Popularly sentence example

popularly
  • He was popularly known as "Prince John" because of his manners and appearance.
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  • Popularly, however, the emperor is known by his old Russian title of tsar.
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  • He was popularly regarded as a prophet, more especially as a second Elijah.
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  • The horse does not occupy the important position in the Bedouin economy that is popularly supposed.
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  • In fact, he did so much to make the atomic theory of matter probable that he is popularly regarded as its originator.
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  • The monitor lizard is popularly known as the goanna, a name derived from the iguana, an entirely different animal.
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  • He was not indeed the monster of iniquity he is popularly supposed to have been.
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  • The worship of the tulsi plant, or holy basil (Ocymum sanctum, Don), by the Hindus is popularly explained by its consecration to Vishnu and Krishna.
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  • A new company, officially known as the West India, American, or New Sweden Company, but like its predecessor popularly known as the South Company, was chartered, and a governor, Johan Printz (c. 1600-1663) was sent out by the crown.
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  • It is the largest railway centre in the state, and is popularly known as the Gate City of Florida.
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  • Those popularly known as " bluestones " belong to the Hamilton period of the Devonian formation and occur mainly between the Hudson and Delaware rivers.
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  • The following herbs are popularly used in many recipes.
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  • Members of the closely allied genera Gasteria and Haworthia, with a similar mode of growth, are also cultivated and popularly known as aloes.
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  • The English Revolution is popularly called the Revolution of 1688.
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  • One of its companies carried a number of gamecocks said to have been the brood of a blue hen; hence the soldiers, and later the people of the state, have been popularly known as the " Blue Hen's Chickens."
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  • In this government, though the Schepenen retained a dignified precedence, all power was practically concentrated in the popularly elected Raad, even the estates of the see (Sticht) had "nothing to say in the city."
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  • In 409 or 410 Synesius, whose Christianity had until then been by no means very pronounced, was popularly chosen to be bishop of Ptolemais, and, after long hesitation on personal and doctrinal grounds, he ultimately accepted the office thus thrust upon him, being consecrated by Theophilus at Alexandria.
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  • Again, popularly, an unproved ex cathedra statement of any kind is called " dogmatic," with perhaps an insinuation that it is being obstinately adhered to without, or beyond, or in defiance of, obtainable evidence.
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  • It was these "Hyderabad Assigned Districts" which were popularly supposed to form the province of Berar, though they coincided in extent neither with the Berar of the nizams nor with the old Mogul province.
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  • gremillet, scorpionne), the name popularly applied to the small annual or perennial herbs forming the genus Myosotis of the natural order Boraginaceae, so called from the Greek µus, a mouse, and oiis, an ear, on account of the shape of the leaves.
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  • Remains of the piles of the mole still exist, and are popularly known as Caligula's Bridge, from the mistaken idea that they belong to the temporary structure which that emperor flung across the bay from the mole at Puteoli to the shore at Baiae.
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  • The sole legislative authority was vested in a single popularly elected chamber styled the volksraad.
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  • From this time Greeley was popularly identified with The Tribune, and its share in the public discussion of the time is his history.
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  • At the outbreak of the war with Spain he resigned from the Navy Department and raised the first volunteer regiment of cavalry, popularly known as the "Rough Riders," because many of its members were Western cowboys and ranchmen expert in the handling of the rough and often unbroken horses of the Western frontier.
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  • As the time drew on it was obvious that the celebrations of this Diamond Jubilee, as it was popularly called, would exceed in magnificence those of the Jubilee of 1887.
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  • The Old Testament has no theory of sacrifice; in connexion with sin the sacrifice was popularly regarded as payment of penalty or compensation.
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  • One special class called kher heb were charged with reciting the divine formulae, which were popularly held to possess magical virtue.
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  • Legislative authority is exercised by two popularly elected bodies, a Chamber of Deputies of 300 and a Senate of i so members.
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  • Local civil government is carried on by popularly elected parish, district, urban and municipal councils.
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  • "Pint-pot" Latuski, bishop of Posen, had purchased his office for 12,000 ducats from Queen Bona; while another of her creatures, Peter, popularly known as the "wencher," was appointed bishop of Przemysl with the promise of the reversion of the still richer see of Cracow.
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  • Such remission was popularly called a pardon in the middle ages - a term which still survives, e.g.
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  • He also devoted much attention to the study of obscure morbid conditions like hysteria, especially in relation to hypnotism; indeed, it is in connexion with his investigation into the phenomena and results of the latter that his name is popularly known.
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  • The Hohe Tauern contains many high lying valleys, traversed by the streams which flow into the Salzach, as well as numerous depressions and passes, here called popularly Tauern.
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  • MEDUSA, the name given by zoologists to the familiar marine animals known popularly as jelly-fishes; or, to be more accurate, to those jelly-fishes I in which the form of the body resembles that of an umbrella, bell or parachute.
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  • These two lines, popularly called the Mexican Central and Mexican National, have their northern termini at Ciudad Juarez and Laredo on the Rio Grande and connect with American trunk lines at El Paso and Laredo.
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  • Whittingham's enterprise was, however, soon superseded by an issue of the whole Bible, which appeared in 1560, the so-called Genevan Bible, popularly also known as the Breeches The Bible, from its rendering of Gen.
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  • gigantea was brought to England by Lobb in 1853, and received from Dr Lindley the name of Wellingtonia, by which it is still popularly known, though its affinity to the redwood is too marked to admit of generic distinction.
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  • In 1812, urging baptism by immersion upon his followers by his own example, he took his father's place as leader of the Disciples of Christ (popularly called Christians, Campbellites and Reformers).
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  • Willughby in 1676 it was the name given by Yorkshiremen to the bird popularly known in England as the " Summer-Snipe," - the Tringa hypoleucos of Linnaeus and the Totanus hypoleucos of later writers, - but probably even in Willughby's time the name was of much wider signification.
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  • The eastern coast is fringed by long-stretching sand reefs, enclosing lagoons so narrow and continuous that they are popularly called rivers.
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  • MANCHESTER (popularly Manchester-by-the-Sea), a township of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 25 m.
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  • Its members, popularly called Liguorians or Redemptorists, devote themselves to the religious instruction of the poor, more especially in country districts; Liguori specially forbade them to undertake secular educational work.
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  • Just at this time was formed under the aegis of Cardinal Richelieu the " Company of New France," known popularly as " The Company of One Hundred Associates."
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  • Therefore his contemporary, Cicero, who knew the early dialogues on Philosophy, the Eudemus and the Protrepticus, and also among the mature scientific writings the Topics, Rhetoric, Politics, Physics and De Coelo, to some extent, was justified by Aristotle's example and precept in drawing the line between two kinds of books, one written popularly, called exoteric, the other more accurately (Cic. De Finibus, v.
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  • Among the archives, kept in the sacristy of the church, are several banners captured by the Appenzellers in former days, among them one taken in 1406 at Imst, near Lanedeck, with the inscription Hundert Teufel, though popularly this number is multiplied a thousandfold.
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  • Chief of these is the Misericordia Hospital, popularly known as the " Santa Casa," belonging to a religious brotherhood dating from 1591.
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  • 13 he became head of what was popularly known as the "great" or "national" Ministry, in which he also held the portfolio of Foreign Affairs.
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  • Under the hill of Ascension are the remains of a temple, popularly called of Neptune, a very simple Doric structure, which still in its mutilated state presents some peculiarities of architecture.
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  • The invention of these various arts and industries was popularly ascribed to the Phoenicians, no doubt merely because Phoenician traders brought the products into the market.
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  • At the time of the crusades, "Liche," as Jacques de Vitry says it was popularly called, was a wealthy city.
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  • In the New Testament it denotes the native language of Palestine (Aramaic and Hebrew being popularly confused) as opposed to Greek.
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  • REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA, until 1867 called officially "The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in North America," and still popularly called the Dutch Reformed Church, an American Calvinist church, originating with the settlers from Holland in New York, New Jersey and Delaware, the first permanent settlers of the Reformed faith in the New World.
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  • The system is now popularly known in England as " French gardening."
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  • van Wyck as first mayor of greater New York in 1897, and during van Wyck's administration Croker is popularly supposed to have dominated completely the government of the city.
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  • One of the water-tanks in the town is popularly reputed to be filled with water admitted from the Ganges every twelve years by a subterranean passage 1200 m.
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  • Caymans, water-hogs (capinchos), several kinds of deer (Cervus paludosus the largest), ounces, opossums, armadillos, vampires, the American ostrich, the ibis, the jabiru, various species popularly called partridges, the pato real or royal duck, the Palamedea cornuta, parrots and parakeets, are among the more notable forms. Insect life is peculiarly abundant; the red stump-like ant-hills are a feature in every landscape, and bees used to be kept in all the mission villages.
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  • The discovery with which Leverrier's name is popularly identified was only an incident in his career.
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  • The Chromis simonis is popularly supposed to be the fish from which Peter took the piece of money (Matt.
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  • The promoter of the faith, popularly called the "devil's advocate" (advocates diaboli), is the defendant, whose official duty is to point out to the tribunal the weak points of the case.
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  • (This law, which still exists, is popularly known as the Kanzlei or Pulpit-paragraph.) It was of course opposed by the Centre, who declared that the Reichstag had no right to interfere in what was after all a religious question, and the Bavarian Opposition expressed much indignation that their government should turn for help to the Protestants of the North in order to force upon -the Catholics of Bavaria a law which they could not have carried in that state.
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  • The decision between the two races turned on the vote of the feudal proprietors, and in order to win this a society was formed among the German capitalists of Vienna (to which the name of Chabrus was popularly given) to acquire by real or fictitious purchase portions of those estates to which a vote was attached.
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  • The cities appear equally Hellenic in their political organs and functions with boule and demos and popularly elected magistrates.
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  • The demos first sank into political annihilation and the council, no longer popularly elected but an aristocratic order, concentrated the whole administration in its hands.
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  • Popularly it is supposed that earthquake recorders are instruments so sensitive to slight vibrations that great care is necessary in selecting a site for their installation.
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  • The fff of a piastre is popularly called a para and the native population generally reckon in paras.
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  • The general assembly consists of the legislative council and the ministers of state, together with popularly elected members, who form a majority of the whole assembly.
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  • With its popularly elected assembly of twenty-four Etten (jurati) Drente remained practically independent.
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  • The national or state church of Denmark is officially styled " Evangelically Reformed," but is popularly described as Lutheran.
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  • All these logical and philosophic developments were popularly expounded by James in his Pragmatism (1907), followed by A Pluralistic Universe (1908) and The Meaning of Truth (1909).
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  • Besides such fine single woodcuts as the "Mass of St Gregory," the "St Christopher," the "St Jerome," and two Holy Families of 1511, Darer published in the same year the most numerous and popularly conceived of all his woodcut series, that known from the dimensions of its thirty-seven subjects as the "Little Passion" on wood; and in the next year, 1512, a set of fifteen small copper-engravings on the same theme, the "Little Passion" on copper.
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  • He had been active in proceedings against certain Italians accused of crime, and his death was popularly attributed to the Mafia.
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  • The carrion hawks are represented by the Polyborus tharus, popularly called the " caracara," and the Phalcobaenus carunculatus; the falcons by the Aesalon columbarius; and the kites by the Gampsonyx swainsoni.
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  • An interesting species of the song birds is popularly known as the " flautero " (flute-bird), which inhabits the eastern forests.
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  • new canal, the Illinois & Mississippi, popularly known as the Hennepin, from Hennepin to Rock river (just above the mouth of Green river), 7 ft.
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  • On this account curling-stones are popularly known as "Ailsas" or "Ailsa Craigs."
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  • Dark wampum, which was made from a "hard shell" clam (Venus mercenaria), popularly called quahang or quahog, a corruption of the Indian name, was the most valuable.
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  • El Morro, as it is popularly called, was first erected in 1590-1640, and La Punta, a much smaller fort, is of the same period; both were reconstructed after the evacuation of the city by the English in 1763, from which time also date the castles of Principe, Atares and the Cabana.
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  • Popularly any inhabitant of Afghanistan is known as Afghan on the Indian frontier without distinction of origin or language; but the language division between the Parsiwan (or Persian-speaking Afghan) and the Pathan is a very distinct one.
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  • This was popularly condensed into the aphorism, yet current in Holland, that "Art is not the business of the government," and Thorbecke was condemned as the author of it.
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  • FLORIANOPOLIS (formerly Desterro, Nossa Senhora do Desterro and Santa Catharina, and still popularly known under the last designation), a city and port of Brazil and the capital of the state of Santa Catharina, on the western or inside shore of a large island of the same name, 485 m.
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  • Alcala de Guadaira (8198), on the river Guadaira, near Seville, is popularly called Alcala de los Panadores, or "Alcala of the Bakers," because it supplies Seville with large quantities of bread.
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  • Porcelain is the name of a type of ceramic ware which is characterized by a translucent body and is also loosely used for the finer kinds of ware, popularly known as chinaware.
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  • Among such edible or culinary plants or portions of plants, a further distinction is made popularly between "fruits" and "vegetables," for which see Fruit.
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  • This episode is known as the " Bear Flag War," inasmuch as there was short-lived talk of making California an independent state, and a flag with a bear as an emblem (California is still popularly known as the Bear Flag State)flew for a few days at Sonoma.
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  • a, from, prior, Arius, that which is before, precedes), (1) a phrase used popularly of a judgment based on general considerations in the absence of particular evidence; (2) a logical term first used, apparently, by Albert of Saxony (14th century), though the theory which it denotes is as old as Aristotle.
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  • The greatest length of Asia Minor, as popularly understood, is along its north edge, 720 m.
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  • This supposition is confirmed by evidence that seems to show that the Grendel legend was popularly current in this country.
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  • (2) Yogis (or popularly, Jogis), i.e.
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  • The Ramanandis or Ramavats (popularly Ramats) are a numerous northern sect of similar tenets to those of the Ramanujas.
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  • - The Macrura anomala, or Anomura in restricted sense, are popularly known through the hermit-crabs alone.
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  • The age at which a wine is at its best is by no means so great as is popularly supposed.
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  • The district producing the finest champagne is divided into two distinct regions, popularly known as the river and the mountain respectively.
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  • He was the author of the so-called Edmunds Act (22nd of March 1882) for the suppression of polygamy in Utah, and of the anti-trust law of 1890, popularly known as the Sherman Act.
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  • Another species (Macrorhinus leoninus), popularly known as the sea-elephant, is provided with short tusks and a short trunk and sometimes grows to a length of 20 ft.
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  • It distances perhaps every other German university in the extent to which it carries out what are popularly regarded as the characteristics of German student-life - duelling and the passion for Freiheit.
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  • For many years pepsine has been used as a remedy in dyspepsia to supplement the deficiency of digestive juice in the stomach, and it has been used popularly in dyspepsia for a still longer period.
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  • The broad estuary which separates Sherbro Island from the mainland, and is popularly called the Sherbro river, receives the Bagru from the N.W.
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  • Nearly in the centre of the city is the old Franciscan mission (San Francisco de Asis, popularly known as Mission Dolores), a landmark of San Francisco's history (1776).
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  • For many years Rahway was popularly known as Spanktown, and in January 1777, during the War of Independence, a skirmish, known as the battle of Spanktown, was fought here.
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  • The, city lies at the base of the eastern slope of the first Watchung, or Orange, Mountain, and is primarily a residential suburb of New York and Newark; with East Orange, West Orange and South Orange it constitutes virtually a single community, popularly known as " the Oranges."
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  • The minute organisms which are commonly called " bacteria " 1 are also known popularly under other designations, e.g.
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  • It is popularly divided into Upper or Western, and Lower or Eastern Brittany.
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  • It is not obvious why these fresh-water forms have been associated popularly with the Mytilacea under the name mussel, unless it be on account of the frequently very dark colour of their shells.
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  • The eastern crescent includes by far the largest as well as the oldest portion of Naples - the ports, the arsenal, the principal churches, &c. The best-known thoroughfare is the historic Toledo (as it is still popularly called, though the official name is Via Roma) which runs almost due north from the Piazza (Largo) del Plebiscito in front of the Palazzo Reale, till, as Strada Nuova Di Capodimonte, crossing the Ponte della Sanita (constructed by Murat across the valley between Santa Teresa and Capodimonte), it reaches the gates of the Capodimonte palace.
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  • His original name was Jacques Duese, and he came either of a family of petty nobility or else of well-to-do middle-class parents, and was not, as has been popularly supposed, the son of a shoemaker.
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  • At the same time the leading part played by the province of Holland in the history of the republic has not been unrecognized, for the country ruled over by the sovereigns of the house of Orange is always popularly, and often officially, known as Holland.
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  • Peter the Great introduced the use of the style "Imperator," and the official designation is now "Emperor of all the Russias, Tsar of Poland, and Grand Duke of Finland," though the term tsar is still popularly used in Russia.
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  • He had so great an authority among the Baptists that he was popularly called Bishop Bunyan.
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  • The highest point in the neighbourhood of Baden is the peak of the Hoher Lindkogel (2825 ft.), popularly called the Eiserne Thor, which is ascended in about three hours.
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  • At one point in its course it is crossed by the Rumichaca arch, a natural arch of stone, popularly known as the "Inca's bridge," which with the Minima gorge should be classed among the natural wonders of the world.
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  • In 1905 an act was passed dividing the colony into school districts under the control of popularly elected school boards, which were established during 1905-1906.
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  • These illustrations of the enormous variability of discharge serve to explain what is popularly so little understood, namely, the advantage which riparian owners, or other persons Comperei nterested in a given stream, may derive from works cation water.
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  • It has its modern name, signifying "land of the Arabs," from the Arabs who form the bulk of the population, and is subdivided into the districts of Muhamrah, Fellahiyeh (the old Dorak), Ram Hormuz (popularly known as Ramiz), Havizeh, Shushter and Dizful.
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  • Alcyonium digitatum, a pink digitate form popularly known as" dead.men's fingers,"is common in 10 -20 fathoms of water off the English coasts.
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  • 39° 43' 26.3" N.) between Maryland and Pennsylvania, U.S.A.; popularly the line separating " free " states and " slave " states before the Civil War.
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  • Territory; popularly known as the " Hoosier State."
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  • Patrick Hamilton, the Scottish martyr, was one of his pupils; and it was at Lambert's instigation that Hamilton composed his Loci communes, or Patrick's Pleas as they were popularly called in Scotland.
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  • Russian diplomacy was exerting an increasing influence in Persia, and the latter had always coveted the city of Herat, which was popularly regarded as the gate of India.
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  • (1389-1403), and some tumuli on the south, popularly called the tombs of the Thracian kings.
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  • The provinces are divided into municipal districts (distritos municipales), each of which has a municipal legislature (consejo municipal), popularly elected for two years, and an alcalde, who is the agent of the governor of the province and is appointed annually.
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  • The prees de la doctrine chretienne, popularly known as the "doctrinaires," were a French religious order founded in 1592 by Cesar de Bus.
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  • The anniversary of his death has since been honoured in an unprecedented manner, the 19th of April being celebrated as "Primrose Day" - the primrose, for reasons impossible accurately to define, being popularly supposed to have been Disraeli's favourite flower.
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  • A rudely carved stone lion, which lies on the roadside close to the southern extremity of the city, and by some is supposed to have formed part of a building of the ancient city, is locally regarded as a talisman against famine, plague, cold, &c., placed there by Pliny, who is popularly known as the sorcerer Balinas (a corruption of Plinius).
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  • There his father kept an inn known as "am Sand," which Hofer inherited, and on that account he was popularly known as the "Sandwirth."
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  • The word mercuriales was popularly used as equivalent to "cheat."
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  • The original office of the dean of the Arches may now be regarded as extinct, though the title is still popularly used, for no dean of the Arches has been appointed eo nomine for several centuries, and by an act of 1838 bishops have jurisdiction over all peculiars within their diocese.
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  • In the Philebus, however, though a more careful psychological analysis leads him to soften down the exaggerations of this attack on sensual pleasure, the antithesis of knowledge and pleasure is again sharpened, and a desire to depreciate even good pleasures is more strongly shown; still even here pleasure is recognized as a constituent of that philosophic life which is the highest human good, while in the Laws, where the subject is more popularly treated, it is admitted that we cannot convince man that the just life is the best unless we can also prove it to be the pleasantest.
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  • When a student passes from Plato to Aristotle, he is so forcibly impressed by the contrast between the habits of mind of the two authors, and the literary manners of the two philosophers, that it is easy to under stand how their systems have come to be popularly conceived as diametrically opposed to each other; and the uncompromising polemic which Aristotle, both in his ethical and in his metaphysical treatises, directs against Plato and the platonists, has tended strongly to confirm this view.
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  • The principles on which this opposition is based are mainly two: that popularly elected representatives are not likely to have the qualifications or the sense of responsibility required for dealing with the multitudinous enterprises and the large sums of public money involved, and that the health of the state depends on the exertions of individuals for their personal benefit.
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  • From the number of palmettoes along the coast South Carolina has become popularly known as the Palmetto state.
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  • Despite Magyar protests the misleading name "Croatia" was popularly and even in official documents applied to the whole country, including the purely Slavonian provinces of Virovitica, Poega and Syrmia.
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  • WORM, a term used popularly to denote almost any kind of elongated, apparently limbless creature, from a lizard, like the blindworm, to the grub of an insect or an earthworm.
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  • For many years Mr. Labouchere himself contributed racy articles and notes, and he was to the end popularly identified with Truth, though in fact he left the direction in later years first to Mr. Horace Voules and then to Mr. Bennett, and took no active part either in writing or editing.
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  • The movement, in the actual origination of which he had had no share, came to bear his name: it was popularly known as Puseyism (sometimes as Newmania) and its adherents as Puseyites.
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  • Passing to the dentals, except as an initial, tin words that are popularly current and belong to the old stock of the language, can only be derived from Lat.
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  • This book is popularly called The Thousand and One Nights, and contains the story of the king and his vizier and of his daughter Shirazad and her slave girl.
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  • For Abu'l-Mahasin, an Egyptian historian who died in 1470, writing of IIamdi, a famous highwayman of Bagdad in the 10th century, remarks that he is probably the figure who used to be popularly spoken of as Ahmad al-Danaf (ed.
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  • fleur), a term popularly used for the bloom or blossom of a plant, and so by analogy for the fairest, choicest or finest part or aspect of anything, and in various technical senses.
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  • The vernacular name barnacle, traceable to the fable of pedunculate cirripedes hatching out into bernicle geese, has also been transferred to the sessile cirripedes, which are popularly known as acorn barnacles.
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  • The other arch, popularly called the arch of Constantine, but with greater probability assigned to the reign of Galerius (A.D.
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  • The father of Manga is popularly acknowledged as being Dr. Osamu Tezuka, who was influenced by Japanese war propaganda animation and Disney.
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  • Chile (1973) - orchestrated a coup, killing President Allende who had been popularly elected.
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  • The limestone outcrops are popularly believed to be the petrified bodies of trolls and giants, rendered immobile by the witches.
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  • While technically incorrect, it is popularly used in a great deal of published literature.
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  • orchestrated a coup, killing President Allende who had been popularly elected.
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  • Let's consider General Augusto Pinochet, a CIA installed dictator following the ouster of the popularly elected Salvador Allende of Chile in 1973.
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  • FIREFLY, a term popularly used for certain tropical American click-beetles (Pyrophorus), on account of their power of emitting light.
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  • In 1655 he and Davenport drew up the code of laws, popularly known as the "Connecticut Blue Laws," which were published in London in 1656 under the title New Haven's Settling in New England and some Lawes for Government published for the Use of that Colony.
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  • gathered by an Achaemenian king was shattered in the battle called popularly after the city of Arbela some 60 m.
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  • It is primarily a residential suburb of New York and Newark, and has many beautiful homes; with Orange, West Orange and South Orange it forms virtually one community, popularly known as "the Oranges."
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  • This was called the cabinet du secret des postes, or more popularly the cabinet noir.
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  • The name of Feuillants was popularly given to this group of men, because they met in the fine buildings which had been occupied by the religious order bearing this name, in the rue Saint-Honore, near the Place Vendome, in Paris.
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  • He succeeded Bourchier as archbishop of Canterbury in 1486 and Alcock as lord chancellor in 1487; and he was responsible for much of the diplomatic, if not also of the financial, work of the reign, though the ingenious method of extortion popularly known as "Morton's fork" seems really to have been the invention of Richard Fox, who succeeded to a large part of Morton's influence.
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  • Though popularly connected with lavah, " be joined, attached," an ethnic from Leah has found some favour; the Assyrian li'u "powerful, wise," has also been suggested.
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  • The monitor is popularly known as the goanna, a name derived from the iguana, an entirely different animal.
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  • The next step of Alva was to create a special tribunal which was officially known as the " Council of Troubles," but was popularly branded with the name of the " Council of Blood," and as such it has passed down to history.
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  • In phrenology, however, as popularly carried on as an unofficial cult, we may recognize a modified form of divination, co-ordinate with the third stage in the development of beliefs regarding the seat of soul and based on the assumption that this organ is - as were its predecessors - a medium of revelation of otherwise hidden knowledge.
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  • At once the malcontents presented their demands in a document known popularly as the Articles of the Barons, more strictly as Capitula quae barones petunt et dominus rex concedit.
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  • Boracic acid receives no mention here; though it is popularly known as an antiseptic, it is in reality only a soothing fluid, and bacteria will flourish comfortably in contact with it.
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  • Leaving Italy in the summer preceding the year 1000, when it was popularly believed that the end of the world was to come, Otto made a pilgrimage to the tomb of his old friend Adalbert, bishop of Prague, at Gnesen, and raised the city to the dignity of an archbishopric. He then went to Aix, and opened the tomb of Charlemagne, where, according to a legendary tale, he found the body of the great emperor sitting upright upon a throne, wearing the crown and holding the sceptre.
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  • The parts of a river system have not been so clearly defined as is desirable, hence the exaggerated importance popularly attached to " the source " of a river.
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  • & Xj jsa, a double proposition, from 81- and Xaµ(3avav), a term used technically in logic, and popularly in common parlance and rhetoric. (I) The latter use has no exact definition, but in general it describes a situation wherein from either of two (or more) possible alternatives an unsatisfactory conclusion results.
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  • Popularly, however, the emperor is known by his old Russian title of tsar (q.v.).
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  • Closer akin to certain Western forms of dissidence from traditional Catholicism, though of native growth, are the Molokani, so called popularly because they continue to drink milk (moloko) during fasts.
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  • The early part of Alexander's reign (1801-25) was a period of generous ideas and liberal reforms. Under the influence of his Swiss tutor, Frederick Cesar de Laharpe, he Alex- had imbibed many of the democratic ideas of the time, and he aspired to put them in practice, with the assistance at first of three young friends, Novosiltsov, Adam Czartoryski and Strogonov, who were his intimate counsellors and were popularly known as the Triumvirate, and later of Mikhail Speranski.
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  • Philopator Philometor Caesar; he was known popularly as Caesarion.
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  • " general mines"), popularly Minas, an inland state of Brazil, bounded N.
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  • GERMAN BAPTIST BRETHREN, or German Brethren, a sect of Anabaptist Pietists which originated in Germany, and whose members are popularly known in the United States as "Dunkers," "Dunkards" or "Tunkers," corruptions of the German verb tunken, " to dip," in recognition of the sect's continued adherence to the practice of trine immersion.
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  • He soon became known to the German king, Arnulf, who appointed him archbishop of Mainz in 891; and he became such a trustworthy and confidential counsellor that he was popularly called "the heart of the king."
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  • The action of the Convention in perpetuating its influence by the imposition of two-thirds of its members on the next popularly elected councils, aroused a storm of indignation in Paris, where the "moderate" and royalist reaction was already making headway.
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  • True, the Directory seemed on the point of collapse; it had been overcome by the popularly elected Chambers in the insignificant coup d'etat of 30 Prairial (18th of June) 1799; when Larevelliere-Lepeaux and Merlin were compelled to resign.
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  • HEXAPODA (Gr., six, and g obs, foot), a term used in systematic zoology for that class of the Arthropoda, popularly known as insects.
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  • The chief feature of the southern portion of the state is the Everglades, the term " Everglade State" being popularly applied to Florida.
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  • The derivation of its ancient name Varanasi is not known, nor is that of its alternative name Kasi, which is still in common use among Hindus, and is popularly explained to mean "bright."
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  • con-scientia, literally "knowledge of a thing shared with another person" or "complete knowledge," and derivatively "consciousness" in general), a philosophical term used both popularly and technically in many different senses for that mental faculty which decides between right and wrong.
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  • Samuel Johnson, Gibbon, Lord Lyttelton and Bishop Horne all spoke enthusiastically of its merits; and it is still the only work by which its author is popularly known.
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  • Carmarthen is commonly reputed to occupy the site of the Roman station of Maridunum, and its present name is popularly associated with the wizard-statesman Merlin, or Merddyn, whose memory and prophecies are well remembered in these parts of Wales and whose home is popularly believed to have been the conspicuous hill above Abergwili, known as Merlin's Hill.
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  • solitaria), popularly called coatis.
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  • The most numerous of these are the perdiz (partridge), the best known of which is the Tinamus maculosa which frequents the campos of the south, the inhambd (Crypturus), capoeira (Odontophorus), and several species of the penelope family popularly known as the jacutinga, j acu and jacu-assu.
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  • His popularity was regained, however, to some extent, when, on the death of his father, he was unanimously acknowledged king of Portugal, and especially when he abdicated that crown in favour of his daughter, Donna Maria; but his line of policy was not altered, and commercial treaties entered into with European states conceding them favours, which were popularly considered to be injurious to Brazilian trade, met with bitter censure.
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  • between the peaks of the Carpathians are many small lakes, popularly called " eyes of the sea."
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  • Among these should be mentioned John Fothergill (1712-1780), who investigated the "putrid sore throat" now called diphtheria, and the form of neuralgia popularly known as tic douloureux.
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  • The " City," so called both formally and popularly, is a small area (673 acres) on the north bank of the river, forming the heart of the metropolis, and constituting within its boundaries one only, and one of the smallest, of twenty-nine municipal divisions which make up the administrative County of London.
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  • - The glass popularly known as " plate-glass " is made by casting and rolling.
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  • In England the plant is sometimes popularly termed "alisander"; in North America Thaspium aureum is sometimes called "alexanders."
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  • ADVOCATUS DIABOLI, devil's advocate, the name popularly given to the promoter of the Faith (promotor fidei), and officer of the Sacred Congregation of Rites at Rome, whose duty is to prepare all possible arguments against the admission of any one to the posthumous honours of beatification and canonization.
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  • POTTO, the native name of the West African slow-lemurs, popularly miscalled "sloths," and scientifically known as Perodicticus, a name referring to the aborted condition of the index finger, which forms their most distinctive feature.
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  • He publicly expressed his disapproval of the attacks on the Jews in 1878; and the coalition of Liberal parties founded in 1884 was popularly known as the "crown prince's party," but he scrupulously refrained from any act that might embarrass his father's government.
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  • During the middle ages they were popularly looked upon as cretins, lepers, heretics and even as cannibals.
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  • Under the electoral law of 1817 the Abbe Gregoire, who was popularly supposed to have voted for the death of Louis XVI.
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  • After the Vatican council, and more especially after the death of Pius IX., Manning devoted his attention mainly to social questions, and with these his name was popularly associated during the last fifteen years of his life.
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  • The great sepulchral monuments, popularly called maghazil, i.e.
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  • In the East it is popularly thought that Hellenism, as an exotic, withered altogether away.
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  • Such chambers, denuded of the covering mound, or over which no covering mound has been raised, are popularly known in England as "cromlechs" and in France as "dolmens" (see Stone Monuments).
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  • It is impossible here to follow the schisms which split the seceding body within itself: the Erskines themselves were handed over to Satan; their very families adopted opposite factions: there were " Burghers " and " Anti-Burghers," " New Lights " and " Old Lights "; besides the sects which in the 19th century merged in United Presbyterians, and merged themselves later with the Free Church of the Disruption, itself the parent of a small protesting body, popularly styled " The Wee Frees " (see SCOTLAND, CHURCH or).
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  • To the popular mind the great distinction between the Lutheran and the medieval church service, besides the use of the vernacular and the supreme place assigned to preaching, was that the people partook of the cup in the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; and the Lutheran service became popularly distinguished from the Reformed because it retained, while the Reformed did away with, most of the medieval ceremonies and vestments (see Lutherans).
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  • PORCELAIN, the name of that kind of ceramic ware which is characterized by a translucent body, also loosely used for the finer kinds of ware generally, popularly known as "china" (see Ceramics).
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  • Moreover, sadhuism, by the multiplicity of the independent sects which have arisen in India, has engendered and favoured a spirit of tolerance which cannot escape the notice of the most superficial observer."An independent Saiva sect, or, indeed, the only strictly Saiva sect, are the Vira Saivas, more commonly called Lingayats (popularly Lingaits) or Lingavats, from their practice of wearing on their person a phallic emblem of Siva, made of copper or silver, and usually enclosed in a case suspended from the neck by a string.
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  • It is in the aggregation and segregation of elements thus arising that Empedocles, like the atomists, finds the real process which corresponds to what is popularly termed growth, increase or decrease.
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  • All the other natives, popularly called Kaffirs, are members of the Bantu-negroid family, of whom they here form three distinct branches: (I) the Zulu-Xosas, originally confined to the south-east seaboard between Delagoa Bay and the Great Fish River, but later (19th century) spread by conquest over Gazaland, parts of the Transvaal, and Rhodesia (Matabeleland), (2) the Bechuanas, with the kindred Basutos, on the continental plateau from the Orange to the Zambezi, and ranging westwards over the Kalahari desert and the Lake.
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  • The best-known series is the papal series of leaden seals which have lent their name to the documents of the papal chancery which they authenticate, popularly known as papal " bulls."
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  • The cultivated lands of Britain being disposed in ridges which usually lie in the line of greatest ascent, it became customary to form the drains in each furrow, or in each alternate, or third or fourth one, as the case might require, or views of economy dictate and hence the system soon came to be popularly called "furrow draining."
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  • 39° 43' 26.3" N.) between Maryland and Pennsylvania, U.S.A.; popularly the line separating " free " states and " slave " states before the Civil War.
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  • It was firmly believed in, for the incombustible cloths woven of flexible asbestos were popularly thought to be made of its hair or plumage, and were themselves called by the same name (cf.
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  • Tulsi's great poem, popularly called Tulsi-krit Ramayan, but named by its author Ram-charit-manas, " the Lake of Rama's deeds," is perhaps better known among Hindus in upper India than the Bible among the rustic population in England.
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  • Mozart was popularly supposed to dislike the flute as an instrument, but you would never know it from this spirited and tuneful piece.
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  • Dill - one of the easiest herbs to grow, it is popularly used for making pickles.
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  • From pottery to wood carvings, you can find these influences in what is popularly called the Southwestern style.
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  • Rouge is also popularly worn in stage productions and with any kind of performer, especially cultural dancers.
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  • Henna is popularly found here in America in amusement parks, beach side malls, and anywhere else where people are vacationing and are in the mood to try something a little different.
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  • Miniature deer may also stand atop hills or in meadows of green frosting, and - most popularly - the cake may be molded into the shape of a deer itself.
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  • There are three types of Hershey's candy popularly used for wedding favors: full sized candy bars, miniature candy bars, and chocolate kisses.
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  • It is most commonly used to treat episodes of anxiety as well as being popularly prescribed as a muscle relaxant to treat problems such as back pain.
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  • Classics like Osh Kosh and contemporary favorites such as Baby Gap and The Children's Place are just a few examples of the popularly labeled duds for the ten and under set.
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  • This has few or no perfect flowers, the whole truss consisting of the more showy barren ones, which makes it much more rounded, and, together with the pure whiteness of the flowers, has led to its being popularly known as the Snowball Tree.
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  • There are very few, if any, double varieties, but some varieties are curious and interesting from the duplication of the calyx or-corolla; these are popularly known as "hose-in-hose" Polyanthus.
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  • Popularly known as "knickerbockers" they were considered to be standard appropriate wear for young men and athletes, particularly golfers and baseball players.
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  • Everquest, a hugely popular and involving online role-playing game, is popularly known by its users and critics alike as "Evercrack" because of its power over players' lives.
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  • Sangria is now popularly made with Rioja and other Spanish reds.
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  • Production of the contour bottle, popularly called the hobbleskirt bottle, began in 1917.
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  • Relaxation techniques, such as yoga and massage therapy, that focus on relieving tension are popularly recommended methods for reducing stress.
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  • Glands within the skin of the canal produce a waxy substance called cerumen (popularly called earwax).
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  • Also known popularly as a staph infection.
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  • Another popularly held misconception about food and AD/HD is that the consumption of sugar causes the hyperactive behavior in an AD/HD child.
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  • The show is more popularly known as ABC Dance War: Bruno vs. Carrie Ann, named after its two choreographers - Bruno Tonioli and Carrie Ann Inaba.
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  • Many fans of the dance form have their favorites, such as the courtship ritual popularly known as the "Mexican Hat Dance."
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  • The presence of the hormone testosterone, popularly known to be a masculine hormone, can too be present in females.
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  • So here is a short list of films popularly regarded as some of the best Christmas films ever made.
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  • As the Twilight films and books continue to grow in popularly, it is no surprise that Edward Cullen Halloween costumes are in demand.
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  • This type of steel can be refinished and repaired by any jeweler, and it is popularly used for wedding bands.
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  • It is popularly known that some people record films to a digital format and share the files online.
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  • It also became more popularly known as "The Deadly Triangle".
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  • If stenciling is the most basic type of decorative painting, one step up would be the faux painting techniques popularly done on walls, such as sponge painting, ragging, and distressed or crackle glazing.
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  • More popularly known as the Urban Rebounding System, those who choose to become an Urban Rebounder are in for a bouncing ride.
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  • His first band was The King Kasuals and he toured the Southern U.S. on what was popularly known as "The Chitlin Circuit," where many African American artists honed their acts.
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  • In particular, the Leo fairy is a contemporary fictional concept popularly distributed in the form of artwork by Jessica Galbreth, who created a series of stunning paintings of Zodiac fairies which she calls the Zodiac Collection.
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  • As the web developed into what is popularly known as "Web 2.0" there has been a tendency to try to make the content of a web page independent of the presentation.
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  • Although this plant is popularly termed the "meadow mushroom," it never as a rule grows in meadows.
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  • The name is often in popular literature written Cambalu, and is by Longfellow accented in verse Cambeilic. But this spelling originates in an accidental error in Ramusio's Italian version, which was the chief channel through which Marco Polo's book was popularly known.
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  • Bobby Lowe, as he was popularly known, was one of the most remarkable personalities of his day, with his tall, striking figure, albino complexion and hair, and faculty for epigram and irony.
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  • In the most generally used sense, a plant is a member of the lower or vegetable order of living organized things; the term is also popularly applied to the smaller herbaceous plants, thus excluding trees and shrubs.
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  • Closer akin to certain Western forms of dissidence from traditional Catholicism, though of native growth, are the Molokani or Molokans, so called popularly because they continue to drink milk (moloko) during fasts.
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  • He became popularly known as the duende, the fairy or brownie of the palace, and was believed to be the lover of the queen.
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  • The province is popularly, but not for administrative purposes, divided according to climate into germsir and sardsir, or the warm and cold regions.
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  • New Haven is popularly known as the "City of Elms," because of the number of these trees.
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  • But before the close of their rule a miraculous event occurred on the Chang-pai-Shan mountains which is popularly believed to have laid the seeds of the greatness of the present rulers of the empire.
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  • It is popularly used of a relation between persons amounting to more than goodwill or friendship. By ethical writers the word has been used generally of distinct states of feeling, both lasting and spasmodic; some contrast it with "passion" as being free from the distinctively sensual element.
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  • When in this condition the metal is popularly said to be " saturated."
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  • The personal element is conspicuous in the Brazilian journalism, and for a considerable period of its history libellous attacks on persons, signed by professional sponsors, popularly called testas de ferro (iron heads), were admitted at so much a line in the best newspapers.
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  • It was openly suggested in the journals to reform the constitution by turning Brazil into independent federal provinces, governed by authorities popularly elected, as in the United States.
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  • The metric weights and measures have been officially adopted by Venezuela, but the old Spanish units are still popularly used throughout the country.
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  • In Kudanzaka Park is the Yasukuni Temple, popularly known by the name of Shokonsha, and consecrated to the spirits of departed heroes who fell in war.
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  • At Baiae itself there exist three large and lofty domed buildings, two octagonal, one circular, and all circular in the interior, of opus reticulatum and brick, which, though popularly called temples, are remains of baths or nymphaea.
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  • They were popularly known as the crown princes party.
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  • This is popularly supposed to have been a list of William the Conqueror's companions preserved at Battle Abbey, on the site of his great victory over Harold.
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  • Firefly is a term popularly used for certain tropical American click-beetles (Pyrophorus), due to their power of emitting light.
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  • The meteorites which appear annually on or about the 10th of August are popularly known as "the tears of St Lawrence."
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