory settlers, many of them from North Carolina, had gone immediately before and during the War of Independence, and had organized a practically independent government.

    0
    0
  • In 1823 the West called an extra-legal convention to meet at Raleigh, and delegates from 24 of the 28 western counties responded, but those from the far West, in which there were practically no slaves, wished free white population to be made the basis of representation, while those from the Middle West demanded the adoption of the basis for the national House of Representatives and the convention made only a divided appeal to the people.

    0
    0
  • In 1772 he was appointed by Wesley "general assistant" in charge of the work in America, and although superseded by an older preacher, Thomas Rankin (1738-1810), in 1773, he remained practically in control.

    0
    0
  • Its main centres were at Edessa and Nisibis, but it was the literary language of practically all the Christian writers in the region east of Antioch, as well as of the Christian subjects of the Persian empire.

    0
    0
  • The vowels play no part in differentiating the roots, for the vowels are practically the same in the corresponding forms of every root.

    0
    0
  • Soon afterwards she poisoned Claudius and secured the throne for her son, with the intention of practically ruling on his behalf.

    0
    0
  • The whole tract, excepting south-eastern Arabia, is nominally subject to Turkey, but the people are to no small extent practically independent, living a nomadic, pastoral and freebooting life under petty chiefs, in the more arid districts, but settled in towns in the more fertile tracts, where agriculture becomes more profitable and external commerce is established.

    0
    0
  • It thus places a broad width of independent territory between the boundaries of British India (which have remained practically, though not absolutely, untouched) and Afghanistan; and this independent belt includes Swat, Bajour and a part of the Nlohmand territory north of the Kabul river.

    0
    0
  • The agent to the governor-general of India, with a staff of political assistants, practically exercises supreme control.

    0
    0
  • A large part of the Temple records from that time onwards were destroyed under the Restoration, so that exact knowledge of the facts is practically impossible.

    0
    0
  • The weak parts of this story are the sudden and unexplained departure of the Simons; the subsequent useless cruelty of treating the child like a wild beast and keeping him in a dark room practically out of sight (unless any doubt of his identity was possible), while his sister was in comparative comfort; the cause of death, declared to be of long standing, but in fact developed with such rapidity; the insufficient excuse provided for the child's muteness under Gomin's regime (he had answered Barras) and the irregularities in the formalities in attending the death and the funeral, when a simple identification of the body by Marie Therese would have prevented any question of resuscitated dauphins.

    0
    0
  • The Mahrattas practically held Tanjore until 1799.

    0
    0
  • - Excretory organs which are undisputed nephridia are practically universal among the Oligochaeta, Hirudinea and Archiannelida, and occur in many Polychaeta.

    0
    0
  • The gonads are, moreover, limited and fixed in numbers, and are practically invariably attached to the intersegmental septa, usually to the front septum of a segment, more rarely to the posterior septum.

    0
    0
  • Thus its non-liability to freeze (when not absolutely anhydrous, which it practically never is when freely exposed to the air) and its nonvolatility at ordinary temperatures, combined with its power of always keeping fluid and not drying up and hardening, render it valuable as a lubricating agent for clockwork, watches, &c., as a substitute for water in wet gas-meters, and as an ingredient in cataplasms, plasters, modelling clay, pasty colouring matters, dyeing materials, moist colours for artists, and numerous other analogous substances which are required to be kept in a permanently soft condition.

    0
    0
  • He successfully opposed a bill providing for what would have been practically an irredeemable currency, and he voted against the bill for chartering the second United States bank, although it provided for the redemp - tion of bank notes in specie, because he objected to permitting the government to have so large a share in its management.

    0
    0
  • At this time the state had been brought to the brink of ruin by the growth of avarice and luxury; there was a glaring inequality in the distribution of land and wealth, and the number of full citizens had sunk to 700, of whom about roc practically monopolized the land.

    0
    0
  • The Getica of Jordanes shows Gothic sympathies; but these are probably due to an imitation of the tone of Cassiodorus, from whom he draws practically all his material.

    0
    0
  • no number of the form 4n+3, or 4n - I, can be the sum of two squares), and goes on to a d, practically, the condition stated by Fermat, "and the double of it [n] increased by one, when divided by the greatest square which measures it, must not be divisible by a prime number of the form 4n - 1," except for the omission of the words "when divided.

    0
    0
  • He was able to gather around him a group of congenial friends and pupils, such as the Mills, the Austins and Bowring, with whom he could discuss the problems upon which he was engaged, and by whom several of his books were practically rewritten from the mass of rough though orderly memoranda which the master had himself prepared.

    0
    0
  • By the 12th century the archdeacon had become practically independent of the bishop, whose consent was only required in certain specified cases.

    0
    0
  • The truths which this "disposition of nature" obliges us to accept can be neither proved nor disproved; they are practically followed even by those who reject them speculatively.

    0
    0
  • beyond the heavy batteries, and practically unbroken from the north bank of the James (west of the city) to about 1 m.

    0
    0
  • But the two were strongly attached to one another, and practically lived in common.

    0
    0
  • The generally wet character of the seasons in 1879 and the two or three years following was mainly responsible for the high prices of meat, so that the supplies of fresh beef and mutton from Australia which now began to arrive found a ready market, and the trade in imported fresh meat which was thus commenced has practically continued to expand ever since.

    0
    0
  • The hay crop was very inferior, and in some cases it was practically ruined.

    0
    0
  • [[Table Xiv]].-Numbers of Cattle, Sheep and Pigs imported into the United Kingdom, 1891-1905 The animals come mainly from the United States of America, Canada and Argentina, and the traffic in cattle is more uniform than that in sheep, whilst that in pigs seems practically to have reached extinction.

    0
    0
  • The export trade in cattle, sheep and pigs is practically restricted to pedigree animals required for breeding purposes, and though its aggregate value [[Table Xxvi]].-Quantities and Value of Home-bred Live Stock exported from the United Kingdom, 1900-1905.

    0
    0
  • Cairnes and Alexander Bain) practically held the field during the third quarter of the 19th century and even later.

    0
    0
  • It is, for instance, practically impossible to obtain reliable evidence as to the regularity of employment in any industry in the 17th century, and the best approximations and devices we can invent are very poor substitutes for what we really want.

    0
    0
  • Some doctrines of the earlier economists, such as the Wages Fund Theory, are now practically abandoned, though it may be said that they contained a certain amount of truth.

    0
    0
  • Below the surface these walls are excavated with blood-vessels, so that the sac is practically a series of blood-vessels covered with renal epithelium, and forming 6 Cephalic tentacle.

    0
    0
  • The unrest in France in the years1795-1797resulted mainly from the harshness, incompetence and notorious corruption of the five Directors who, after the 13th of Vendemiaire 1795, practically governed France.

    0
    0
  • While restoring the principle of universal suffrage, which had been partially abrogated in 1795, Sieyes rendered this system of election practically a nullity.

    0
    0
  • Bonaparte's powers were subsequently extended in the years 1802, 1804 and 1807; but it is clear that autocracy was practically established by his own action in the secret commission of 1799.

    0
    0
  • Napoleon's powers as First Consul for Life were so wide as to render much extension both superfluous and impossible; but we may note here that the senate now gained a further accession of authority at the expense of the two legislative bodies; and practically legislation rested with the emperor, who sent his decrees to the senate to be registered as senatus consulta.

    0
    0
  • He now grouped together the princes of south and central Germany in the Confederation of the Rhine, of which he was the protector and practically the ruler in all important affairs.

    0
    0
  • The French reinforcements which entered Spain managed to secure some of the strongholds of the northern provinces; and the disgraceful feuds in the royal family left the country practically at the emperor's mercy.

    0
    0
  • He also split his Grallatores and Natatores (practically identical with the Grallae and Anseres of Linnaeus) each into four sections; but he failed to see - as on his own principles he ought to have seen - that each of these sections was at least equivalent to almost any one of his other " Ordres."

    0
    0
  • These three systems are essentially identical; but, plausible as they may be at the first aspect, they have been found to be practically useless, though such of their characters as their upholders have advanced with truth deserve attention.

    0
    0
  • More than this, he entered upon their geographical distribution, the facts of which important subject are here, almost for the first time, since the attempt of Blyth already mentioned, 4 brought to bear practically on classification.

    0
    0
  • In addition to an enormous body of new information chiefly on the shoulder girdle, the alar muscles and the nerve plexuses of birds, this work contained a critical and descriptive summary of practically the whole pre-existing literature on the structure of birds, and it is hardly necessary for the student of ornithology to refer to earlier literature at first hand.

    0
    0
  • The state was originally covered with a dense forest mostly of hardwood timber, and although the merchantable portion of this has been practically all cut away, there are still undergrowths of young timber and a great variety of trees.

    0
    0
  • The supreme court in June 1902 decided that practically all the existing municipal legislation was special in character and was therefore unconstitutional.

    0
    0
  • The constitution of 1851 practically deprived the legislature of the power to create new obligations.

    0
    0
  • of the Cuyahoga, the Tuscarawas, and an irregular line from Fort Laurens (Bolivar) in Tuscarawas county to Fort Recovery in Mercer county, practically the whole E.

    0
    0
  • Independence is further curtailed by other state boards semi-independent of the city - the police commission of three members from 1885 to 1906, and in 1906 a single police commissioner, appointed by the governor, a licensing board of three members, appointed by the governor; the transit commission, &c. There are, further, county offices (Suffolk county comprises only Boston, Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop), generally independent of the city, though the latter pays practically all the bills.

    0
    0
  • The calendar was the Syro-Macedonian, a solar, as distinct from the primitive lunar, calendar, which Roman influence disseminated throughout Syria; it was practically a reproduction of the Julian calendar.

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  • There is practically no limitation, but the will of the parties, as to the persons to whom a lease may be granted.

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  • It lies on the north coast of Thanet, and is practically contiguous with Westgate on the west and with Broadstairs on the south-east, 'owing to the modern extension of these popular watering-places.

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  • By 1842, however, the place was practically abandoned.

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  • When the War of 1812 opened there were fully 600 seamen in the city, practically all of whom were engaged in privateering or in the regular naval service of the United States.

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  • Though it is probably destined to be used even more extensively as a fertilizer before the demand for it as a feeding stuff becomes equal to the supply, practically all the cotton seed meal of the south will ultimately be used for feeding.

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  • In Fiji the cotton exported in the 'sixties and 'seventies was worth £93,000 annually; but the cultivation has been practically abandoned.

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  • Up to the year 1885 there was an average yearly export equivalent to about 2140 bales of 500 lb, after which date the export practically ceased.

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  • Across the river is Rock Falls (pop. in 1900, 2176), practically a suburb of Sterling, with foundries and machine-shops and manufactories of agricultural implements, barbed wire and bolts and rivets.

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  • Consideration of the evidence leads us to the conclusion that, at least in commercially valuable deposits, mineral oil has generally been formed by the decomposition of marine organisms, in some cases animal, in others vegetable, in others both, under practically normal conditions of temperature and pressure.

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  • The cracking process practically consists in distilling the oils at a temperature higher than the normal boiling point of the constituents which it is desired to decompose.

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  • For heating purposes, the stoves employed are practically kerosene lamps of suitable construction, though gasoline is used as a domestic fuel in the United States.

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  • A new sultan, Barkiyaroq or Barkiarok, ruled in Bagdad (1094-1104); but in Asia Minor Kilij Arslan held sway as the independent sultan of Konia (Iconium), while the whole of Syria was also practically independent.

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  • The period of conquest practically ends at this date, though isolated gains were afterwards made.

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  • To all these various forces must be added the knights and native levies of the great orders, whose masters were practically independent sovereigns like the princes of Antioch and Tripoli; 3 and with these the total levy of the kingdom may be reckoned at some 25,000 men.

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  • Finally, when one remembers how, during the First Crusade, the pedites had marched side by side with the principes, and how, from the beginning of 1099, they had practically risen in revolt against the selfish ambitions of princes like Count Raymund, it becomes easy to understand the independent position which the burgesses assumed in the organization of the kingdom.

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  • The richest proprietor in the Holy Land,' but practically immune from any charges on its property, the Church helped, unconsciously, to ruin the kingdom which it should have supported above all others.

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  • 3 The patronage of Constantinople, to which Jerusalem was thus practically surrendered, contributed to some slight extent in maintaining the kingdom against Nureddin.

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  • But nevertheless the kingdom of Jerusalem continued almost unmenaced, and practically undiminished, for the next sixteen years.

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  • p. 240) that this truce was already practically dissolved before Raynald struck, and that Raynald's "action may reasonably be viewed as the practical outcome of the feeling of a party."

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  • This was practically the aim of Richard I.'s negotiations; and this was what Frederick II.

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  • If Frederick had only come in person, a single month of his presence might have meant everything: if Pelagius had only listened to King John, the sultan was ready to concede practically everything which was at issue.

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  • Finally he was an eye-witness throughout, and absolutely contemporary, in the sense that he wrote his account of each great event practically at the time of the event.

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  • Syria up to and beyond the Euphrates is called more precisely Sahi (or Zahi), and is regarded as consisting of the following parts: (r) Rutenu, practically the same as Palestine (occasionally Palestine with Coelesyria is called Upper Rutenu, as distinguished from Lower Rutenu extending to the Euphrates); (2) the land of the Kheta (sometimes reckoned as belonging to Rutenu with Kadesh on the Orontes as its capital in the Ramesside period; (3) Naharina, the land on both sides of the Euphrates (extending, strictly speaking, beyond the Syrian limits).

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  • In 409 Britain and Armorica declared their independence, which was confirmed by Honorius himself, and were thus practically lost to the empire.

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  • Provincial governors were kept under strict supervision; extortion was practically unheard of; the jus Latii was bestowed upon several communities; special officials were instituted for the control of the finances; and the emperor's interest in provincial affairs was shown by his personal assumption of various municipal offices.

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  • Florida's industrial progress has been mainly since the Civil War, for before that conflict a large part of the state was practically undeveloped.

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  • 7 point to social, not intellectual, conditions, and a slight change (pm for 'non) gives the sense" poor."death is practically the end-all; and so poor a thing is life that the dead are to be considered more fortunate than the living, and more to be envied than either class is he who never came into existence (iv.

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  • Being thus soluble in salt water it cannot, of course, be salted out like common soaps; but if a very concentrated salt solution is used precipitation is effected, and a curd soap is separated so hard and refractory as to be practically useless.

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  • The lake is practically tideless, though true tidal pulsations amounting to 3 in.

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  • of the town), and in 1300 practically founded the town and surrounded it with walls.

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  • A few scenes and inscriptions were added by later kings, but the above is practically the history of the temple until Alexander the Great rebuilt the sanctuary itself.

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  • At one time it was regarded as the work of a priest of Liege, named Amelgard, but it is now practically certain that Basin was the writer.

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  • The circuit has been practically ascertained in its general lines, though not in details; it is given by Thucydides (ii.

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  • The Theseum or temple of Theseus, which lay to the east of the Agora near the Acropolis, was built by Cimon: here he deposited the bones of the national hero which he brought from Scyros about 470 B.C. The only building in the city which can with certainty be assigned to the administration of Pericles is the Odeum, beneath the southern declivity of the Acropolis, a structure mainly of wood, said to have been built in imitation of the tent of Xerxes: it was used for musical contests and the though not established, may be regarded as practically certain, notwithstanding the difficulty presented by the subjects of the sculptures, which bear no relation to Hephaestus.

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  • The New, or Roman, Agora to the north of the Acropolis, perhaps mainly an oil market, was constructed after the year 27 B.C. Its dimensions were practically determined by excavation in 1890-1891.

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  • Acids have practically no action on the metal, but it is soluble in solutions of the alkaline hypochlorites.

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  • The way in which his teaching on obedience is practically carried out is the best corrective of the false ideas that have arisen from misconceptions of its nature.

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  • was practically complete.

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  • The agouti and the armadillo are practically extinct and the only other mammals are ground squirrels, rats, a few other small rodents, and some bats.

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  • The right to determine the electoral franchise is vested in the legislature itself and that body has conferred it upon practically all adult males.

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