How to use Pp in a sentence

pp
  • Loserth gives a bibliography of authorities dealing with the history of the Order on pp. 131, 365 and 567-8.

    1
    0
  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

    1
    0
  • The a-oxime, on long continued boiling with a concentrated solution of a caustic alkali, is partially decomposed with formation of some acetone and acetoxime (C. Harries, Ber., 1898, 31, pp. 1381, 1808; 18 99, 32, p. 1 33 1).

    1
    0
  • Hantzsch (Ann., 1896, 2 9 2, pp. 34 0 et seq.) hyponitrous acid and nitramide are to be regarded as stereoisomers, being the anti-and synforms of the same compound.

    1
    0
  • Count Litzow in The Life and Times of Master John Hus (London and New York, 1909), pp. 5-9, gives a good abstract of the Defensor pacis and the relations of Marsilius to other precursors of the Reformation.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The arrangement he subsequently adopted for them and for other groups is to be found in his Natiirliches System der Amphibien (pp. 77-128), published in 1830, and is too fanciful to require any further attention.

    0
    0
  • In 1828 Fleming brought out his History of British Animals (8vo), in which the birds are treated at considerable length (pp. 41-146), though not with great success.

    0
    0
  • This scheme was the work of Blasius Merrem, who, in a communication to the Academy of Sciences of Berlin on the t oth December 1812, which was published in its Abhandlungen for the following year (pp. 237-259), set forth a Tentamen systematis naturalis avium, no less modestly entitled than modestly executed.

    0
    0
  • Sundevall in 1835, and was published the following year in its Handlingar (pp. 43-130).

    0
    0
  • Owen com municated a detailed description of them to the Philosophical Transactions (1863, pp. 33-47), proving their bird-like nature, and referring them to the genus Archaeopteryx of Hermann von Meyer, hitherto known only by the impression of a single feather from the same geological beds.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Almost simultaneously with this he expounded more particularly before the Zoological Society, in whose Proceedings (1868, pp. 2 94-3 1 9) his results were soon after published, the groups of which he believed the Alectoromorphae to be composed and the relations to them of some outlying forms usually regarded as Gallinaceous, the Turnicidae and Pteroclidae, as well as the singular hoactzin, for all three of which he had to institute new groups - the last forming the sole representative of his Heteromorphae.

    0
    0
  • Extracts from it are given by Charles (pp. 339-348).

    0
    0
  • The part of this work, generally called Opus Tertium, is printed by Brewer (pp. 1-310), who considers it to be a complete treatise.

    0
    0
  • Their opportunity came with the disaster which befell the Roman army under Valerian (q.v.) at Edessa, a disaster, says ' The full text, both Greek and Palmyrene, with an English translation, is given in NSI, pp. 313-340.

    0
    0
  • See Strabo, pp. 401, 418, 424-425; Pausanias x.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Certainly it is due to this very much more than we commonly think, and the more it is due to this the more do moral therapeutics rise in possibility and importance " (Literature and Dogma, pp. 143-144).

    0
    0
  • Peppe's original article is in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society for 1898, pp. 573 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Comments upon it, one or two of them sceptical, are in the same journal 1898, pp. 579, 588, 387, 868; 1899, p. 4 2 5; 1 9 01, p. 39 8; 1905, p. 6 79; 1906, pp. 1 49 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Wagner's Lehrbuch (Hanover, 1908, pp. 241-252) refers to numerous authorities who deal fully with the whole question of measurement.

    0
    0
  • See Die neue Psychologie, pp. 320-330.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Finally, we have the family Rhinocerotidae, which includes the existing representatives of the group. In this family the dentition has undergone considerable reduction, and may be represented inclusive of all the variations, by the formula i a or a m a The first upper incisor, whenpresent, has an 430r2; PP antero-posteriorly elongated crown, but the second is small; when fully developed, the lower canine is a large forwardly directed tusk-like tooth with sharp cutting-edges, and biting against the first upper incisor.

    0
    0
  • See life in Biographia Britannica; McCosh's Scottish Philosophy, PP. 42-49.

    0
    0
  • See Esperandieu, Inscriptions de Lectoure (1892), pp. 94 ff.; Zippel, Festschrift zum Doctorjubilaeum, Ludwig Friedlander, 1895, p. 489 f.; Showerman, The Great Mother of the Gods, Bulletin of the University of Wisconsin, No.

    0
    0
  • See C. Brown's Lives of Nottinghamshire Worthies (1882), pp. 352-353, and Journ.

    0
    0
  • Of the rest the uncanonical sayings have been collected by Preuschen (Reste der ausserkanonischen Evangelien, 1901, pp. 44-47) A different collection will be found in Hennecke, NTliche Apok.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Two Latin translations have been published in this work by the same scholar - one on pp. 164-180, the other under the wrong title, Pseudo-Matthaei Evangelium, on pp. 93-112.

    0
    0
  • Berlin (1896), pp. 839 sqq., this gospel gives disclosures on the nature of matter (An) and the progress of the Gnostic soul through the seven planets.

    0
    0
  • The Coptic version (C. Schmidt, Acta Pauli, pp. 74-82), which is here imperfect, is clearly from a Greek original, while the Latin and Armenian are from the Syriac. (c) The Acts of Paul and Thecla.

    0
    0
  • The best critical edition of the Greek text will be found in Lipsius, Acta Apostolorum Apocrypha, 1891, pp. 279-283.

    0
    0
  • A portion of his Latin verse is printed in the first volume (pp. 306354) of Delitiae poetarum Scotorum (Amsterdam, 1637).

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The pp g y Dutch were unable, however, to extend their power beyond the limits of the town, until the arrival of Count John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen in 1636.

    0
    0
  • Hungary, pp. 280, 588; Gonnard, La Hongrie, p. 72.

    0
    0
  • Y, 9 P ?, PP ment of a Coalition cabinet 2 under Dr Sandor Wekerle was announced, the world was taken completely by surprise.

    0
    0
  • At first sight it appears difficult to understand how g PP the complicated series of actions which are definitely exhibited as so-called " instincts " by a variety of animals can have been due to the selection of congenital variations, or can be otherwise explained than by the transmission of habits acquired by the parent as the result of experience, and continuously elaborated and added to in successive generations.

    0
    0
  • The value of C for an annular aperture of radius r and width dr is thus dC =271-Jo(Pp)pdp, (12).

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Ephraemi Syri, &c., opera selecta, pp. 2 5 1 -33 6; and these have since been supplemented by Zettersteen's edition of a large number of his religious poems or metrical prayers (Beitrdge zur Kenntniss der religiosen Dichtung Balais, Leipzig, 1902).

    0
    0
  • In a succession of missionary journeys he succeeded, partly by persuasion and partly (if his enemies are to be believed) ' See Labourt, op. cit., especially pp. 87-90, 92-99.

    0
    0
  • See Marquardt-Mau, Privatleben der Romer, pp. 550 seq.

    0
    0
  • Busch (Ber., 1905, 38, pp. 856, 4049) has isolated a series of bridged ring compounds which he describes as endo-iminodihydrotriazoles, the triphenyl derivative (annexed formula) being prepared by condensing triphenylaminoguanidine with formic acid.

    0
    0
  • To the east of the gorge the wall still follows the edge of low cliffs of the, coast, and continues to do so all along the east side of Achradina 1 The date of the fragment of city wall immediately to the north-east of the so-called palaestra is uncertain; it is therefore doubtful whether it can belong to this system of defences (Lupus, pp. 308, 331).

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Smiles (Comptes rendus, 1902, pp. 5 6 9, 1 549) from the products obtained in the action of hydrochloric acid on magnesium silicide.

    0
    0
  • Sodium percarbonates of the formulae Na 2 CO 4, Na2C206, Na 2 C05, NaHCO 4 (two isomers) are obtained by the action of gaseous or solid carbon dioxide on the peroxides Na 2 0 2, Na 2 0 3, NaHO 2 (two isomers)in the presence of water at a low temperature (R.Wolffenstein and E.Peltner, Ber., 1908, 41, pp. 275, 280).

    0
    0
  • As the molten metal is run in, the upward thrust on the outside mould, when the level has reached PP', is the weight of metal in the volume generated by the revolution of APQ; and this, by a theorem of Archimedes, has the same volume as the cone ORR', or rya, where y is the depth of metal, the horizontal sections being equal so long as y is less than the radius of the outside FIG.

    0
    0
  • Thus if d,/ is the increase of 4, due to a displacement from P to P', and k is the component of velocity normal to PP', the flow across PP' is d4 = k.PP'; and taking PP' parallel to Ox, d,, = vdx; and similarly d/ ' = -udy with PP' parallel to Oy; and generally d4,/ds is the velocity across ds, in a direction turned through a right angle forward, against the clock.

    0
    0
  • Taking two planes x = =b, and considering the increase of momentum in the liquid between them, due to the entry and exit of liquid momentum, the increase across dy in the direction Oy, due to elements at P and P' at opposite ends of the diameter PP', is pdy (U - Ua 2 r2 cos 20 +mr i sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0+mr 1 cos 0) + pdy (- U+Ua 2 r 2 cos 2 0 +mr1 sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0 -mr 1 cos 0) =2pdymUr '(cos 0 -a 2 r 2 cos 30), (8) and with b tan r =b sec this is 2pmUdo(i -a 2 b2 cos 30 cos 0), (9) and integrating between the limits 0 = 27r, the resultant, as before, is 27rpmU.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Motion symmetrical about an Axis.-When the motion of a liquid is the same for any plane passing through Ox, and lies in the plane, a function ' can be found analogous to that employed in plane motion, such that the flux across the surface generated by the revolution of any curve AP from A to P is the same, and represented by 2s-4 -11'o); and, as before, if d is the increase in due to a displacement of P to P', then k the component of velocity normal to the surface swept out by PP' is such that 274=2.7ryk.PP'; and taking PP' parallel to Oy and Ox, u= -d/ydy, v=dl,t'/ydx, (I) and 1P is called after the inventor, " Stokes's stream or current function," as it is constant along a stream line (Trans.

    0
    0
  • The preface was translated into German by Theodor Noldeke in his Beitrage (Hanover, 1864), pp. 1-51.

    0
    0
  • Kohler (Kohut Memorial Volume, 18 97, pp. 264-338) has given good grounds for regarding the whole work, with the exception of some interpolations, as "one of the most remarkable productions of the pre-Christian era, explicable only when viewed in the light of Hasidean practice."

    0
    0
  • See Tischendorf, Apocalypses Apocryphae, pp. 24-33.

    0
    0
  • This g Y P Y PP Y infamous law, however, aroused so much opposition that some of the very men who had proposed it assembled in secret to discuss its abolition, and a quarrel between the Albizzi and the Ricci having weakened the parte, a balia of 56 was agreed upon.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The signory appointed Piero Capponi, a man of great ability and patriotism, and experienced in diplomacy, the gonfaloniere Francesco Valori, the Dominican Giorgio Vespucci, and the jurisconsult and diplomatist Domenico Bonsi, rule, 's every five years, appointed all the magistrates and Y Y PP g syndics to conduct the negotiations with the French king.

    0
    0
  • A few short Pisidian inscriptions have been published by Ramsay in Revue des etudes anciennes (18 95, pp. 353-3 62).

    0
    0
  • Bent (Southern Arabia, pp. 24 ff.) explored one of several mounds in Bahrein.

    0
    0
  • The main argument for putting it earlier is derived from the admitted affinities between it and Romans, the Colossian and Ephesian epistles containing, it is held, a more advanced christology (so Lightfoot especially, and Hort, Judaistic Christianity, pp. 115-129).

    0
    0
  • Knowling's Testimony of St Paul to Christ, pp. 111 seq.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, illustrated in Pegge's Anecdotes of the English Language (1803) and confirmed by the editor of the 3rd edition (1844), pp. 65-66.

    0
    0
  • While through a great crisis due to the conflict of two 0 os g g PP Classifica= from a single trunk, - is to give to science the ensemble tion of sciences.

    0
    0
  • For the Iranian parallel, see § 8, and on the Hebrew Priestly Writer, Gunkel, Genesis 2, pp. 2 33 ff.

    0
    0
  • Firth, for which see his Cromwell, pp. 281 ff.

    0
    0
  • Hardy, Christianity and the Roman Government (1894), reprinted in Studies in Roman History (1906), pp. 1-162; with the literature quoted in these works and in Schanz, Rom.

    0
    0
  • Recognizing a supernatural element in the Bible, he nevertheless allowed to the full the critical exercise of reason in the interpretation of its dogmas (cp. Otto Pfleiderer, Development of Theology, pp. 89 ff.).

    0
    0
  • Times [1 897], pp. 35 1 -354, and M.-J.

    0
    0
  • A story had gone about, even in the days of John of Gaunt, who, if we may trust the rhymer John Hardyng (Chronicle, pp. 290, 291), had got it inserted in chronicles deposited in various monasteries, that this Edmund, surnamed Crouchback, was really hump-backed, and that he was set aside in favour of his younger brother Edward on account of his deformity.

    0
    0
  • He criticizes sharply (pp. 173 sqq., 233 sqq.) former methods of interpretation, and with the ardour of a discoverer of a new truth seeks to establish its currency throughout the entire field of apocalyptic. To such an extreme does he carry his theory that he denies obvious references to historical personages in the Apocalypse, when these are clothed in apocalyptic language.

    0
    0
  • Julicher (Einleitung in das Neue Testament', 1901, pp. 204-29) adopts the same three methods of interpretation.

    0
    0
  • Yet another explanation from Egyptian mythology is given by Bousset (Offenbarung Johannis, 2nd ed., pp. 354, 355) in the birth of the sun-god Horus.

    0
    0
  • We conclude, therefore, that the Gospel and the Apocalypse See Bousset, Offenbarung Johannis 2, pp. 177-179; Swete 2, pp. cxxv - cxxix.

    0
    0
  • Belloc,Marie-Antoinette, pp. 311-312, states that clause of Brunswick's manifesto was "drafted" by Marie Antoinette, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The aggregate amount of these pressures is clearly the sum of the momenta, normal to the boundary, of all molecules which have left dS within a time dt, and this will be given by expression (pp), integrated with respect to u from o to and with respect to v and w from - oo to +oo, and then summed for all kinds of molecules in the gas.

    0
    0
  • The tithe was an oppressive form of taxation, as were the various fees pp ?

    0
    0
  • In cases other than those described in § 82, the pth moment with regard to the axis of u is given by Pp = XPrA where A is the total area of the original trapezette, and S 2 _ 1 is the area of a trapezette whose ordinates at successive distances h, beginning and ending with the bounding ordinates, are o, x1P -1A, x2 P-1 (AI+AI),.

    0
    0
  • Cheyne, Genesis and Exodus, referring to Dorsey, Traditions of the Skidi Pawnee, pp. 2, 80 ff.

    0
    0
  • On the illustrative value of Gaokerena see Cheyne, Origin of the Psalter, pp. 400 - 439.

    0
    0
  • Deissmann, Bible Studies, pp. 1-60, for this distinction between the genuine "letter" and the literary "epistle," as applied to the New Testament in particular.

    0
    0
  • Many candidates qualifica- approach the calling with a very imperfect a reciaPP g Y P PP tion of its exacting character.

    0
    0
  • A good account of the principal works of Legendre is given in the Bibliotheque universelle de Geneve for 18 33, pp. 45-82.

    0
    0
  • We may here notice the "percarbonates" obtained by Wolffenstein and Peltner (Ber., 1908, 41, pp. 2 75, 280) on acting with gaseous or solid carbon dioxide on Na202, Na203 and NaHO 2 at low temperatures; the same authors obtained a perborate by adding sodium metaborate solution to a 50% solution of sodium peroxide previously saturated with carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • All the other proposals and votes relating to Greek in the Previous Examination in 1870-1873, 1878-1880, and 1891-1892 are set forth in the Cambridge University Reporter for November 11, 1904, pp. 202-205.

    0
    0
  • For further bibliographical details see pp. 875-890 of Dr Karl Breul's " Grossbritannien " in Baumeister's Handbuch, I.

    0
    0
  • For these Tigqune Sopherim or " corrections of the scribes " see Geiger, Urschrift, pp. 308 f.; Strack, Prolegomena Critica, p. 87; Buhl, Canon and Text of the Old Testament, pp. 103 f.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay (Was Christ Born at Bethlehem?, 1898, pp. 1 49 ff.) defends the exact accuracy of St Luke's " first census " as witnessing to the (otherwise of course unknown) introduction into Syria of the periodic fourteen years' census which the evidence of papyri has lately established for Egypt, at least from A.D.

    0
    0
  • Charles (Assumption of Moses, pp. 105 seq.), and it appears that the incident was familiar to Clement of Alexandria, Origen and other early writers.

    0
    0
  • For other examples illustrating Rabbinical methods of exegesis in the New Testament, see McNeile, pp. 221, sqq.

    0
    0
  • Kirche (1878), pp. 216-255 (learned but utterly uncritical); Bonwetsch, "Die Prophetie im apostol.

    0
    0
  • Five years previously he had defeated a Tatar raid upon Moscow, for which service he received the title of sluga, 1 Brough, Mine Surveying, pp. 276-278; Marriott, Trans.

    0
    0
  • Of his numerous publications, For the use of the drum in the 16th century, see Sir John Smyth, Instructions and Observations for all Chieftaines, Captaines, &c. (London, 1 595), pp. 158-159.

    0
    0
  • On the relation of Neoplatonism to Christianity, and the historical importance of Neoplatonism generally, see the leading church histories, and the Histories of Dogma by Baur, Nitzsch, Harnack, &c. Compare also Loffler, Der Platonismus der Kirchenvater (1782); Huber, Die Philosophie der Kirchenvdter (1859); Tzchirner, Fall des Heidenthums (1829), pp. 574618; Burckhardt, Die Zeit Constantin's des Grossen (1853); Chastel, Hist.

    0
    0
  • Duffield and published in the Report of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for 1895-1896 as Appendix 12, pp. 395-7 22.

    0
    0
  • Bancroft (Resources of Mexico, pp. 3-4), the tierras calientes, which include a coastal zone 30 to 40 m.

    0
    0
  • The editors of the Wycliffite versions say in the Preface, pp. xv.

    0
    0
  • Several editions of the Bishops' Bible were afterwards published, but it is doubtful whether the ecclesiastical authorities in spite of repeated enactments (Cardwell, Synodalia, pp. 115, 123, 210, 292) ever succeeded in entirely enforcing its public use in the churches.

    0
    0
  • Fittig and his pupils (Annalen, 1883, 216, pp. loo, 115; 1885, 227, pp. 55, 119), in which it was shown that the aldehyde forms an addition compound with the sodium salt of the fatty acid, and that the acetic anhydride plays the part of a dehydrating agent.

    0
    0
  • Mulhall (Industries and Wealth of Nations, edition of 1896, pp. 3435) that Great Britain then produced approximately one-third, the United States one-third, and all other countries collectively one-third of the minerals of the world in weight.

    0
    0
  • See further Joseph Lucas, Studies in Nidderdale (1882), pp. 156-157.

    0
    0
  • He who believes that every judgment on the highest matters different from his own is simply a heresy must have a mean idea of the faith; and while the qualifications, the reserve, the lingering sympathies of the real student make him in many cases a poor controversialist, it may be said that a mere controversialist cannot be a real theologian" (Lessons from Work, pp. 84-85).

    0
    0
  • Ostwald (ibid., 1900, 35, pp. 33, 204) has observed that on dissolving chromium in dilute acids, the rate of solution as measured by the evolution of gas is not continuous but periodic. It is largely made as ferro-chrome, an alloy containing about 60-70% of chromium, by reducing chromite in the electric furnace or by aluminium.

    0
    0
  • The interesting parallels between the Babylonian Marduk (Merodach) god of light and Christ as a world saviour are ingeniously set forth by Zimmern in K.A.T., 3rd ed., pp. 376-391, but the total impression which they leave is vague.

    0
    0
  • The best edition is in Duchesne, Bibliotheca Cluniacensis, pp. 353362.

    0
    0
  • An interesting article on the subject, by Stoyan Krstoff Vatralsky of Boston, Mass., entitled " Mohammedan Gnosticism in America," appeared in the American Journal of Theology for January 1902, pp. 57-58.

    0
    0
  • Some account of the latter is given by Napier Malcolm in his book Five Years in a Persian Town (London,1905), pp. 87-89 and 186.

    0
    0
  • Hantzsch (Ber., 18 99, 3 2, pp. 59 o, 3089) considers that the oxyazo compounds are to be classed as pseudoacids, possessing in the free condition the configuration of quinone hydrazones, their salts, however, being of the normal phenolic type.

    0
    0
  • A Klages (Ber., 1902, 35, pp. 2633 et seq.) has shown that if one uses an excess of magnesium and of an alkyl halide with a ketone, an ethylene derivative is formed.

    0
    0
  • See Ball, pp. 260-261, and Scharer in loc., for a full bibliography.

    0
    0
  • It is practically only bulls of canonization which are signed by the pope and all the cardinals present in Rome; the signature of the pope is then "(Pius) Episcopus Ecclesiae catholicae," while his ordinary signature bears only his name and number, "Pius PP. X."

    0
    0
  • In the latter case, the first preparations were according to the I See Victor Loret, "Les flutes egyptiennes antiques," Journal Asiatique, 8eme serie, tome xiv., Paris, 1889, pp. 129, 130 and 132.

    0
    0
  • Hill, Church Quarterly Rev. (April 1908), pp. 118-141, who specially emphasizes the evidence of the Phoenician coins.

    0
    0
  • If there is anything of interest in my story, it is as a story of mental development" (Memoirs, pp. 2).

    0
    0
  • Rothpletz, Die Perm-, Trias-, and Jura-Formation auf Timor and Rotti im indischen Archipel, Palaeontographica (1892) pp. 57106.

    0
    0
  • The extension of this idea to substances in general necessarily led him to the law of combination in multiple proportions, and the comparison with experiment brilliantly confirmed the truth of his deduction" (A New View, &c., pp. 50, 51).

    0
    0
  • See Henry, Life of Dalton, Cavendish Society (1854); Angus Smith, Memoir of John Dalton and History of the Atomic Theory (1856), which on pp. 253-263 gives a list of Dalton's publications; and Roscoe and Harden, A New View of the Origin of Dalton's Atomic Theory (1896); also Atom.

    0
    0
  • This custom, which is still observed among the Jews of Caucasia (Tchorni, Sepher ha-Masaoth, pp. 191-192), is very ancient, as it is mentioned in the Talmud (Sanhedrin 64).

    0
    0
  • Smith, Short History of Christian Missions, pp. '16-118; Gustavus Vasa in 1559 made an effort to educate and evangelize the Lapps.

    0
    0
  • This figure, with a copy of Thevet's and a detailed description, was repeated in the posthumous edition (1585) of his larger work (pp. Boo, 801).

    0
    0
  • Throughout the Teutonic region of the Alps the word Alp is used specifically for the upper pastures where cattle are fed in summer, but this region is held to include the whole space between the uppermost limit of trees and the first Alpine p pp appearance of permanent masses of snow.

    0
    0
  • See especially his Sumerian grammar in this latter work, pp. 133-147.

    0
    0
  • To the legs is screwed a plate 00, which supports the lower side of the plate PP. This receives the ends of the screws SS by which the instrument is levelled, its annular portion being larger than the collar in 00, so that, until clamped by the screwed plate above it, the whole of the instrument except the legs can be moved horizontally in any direction to the extent of about in.

    0
    0
  • The upper plate PP is bored centrally to receive a parallel or conical pillar which supports the lower circle of the theodolite or the arm of the level which carries the telescope.

    0
    0
  • A collar is provided, which when tightened on the vertical axis, otherwise free to move, holds it rigidly in position with respect to the plate PP. To this collar is attached a slow-motion screw, working against a reaction spring, by which the plate rr can be rotated through a small arc. The upper plate carrying two, three .or four verniers vv is attached to a vertical coned pillar passing through the centre of the larger pillar and rotating in it; this plate can be clamped to the lower plate by means of the screw C, and can be rotated with respect to it by the slow-motion screw d.

    0
    0
  • The earliest record in the West of the blessing of the palms and the subsequent procession is the liber ordinum of the West Gothic Church (published by Fhrotin, Paris, 1904, pp. 178 sqq.), which dates from the 6th century; this shows plainly that the ceremonial of the procession had been borrowed from Jerusalem.

    0
    0
  • See the passage quoted by Munk, Mélanges de philosophee arabe et juive (Paris, 1859), pp. 264 and 517.

    0
    0
  • With Bacon he was so intimate (Aubrey's Lives, pp. 222, 602) that some writers have described him as a disciple.

    0
    0
  • Huxley in his often-quoted paper in the Zoological Proceedings (1867, pp. 4 2 5, 426) was enabled to place the whole matter in a clear light, urging that the Tinamous formed a very distinct group of birds which;, though not to be removed from the Carinatae, presented so much resemblance to the Ratitae as to indicate them to be the bond of union between those two great divisions.

    0
    0
  • A very full list of his Latin and English works is given (pp. 36-43) in Dr Carl Horstmann's edition (1895-96) of his works in the Library of Early English Writers.

    0
    0
  • Among editions the first is of 1619, by Gretser; the best, that of 1877, by Tobler, in Itinera et Descriptiones Terrae Sanctae; we may also mention that of 1870, by Delpit, in his Essai sur les anciens pelerinages a Jerusalem; see also Delpit's remarks upon Arculf in the same work, pp. 260-304; Beazley, Dawn of Modern Geography, i.

    0
    0
  • P PP Chamber from being overwhelmed at any critical moment by an influx of crown nominees appointed ad hoc. The general election which took place amid considerable enthusiasm on the 14th of May resulted in a sweeping victory for the Social Democrats whose number rose from II to 87; in a less complete triumph for the Christian Socialists who increased from 27 to 67; and in the success of the extremer over the conservative elements in all races.

    0
    0
  • Thackeray, Relation of St Paul to contemporary Jewish Thought (London, 1900), pp. 196 sqq.; Hagar typifies the old Sinaitic covenant, and Sarah represents the new covenant of freedom from bondage.

    0
    0
  • Starcke, Le Danemark (Copenhagen, 1900), 700 pp.; illustrated, published in connexion with the Paris Exhibition.

    0
    0
  • For further details see Bacon, Triple Tradition of Exodus, pp. III f., 132 f.

    0
    0
  • Mackenzie, for his opposition, lost P, PP office.

    0
    0
  • Abteilung, pp. 216-226 and 440-442; Ludwig Braunfels, Kritischer Versuch fiber den Roman Amadis von Gallien (Leipzig, 1876); Theophilo Braga, Historia das novelas portuguezas de cavalleria (Porto, 1873), Curso de litteratura e arte portugueza (Lisboa, 1881), and Questoes de litteratura e arte portugueza (Lisboa,1885); Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo, Origenes de la novela (Madrid, 1905); Eugene Baret, De l'Amadis de Gaule et de son influence sur les me urs et la litterature au X VI e et au X VII e siecle (Paris, 1873).

    0
    0
  • In fact, between the years 1300 and 1600, no fewer than 1400 men of distinction can be enumerated from Germany alone who travelled to the Holy Land (Rohricht and Meissner, Deutsche Pilgerreisen, pp. 465-546).

    0
    0
  • The old trade-route from Cappadocia to Sinope, which had passed out of use centuries before the time of Strabo (pp. 540, 546), fixes this centre with precision.

    0
    0
  • The above are the essential doctrines of 7 Iti-vuttaka, pp. 19-21.

    0
    0
  • The philosophical basis of the old ethics is overshadowed by new 1 See Journal of the Pali Text Society, 1896, pp. 87-92.

    0
    0
  • Scheele, working independently, also announced in 1775 the discovery of this element which he called "empyreal air" (Crells' Annalen, 1785, 2, pp. 229, 291).

    0
    0
  • Villiger (Be y ., 1901, 34, pp. 2679, 3612) showed that many organic compounds (ethers, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, &c.) behave towards acids, particularly the more complex acids, very much like bases and yield crystallized salts in which quadrivalent oxygen must be assumed as the basic element.

    0
    0
  • See John Ball, Hints and Notes for Travellers in the Alps (article x., especially pp. lvii.-lxv.); new edition, London, 1899; Felix Anderegg, Illustriertes Lehrbuch fur die gesamte schweiz.

    0
    0
  • Bureau of American Republics for July 1900, p. 26, and for August 1908, pp. 280-282; Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Council of Foreign Bondholders, pp. 115, 117.

    0
    0
  • At the Cambridge tripos (as described by Jebb in 1774, Remarks, &c., pp. 20-31) the first twenty-four candidates were also selected by a preliminary test; they were then divided further into " wranglers" (the disputants, par excellence) and Senior Optimes, the next twelve on the list being called the Junior Optimes.

    0
    0
  • Thiele (Ann., 1892, 270, p. 1; 18 93, 2 73, p. 1 33; Ber., 1893, 26, pp. 2598, 2645).

    0
    0
  • Various other works have been attributed to Moses, such as the Petirath Moshe, the 1 31 4 13Xos Aoywv, uucrrcK&v Mwuetws, The Exodus of Moses (in Slavonic), &c. See Charles, Assumption of Moses, pp. xiv.

    0
    0
  • See Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopeidie; Otto Pfleiderer, The Development of Theology in Germany since Kant, pp. 89 ff.

    0
    0
  • For their bearing on Palestine, see especially P. Dhorme, Rev. biblique (2908), pp. 500 -529; (1909), pp - 5 0 -73, 368-385.

    0
    0
  • Driver, Modern Research as illustrating the Bible (London, 1909), pp. 60 sqq., 90.

    0
    0
  • Sayce (Modern Review, 5884, pp. 158-169), cannot easily be explained.

    0
    0
  • Among the developments in Greek thought of this period, especially interesting for the Old Testament is the teaching associated with Phocylides of Miletus; see Lincke, Samaria, pp. 47 seq.

    0
    0
  • They were applied to other P Y PP uses less justifiable or defensible; they served to execute the will of the despotic master upon all who set themselves in opposition to his authority, or were decreed, more or less wisely but still arbitrarily, by a government in the best interests of society, organized for the general good.

    0
    0
  • But he forbade extortion and suppressed more than 1 Seyid Ameer Ali, A Critical Examination of the Life and Teachings of Mahomet, pp. 341-343.

    0
    0
  • From the Posthumous Papers (pp. ' 22, 24) it is clear that Mrs Grote was wrong in asserting that she first in 1823 (autumn) suggested the History of Greece; the book was already in preparation in 1822, though what was then written was subsequently reconstructed.

    0
    0
  • P PP This is dealt with in the Theaetetus (184b sqq.).

    0
    0
  • The System der Logik (1828) of Bachmann (a Kantian logician of distinction) contains a historical survey (pp. 569-644), as does the Denklehre (1822) of van Calker (allied in thought to Fries), pp. 12 sqq.; Eberstein's Geschichte der Logik and Metaphysik bei den Deutschen von Leibniz bis auf gegenwartige Zeit (latest edition, 1 799) is still of importance in regard to logicians of the school of Wolff and the origines of Kant's logical thought.

    0
    0
  • See also Acts of the Privy Council (1542-1547), pp. 4 2 4, 462; Wriothesley's Chron.

    0
    0
  • Useful lists of national collections of treaties will be found in the Revue de droit international for 1886, pp. 169-187, and in the Marquis Olivart's Catalogue de ma bibliotheque (1899-1910).

    0
    0
  • Kaltenbach (Pflanzenfeinde, pp. 633-638, 1874) enumerates ninety-eight insects which attack the hazel.

    0
    0
  • The Jesuit Vaniere, who flourished in the early part of the 18th century, in the Praedium rusticum (pp. 12, 13, new ed., Toulouse, 1742) amusingly relates the manner in which he exposed the chicanery of one who pretended by the aid of a hazel divining-rod to point out hidden water-courses and gold.

    0
    0
  • This feature sometimes applies, tions with pp clans.

    0
    0
  • Darton, " Preliminary Description of the Geology and Water Resources of the Southern Half of the Black Hills and adjoining regions in South Dakota and Wyoming," pp. 489-599 of Pt.

    0
    0
  • The difficulties of the mission of a Hebrew prophet to Asshur are diminished by Cheyne's later theory, Critica Biblica (1904), pp. 150-152.

    0
    0
  • P. Peters agrees (pp. 191 ff.) that the best test is the etymology of the names of the letters.

    0
    0
  • The earliest tradition of the names is discussed by Noldeke in his Beitrdge zur semitischen Sprachwissenschaft (1904), pp. 124 ff.

    0
    0
  • C and IC, as k was frequently written, would easily be confusedin writing, and Professor Hempl (Transactions of the American Philological Association for 18 99, pp. 24 ff.) shows that the Chalcidian form of y` - = developed into shapes which might have partaken of the confusion.

    0
    0
  • Some of these objects are in the museum at Cagliari, others in private collections, and many scarabs are in she British Museum, all of which by the coins found with them are dated later than the Roman occupation (Catalogue of Gems, London, 1888,1888, pp. 13 sqq.).

    0
    0
  • Much, however, is to be gathered from the arguments of the Trojan part of the Epic Cycle (preserved in the Codex Venetus of the Iliad, a full discussion of which will be found in the Journal of Hellenic Studies, 1884, pp. 1-40).

    0
    0
  • The part of the Prolegomena which deals with the original form of the Homeric poems occupies pp. xl.

    0
    0
  • Wolf shows how the question of the date of writing meets us on the 1 See the chapter in Cobet's Miscellanea critica, pp. 225-239.

    0
    0
  • A useful systematized bibliography is also given in the Subject Index of the London Library (1909), pp. 945-51.

    0
    0
  • For a discussion of Sennacherib's record, see Wilke,, Jesaja (Leipzig, 1905), pp. 97 sqq.

    0
    0
  • The principal publications respecting this and all sites and phases of culture mentioned in this section are collected in Myres and Ohnefalsch-Richter, Cyprus Museum Catalogue (Oxford, 18 99), pp. 1-35.

    0
    0
  • The saint's evidence is carefully weighed by Dresdner (l.c.), especially on pp. 309 ff.

    0
    0
  • See "Les Origines de l'heresie albigeoise," by Vacandard in the Revue des questions historiques (Paris, 1894, pp. 67-83).

    0
    0
  • Winkelmann, Handbuch der Physik (Breslau, 1905), pp. 58-70, which contains a large number of references to original papers on electrometers.

    0
    0
  • Reference may also be made to the treatise of Czapski-Eppenstein, pp. 155-161.

    0
    0
  • Volter, who applies this method to the other Pauline epistles, admits that Galatians,whether authentic or not, is substantially a literary unity (Paulus and seine Briefe, 1905, pp. 2 29-285).

    0
    0
  • Blass, Die Rhythmen der asianischen and rOmischen Kunstprosa (1905), PP. 43-53, 204-216, where, however, this feature is exaggerated into unreality.

    0
    0
  • Gerth van Wijk, in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopadie (3rd ed., Leipzig, 1900), pp. 599-606, where further references are given.

    0
    0
  • Andersson in his Lake N'gami (pp. 2 5326 9) has given a lively account of the pursuit by himself and Francis Galton of a brood of ostriches, in the course of which the male bird feigned being wounded to distract their attention from his offspring.

    0
    0
  • The change in the use of particles and the comparative rarity of the definite article form, together with the startling divergence in vocabulary, the chief ground of our perplexity" (Church Quarterly Review, 1903, pp. 428 seq.).

    0
    0
  • Ngeli (Der Wortschatz des Apostels Paulus, 1905, pp. 85 seq.), whose opinion is all the more significant on this point that he refuses to admit any linguistic features adverse to the Pauline authorship of the other epistles.

    0
    0
  • Winstedt published it in the Classical Review (1899), pp. 201 seq.

    0
    0
  • Alexis Claude Clairault (Theorie de la figure de la terre, Paris, 1808, pp. 105, 128) appears to have been the first to show the necessity of taking account of the attraction between the parts of the fluid itself in order to explain the phenomena.

    0
    0
  • Draw Pp and Qq touching both catenaries, Pp and Qq will intersect at T, a point in the directrix; for since any catenary with its directrix is a similar figure to any other catenary with its directrix, if the directrix of the one coincides with that of the other the centre of similitude must lie on the common directrix.

    0
    0
  • Hence T, the point of intersection of Pp and Qq, must be the centre of similitude and must be on the common directrix.

    0
    0
  • P. Winship, " The Coronado Expedition," in U.S. Bureau of Ethnology, z4th Annual Report (1892-1893), pp. 33961 3, with an abundant literature to which this may be the guide.

    0
    0
  • For the other names by which it is referred to, such as The Apocalypse of Moses, The Testament of Moses, The Book of Adam's Daughters and the Life of Adam, the reader may consult Charles's The Book of Jubilees, pp. xvii.-xx.

    0
    0
  • A summary of dispositions, movements, and events will be found in Hazell's Annual, 1914, pp. 369-71.

    0
    0
  • For full details see Nisbet Bain, The First Romanovs, pp. 327-329.

    0
    0
  • But this error of thought would be easily concealed from a mind with the rabbinical training of Paul's" (Schmiedel, in Hibbert Journal, 1902, pp. 548549) Cf.

    0
    0
  • For the religious aspect of vegetarianism in these and other circles, see von Dobschiitz's Christian Life in the Primitive Church (1904), pp. 125 f., 396 f.

    0
    0
  • Gifford (pp. 27-30) evades the difficulty by taking xvi.

    0
    0
  • Ryder (Journal of Biblical Literature, 1898, pp. 184 f.) suggests that xv.-xvi.

    0
    0
  • Steinmetz (ibid., 1908, 177 f.); and Schmiedel in Hibbert Journal (1903), pp. 537 f heart of the gospel with all his heart, and while a certain controversial' element inevitably enters into his expositionsince he is writing with his eye on the Roman Church-any such considerations are quite subordinate to his dominating aim.

    0
    0
  • Lightfoot's posthumous fragment (Notes on Epistles of St Paul, 18 95, pp. 2 37-3 0 5) unfortunately breaks off at vii.

    0
    0
  • Knowling's The Testimony of St Paul to Christ (1905), pp. 60 f., 1 Not, however, in the sections bearing on the Law.

    0
    0
  • It is conceded on all hands that Livy in this decade makes con For Livy's debt to Valerius Antias, see A A Howard in Harvard Studies Classical Philology, xvii (1906), pp 161 sqq.

    0
    0
  • For a list of Occam's works, see Little's Grey Friars, pp. 225-234.

    0
    0
  • Talmage, The Great Salt Lake, Present and Past (Salt Lake City, 1900); and Grove Karl Gilbert, Lake Bonneville, monograph i of United States Geological Survey (Washington, 1890), containing (pp. 12-19) references to the earlier literature.

    0
    0
  • Scharer (Geschichte des jiidischen Volkes, ii., 4th ed., pp. 447-456, 475-4 8 9) gives the evidence of the ancient authorities and references to modern studies of the subject.

    0
    0
  • Bancroft, Alaska 1730-1885, pp. 59560 9; and various other bibliographies in titles mentioned below, especially in Brooke's The Geography and Geology of Alaska.

    0
    0
  • It is a system " whereby the great conquering or commercial peoples masked, so to speak, their irresistible advance "; it was much practised by the Romans in Africa and A si a; it has been chiefly applied in modern times Y PP in India (p. 326).

    0
    0
  • Bartlet (Ap. Age, pp. 217-250) pleads for it, and the view is still common among English interpreters.

    0
    0
  • Moffat, Historical New Test.2 (pp. 57 6 -5 81), and in the articles s.v.

    0
    0
  • On both the theories here concerned it would be admitted, in the words of Agassiz (Principles of Zoology, pp. 205-206), that " there is a manifest progress in the succession of beings on the surface of the earth.

    0
    0
  • A memoir by his son Richard will be found in the Jahrbacher for 1871, pp. 154-163.

    0
    0
  • Duchesne, Bulletin critique, 1889, pp. 41-48; for the Epistles see Apocryphal Literature, sect.

    0
    0
  • That the Book of Enoch was written in Semitic is now accepted on all hands, but scholars are divided as to whether the Semitic language in question was Hebrew or Aramaic. Only one valuable contribution on this question has been made, and that by Halevy in the Journal Asiatique, AvrilMai 186 7, pp. 35 2 -395.

    0
    0
  • Robertson Smith (Religion of the Semites, new ed., 1894, pp. 191, 290, 411), who, regarding Adonis as the swine-god, characterizes the Adonia as an annual piacular sacrifice (of swine), "in which the sacrifice has come to be overshadowed by its popular and dramatic accompaniments, to which the Greek celebration, not forming part of the state religion, was limited."

    0
    0
  • See the authorities quoted in Buddhist India, pp. 141, 142.

    0
    0
  • Since the fall of Ibn Zubair the political position of Mecca 4 For details as to the ancient quarters of Mecca, where the several families or septs lived apart, see Azraqi, 455 pp. seq., and compare Ya`qubi, ed.

    0
    0
  • The most extravagant estimate of all was that of Whiston, who calls them "the most sacred standard of Christianity, equal in authority to the Gospels themselves, and superior in authority to the epistles of single apostles, some parts of them being our Saviour's own original laws delivered to the apostles, and the other parts the public acts of the apostles" (Historical preface to Primitive Christianity Revived, pp. 85-86).

    0
    0
  • Formerly the greatest 3 This and the following passages in quotation marks are from Professor Wilson's translation of too Sakhis, pp. 83-90.

    0
    0
  • Doebner (Ber., 1902, 35, pp. 2129, 2 53 8; 1903, 3 6, p. 43 18) obtained compounds, which in all probability are cyclo-octadienes, by the distillation of s-vinylacrylic acid, sorbic acid, and cinnamenyl acrylic acid with anhydrous baryta.

    0
    0
  • Of C. coscoroba Mr Gibson remarks (Ibis, 1880, pp. 36, 37) that its "note is a loud trumpet-call," and that it swims with "the neck curved and the wings raised after the true swan model."

    0
    0
  • Nationalokonomik (Munich, 1874), pp. 21-28; and works quoted under Scholasticism.

    0
    0
  • Mushketov's Turkestan (pp. 35, 681) seems to justify this conclusion.

    0
    0
  • It was a courageous PP g shares.

    0
    0
  • An account of them was published in 1755, entitled De Litteraria expeditione per pontificam ditionem ad dimetiendos duos meridiani gradus a PP. Maire et Boscovich.

    0
    0
  • Uranus was recognized specula of continually augmented size, up to a diameter 4 p pp Herschel.

    0
    0
  • Forbes (Ibis, 1881, pp. 360, 361) to inhabit the dry and open "sertoes" of north-eastern Brazil, a discovery the more interesting since it was in that part of the country that Marcgrav and Piso became acquainted with a bird of this kind, though the existence of any species of rhea in the district had been long overlooked by or unknown to succeeding travellers.

    0
    0
  • Vumel, Notitia codicum Demosth., and Prolegomena Critica to his edition published at Halle (1856-1857), pp. 175-178.1 The extant scholia on Demosthenes are for the most part poor.

    0
    0
  • Round in his article on " The Pope and the Conquest of Ireland " (Commune of London, 1899, pp. 171 -200), where further references will be found.

    0
    0
  • See Life by Hans Trog in the Basler Jahrbuch for 1898, pp. 1 -172.

    0
    0
  • Diceto's fragmentary Domesday of the capitular estates has been edited by Archdeacon Hale in The Domesday of St Paul's, pp. 109 ff.

    0
    0
  • The oldest known coins are the electrum coins of the earlier Mermnads (Madden, Coins of the Jews, pp. 19-21), stamped on one side with a lion's head or the figure of a king with bow and quiver; these were replaced by Croesus with a coinage of pure gold and silver.

    0
    0
  • Its surface is not, however, smooth, but is everywhere, with the exception of the perioral region, raised into minute secondary pp' / _ can, ?

    0
    0
  • Opposed to Ormuzd, the author of all good, is Ahriman, the source of all evil; and the opposition runs through the whole universe (D'Alviella's Hibbert Lectures, pp. 158-164).

    0
    0
  • He argues that "the world-order, being in process as a moral order, permits breaches everywhere into which Satan can obtain entrance" (pp. 99, 102).

    0
    0
  • Pp Y Y P just before the sultan accepted that scheme, and after his acceptance of it they spread rapidly.

    0
    0
  • It =; L 1 = front lens is simpler to place an illuminating O of microscope; lens in front of the source of light so PP =diaphragm.

    0
    0
  • To show the cause of this motion, let BQ represent a section of an oblate spheroid through its shortest axis, PP. We may consider this spheroid to be that of the earth, the ellipticity being greatly exaggerated.

    0
    0
  • If set in rotation around its axis of figure PP, it will continue to rotate around that axis for an indefinite time.

    0
    0
  • A slight deformation of the earth will thus result; and the axis of figure of the distorted spheroid will no longer be PP, but a line P'P' between PP and RR.

    0
    0
  • Lods, Etudes de theologie (Paris, 1 9 01), pp. 2 5928 4, and below, § 6.

    0
    0
  • De Reiset (La Comtesse de Balbi, pp. 152-161) produces evidence to disprove this assertion.

    0
    0
  • For an exposition of his religious position, 3 The summary given above is condensed from the translation by Dr Grierson, at pp. 229-236 of the Indian Antiquary, vol.

    0
    0
  • See David; Samuel (BooKs) and especially Cheyne, Aids and Devout Study of Criticism, pp. 80 sqq., 125 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Morse, article cited below, pp. 4, 18-21.

    0
    0
  • For other fragments and their localities see Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (iii., 1873, pp. 801 and 1055; and supplement i., 1893, p. 1909); special mention may be made of those of Elatea, Plataea and Megalopolis.

    0
    0
  • He also rendered good service to historians by the publication of his Collection des meilleures dissertations, notices et traites relatifs 4 l'histoire de France (20 vols., 1826-1840); in the absence of an index, since Leber did not give one, an analytical table of contents is to be found in Alfred Franklin's Sources de l'histoire de France (1876, pp. 342 sqq.).

    0
    0
  • I., pp. 462-542 (1896); " The Cretaceous Formation of the Black Hills as indicated by the Fossil Plants," 19th Report U.S. Geological Survey, Pt.

    0
    0
  • Many of these conclusions were arrived at independently by a French scholar, De Faye (Les Apocalypses juives, 1892, pp. 25-28, 76-103, 192-204).

    0
    0
  • This book was undoubtedly written originally by a Jew but was subsequently revised by a Christian, as has been shown by Kohler in the Jewish Quarterly Review (1893), pp. 407-409.

    0
    0
  • This clerical side of the parish bounds-beating was one of the religious functions prohibited by the Injunctions of Queen Elizabeth; but it was then ordered that the perambulation should continue to be performed as a quasi-secular function, so that evidence of the boundaries of parishes, &c. might be preserved (Gibson, Codex juris Ecclesiastici Anglicani (1761) pp. 213-214).

    0
    0
  • This latter assassination attempt is graphically described in Nancy, Lady Enniskillen's Florence Court, pp.

    0
    0
  • The two companies will also further develop metallocene single-site polymerisation catalysts for use in bulk PP polymerisation processes.

    0
    0
  • This northernmost german comparing ships there pounds pp reduced.

    0
    0
  • I'm now having a head-to-head with the PP tomorrow (Tuesday ).

    0
    0
  • Polypropylene can be made auxetic by compacting ultra high molecular weight PP powder, with a particle size of 30 to 120 microns.

    0
    0
  • The relevant passages, variously for high or low voices, were then notated in score on pp.

    0
    0
  • Proceedings of a Conference organized by the British Council in Cairo, Cairo, The British Council, pp.

    0
    0
  • In this case, PP refers to preambular paragraph and OP refers to operative paragraph.

    0
    0
  • Target materials are low and linear low density polyethylene, but the new masterbatches can also be used with HDPE and PP.

    0
    0
  • Retardex materials can be recycled and the PP compounds containing phosphorus flame retardants retain their flame retardant properties.

    0
    0
  • Sat 26th Today is hog roast, & I am helping at pp stall.

    0
    0
  • The formula contains Vitamin PP and a starch derivative that absorbs and regulates excess sebum as well as aromatic plants that purify the skin.

    0
    0
  • This method of treating the Psalter has largely vitiated modern criticism 10 A. C. Welch, op. cit., pp.

    0
    0
  • Seeing that the tribe was blotted out at the beginning of the 3rd century B.e., we can scarcely wonder that no record of its speech survives; but its geographical situation and the frequency of the co-suffix in that strip of coast (besides Aurunci itself we have the names Vescia, Mons Massicus, Marica, Glanica and Caedicii; see Italic Dialects, pp. 283 f.) rank them beyond doubt with their neighbours the Volsci.

    0
    0
  • The lowest of these slides reposes upon a foundation-plate pp, into one end of which the screw s is tapped.

    0
    0
  • K is the clamp in position angle, P the slow motion screw in position-angle; pp is the position circle, R, R its two readers.

    0
    0
  • Bury points out (Ancient Greek Historians, 1909, pp. 1 33 seq.), he was by no means a blind admirer.

    0
    0
  • He was born in 356 B.C., probably about October (Hogarth, pp. 284 ff.).

    0
    0
  • Among the mass of monographs and special articles, reference may be made to Freeman, Historical Essays, 2nd series, pp. 182 f.; Dodge, Alexander (in a series called Great Captains) 1890; Mahaffy, Problems in Greek History (1892), ch.

    0
    0
  • Y Y PP in use, or the water in them become frozen, the lighting of the fire would cause the water to expand, and having no outlet it would in all probability burst the boiler.

    0
    0
  • On p. 8, 10.502 is multiplied by 3.216, and the result found to be 33.77443 2; and on pp. 23 and 24 occur decimals not attached to integers, viz.

    0
    0
  • He has been sometimes erroneously called "Peer of Merchiston," and in the 1645 edition of the Flamm Discovery he is so styled (see Mark Napier's Memoirs, pp. 9 and 173, and Libri qui supersunt, p. xciv.).

    0
    0
  • An excellent account of the Cosmati is given by Boito, Architettura del medio evo (Milan, 1880), pp. 117 -182.

    0
    0
  • He rejects the attempt to explain human personality as " generated by the material molecular aggregate of its own unaided latent power," and affirms that the " universe where the human spirit is more at home than it is among these temporary collocations of matter" is " a universe capable of infinite development, of noble contemplation, and of lofty joy, long after this planet - nay the whole solar system - shall have fulfilled its present spire of destiny, and retired cold and lifeless upon its endless way " (pp. 199-200).

    0
    0
  • Gregory has maintained (Dead Heart of Australia, 1906, pp. 273-341) that the ascent of water in these wells is due to the tension of the included gases and the pressure of overlying sheets of rocks, and that some of the water is of plutonic origin.'

    0
    0
  • G., 1874, pp. 173 seq.) has shown that they are the Kissians of the older Greek authors who are identified with the Susians by Aeschylus (Choeph.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Bonner did not go out of his way to persecute; many of his victims were forced upon him by the council, which sometimes thought that he had not been severe enough (see Acts of the P.C. 1 5541 55 6, pp. 115, 1 39; 1556-1558, pp. 18, 19, 216, 276).

    0
    0
  • Sclater (Ibis, 18 74, pp. 189-206) in 8 genera, are believed to belong to this group.

    0
    0
  • The story of his death is given in two widely different forms, by Saxo in his Gesta Danorum (ed Holder, pp. 69 ff.) and in the prose Edda (Gylfaginning, cap. 49).

    0
    0
  • Such an arrangement would distribute a 1 For a history of the discovery of the earth return, see Fahie, History of Electric Telegraphy to the Year 18 37, pp. 343-348.

    0
    0
  • An obituary notice by his friend Auguste Chevalier appeared in the Revue encyclopedique (1832); and his collected works are published, Journal de Liouville (1846), pp. 381-444, about fifty of these pages being occupied by researches on the resolubility of algebraic equations by radicals.

    0
    0
  • The first edition, with a full commentary based on scientific principles, was that of Aufrecht and Kirchhoff in 1849-1851, and on this all subsequent interpretations are based (Breal, Paris, 1875; Bucheler, Umbrica, Bonn, 1883, a reprint and enlargement of articles in Fleckeisen's Jahrbuch, 18 75, pp. 127 and 313).

    0
    0
  • Of these only the outstanding features can be mentioned here; for a fuller discussion the reader must be referred to The Italic Dialects, pp. 400 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Prescott, The Speaking Telephone (London, 1879), pp. 151-205.2 Scientific American, 18th June 1881.

    0
    0
  • So under the advice of his minister (the marquis of Pombal), King Joseph of Portugal in 1759-1760 claimed that the pope should give him permission to try in all cases clerics accused of treason, and was not content with the limited permission given to try and execute, if guilty, the Jesuits then accused of conspiring his death (Life of Pombal, by Count da Carnota, 1871, pp. 128, 1 4 1).

    0
    0
  • In the remainder of the empire the titles of metropolitan, save in the case of the metropolitan of all Russia, and of archbishop, were and are purely honorary, and their holders have merely a diocesan jurisdiction (see Mouravieff, History of the Russian Church, translated Blackmore, 1842, translator's notes at pp. 370, 39 0, 416 et seq.).

    0
    0
  • An outline of the history of the Pali alphabet has been given, with illustrations and references to the authorities, in Rhys Davids's Buddhist India, pp. 107-140.

    0
    0
  • But the department of the chronicles, the only 1 Journal of the Pali Text Society (1905), pp. 72, 86, one so far at all adequately treated, has thrown so much light on many points of the history of India that we may reasonably expect results equally valuable from the publication and study of the remainder.

    0
    0
  • The original sources are best reproduced in Hilgenfeld, Ketzergeschichte des Urchristentums (1884), pp. 1 952 3 0.

    0
    0
  • Marti, in his stimulating work Religion des A.T., pp. 5, 72, advocates the exclusive reference of the word Sabbath to the full moon until the time of Ezekiel on the basis of Meinhold's arguments in Sabbat u.

    0
    0
  • He argued from past history that 2 Kautzsch, in his profoundly learned article on the " Religion of Israel," to which frequent reference has been made, exhibits (pp. 669-671) an excess of scepticism, in our opinion, towards the views propounded by Gunkel in 1895 (Schopfung and Chaos) respecting the intimate connexion between the early Hebrew cosmogonic ideas and those of Babylonia.

    0
    0
  • Stade indeed (Z.A.T.W., 1903, pp. 176178) maintained that the conception of Yahweh as creator of the world could not have arisen till after the middle of the 8th century as the result of prophetic teaching, and that it was not till the time of Ezekiel that Babylonian conceptions entered the world of Hebrew thought in any fulness.

    0
    0
  • See Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly Statement, 1869, p. 123; 1874, p. 62; 1878, pp. 10, 132, 194; 1881, p. 254.

    0
    0
  • Yet little or nothing was generally known about the bird until Delattre sent an account of his meeting with it to the Echo du monde savant for 1843, which was reprinted in the Revue zoologique for that year (pp. 163-165).

    0
    0
  • Commission (Appendix, pp. 379-397), contains numerous letters from various popes, from the king, a correspondence dealing with the affairs of the university of Oxford, another with the province of Gascony, beside some harangues and letters evidently kept as models to be used on various occasions.

    0
    0
  • But, confining ourselves to what is here our special business, it is to be remarked that perhaps the heaviest blow dealt at these strange doctrines was that delivered by Rennie, who, in an edition of Montagu's Ornithological Dictionary (pp. xxxiii.-1v.), published in 1831 and again issued in 1833, attacked the Quinary System, and especially its application to ornithology by Vigors and Swainson, in a way that might perhaps have demolished it, had not the author mingled with his undoubtedly sound reason much that is foreign to any question with which a naturalist, as such, ought to deal - though that herein he was only following the example of one of his opponents, who had constantly treated the subject in like manner, is to be allowed.

    0
    0
  • To Dr Cabanis we are indebted for the ornithological results of Richard Schomburgh's researches given in the third volume (pp. 662-765) of the latter's Reisen im Britisch-Guiana (8vo, 1848), and then in Leotaud's Oiseaux de file de la Trinidad (8vo, 1866).

    0
    0
  • Oiseaux in Vieillot's Faune francaise (8vo, 1822-1829); France but there is a great number of local publications of which Mr Saunders has furnished (Zoologist, 18 7 8, pp. 95-99) a catalogue.

    0
    0
  • In 1835 Mr Jenyns (afterwards Blomefield) produced as excellent Manual of British Vertebrate Animals, a volume (8vo) executed with great scientific skill, the birds again receiving due attention (pp. 49-286), and the descriptions of the various species being as accurate as they are terse.

    0
    0
  • It was only when, after a close examination of the sternal apparatus of one hundred and thirty species, which he carefully described, that he arrived (pp. 177-183) at the conclusion - astonishing to us who know of L'Herminier's previous results - that the sternum of birds cannot be used as a help to their classification on account of the egregious anomalies that would follow the proceeding - such anomalies, for instance, as the separation of Cypselus from Hirundo and its alliance with Trochilus, and the grouping of Hirundo and Fringilla together.

    0
    0
  • It is plain that Blyth saw, and perhaps he was the first to see it, that geographical distribution was not unimportant in suggesting the affinities and differences of natural groups (pp. 258, 259); and, undeterred by the precepts and practice of the hitherto dominant English school of Ornithologists, he declared that " anatomy, when aided by every character which the manner of propagation, the progressive changes, and other physiological data supply, is the only sure basis of classification."

    0
    0
  • On the other hand Oken (Isis, 1842, pp. 39 1 -394), though giving a summary of Nitzsch's results and classification, was more sparing of his praise, and prefaced his remarks by asserting that he could not refrain from laughter when he looked at the plates in Nitzsch's work, since they reminded him of the plucked fowls hanging in a poulterer's shop, and goes on to say that, as the author always had the luck to engage in researches of which nobody thought, so had he the luck to print them where nobody sought them.

    0
    0
  • The Revue Zoologique for 1847 (pp. 360-369) contained the whole, and enabled naturalists to consider the merits of the author's project, which was to found a new classification of birds on the form of the anterior palatal bones, which he declared to be subjected more evidently than any other to certain fixed laws.

    0
    0
  • After several minor notices that appeared in journals at various times, Des Murs in 1860 brought out at Paris his ambitious Traite general d'oologie ornithologique au point de vue de la classification, which contains (pp. 529-538) a " Systema Oologicum " as the final result of his labours.

    0
    0
  • It is perfectly true that in several or even in many instances he acknowledges and deplores the poverty of his information, but this does not excuse him for making assertions (and such assertions are not unfrequent) based on evidence that is either wholly untrustworthy or needs further inquiry before it can be accepted (Ibis, 1860, pp. 331-335).

    0
    0
  • Wallace (Ibis, 1864, pp. 36-41), who successfully showed that they are not altogether to be despised.

    0
    0
  • That this was the case is undeniably shown by some remarks of Canon Tristram, who, in treating of the Alaudidae and Saxicolinae of Algeria (whence he had recently brought a large collection of specimens of his own making), stated (Ibis, 18 59, pp. 4 2 9-433) that he could " not help feeling convinced of the truth of the views set forth by Messrs Darwin and Wallace," adding that it was " hardly possible, I 'should think, to illustrate this theory better than by the larks and chats of North Africa."

    0
    0
  • Professor Parker replied to his critic (Ibis, 1862, PP. 297-299).

    0
    0
  • Huxley, to the delight of an appreciative audience, delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons of England a course of lectures on birds, and a few weeks after presented an abstract of his researches to the Zoological Society, in whose Proceedings for the same year it will be found printed (pp. 415-472) as a paper " On the Classification of Birds, and on the taxonomic value of the modifications of certain of the cranial bones observable in that Class."

    0
    0
  • We possess at least one of these in the tract De Multiplicatione Specierum, printed as part of the Opus Majus by Jebb (pp. 358-444).

    0
    0
  • Absentee landlords, he thinks, rack-rented the soil (p. 167), while the "inhuman severity" of their treatment of villeins led to a progressive decay of agriculture, destroyed the economic basis of the Latin kingdom, and led the natives to welcome the invasion of Saladin (pp. 327-331) The French writers Rey and Dodu are more kind to the Franks; and the testimony of contemporary Arabic writers, who seem favourably impressed by the treatment of their subjects by the Franks, bears out their view, while the tone of the assizes is admittedly favourable to the Syrians.

    0
    0
  • Maxwell, Manual of the Malay Language (1882), pp. 5-34, where this subject is treated more fully than by previous writers.

    0
    0
  • In Maxwell's Manual, pp. 120 seq., no less than sixteen terms are given to express the different kinds of striking, as many for the different kinds of speaking, eighteen for the various modes of carrying, &c. An unnecessary distinction has been made between High Malay and Low Malay.

    0
    0
  • Gasquet, English Monastic Life, pp. 2 34249 (1904), where special information on all the English friars is coveniently brought together..

    0
    0
  • A collection of legends about Asoka, included in the Divyavadana, a work composed probably in the ist or 2nd century A.D., tells us (pp. 3 8 9, 39 0) how Asoka, the Buddhist emperor, visited the traditional site of this grove, under the guidance of Upagupta.

    0
    0
  • The tomb of St Silvester could be identified, and that of Pope Siricius " at his feet," as the pilgrim noted (Bullett., 1890, pp. 106-119).

    0
    0
  • A good plan of the catacombs at Albano (at the 15th milestone of the Appian way), discovered by Boldetti and described by De Rossi, has been published by Marucchi (Nuovo Bulletino di archeologia cristiana, 1902, pp. 89 ff.).

    0
    0
  • It cannot, however, be said that the poem itself supports this assertion, 1 Followed by Peake in The Problem of Suffering, pp. 4 f., 151 f., to whose appendix (A) reference may be made for further details of recent criticism.

    0
    0
  • C.P. Steinmetz (Electrician, 1891, 26, p. 261; 1892, 28, pp. 3 8 4, 408, 425) has called attention to a simple relation which appears to exist between the amount of energy dissipated in carrying a piece of iron or steel through a magnetic cycle and the limiting value of the induction reached in the cycle.

    0
    0
  • Moreau (C. R., 1900, 130, pp. 122, 412, 562) that if K is the coefficient of the Hall effect (I) and K' the analogous coefficient of the Nernst effect (i.) (which is constant for small values of H), then K' = Ka/p, v being the coefficient of the Thomson effect for the metal and p its specific resistance.

    0
    0
  • Among the upper classes it was unusually broad and was made to stand out in 2 Old Babylonian sculptors who represent the enemy as naked (Meyer [see bibliography below], pp. 12, 70 seq., 116), conventionally anticipate the usual treatment of the slain and wounded warriors.

    0
    0
  • Egyptian monuments depict Semites with long bordered tunics reaching from neck to ankle; they have sleeves, which are sometimes curiously decorated, and are tied at the neck with tasselled cords; some times there is a peculiar design at the neck resembling a cross (Muller, Asien and Europa, pp. 298 seq.).

    0
    0
  • It has generally been supposed to be a " milliarium " or central point for measuring distances, but Sir Christopher Wren believed it was part of some more considerable monuments in the forum (Parentalia, pp. 265, 266).

    0
    0
  • Mr Laurence Gomme (Primitive Folk-Moots, pp. 1 55, 156) takes up the matter at this point, and places the tradition implied by Cade's significant action as belonging to times when the London Stone was, as other great stones were, the place where the suitors of an open-air assembly were accustomed to gather together and to legislate for the government of the city.

    0
    0
  • Renan, Les rabbins francais, pp. 647 foil.; Perles, Salomo ben Abraham ben Adereth, pp. 15-54; Jewish Encyclopaedia, s.v.

    0
    0
  • I See Sayce, Early Israel, pp. 281 ff., and Encyc. Brit., 10th ed., vol.

    0
    0
  • Near the site are the rock reliefs of Yasili Kaya in two hypaethral galleries, showing, in the one, two processions composed of over sixty figures meeting at the head of the gallery; in the other, isolated groups of figures, fifteen in number (see for detailed description Murray's Guide to Asia Minor, 18 95, pp. 23 ff.).

    0
    0
  • An English translation of James's texts will be found in the Ante-Nicene Christian Library (Clark, 1897), pp. 185-201.

    0
    0
  • Finally, an unknown 5th-century writer (see Buresch, Klaros, 1889, pp. 87-126) says that the Oracles of Hystaspes dealt with the incarnation of the Saviour.

    0
    0
  • The introduction, which is wanting in the Greek MS., has been supplied by a Latin translation from the Slavonic version (see pp. vii.-ix.).

    0
    0
  • Something of the old enthusiasm seems to have passed to the inhabitants of Chorum, whom most travellers have found bigoted and fanatical Mahommedans (see J.G.C.Anderson, Studia Pontica, pp. 6 ff.).

    0
    0
  • In the English dialects of Kent, Essex and Norfolk there is a common change of v to w, but Ellis says (English Pronunciation, V, pp. 132, 229) that though he has made diligent search he has never been able to hear the v for w which is so characteristic of Sam and Tony Weller in the Pickwick Papers.

    0
    0
  • Lane-Poole's Mohammadan Dynasties (1894), pp. 222-231; for the relations of the various descendants of Jenghiz, see Stockvis, Manuel d'histoire, vol.

    0
    0
  • The mystical tendency in Islam, Sufism, is also regarded as heretical (see Kuenen's Hibbert Lecture, pp. 45-5 0).

    0
    0
  • The Maori story, told by Grey and others, of the rending apart of Rangi (= Langi, heaven) 5 See Schoolcraft, Myth of Hiawatha (1856), pp. 35-39; and cf.

    0
    0
  • The ' The curious but apparently well-attested fact of the occurrence in England, near Poole, in June 1851, of a male bird of this species (Zoologist, pp. 3601, 3654) has been overlooked by several writers who profess to mention all cases of a similar character.

    0
    0
  • On the whole there seems little doubt that successful crystalgazing is the exertion of a not uncommon though far from universal faculty, like those of "chromatic audition" - the vivid association of certain sounds with certain colours - and the mental seeing of figures arranged in coloured diagrams (Galton, Inquiry into Human Faculty, pp. 114-154).

    0
    0
  • It is thus contrasted with metaphysics, which considers the nature of reality, and with psychology, which deals with the objective part of cognition, and, as Prof. James Ward said, "is essentially genetic in its method" (Mind, April 1883, pp. 166-167).

    0
    0
  • Struve (Description de l'Observatoire ' Central de Pulkowa, pp. 196, 197) adds a few remarks to Steinheil's description, in which he states that the images have not all desirable precision - a fault perhaps inevitable in all micrometers with divided lenses, and which is probably in this case aggravated by the fact that the rays falling upon the divided lens have considerable convergence.

    0
    0
  • Arago (Comptes rendus, xxiv., 18 47, pp. 400-402) found that in Rochon's micrometer, when the prism was approached close to the eye-piece for the measurement of very small angles, the smallest imperfections in the crystal or its surfaces were inconveniently magnified.

    0
    0