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popularity

popularity

popularity Sentence Examples

  • His talents and amiability soon won him great popularity, especially among the peasants.

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  • Henceforward Ayala's position and popularity were secure.

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  • He allowed the prince to hope for such a union, and thus enhanced the popularity of the French party at Madrid.

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  • Whether he had really given any grounds for suspicion is unknown; but there is no doubt, so great was his popularity with the soldiers and such the hatred felt for Nero, that he could easily have seized the throne.

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  • But so great was his popularity that the court was decidedly worsted in the contest, and the emperor's authority maLerially shaken.

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  • She found the maestro towards the end of 1837 dispirited by a temporary eclipse of popularity and in the first stage of his fatal malady, and carried him off to winter with her in the south.

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  • She found the maestro towards the end of 1837 dispirited by a temporary eclipse of popularity and in the first stage of his fatal malady, and carried him off to winter with her in the south.

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  • Luther, in spite of his belief in the Real Presence, regarded it as the most harmful of all the medieval festivals and, though he fully realized its popularity, it was the first that he abolished.

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  • Luther, in spite of his belief in the Real Presence, regarded it as the most harmful of all the medieval festivals and, though he fully realized its popularity, it was the first that he abolished.

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  • Wealth, popularity and power tend to dethrone the authority of reason and to pervert the soul from the natural to the artificial.

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  • Due to the restaurant's popularity at the weekends, reservations are recommended.

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  • This exclusiveness naturally strengthened the popularity and power of the districts, where energy and talent found a scope elsewhere denied.

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  • This very popularity had the effect of attracting into their ranks charlatans of the worst type.

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  • Though it never ceased to influence individual thinkers, it had handed on to Condillac its popularity with the masses.

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  • Though it never ceased to influence individual thinkers, it had handed on to Condillac its popularity with the masses.

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  • Of his popularity in the latter half of the 15th and in the 16th centuries there are many signs.

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  • Of his popularity in the latter half of the 15th and in the 16th centuries there are many signs.

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  • As heir-apparent he collected a bodyguard, and studiously courting personal popularity by a pretended interest in the administration of kingly justice, ingratiated himself with the mass.

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  • The amnesty which he granted was the beginning of the immense if short-lived popularity which he was to enjoy.

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  • He compiled a Russian grammar, which long enjoyed popularity, and did much to improve the rhythm of Russian verse.

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  • The praise of the fair sex in the first poem is exceptional in the literature of his age; and its geniality may help us to understand the author's popularity with his contemporaries.

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  • One can readily understand the popularity of the Crusades, when one reflects that they permitted men to get to the other world by fighting hard on earth, and allowed them to gain the fruits of asceticism by the ways of hedonism.

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  • Enjoy the city's natural wonders, historical significance and popularity as a centrally-located meeting and convention destination.

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  • But his preference for a sedentary and not for an active life and his increasing attachment to favourites of humble birth diminished his popularity, and he had some differences with his parliament.

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  • Simple in his habits, conciliatory in his bearing, and catholic in his tastes, he enjoyed great popularity and rarely made a personal enemy.

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  • Its ready accessibility from the metropolis is the chief factor in its popularity.

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  • His writings long enjoyed a high popularity.

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  • He demanded the suppression of the order and thus acquired popularity.

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  • Wild game restaurants are gaining popularity across the country as foodies extol the culinary and nutritional value of wild game meat.

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  • Simple in his habits, conciliatory in his bearing, and catholic in his tastes, he enjoyed great popularity and rarely made a personal enemy.

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  • Batthyany, who formed the first responsible ministry, could not refuse to admit Kossuth, but he gave him the ministry of finance, probably because that seemed to open to him fewest prospects of engrossing popularity.

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  • The visits to the United Kingdom of properly organized teams of bowlers from Australia and New Zealand in 1901 and from Canada in 1904 demonstrated that the game had gained enormously in popularity.

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  • There is a tradition in the Talmud which illustrates his popularity.

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  • see Morner, p. 180, for list of guesses), speedily attained a wide popularity.

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  • This position, however, did not prevent him from negotiating both with the dauphin and with the English; terms were soon arranged with the former, and Charles, having lost much of his popularity, left Paris just before the murder of Marcel in July 1358.

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  • The latter was received with great enthusiasm both in England (where it reached its 19th edition) and in America, but recent criticism has lessened its popularity and it is now almost forgotten.

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  • Neither series when published attained any great popularity.

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  • In February Whitefield went to Bristol, where his popularity was unbounded.

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  • Critics have also urged that Kallay; fostered the desire for material welfare at the cost of every other national ideal; that, despite his own popularity, he never secured the goodwill of the people for Austria-Hungary; that he left the agrarian difficulty unsolved, and the hostile religious factions unreconciled.

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  • Meanwhile the sultan's whole efforts were directed towards the reform of the country; the newly-instituted militia was in every respect a success; it grew in numbers, and hopes were entertained that it would gain popularity.

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  • Turkey's severity in repressing the Bulgarian insurrection had raised up in England a storm of public opinion against her, of which the Liberal opposition had taken the fullest advantage; moreover the suspension of payments on the Ottoman debt had dealt Turkey's popularity a blow from which it had never recovered.

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  • Pop. (1891), 29,296; (igoi), 33373 It owes its popularity to its chalybeate spring and its beautiful situation in a hilly wooded district.

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  • He moderated the lord-deputy's policy of deporting the Irish, and unlike him he paid some attention to the interests of the English settlers; moreover, again unlike Fleetwood, he appears to have held the scales evenly between the different Protestant sects, and his undoubted popularity in Ireland is attested by Clarendon.

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  • When he swore to maintain the constitution, then in progress of construction, at the festival of the federation on the 14th of July 1790, he was at the height of his popularity.

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  • The book attained an almost unprecedented popularity both in America and in Europe, where it was translated into several languages; and it came to be considered a classic. Immediately after the appearance of this book Dana began the practice of law, which brought him a large number of maritime cases.

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  • As a preacher he early attained great popularity, and Was, albeit unjustly, accused of Methodism.

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  • No platform was adopted, the widespread popularity of Jackson being relied upon to win success at the polls.

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  • His effective support of this measure vastly increased the popularity of Flaminius with his own order, and secured his second election as consul in the following year (217), shortly after the defeat of T.

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  • It is only since about 1870 that this popularity has grown up. Ten years earlier even rowing-boats were few excepting at Oxford, at Henley in regatta time, and at Putney on the tideway.

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  • Eclecticism gained great popularity, and, partly owing to Cousin's position as minister of public instruction, became the authorized system in the chief seats of learning in France, where it has given a most remarkable impulse to the study of the history of philosophy.

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  • and the royal family in 1789 paid Weymouth the first of a series of visits which further ensured its popularity.

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  • Its popularity remained unimpaired after the fall of Persia, and it was during the ferment following the conquests of Alexander that the characteristics which mark it during the Roman period were firmly fixed.

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  • As the king could not abandon Portugal to itself he determined at first to send the prince thither as regent, but Dom Pedro had acquired such popularity by his conduct in the revolution, and had exhibited such a thirst for glory, that the king feared to trust his adventurous spirit in Europe, and decided to go himself.

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  • Meanwhile the well-deserved popularity of the emperor began to decline.

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  • The last days of the Confederate Congress were spent in recriminations between that body and President Davis, and the popularity with which he commenced his administration had almost entirely vanished.

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  • By this course he sacrificed the great popularity he had won as the champion of free trade, and became for a time the best-abused man in England.

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  • The alarm of the government at the power and popularity of the Liberal party induced it, soon after the accession of the new king, the emperor Ferdinand I.

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  • But, however gratifying such an elevation might be, it was distinctly prejudicial, at first, to Hungary's domestic affairs, for no one else at this time, in Hungary, possessed either the prestige or the popularity of Andrassy.

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  • Contemporaneously with the remarkable discoveries of the Italian mathematicians, algebra was increasing in popularity in Germany, France and England.

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  • The Trialist solution (which would have united the Yugoslav provinces of Austria-Hungary in a third state enjoying equality with the two existing partners) rapidly lost popularity, even among the clerical parties, which had been attracted by the prospect of Catholic predominance in such a State.

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  • Both works, though showing little originality of thought, achieved wide popularity.

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  • Mr Arch nevertheless retained sufficient popularity to be returned to parliament for north-west Norfolk in 1885; and although defeated next year owing to his advocacy of Irish Home Rule, he regained his seat in 1892, and held it in 1895, retiring in 1900.

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  • It is plainly Gnostic and may perhaps have been composed by Bardaisan or his son Harmonius.0 Among recent editions of Apocrypha in Syriac may be mentioned those of the Apocalypse of Baruch, the Epistle of Baruch, ' For the later Monophysite versions, none of which attained much popularity, see Wright's Syr.

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  • His most important work was his Economia politica del medio evo (Turin, 1839), which enjoyed great popularity at the time, but is now of little value.

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  • He had never been a rich man, nor had he been a saving one, and during his period of popularity and office he had incurred great expenses.

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  • Jocelyn had at one time more popularity in England than most French verse.

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  • The popularity of Caelius is evidenced by the fact that in the 6th century an abridgment of his larger work was recommended by Cassiodorus to the Benedictine monks for the study of medicine.

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  • As in the case of Galen, the formal and encyclopaedic character of Avicenna's works was the chief cause of his popularity and ascendancy, though in modern times these very qualities in a scientific or medical writer would rather cause him to become more speedily antiquated.

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  • It is difficult to form a clear estimate of the importance of the last systematizer of medicine - John Brown (1735-1788) - for, though in England he has been but little regarded, the wide though shortlived popularity of his system on the Continent shows that it must have contained some elements of brilliancy, if not originality.

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  • Once prime minister, his personal popularity proved to be a powerful unifying influence in a somewhat heterogeneous party; and though the illness and death (August 30, 1906) of his wife (daughter of General Sir Charles Bruce), whom he had married in 1860, made his constant attendance in the House of Commons impossible, his domestic sorrow excited widespread sympathy and appealed afresh to the affection of his political followers.

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  • The popularity of the story of Jason and Medea in antiquity is shown by the large amount of literature on the subject.

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  • The growth of popularity of the cycle, and later of the motor-car, has been a principal factor in the wide development of a tendency to leave London during the ” week-end,” that is to say, as a rule, for Saturday afternoon and Sunday.

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  • He denounced Marat's placards as inciting to murder, summoned Danton to give an account of his ministry, watched carefully over the furnishing of military supplies, and was a strong opponent of Dumouriez, in spite of the general's great popularity.

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  • The catasto was largely the work of Giovanni de' Medici, who greatly increased his popularity thereby.

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  • The king demanded the cession of Pisa, Leghorn and other towns, which Piero granted, but on returning to Florence on the 8th of November 1494 he found the opposition greatly strengthened and his popularity forfeited, especially when the news of his disgraceful cessions to Charles became known.

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  • But in spite of Savonarola's popularity there was a party called the Bigi (greys) who intrigued secretly in favour of the return of the Medici, while the men of wealth, called the Arrabbiati, although they hated the Medici, were even more openly opposed to the actual regime and desired to set up an aristocratic oligarchy.

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  • All this decreased Savonarola's popularity to some extent, but the enemy having been beaten at Leghorn and the league being apparently on the point of breaking up, the Florentines took courage and the friar's party was once more in the ascendant.

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  • The numerous copies of Odoric's narrative (both of the original text and of the versions in French, Italian, &c.) that have come down to our time, chiefly from the 14th century, show how speedily and widely it acquired popularity.

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  • C. Tychsen (1758-1834) were then at the height of their popularity.

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  • 8vo, 1697-1798), the popularity of which endured till the advent of Dr William Smith's dictionaries.

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  • On entering the Second Chamber of Baden in 1842, he at once began to take part in the opposition against the government, which assumed a more and more openly Radical character, and in the course of which his talents as an agitator and his personal charm won him wide popularity and influence.

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  • A speech, denouncing the projected incorporation of Schleswig and Holstein with Denmark, delivered in the Chamber of Baden on the 6th of February 1845, spread his fame beyond the limits of his own state, and his popularity was increased by his expulsion from Prussia on the occasion of a journey to Stettin.

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  • In spite of the shallowness and his culture and his extremely weak character, he enjoyed an ever-increasing popularity.

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  • General Bolivar ruled Peru with dictatorial powers for more than a year, and though there were cabals against him there can be little doubt of his popularity.

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  • The saint's feast was removed from the Breviary at Paris about this time, and the devotion to St Catherine has since lost its earlier popularity.

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  • But there seems no reason for doubt; the great grammarians of imperial times (Apollonius Dyscolus and Herodian) were acquainted with the work in its present form, although, as was natural considering its popularity, additions and alterations may have been made later.

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  • Lorenzo the Magnificent was then (1482) at the height of his power and popularity.

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  • The 1VIagnifico then sought to undermine his popularity, and Fra Mariano was employed to attack him from the pulpit.

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  • This silence proved fatal to his popularity with moderate men, gave new adherents to the Arrabbiati, and whetted the fury of the pope, Sforza and all potentates well disposed to the Medici faction.

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  • Great as was his popularity as a preacher, it was in the arena of ecclesiastical debate that his ability chiefly showed itself, and probably no other single man had from first to last so large a share in shaping the constitution and guiding the policy of the Free Church.

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  • The time slipped by with incidents but few and slight, Tennyson's popularity in Great Britain growing all the time to an extent unparalleled in the whole annals of English poetry.

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  • This bid for popularity failed, the general election resulting in a Tory majority of forty-six.

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  • His popularity as a preacher was very great, and his influence in the denomination is indicated by the fact that he was three times (1806, 1814, 1822) chosen to be president of the conference.

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  • In 1736 a smuggler named Wilson, who had won popularity by helping a companion to escape from the Tolbooth prison, was hanged; and, some slight disturbance occurring at the execution, the city guard fired on the mob, killing a few and wounding a considerable number of persons.

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  • Many suffered under this law, but the ultimate effect was to invest the press with new popularity, and very soon the newspapers conceived a device which effectually protected their literary staff, for they employed dummy editors whose sole function was to go to prison in lieu of the true editor.

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  • It was in the middle of the 18th century that the decorative, but relatively feeble, Chinese art of the later Ming period found favor in Japan and a clever exponent in a painter named Ryurikyo It must be regarded as a sad decadence from the old Chinese ideals, which was further hastened, from about 1765, by the popularity of the southern Chinese style.

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  • About the year 1680 Hishigawa Moronobu achieved a great popularity for woodcut illustration, and laid the foundations of the splendid school which followed.

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  • The raku faience owed much of its popularity to the patronage of the tea clubs.

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  • Even the yi-hsing-yao, too, owed much of its popularity to special utility.

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  • But the style was not calculated to win general popularity, and the manufacturing processes were too easy to occupy the attention of great potters.

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  • Amyot's book, therefore, obtained an immense popularity, and exercised great influence over successive generations of French writers.

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  • But as Fox on this occasion aided the vested interests of some English manufacturers he secured a certain revival of popularity.

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  • The triumphs which Heraclius had won through his own energy and skill did not bring him lasting popularity.

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  • The popularity he won was of political service in preparing the way for the union of North and South Germany, and he was the foremost advocate of the imperial idea at the Prussian court.

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  • It was truly tragic that his doom should have come at the moment when he had once more drawn together a great alliance in Europe, and when he possessed a popularity in England such as he had never before enjoyed.

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  • It was when he was in the full tide of his popularity and success, and apparently in the full tide of his personal vigour also, that he was struck with angina pectoris.

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  • The influence of the Historia Britonum may be illustrated in another way, by enumerating the more familiar of the legends to which it first gave popularity.

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  • This gave the new king much popularity with the mass of the people; while the educated classes were pleased by his removal of Frederick's ban on the German language by the admission of German writers to the Prussian Academy, and by the active encouragement given to schools and universities.

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  • to swamp the liberal majority in the upper house by the nomination of twenty-seven new peers; he availed himself of the temporary popularity of the monarchy after the Spanish campaign to summon a new Chamber of Deputies.

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  • Hence, probably, the wide popularity which his works enjoyed in the 18th century; and hence the agreeable feeling with which, notwithstanding all their false taste and their tiresome digressions, they impress the modern reader.

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  • After the Treaty of Paris stability of government developed, and many important reforms were introduced under the strong government of the masterful Sir Thomas Maitland; he acted promptly, without seeking popularity or fearing the reverse, and he ultimately gained more real respect than any other governor, not excepting the marquess of Hastings, who was a brilliant and sympathetic administrator.

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  • An order in council (1899) making English the language of the courts after fifteen years (by which the Maltese would have obtained the right to be tried in English) was promulgated at a time when the system of taxation was also being revised; henceforth agitation in favour of Italian and against taxation attained proportions unpleasant for those who preferred popularity to reform and progress.

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  • Political trials were held, Guerrazzi and many others being condemned to long terms of imprisonment, and although in 1855 the Austrian troops left Tuscany, Leopold's popularity was gone.

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  • In spite of these political disturbances Christian's popularity with his people grew steadily, and was enhanced by the patriarchal and unique position which in his later years he occupied in Europe.

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  • Though diffusely written, and neither brilliant nor profound, Crusius' philosophical books had a great but shortlived popularity.

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  • Probably he lost nothing of his popularity with the army by occasional indulgence in sensual pleasures.

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  • His own tremendous powers of work and his rugged manner somewhat alarmed his boys at first, but his popularity was soon undisputed, and he brought up the school to a very high level.

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  • His splendid war record and his personal popularity caused his name to be considered as a candidate for the Presidency as early as 1868, and in 1880 he was nominated for that office by the Democrats; but he was defeated by his Republican opponent, General Garfield, though by the small popular plurality of seven thousand votes.

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  • How great was the popularity and diffusion of this letter may be judged in some degree from the fact that Zarncke in his treatise on Prester John gives a list of close on 100 MSS.

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  • The use of small auxiliary blowing ventilators underground, for carrying air into workings away from the main circuits, which was largely advocated at one time, has lost its popularity, but a useful substitute has been found in the induced draught produced by jets of compressed air or high-pressure water blowing into ejectors.

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  • This fact naturally decreased her popularity, and as early as September 1 774, was made the subject of offensive pamphlets and the like, as in the case of the affdire Beaumarchais.

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  • It is clear that acetylene, if it is to be used on a large scale as a domestic illuminant, must undergo such processes of purification as will render it harmless and innocuous to health and property, and the sooner it is recognized as absolutely essential to purify acetylene before consuming it the sooner will the gas acquire the popularity it deserves.

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  • Buitenzorg is the usual residence of the governor-general of the Dutch East Indies, and is further remarkable on account of its splendid botanical garden and for its popularity as a health !resort.

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  • It was a dangerous triumph for Huss; for his popularity at court and in the general community had been secured only at the price of clerical antipathy everywhere and of much German ill-will.

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  • The impeached ministers were, indeed, saved by the courage of the Chamber of Peers and the attitude of the National Guard; but their safety was bought at the price of Laffitte's popularity.

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  • His policy of a French intervention in favour of the Italian revolutionists, by which he might have regained his popularity, was thwarted by the diplomatic policy of Louis Philippe.

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  • The popularity which he enjoyed in his own time is attested by the fact that at his death, although he had filled none of the offices of state, he received the honour of a public funeral.

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  • Meanwhile, each night had added to his popularity on the stage.

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  • As a manager, though he committed some grievous blunders, he did good service to the theatre and signally advanced the popularity of Shakespeare's plays, of which not less than twenty-four were produced at Drury Lane under his management.

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  • He displayed such radical and reforming inclinations that he laid the foundations of his popularity among the lower and middle classes, which lasted more than a quarter of a century, during which time the Progressists, Democrats and advanced Liberals ever looked to him as a leader and adviser.

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  • He soon became virtually a dictator, as Queen Christina took offence at his popularity and resigned, leaving the kingdom very soon afterwards.

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  • His connexion with this work so enhanced his popularity that he was chosen governor by an overwhelming majority and served for two triennial terms (1817-1823).

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  • The more important are: Ordo Temporum, a treatise on the chronology of Scripture, in which he enters upon speculations regarding the end of the world, and an Exposition of the Apocalypse which enjoyed for a time great popularity in Germany, and was translated into several languages.

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  • A 12th-century version of the first three books of Romulus in elegiac verse enjoyed a wide popularity, even into the Renaissance.

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  • Having won popularity by donations to poorer citizens, he took advantage of a festival of Hera, which was being celebrated outside the walls, to make himself master of the city (about 535 B.C.).

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  • The popularity of these elegies in the Spartan army was such that, according to Athenaeus (xiv.

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  • He continued the policy of improving relations with Austria, which did not contribute to his popularity; after the annexation of Bosnia and the Herzegovina his imprudently worded speech at Carate created the illusion that Italy was to be compensated, perhaps by the cession of the Trentino, and the disappointment when nothing of the kind materialized greatly weakened his prestige.

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  • The extraordinary popularity of Erasmus is a sufficient (1464- indication that his attitude of mind was viewed with sympathy by the learned, whether in France, England, Germany, Spain or Italy.

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  • In 1844 he was appointed vice-chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, a well-paid post which enabled him to enjoy his popularity in London society.

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  • The patriotic action of the council and its attendant popularity enabled it to recover considerable administrative control, which it continued to exercise for the next eighteen years, although its deterioration in ability, becoming every year more noticeable, as well as the rapid rise of democratic ideas, prevented it from fully re-establishing the supremacy which Aristotle, with some exaggeration, attributes to it for this period.

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  • Unlike Taylor, Fillmore favoured the " Compromise Measures," and his signing one of them, the Fugitive Slave Law, in spite of the vigorous protests of anti-slavery men, lost him much of his popularity in the North.

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  • Prior to Charlemagne .it is probable that several other collections of homilies had obtained considerable popularity, but in the time of that emperor these had suffered so many mutilations and corruptions that an authoritative revision was felt to be imperatively necessary.

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  • But the cry of Federal interference was raised as a result of the methods employed in securing his nomination, and this, together with the party division and the popularity of Cleveland, brought about Cleveland's election by the unprecedented plurality of 192,854.

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  • At this very time David returned to Paris; he was now painter to the king, Louis XVI., who had been the purchaser of his principal works, and his popularity was soon immense.

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  • It is difficult for a generation which has witnessed another complete revolution in the standards of artistic taste to realize the secret of David's immense popularity in his own day.

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  • For these reasons its popularity was not so immediate as that of Grote's work, but within recent years its substantial merits have been more adequately recognized.

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  • This was a work for which his experience, habits of observation, and scientific training peculiarly fitted him, and in which his popularity as a teacher, no less than his power as a practical physician, became more than ever conspicuous.

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century a revival of the popularity of this instrument took place, and quartets were played on four sets of pipes of different sizes and pitch.

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  • In England he won great personal popularity, and accomplished much in fostering the good relations of the two great English-speaking powers.

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  • Noske, notwithstanding the genuineness of his Republican and Social Democratic opinions, enjoyed con siderable popularity in the new army and with the reactionary friends of law and order, as a man of decided character, great energy and resourcefulness in times of crisis.

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  • The letters which he wrote during this voyage were gathered in 1869 into a volume, The Innocents Abroad, and the book immediately won a wide and enduring popularity.

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  • This popularity was of service to him when he appeared on the platform with a lecture - or rather with an apparently informal talk, rich in admirably delivered anecdote.

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  • The justness of Sir Harry Smith's measures and his popularity among the Boers gained for his policy considerable support, but the republican party, at whose head was Andries Pretorius, did not submit without a struggle.

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  • It may be said without exaggeration that no American public man in the history of the country has achieved such extraordinary popularity during his lifetime as Mr Roosevelt had attained at fifty years of age, both at home and abroad.

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  • Great popularity necessarily brings with it bitter enmity and genuine criticism.

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  • that she endeared herself to the public. Partly, no doubt, her popularity was due to the disgust inspired by her rival, Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, and to the fact that, while the Frenchwoman was a Catholic, she was a Protestant.

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  • Many suits were thereupon entered against Hancock, which, if successful, would have caused the confiscation of his estate, but which undoubtedly enhanced his popularity with the Whig element and increased his resentment against the British government.

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  • Prince Gorchakov did not want a radical solution involving a great European war, but he was too fond of ephemeral popularity to stem the current of popular excitement.

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  • When he had already achieved some important successes over Jugurtha (q.v.), in 107 he was elected consul for the first time (an almost unheard-of honour for a "new man"), his popularity with the army and people being sufficient to bear down all opposition.

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  • From the first the emperor reproached him with being too easy with his subjects and with courting popularity too much.

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  • He was a delicate boy, but when the war of 1870 broke out his mother sent him to the army, to win popularity for him, and the government journals vaunted his bravery.

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  • The fields and places of entertainment in Islington were favourite places of resort for the citizens of London in the 17th century and later; the modern Ball's Pond Road recalls the sport of duck-hunting practised here and on other ponds in the parish, and the popularity of the place was increased by the discovery of chalybeate wells.

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  • These freedoms are part cause of Erasmus's popularity.

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  • Its use appears to have spread more rapidly outside Germany than in Germany itself, one cause of its popularity being that it was negative and colourless, and could thus be applied by adherents of the "old religion" to those of the "new religion," without giving offence, on occasions when it was expedient to avoid abusive language.

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  • As Daunou shrewdly observes in his Memoires, they were too cultivated and too polished to retain their popularity long in times of disturbance, and were therefore the more inclined to work for the establishment of order, which would mean the guarantee of their own power.'

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  • Well provided with funds, he speedily bought over many of the leading magnates, and his popularity reached its height when he strenuously advocated the adoption of the mode of election by the gentry en masse (which the szlachta proposed to revive), as opposed to the usual and more orderly "secret election" by a congress of senators and deputies, sitting with closed doors.

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  • The work of Kadlubek is more ornate in diction than that of Bogufal, and for a long time enjoyed great popularity.

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  • which enjoyed great popularity among his countrymen and had the good fortune to be set to music by Chopin.

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  • Her novels still enjoy great popularity in Poland.

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  • Meir Ezofowicz has enjoyed great popularity.

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  • Llangeitho became the Jerusalem of Wales, and Rowland's popularity never waned until his physical powers gave way.

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  • In the Systeme social (1 773), the Politique naturelle (1773-1774) and the Morale universelle (1776) Holbach attempts to rear a system of morality in place of the one he had so fiercely attacked, but these later writings had not a tithe of the popularity and influence of his earlier work.

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  • The expression seems to have obtained instant recognition and popularity.

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  • The cessation of the war brought increased popularity to the Democratic administration, and the Hartford Convention was vigorously attacked throughout the country.

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  • The wide popularity of his brilliant lectures in the " schools " of Paris made this city the resort of the many students who were ultimately organized as a " university " (c. 1170).

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  • The insubordination of the szlachta seems to have been one cause of this disgraceful collapse, for John Albert confiscated hundreds of their estates after his return; in spite of which, to the end of his life he retained his extraordinary popularity.

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  • The Trumpet of Nordland remains as fresh as ever in the memories of the inhabitants of the north of Norway; boatmen, peasants, priests will alike repeat long extracts from it at the slightest notice, and its popularity is unbounded.

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  • Porthcawl, however, has grown in popularity as a watering-place.

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  • On the outbreak of Richard Marshal's rebellion (1233), he was carried off by the rebels to the Marshal stronghold of Striguil, in the hope that his name would add popularity to their cause.

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  • By introducing genuine reforms for the benefit of officers and common soldiers alike, and by laying himself out for popularity in the most pronounced fashion - notably by his fire-eating attitude towards Germany in April 1887 in connexion with the Schnaebele frontier incident - Boulanger came to be accepted by the mob as the man destined to give France her revenge for the disasters of 1870, and to be used simultaneously as a tool by all the anti-Republican intriguers.

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  • Boulanger fought a bloodless duel with the baron de Lareinty over this affair, but it had no effect at the moment in dimming his popularity, and on M.

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  • This Judas legend, as given by Jacobus de Voragine, obtained no small popularity; and it is to be found in various shapes in every important literature of Europe.

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  • By these means, and by the lavishness of his expenditure on public entertainments as aedile, he acquired such popularity with the plebs that he was elected pontifex maximus in 63 B.C. against such distinguished rivals as Q.

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  • Its popularity is proved by the numerous MSS.

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  • His great collection of traditions is second in popularity only to that of al-Bukhari, and is commonly regarded as more accurate and reliable in details, especially names.

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  • The Commentary gained immediate and lasting popularity, and spread in numerous copies throughout the country, the peculiarities of the hermit's vigorous northern dialect being either modified or wholly removed in the more 4 K.

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  • remaining, must have enjoyed great and lasting popularity.

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  • 2 The volume, in a convenient quarto size, printed in clear Roman type, and provided with marginal annotations, gained immediate popularity in England, where a Bible suited for household demands had long been needed.

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  • The changes introduced by the Genevan translators were, as a rule, a great improvement, and the version received a ready welcome and immediate popularity, not only on account of its intrinsic merits, but because of its handy size, usually that of a small quarto, and of its being printed, like Whittingham's New Testament, in a readable Roman type instead of black letter.

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  • The popularity of the Genevan Bible was so great that between 1560 and 1644 at least 140 editions of it were published,' and this in spite of its not being allowed for use in the churches.

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  • Some time after the accession of Queen Elizabeth an attempt was made to improve the authorized Great Bible, and in this way to challenge the ever growing popularity of the Calvinistic Genevan Bible.

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  • His lectures enjoyed great popularity, and enthusiasm felt for him by the students is shown in the beautiful lines addressed to him by Mickiewicz.

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  • Macquer (1718-1784) as lecturer in chemistry at the college of the Jardin du Roi, where his lectures attained great popularity.

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  • suggest reformations in the different departments of the army essential to good discipline, order and economy, and that his, character and popularity in the army would facilitate the execution of such reformations when adopted by Congress.

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  • His popularity was probably due to the fact that in his sermons he lays little stress on dogmatic questions, but treats generally of moral subjects, in which the secrets of the human heart and the processes of man's reason are described with poetical feeling.

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  • During the War of Secession, when each governor was responsible for organizing troops from his state, much turned upon his energy, popularity and loyalty.

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  • Ian Maclaren's first sketches of rural Scottish life, Beside the Bonnie Briar Bush (1894), achieved extraordinary popularity and were followed by other successful books, The Days of Auld Lang Syne (1895), Kate Carnegie and those Ministers (1896) and Afterwards and other Stories (1898).

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  • As a portrayer of Scottish peasant-life in fiction he was the precursor of a large school, which has benefited by his example and surpassed its original leader in popularity.

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  • By taking this course he sacrificed much of his remarkable popularity in his native province, but confirmed the work of consolidating the Dominion.

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  • But from the first he won great popularity even in the English-speaking provinces, and showed unusual capacity for leadership. His party was beaten in the first general election held after he became leader (1891), but even with its policy of unrestricted reciprocity with the United States, and with Sir John Macdonald still at the head of the Conservative party, it was beaten by only a small majority.

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  • Though this disaster was retrieved by the successful defence of Edessa by George Maniakes and by the defeat of a Saracen 'fleet in the Adriatic, Romanus never recovered his popularity.

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  • In 456 he defeated the Vandals in a sea-fight near Corsica, and on land near Agrigentum in Sicily, and backed by the popularity thus acquired, Ricimer then gained the consent of the Roman senate to an expedition against the emperor Avitus, whom he defeated in a bloody battle at Piacenza on the 16th of October 456.

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  • and George V., and his popularity in English aristocratic circles, to establish and secure friendly relations between the Cabinets of Vienna and London.

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  • In the 12th century the Matiere de France was waning, the Matiere de Bretagne waxing in popularity, and public opinion demanded that the central figure of the younger cycle (for whatever the date of the subject matter, as a literary cycle the Arthurian is the younger) should not be inferior in dignity and importance to that of the earlier.

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  • The character of Arthur as a romantic hero is, in reality, very different from that which, mainly through the popularity of Tennyson's Idylls, English people are wont to suppose.

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  • The town owes its popularity to a firm expanse of sand, good bathing facilities, and a temperate climate.

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  • On succeeding to the throne in September 1824 the dignity of his address and his affable condescension won him a passing popularity.

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  • Public opinion in England, lately so hostile, now became confident, and Wellington, whose rewards for Talavera had been opposed in both Houses, began to gain extraordinary popularity.

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  • The fact that he was a Lorrainer prejudiced public opinion in his favour, and his popularity was increased by his' foreign policy - especially the successful establishment of the French protectorate over Morocco and the conclusion of the naval agreement with Russia.

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  • The President's activity and enormous popularity roused the anger of the Opposition parties, and the Radical-Socialist congress at Pau, on Oct.

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  • This had no effect, how ever, on public opinion, and Poincare's popularity was undiminished during the months immediately preceding the outbreak of the World War.

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  • In spite of the incontestable popularity enjoyed by this class of literature, we have only some half-dozen fableaux written in England, viz.

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  • This sudden leap into popularity seems to have been occasioned in connexion with a veiled allusion to Irving's striking eloquence made in the House of Commons by Canning, who had been induced to attend his church from admiration of an expression in one of his prayers, quoted to him by Sir James Mackintosh.

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  • Sir Thomas More was pitched upon by the court on this occasion in order that his popularity with the Commons might be employed to carry the money grant for which Wolsey asked.

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  • It was to this superiority of view, and not merely to the satire on the administration of Henry VII., that we must ascribe the popularity of the work in the 16th century.

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  • Gloucester courted popularity by opposing them throughout; with him was Richard of York, who stood next in succession to the crown.

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  • This is ascribed as a credit to his policy and diplomacy by his daughter, by the Latin historians of the crusade to his treachery and falseness, but during the last twenty years of his life he lost much of his popularity.

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  • These works are written in a lucid, racy, picturesque style, which secured for them an unusual degree of popularity.

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  • When Fortis became prime minister, San Guiliano accepted the post of minister for foreign affairs, and on the fall of the Cabinet early in 1906 he was appointed ambassador in London, where he remained until 1910, gaining much popularity and contributing to render Anglo-Italian relations ever more cordial.

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  • During the whole tenure of office the Marquis di San Giuliano was an ardent believer in the Triple Affiance, on which he thought that Italy's foreign policy should be based, and attached the greatest importance to a good understanding with Austria, an attitude not calculated to win him popularity in many circles; under his guidance consequently Italy opposed Serbia's desire for a port on the Adriatic and Greece's aspirations in Epirus, and supported the policy of creating an independent Albanian State.

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  • and marshal of England, during the revival of the popularity of the order, about A.D.

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  • Allowance must here be made for jealousy of a rival order just rising in popularity.

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  • The popular style, good illustrations and pious spirit pervading the writings of Lavater have given to them a popularity they little deserved, as there is no system in his work, which chiefly consists of rhapsodical comments upon the several portraits.

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  • These defects will no doubt be overcome as concrete grows in popularity as a building material and its aesthetic treatment is better understood.

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  • The little treatise became widely popular, gaining rather than losing popularity in the 18th century.

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  • Henry, like his grandfather, gained in popularity with every year of his reign.

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  • Between 1629 and 1643, however, Christian gained both in popularity and influence.

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  • His beauty, and the splendid ceremonials at which he presided, made him a great favourite with the troops stationed in that part of Syria, and Maesa increased his popularity by spreading reports that he was in reality the illegitimate son of Caracalla.

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  • The shameless profligacy of the emperor's life was such as to shock even a Roman public. His popularity with the army declined, and Maesa, perceiving that the soldiers were in favour of Alexander Severus, persuaded Heliogabalus to raise his cousin to the dignity of Caesar (221), a step of which he soon repented.

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  • The story met with ready acceptance and popularity.

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  • The popularity of the pamphlet and its translations soon led to reports of the appearance of this mysterious being in almost all parts of the civilized world.

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  • Its rapid increase in size in the last decade of the 19th century was owing to the popularity which it attained as a place of residence for London business men.

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  • Such was his popularity and the confidence he inspired that in 1631 his great offices of state were declared hereditary, in favour of his five-year-old son, by the Acte de Survivance.

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  • The stadholder's authority and popularity continued unimpaired, despite of his frequent absences in England.

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  • His popularity as a preacher is said to have been chiefly due to his "high susceptibility, joined with physical advantages and perfect sincerity."

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  • Lucius (or Gaius) Minucius, the patrician praefectus annonae (president of the market), thereupon accused him of courting popularity with a view to making himself king.

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  • Scribe, who shared with him, as librettist, the success and growing popularity of his compositions.

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  • The popularity of his biblical exegesis is demonstrated by the fact that the first printed texts of the Hebrew Bible were accompanied by his commentary: the Psalms 1477, perhaps at Bologna; the early Prophets, 1485, Soncino; the later Prophets, ibid.

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  • Langtoft's Chronicle seems to have enjoyed considerable popularity in the north, and the latter part of it was translated into English by Robert Mannyng, sometimes called Robert of Brunne, about 1330.

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  • popularity with his Belgian subjects; but it was far otherwise with his policy of internal reform.

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  • His popularity as a preacher was deservedly pre-eminent; but no more diligent student ever shut himself up with his books.

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  • After studying law he practised at Paris as an advocate, but, having met with no great success, entered the church, and soon gained the highest popularity as a preacher, rising to the dignity of canon, and being appointed preacher in ordinary to Marguerite, wife of Henry IV.

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  • He now experienced the Nemesis of his over-cautious system of abstinence from office for fear of compromising his popularity.

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  • The latter piece-obtained a longer lease of life than its intrinsic literary merits warranted, on account of the popularity of the political opinions freely expressed in it - so freely expressed, indeed, that the displeasure of the king was incurred, and Delavigne lost his post.

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  • This song, set to music by Auber, was on the lips of every Frenchman, and rivalled in popularity the Marseillaise.

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  • His attitude in the House of Peers in the autumn of 1815 cost him a two years' exile to Twickenham; he courted popularity by having his children educated en bourgeois at the public schools; and the Palais Royal became the rendezvous of all the leaders of that middle-class opinion by which he was ultimately to be raised to the throne.

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  • The influence of Flood did much to give direction to Grattan's political aims; and it was through no design on Grattan's part that when Lord Charlemont brought him into the Irish parliament in 1775, in the very session in which Flood damaged his popularity by accepting office, Grattan quickly superseded his friend in the leadership of the national party.

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  • His popularity had temporarily declined, and the fact that his proposals for parliamentary reform and Catholic emancipation had become the watchwords of the rebellious United Irishmen had brought upon him the bitter hostility of the governing classes.

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  • His patriotism was untainted by selfseeking; he was courageous in risking his popularity for what his sound judgment showed him to be the right course.

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  • Mary's, Shrewsbury, in 1884; in 1885 he became private chaplain to the Bishop of Lichfield and in 1889 head of the Oxford House, Bethnal Green, where he gained much popularity owing to his devoted work among the East End poor.

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  • The appointment, which had hitherto been reserved for ecclesiastics of marked ability as scholars or administrators, excited much comment; but it was undoubtedly popular, and this popularity was confirmed when it was realized that the bishop intended to carry on in his new sphere the democratic traditions of his East End activities.

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  • Churchill, who, confident in his powers, drunk with popularity, and burning with party spirit, was looking for some man of established fame and Tory politics to insult, celebrated the Cock Lane ghost in three cantos, nicknamed Johnson Pomposo, asked where the book was which had been so long promised and so liberally paid for, and directly accused the great moralist of cheating.

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  • In this frontier community law and politics claimed a large proportion of the stronger and the more ambitious men; the law early appealed to Lincoln and his general popularity encouraged him as early as 1832 to enter politics.

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  • 4 in., and of spare but muscular build; he had been in youth remarkably strong and skilful in the athletic games of the frontier, where, however, his popularity and recognized impartiality oftener made him an umpire than a champion.

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  • The secret of Fredericks great popularity was partly the national pride excited by his foreign achievements, partly the ascendance over other minds which his genius gave him, and partly the conviction that while he would forego nmrne of his rights he would demand from his vassals nothing more than was sanctioned by the laws of the Empire.

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  • The popularity she thus gained among German Liberals and Nationalists was helped by the course of events at Berlin.

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  • The return of King William to his capital had been a triumphal progress; and Bismarck had shared to the full the new-born popularity of his master.

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  • In spite of the denunciation by the Social Democratic leaders of what they stigmatized as a policy N I of brag, the general popularity of the idea of estab- prf~oVg~~ress.

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  • It has gained rapidly in popularity since the beginning of this century, and is spreading to other centres.

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  • The popularity of his devotional writings is attested by the numerous existing editions and by the many close imitations of them.

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  • This narrative, as written out by Adamnan, was presented to Aldfrith the Wise, last of the great Northumbrian kings, at York about 701, and came to the knowledge of Bede, who inserted a brief summary of the same in his Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, and also drew up a separate and longer digest which obtained great popularity throughout the middle ages as a standard guide-book (the so-called Libellus de locis sanctis) to the Holy Places of Syria.

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  • The proclamation on the 26th of February 1861 of the new constitution for the whole monarchy, elaborated by Anton von Schmerling, though far from satisfying the national aspirations of the races within the empire, at least gave Austria a temporary popularity in Germany; the liberalism of the Habsburg monarchy was favourably contrasted with the " reactionary " policy of Prussia, where Bismarck was defying the majority of the diet in his determination to build up the military power of Prussia.

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  • Both books obtained immediate popularity, and the former, at least, was translated into several languages.

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  • Naturally of great ability, he received an excellent education and was distinguished both for the independence of his mind and the popularity of his manners.

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  • - The final stages of the Egyptian religion are marked by a renewed popularity of all its more barbarous ~Iements.

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  • For some months the caliph was under this sons control; but the latter, who aimed at conciliating the people, speedily lost his popularity with the troops, and his father was able to get possession of his person and cause him to be poisoned (beginning of 1133).

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  • Whatever popularity might have been gained by these measures was counteracted by his declaration of a French protectorate over Egypt, which was to count as a French colony.

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  • in the extremity of the national danger had won for " the least expansive of monarchs " an extraordinary popularity.

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  • Nor in any series of comedies in existence is decency so rarely sacrificed to a desire for popularity or a false sense of wit.

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  • 1850) persevered in composing novels which attain a wide general popularity.

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  • It was continued to the end of Frederick's reign, and nothing did so much to injure his otherwise immense popularity.

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  • Still acting under Shaftesbury's advice, Monmouth now went upon the first of his progresses in the west of England, visiting the chief members of the country party, and gaining by his open and engaging manner much popularity among the people.

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  • He had already gained some popularity by writing in favour of reform, and in 1819 he issued A defence of the People in reply to Lord Erskine's "Two Defences of the Whigs," followed by A trifling mistake in Thomas, Lord Erskine's recent preface.

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  • But this proceeding only increased his popularity, and at the general election of 1820 he was returned for Westminster.

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  • The Hiilsemann letter was published and greatly increased Marcy's popularity.

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  • And his unbending common-sense, and sobriety of criticism in matters which deeply interested the less academic Radicals who were enthusiasts for extreme courses, would have made the parliamentary situation difficult but for the exceptional popularity of the prime minister.

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  • Diirer's engravings, both on copper and wood, had by this time attained great popularity both north and south of the Alps, and had begun to be copied by various hands, among others by the celebrated Marcantonio of Bologna, then in his youth.

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  • He was of imposing presence and had great conversational powers; but his inflexible integrity was not sufficiently tempered by tact and civility to admit of his winning general popularity.

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  • Lord Rosebery's personal popularity had been increased at home by his successful intervention in the coal strike of December 1893, and when in March 1894 the resignation of Gladstone was announced, his selection by Queen Victoria for the premiership was welcomed by the public at large and by the majority of his own party.

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  • Monckton Milnes (Lord Houghton), who won universal popularity by the most genuine kindliness of nature, became a cordial friend.

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  • The initiative was taken by the French in the 12th and 13th centuries, and the Germans followed in the 14th and 15th; while the Book of Wa y es to Jerusalem of John de Maundeville (c. 1336) attained extreme popularity, and was translated into almost all the vernacular languages.

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  • In England, indeed, the shrine of St James of Compostella became practically the most favoured devotional resort; and in the 12th century its visitation had attained such popularity that a pilgrimage thither was ranked on a level with one to Rome or Jerusalem (Honor.

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  • By the death of the latter in 1883 the count became undisputed head of the house of Bourbon; but he did not show any disposition to push his claims. The popularity of the Orleans family, however, was shown on the occasion of the marriage of the comte de Paris's eldest daughter with the duke of Braganza, son of the king of Portugal, in May 1886.

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  • As a ballad poet, Schiller's popularity has been hardly less great than as a dramatist; the bold and simple outline, the terse dramatic characterization appealed directly to the popular mind, which did not let itself be disturbed by the often artificial and rhetorical tone into which the poet falls.

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  • Wallenstein was followed in 1800 by Maria Stuart, a tragedy, which, in spite of its great popularity in and outside of Germany, was felt by the critics to follow too closely the methods of the lachrymose "tragedy of common life" to maintain a high position among Schiller's works.

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  • But since the re-establishment of the German empire in 1871 there has been, at least in intellectual circles, a certain waning of his popularity, the Germans of to-day realizing that Goethe more fully represents the aspirations of the nation.

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  • Economic depression gave the Granger Movement considerable popularity, and an outgrowth of the Granger organization was the Independent Reform Party, of 1874, which advocated retrenchment of expenses, the state regulation of railways and a tariff for revenue only.

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  • In defiance of her commercial interests and of her popularity with the Moslem population of the Gulf, Great Britain set herself to suppress the trade, and executed a series of agreements with the chiefs of the Arabian littoral with this object.

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  • The popularity of St George in England has never reached the height attained by St Andrew in Scotland, St David in Wales or St Patrick in Ireland.

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  • For a while, indeed, this opposition did not impair the king's popularity, due to his amiable character...

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  • His popularity, which had been shaken by the Montez affair, he soon recovered, especially among artists.

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  • The first bright days of welcome and popularity are soon clouded: the storm begins to lower.

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  • The Galilean ministry opens with enthusiasm, ripening into a popularity which even endangers a satisfactory result.

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  • Gustavus's prompt dismissal of the generally detested Gustaf Reuterholm added still further to his popularity.

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  • Its strength and popularity, especially among the artizan classes, have been very much underrated by most historians.

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  • His own attitude towards the World War was vigorous and patriotic. He made a recruiting tour in 1915 through Great Britain, where he won a popularity perhaps greater than he enjoyed at home, and pledged himself to introduce conscription in Australia, though he failed to carry it.

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  • He had amassed some wealth, which on his return to Rome he so employed among the poor as to secure for himself great popularity; and, when Vigilius was summoned to Byzantium in 544, Pelagius, now archdeacon, was left behind as his vicar, and by his tact in dealing with Totila, the Gothic invader, saved the citizens from murder and outrage.

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  • Perhaps his popularity and many-sidedness militated against his academical success; at any rate he only obtained, to his chagrin, a second class in the History Tripos.

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  • The Gomal is the great central trade route between Afghanistan and India; and the position, which is held by a tribal post at Wana, will do much to ensure its continued popularity.

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  • The amir's first measures were designed to enhance his popularity and to improve his internal administration, particularly with regard to the relations of his government with the tribes, and to the system introduced by the late amir of compulsory military service, whereby each tribe was required to supply a proportionate number of recruits.

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  • It is plain that Prodicus was an affected pedant; yet his simple conventional morality found favour, and Plato (Rep. 600 C) couples him with Protagoras in his testimony to the popularity of the sophists and their teaching.

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  • For, though that celebrated personage would have liked to be called, not " sophist " but " political philosopher," and tried to fasten the name of " sophist " upon his opponents the Socratics, it is clear from his own statement that he was commonly ranked with the sophists, and that he had no claim, except on the score of superior popularity and success, to be dissociated from the other teachers of political rhetoric. It is true that he was not a political sophist of the vulgar type, that as a theorist he was honest and patriotic, and that, in addition to his fame as a teacher, he had a distinct reputation as a man of letters; but he was a professor of political rhetoric, and, as such, in the phraseology of the day, a sophist.

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  • Hence, despite its original popularity, eristical sophistry could not hold its ground.

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  • In connexion with the post-office there are inland money order and savings-bank businesses; and in addition the value-payable system, by which the post-office undertakes to recover from the addressee the value of an article sent by post and to remit the amount to the sender, has found great popularity.

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  • The government tended to become more and more autocratic and to rely wholly on the all-powerful police, the spies and the priests; and, although the king showed some independence in foreign affairs, his popularity waned; the desire for a constitution was by no means dead, and the survivors of the old Carbonari gathered round Carlo Poerio, while the Giovane Italia society (independent of Mazzini), led by Benedetto Musolino, took as its motto " Unity, Liberty and Independence."

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  • The book maintained its popularity as late as the 17th century, especially in Germany.

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  • There were a few rich men, but they were almost ashamed to differ from their neighbours and, in some known cases, they affected democracy in order to win popularity.

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  • His opposition to slavery, however, together with his popularity - won by the successes, hardships and dangers of his exploring expeditions, and by his part in the conquest of California - led to his nomination, largely on the ground of "availability," for the presidency in 1856 by the Republicans (this being their first presidential campaign), and by the National Americans or "Know-Nothings."

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  • The disgust aroused by the vices and effeminacy of the king increased the popularity of Henry of Guise.

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  • With the declaration of peace the president again gained a momentary popularity much like that he had won in 1809 by his apparent willingness at that time to fight France.

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  • Chief-Justice Pratt pronounced, with decisive and almost passionate energy, against their legality, thus giving voice to the strong feeling of the nation and winning for himself an extraordinary degree of popularity as one of the "maintainers of English constitutional liberty."

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  • Then, however, by the publication of L'Almanach du Pere Gerard, a little book setting forth, in homely style, the advantages of a constitutional monarchy, he suddenly acquired great popularity.

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  • In May 1794 an attempt was made to assassinate Collot; but it only increased his popularity, and this won him the hatred of Robespierre, against whom he took sides on the 9th Thermidor, when he presided over the Convention during a part of the session.

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  • of France, and both there and in England his talents and diplomatic experience, as well as his well-grounded enmity to Philip, secured him much popularity.

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  • Melodious, effective, readily intelligible, with a dash of the commonplace, Les Preludes, Tasso, Mazeppa and Fest-Kldnge bid for popularity.

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  • Now, without counting the Homeric poems - which doubtless had exceptional advantages in their fame and popularity - we find a body of literature dating from the 8th century B.C. to which the theory of oral transmission is surely inapplicable.

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  • The king's habit of mingling with the peasantry secured for him a large amount of popularity, and probably led many to ascribe to him the authorship of poems describing scenes in peasant life, Christis Kirk on the Grene, The Gaberlunzie Man and The Jolly Beggar.

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  • Accordingly Pius soon drew back, and his popularity waned.

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  • the sweets of popularity without the actual burdens of government succeeded for the time.

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  • One of the chief sources of his popularity was his activity in Congress in promoting the war with Great Britain in 1812, while as one of the peace commissioners he reluctantly signed the treaty of Ghent on the 24th of December 1814.

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  • Then, greeted with the title of "The Great Pacificator" as a reward for his success, he retired temporarily to private life, with a larger stock of popularity than he had ever had before.

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  • His popularity was as great and as inexhaustible among his neighbours as among his fellow-citizens generally.

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  • of seeking popularity, and was for a time excluded from the court.

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  • He therefore addressed an eloquent and imploring letter to the earl, pointing out the dangers of his position and urging upon him what he judged to be the only safe course of action, to seek and secure the favour of the queen alone; above all things dissuading him from the appearance of military popularity.

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  • His unskilful and unlucky management of the sea expedition to Ferrol and the Azores in no way lowered his popularity with the people, but undoubtedly weakened his influence with the queen.

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  • His great popularity, and the general ignorance of the reasons for his imprisonment, stirred up a strong feeling against the queen, who was reported to be influenced by Bacon, and such indignation was raised against the latter that his friends feared his life would be in danger.

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  • His Manual of Chemistry, first published in 1819, enjoyed wide popularity, and among other works he brought out a Dictionary of Science, Literature and Art in 1842, on a new edition of which he was engaged when he died at Tunbridge Wells on the 11th of February 1866.

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  • Of these two Puritan divines, Vicar Prichard, who was essentially orthodox in his behaviour, forms an interesting connecting link between the learned Elizabethan translators of the Bible and the great revivalists of the 18th century, and his moral rhymes in the vernacular, collected and printed after his death under the title of The Welshman's Candle (Canwyll y Cymry), still retain some degree of popularity amongst his countrymen.

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  • After 1870 Welsh ecclesiastical appointments were made in a more truly national spirit, and this official acknowledgment of the peculiar duties and claims of the Church in Wales largely helped to win back no small amount of the strength and popularity that had been lost during Georgian times.

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  • According to Ephraim's biographer, his main motive for providing these hymns set to music was his desire to counteract the baneful effects produced by the heretical hymns of Bardaisan and his son Harmonius, which had enjoyed popularity and been sung among the Edessenes for a century and a half.

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  • Most important of all, however, is Joseph Caro's Shullhan `Aruk (" prepared table "), which came in the age of printing (1565), leapt into popularity, and has been, in its turn, the subject of many commentaries and hand-books.

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  • The popularity of the parable as a form of didactic teaching finds many examples in the Rabbinical writings, and some have noteworthy parallels in the New testament.

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  • It obtained great popularity, and was conscientiously exploited by various writers until the 11th century, being translated even into the Slavonic languages.

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  • Though a large proportion of the New England Baptists co-operated heartily in the cause of independence, the denomination failed to win the popularity that comes from successful leadership.

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  • At Tours he lived with Euphronius, and so great was the young man's popularity that, on the death of Euphronius in 573, the people unanimously designated him bishop.

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  • She was at once raised to the throne by the party of progress, as represented by Prince Menshikov and Count Tolstoy, whose interests and perils were identical with those of the empress, before the reactionary party had time to organize opposition, her great popularity with the army powerfully contributing to her success.

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  • Many of these he published, with illustrations, in 1846, and they enjoyed and still enjoy an extreme popularity.

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  • She was at least in part the cause of the only moment of popularity which the king enjoyed.

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  • As a resort for foreign travellers and tourists Sweden lacks the °,:markable popularity of Norway.

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  • Within three years of the introduction of the new electoral laws De Geer's ministry had forfeited much of its former popularity, and had been forced to resign.

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  • A short narrative poem, The Death of the Countess Spastara (1783), has retained its popularity.

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  • The Roman revolution availed itself of Arnold's popularity, and of his theories, but was carried out without his aid.

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  • In the religion of the people, these divinities always survived; and the popularity of Mithras is evinced by the numerous Aryan proper names thence derived (Mithradates, &c.).

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  • He gave the dethroned shah a handsome allowance, and strove, by a mild policy, to acquire popularity.

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  • His popularity was real, but never seemed to have effect outside the limited sphere of personal sympathy and regard.

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  • When England was engaged in the Crimean War of 185455 her alliance with a Mahommedan power in no way added to her popularity or strengthened her position in Persia.

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  • His immense popularity, his friendly relations with the clergy, and some temporary advances from the banks, tided over difficulties for some time.

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  • 2 An interesting example of Schongauer's popularity in Italy is given by the lovely Faenza plate in the British Museum, on which is painted?a copy of Martin's beautiful engraving of the "Death of the Virgin."

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  • He enjoyed a genuine popularity, and in 1506 the estates of Tours conferred on him the surname of Pere du Peuple.

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  • The population, 5585 in 1881, shrunk in 1901 to 4188, but is increasing owing to the popularity of the town as a summer resort.

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  • The popularity of Charles, now greatly increased, was raised to national enthusiasm by the discovery of the Rye House plot in 1683, said to be a scheme to assassinate Charles and James at an isolated house on the high road near Hoddesdon in Hertfordshire as they returned from Newmarket to London, among those implicated being Algernon Sidney, Lord Russell and Monmouth, the two former paying the death penalty and Monmouth being finally banished to the Hague.

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  • " It was a common saying that he could send away a person better pleased at receiving nothing than those in the good king his father's time that had requests granted them," 1 and his good-humoured tact and familiarity compensated for and concealed his ingratitude and perfidy and preserved his popularity.

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  • The reign of his predecessor Charles and even of that of his successor James II., with their mistaken principles and ideals, have a saving dignity wholly wanting in that of Charles II., and the administration of Cromwell, in spite of the popularity of the restoration, was soon regretted.

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  • It was succeeded by L'Amour (1859), one of the author's most popular books, and not unworthy of its popularity, but perhaps hardly his best.

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  • His contemporary popularity is indicated by the number of inns and public-houses which took his name and had his portrait as sign-board.

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  • Driven out of Crete by his brother, who was jealous of his popularity, he fled to Boeotia, where he wedded Alcmene.

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  • Its numerous editions bear witness to its popularity, and until the final fall of Aristotle's physics it continued a popular textbook.

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  • There was no bureaucratic fussiness, no seeking after popularity; but every man, whether great or small, was treated exactly as became his station in the world.

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  • It seems clear that he had a peculiar gift for evoking the enthusiasm of rude tribes, and we can well understand how the famous white fawn, a present from one of the natives, which was his constant companion and was supposed to communicate to him the advice of the goddess Diana, promoted his popularity.

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  • Like Silva's operas, the comedies of Nicolao Luiz contain a faithful picture of contemporary society and enjoyed considerable popularity.

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  • The sentences soon attained immense popularity, ultimately becoming the text-book in almost every theological school, and giving rise to endless commentaries, over 180 of these being written in England.

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  • In 1763 he spoke against the obnoxious tax on cider, imposed by his brother-in-law, George Grenville, and his opposition, though unsuccessful in the House, helped to keep alive his popularity with the country, which cordially hated the excise and all connected with it.

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  • By the acceptance of a peerage the great commoner lost at least as much and as suddenly in popularity as he gained in dignity.

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  • It has been insinuated both by contemporary and by later critics that being disappointed at his loss of popularity, and convinced of the impossibility of co-operating with his colleagues, he exaggerated his malady as a pretext for the inaction that was forced upon him by circumstances.

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  • The last independent archbishop was Hieronymus von Colloredo (1732-1812), who ruled with energy and justice but without gaining popularity.

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  • What does, however, seem probable is that the first book of Pantagruel (the second of the whole work) was composed with a definite view to this chap book and not to the existing first book of Gargantua, which was written afterwards, when Rabelais discovered the popularity of his work and felt that it ought to have some worthier starting-point than the Grandes chroniques.

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  • The immense popularity of the first two parts induced him to continue them, and by degrees (the genuineness of the fifth book, at any rate in substance, is here assumed) the possibility of giving the whole something like a consistent form and a regular conclusion presented itself to him.

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  • It was this story that gave Christopher his immense popularity throughout Western Christendom.

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  • In spite of his ungainly exterior and peculiar manner, his happy gifts of exposition and illustration won him extraordinary popularity as a lecturer, his experiments were ingenious and rapidly performed, and Coleridge went to hear him "to increase his stock of metaphors."

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  • The consciousness of these great services even reconciled him to the loss of much of his popularity; for there can be no doubt that a large part of the Hungarian nation regarded the Composition of 1867 as a sort of surrender and blamed Deak as the author of it.

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  • Its popularity was immense and signal.

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  • The Pharisees even improved upon the Temple ritual, and their popularity enabled them to force the Pharisees into adopting the improvements.

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  • Never since Pitt had a minister enjoyed a greater share of popularity and power, and, unlike Pitt, Palmerston had the prestige of victory in war.

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  • In 12 he was made consul, and increased his popularity by appearing as an advocate in the courts of justice, and by the celebration of brilliant games.

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  • The tumult was with difficulty quelled, partly by well-timed concessions, for which the authority of the emperor was forged, but chiefly owing to his personal popularity.

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  • But his personal popularity suffered not the slightest diminution, while his clear, almost intuitive, outlook and his unconquerable faith in the future of his country made him, during those difficult years, a factor of incalculable importance in the public life of Denmark.

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  • 7) is sufficient proof of their widespread popularity.

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  • The defection of Burgundy roused English feeling, and Humphrey won popularity as leader of the war party.

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  • Still he was a cultured and courtly prince, who could win popularity.

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  • So Edward's personal rule became in its character autocratic; but it was in the art of courting popularity and concealing despotism that he most shows himself as a type of tyranny.

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  • His strongest weapons were the fine presence, the affable manners (even with citizens), and the love of pleasure and entertainments which secured his personal popularity.

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  • Some fragments of this work (or these works) have come down to us; they greatly add to the popularity of the Book of Jeremiah.

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  • The popularity of Donne as a preacher rose to its zenith when he returned to his pulpit, and it continued there until his death.

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  • His popularity disappeared entirely in his later years.

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  • His popularity was shown in the regard paid to him by Philip, Cassander and Ptolemy, and by the complete failure of a charge of impiety brought against him.

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  • In six years the work was completed in seventy-two volumes, and immediately achieved a general popularity; the publisher made a fortune out of it, and Cantu's royalties amounted, it is said, to 300,000 lire (12,000).

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  • The stadholder, Frederick Henry of Orange, ruled with well-nigh Frederick monarchical authority (1625-1647), but even he at the Henry height of his power and popularity had always to Prince of reckon with the opposition of the states of Holland Orange.

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  • He had fled to Ireland a broken man, to all appearance politically extinct; a few years were to raise him once more to the summit of popularity, though power was for ever denied him.

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  • None could be procured; the public passion swept everything before it; the patent was cancelled; Wood was compensated by a pension; Swift was raised to a height of popularity which he retained for the rest of his life; and the only real sufferers were the Irish people, who lost a convenience so badly needed that they might well have afforded to connive at Wood's illicit profits.

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  • His popularity remained as great as ever (he received the freedom of Dublin in 1729), and, when he was menaced by the bully Bettesworth, Dublin rose as one man to defend him.

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  • Hardly known outside of Holland, among his own people for nearly two centuries he enjoyed an enormous popularity.

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  • Hyperion, a poetical account of his travels, had, at the time of its publication, an immense popularity, due mainly to its sentimental romanticism.

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  • If published nowadays it would hardly attract notice; but in those gushing, emotion-craving times it had considerable popularity, and helped to increase the poet's now rapidly widening fame.

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  • Though written in a metre deemed foreign to English ears, the poem immediately attained a wide popularity, which it has never lost, and secured to the dactylic hexameter a recognized place among English metres.

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  • But through all the periods of his life his view of the world was essentially religious and subjective, and, consequently, his manner of dealing with it hymnal or lyric. This fact, even more than his merits as an artist, serves to account for his immense popularity.

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  • It is difficult now to account for its extraordinary popularity, its thought being neither just nor profound, while its style is stiff and affected.

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  • President Carnot's ostensible part during this agitation was mainly confined to augmenting his popularity by well-timed appearances on public occasions, which gained credit for the presidency and the republic. When early in 1889, Boulanger was finally driven into exile, it fell to President Carnot's lot to appear at the head of the state on two occasions of especial interest, the celebration of the centenary of 1789 and the opening of the Paris Exhibition of that year.

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  • Carnot seemed to be arriving at the zenith of popularity, when on the 24th of June 1894, after delivering at a public banquet at Lyons a speech in which he appeared to imply that he nevertheless would not seek re-election, he was stabbed by an Italian anarchist named Caserio and expired almost immediately.

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  • Plotinus's wide popularity was due partly to the lucidity of his teaching, but perhaps even more to his strong personality.

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  • The popularity gained by Henry V.

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  • But it would be more than usually rash to prophesy that this exceptional popularity will endure.

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  • Yet the taxes were continually on the increase, and the hospodar Scarlat Ghica (1758-61), though he tried to win some popularity by the removal of Turkish settlers and the abolition of the vakarit or tax on cattle and horses, which was peculiarly hateful to the peasantry, raised the total amount of taxation to 25,000,000 lion-dollars, about £I,000,000.

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  • In Rumanian it rests on an older Greek-Slavonic text, and owes its great popularity to the wise and witty proverbs it contains.

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  • which testify to their great popularity; in the popular songs one finds many traces of their influence upon the people's imagination.

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  • It is, however, entirely legendary, being rather the crystallization of earlier Roland legends than the source of later ones, and its popularity seems to date from the latter part of the 12th century.

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  • The popularity of the work is attested by the fact that there are at least five French translations of the Historia dating from the 13th century and one into Latin verse of about the same time.

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  • Racine is said to have assured his son that Corneille made verses "cent fois plus beaux" than his own, but that his own greater popularity was owing to the fact that he took some trouble to make himself personally agreeable.

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  • The anecdotes of her piety and generosity which have been preserved are proof, however, of her popularity.

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  • Sumner had always prized highly his popularity in England, but he unhesitatingly sacrificed it in taking his stand as to the adjustment of claims against England for breaches of neutrality during the war.

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  • The secretary, however, was not averse to increasing his popularity and his chances for the presidency by obtaining Cuba in an honourable manner, and it was at his suggestion that James Buchanan, J.

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  • Pompey rose still higher in popularity, and on the motion of the tribune Aulus Gabinius in 67 he was entrusted with an extraordinary command over the greater part of the empire, specially for the extermination of piracy in the Mediterranean, by which the corn supplies of Rome were seriously endangered, while the high prices of provisions caused great distress.

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  • It enjoyed its greatest popularity in this respect from the end of the 18th to the middle of the 19th century.

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    0
  • His political advancement was due to his personal popularity.

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    0
  • If they had waited till his popularity had waned, they might have had some chance of success, but in anger and resentment they struck too soon.

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  • Between 1461 and 1465 he only asked for 37,000 from the nationand won no small popularity thereby.

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  • The king had in his favor the prestige of the royal name, and a popularity won by his easy-going affability and his liberal gifts.

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  • seems to have enjoyed personal popularity.

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  • Charles and Buck ingham did their best to win back popularity by strenuous exertion.

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  • The danger, of course, was absurdly exaggerated; as indeed was proved by the very popularity of the repressive measures to which the government thought it necessary to resort, and which gave to the vapourings of a few knots of agitators the dignity of a widespread conspiracy for the overthrow of the constitution.

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  • But the popularity of the queen was extended to her government.

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  • The wave of popularity which had carried Lord Palmerston to victory in 1857 had lost its strength.

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  • But his high-handed proceeding, though it forced the Lords to reconsider their decision, strained the allegiance of many of his supporters, and still further impaired the popularity of his administration.

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  • If Lord Beaconsfield had dissolved parliament immediately after his return from Berlin, it is possible that the wave of popularity which had been raised by his success would have borne him forward to a fresh victory in the constituencies.

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  • A period of distress at home increased the discontent which Lord Beaconsfields external policy was exciting; and, when parliament was at last dissolved in 1880, it seemed no longer certain that the country would endorse the policy of the minister, who only a short time before had acquired such popularity.

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  • - Gladstones government declined in popularity from the date of the earliest of these concessions.

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  • It was obvious that the new government, as its first duty, would be compelled to dissolve the parliament that had been elected when Gladstone was enjoying the popularity which he had lost so rapidly in office.

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  • It was seen then that the queen, by her conduct and character, had gained a popularity which has had no parallel in history, and had won a place in the hearts of her subjects which perhaps no other monarch had ever previously enjoyed.

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  • "Trample on me without ceremony," he wrote to Kossuth on this occasion, "but for God's sake don't use the nimbus of your popularity to plunge Hungary into chaos."

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  • But neither this fact nor the gradual loss of his popularity restrained Szechenyi, both in the Diet and at county meetings, from fulminating conscientiously against the extreme demands of Kossuth.

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  • In 1830 a rising in Dresden led to his being named joint regent of the kingdom along with King Anthony on the 13th of September; and in this position his popularity and his wise and liberal reforms (for instance, in arranging public audiences) speedily quelled all discontent.

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  • From the popularity of Max Miller's works on comparative philology this is the use of the word which is most familiar to the general public. The arguments in support of this use are set forth by him in the latter part of lecture vi.

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  • The moral elevation of the fragment of Cicero thus preserved to us gave the work a popularity in the middle ages to which its own merits have little claim.

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  • His popularity continued undiminished for more than twenty years, until 1779.

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  • But, though Semler was really not inconsistent with himself in attacking the views of Reimarus and Bahrdt, his popularity began from that year to decline, and towards the end of his life he felt the necessity of emphasizing the apologetic and conservative value of true historical inquiry.

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  • Except at royal coronations, however, the use of the cope, even in cathedrals, had practically ceased in England before the ritual revival of the 19th century restored its popularity.

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  • Much of the popularity of her writings was due to their clear and crisp style and the underlying enthusiasm for her subject which pervaded them.

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  • The work enjoyed a high degree of popularity in ancient times as a school-book; it was translated into Latin by Rufus Festus Avienus, and by the grammarian Priscian.

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  • This tactical blunder cost him his popularity and materially assisted the secret operations of the king.

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  • By close attention to his parliamentary duties, he obtained a wide knowledge of the rules and procedure of the House of Commons, and this fact together with his intimacy with Pitt, and his general popularity, secured his election as Speaker in June 1789.

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  • The early popularity of the book is shown by the interpolated passages in the Septuagint and the Old Latin versions.

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  • The popularity of the name and its rapid extension to M.

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  • His popularity in Bosnia was partly due to the tact and personal charm of his wife.

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  • The warmth of his popularity, to which Radical applause contributed nothing in his later days, created an atmosphere entirely favourable to the quiet growth of Conservatism.

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  • He was then sixtyeight years old, and this was his first full banquet of popularity.

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  • At the Berlin conference he had established a formidable reputation; the popularity he enjoyed at home was affectionately enthusiastic; no minister had ever stood in more cordial relations with his sovereign; and his honours in every kind were his own achievement against unending disadvantage.

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  • The likelihood of his death was publicly known for some days before the event, and then the greatness of his popularity and its warmth were declared for the first time.

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  • We have said that never till 1872 did he look upon the full cup of popularity.

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    0
  • Meanwhile political students find to their satisfaction that he never courted popularity, and never practised the art of working for "quick returns" of sympathy or applause.

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  • His popularity among all Liberals was increased by his resignation in 1851, as a protest against the failure of the government to establish the constitution they had promised.

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    0
  • With the Riddara-Sogur they enjoyed great popularity in the 15th century, and gave matter for many Rimur.

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  • Prince Michael's great popularity in consequence of his diplomatic successes alarmed the friends of the exiled Karageorgevich dynasty, more especially when rumours began to circulate that the prince contemplated divorcing his childless wife Julia and remarrying.

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  • In 1780 he was elected to the House of Commons for his native town, his success being due to his personal popularity and his lavish expenditure.

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    0
  • The place owes its popularity as a resort to Lord George Hill (d.

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    0
  • Tandy then took proceedings against the lord lieutenant for issuing a proclamation for his arrest; and although the action failed, it increased Tandy's popularity, and his expenses were paid by the Society of the United Irishmen.

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    0
  • He was an able man, with a special talent for finance, free from all taint of personal corruption, and sincerely solicitous for the honour of Athens, but enslaved to popularity, and without principles of policy.

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    0
  • This adventurer, at once ludicrous and formidable, was a native of Ireland, and was thought to be put forward by Richard to test the popularity of the Yorkist cause.

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  • He endeavoured to define his ideas, and in 1833 published his Reveries politiques, suivies d'un projet de constitution, and Considerations politiques et militaires sur la Suisse; in 1836, as a captain, in the Swiss service, he published a Manuel d'artillerie, in order to win popularity with the French army.

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  • As he well perceived, the popularity of his name, the vague "legend" of a Napoleon who was at once a democrat, a soldier and a revolutionary hero, was his only strength.

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  • He might perhaps have administered successfully, but the exactions he was compelled to enforce by his father soon ruined the popularity of his government and provoked revolts.

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  • Under the fostering care of the margraves of Meissen, and then of the electors of Saxony they attained great popularity.

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  • His popularity and private influence, however, were reasons enough for the court party to mark him for exile; he was not one of them, and could not be depended on.

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  • It was the popularity of these semi-political works, increased by other occasional political articles, and his Rinnovamento civile d'Italia, that caused Gioberti to be welcomed with such enthusiasm on his return to his native country.

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  • xiv.) and thus restored the Law which had been lost; a view which, through the early Christian Fathers, gained currency and has enjoyed a certain popularity to the present day.

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  • Indifference and satiety spread speedily; the bourgeoisie forsook the reformers directly they had recourse to violence (February 1358), and the Parisians became hostile when Etienne Marcel complicated his revolutionary work by intrigues with Navarre, releasing from prison the grandson of Louis X., the Headstrong, an ambitious, fine-spoken courter of popularity, covetous of the royal crown.

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  • Catherine, relieved by the loss of an inconvenient preceptor, and by the disappearance of the other leaders, became mistress of the Catholic party, of whose strength and popularity she had now had proof, and her idea was to make peace at once on the best terms possible.

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  • The victory of Marengo (June 14, i8o0) momentarily in the balance, but secured by Desaix and Kellermann, offered a further opportunity to his jealous ambition by increasing his popularity.

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  • Disorder continuing and a large part of the population being still loyal to him, he was invited to return, and he did so, but accepted the protection of an Austrian army, by which act he forfeited his popularity (July 1849).

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  • The chief causes of his victory over his opponents were his great popularity and the superstitious reverence paid to the episcopal character at that period.

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  • She had even lost the mob popularity which she had once gained by her jovial manners.

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  • Sagasta and the Liberal party would gladly have undertaken the reorganization of Spain and her fi;iances, but the issue of the war and the unavoidable peace treaty had so evidently damaged their popularity in the country and their credit at court, that the government seized the pretext of an adverse division in the Senate to resign.

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  • His personal popularity, too, due partly to his youth and genial manners, was at this time greatly increased by the cool courage he had shown after the dastardly bomb attack made upon him and his young wife, during the wedding procession at Madrid, by the anarchist Matteo Morales.1 Whatever his qualities, the growing entanglement of parliamentary affairs was soon to put them to the test.

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  • Douglas, then still in the heyday of his popularity.

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  • His popularity vanished when his only idea was to ask the assembly for new loans, and in September 1790 he resigned his office, unregretted by a single Frenchman.

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  • This is the true secret of his popularity and of his place in the folk-lore of the Roman poor.

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  • Yet it is largely to this very piecemeal character that its popularity has been due.

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  • The Thousand and One Nights, commonly known in English as The Arabian Nights Entertainments, is a collection of tales written in Arabic, which first became generally known in Europe in the early part of the 18th century through the French translation by Antoine Galland, and rapidly attained universal popularity.

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  • Yet with all their faults the Nights have beauties enough to deserve their popularity, and to us their merit is enhanced by the pleasure we feel in being transported into so entirely novel a state of society.

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  • It is probably in Sibylle and in Julia de Trecceur that he can now be studied to most advantage, though Monsieur de Camors gives a greater sense of power, and though Le Roman d'un jeune homme pauvre still preserves its popularity.

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  • During the long absence of heirs to Louis XVI., " Monsieur," as heir to the throne, courted popularity and took an active part in politics, but the birth of a dauphin (1781) was a blow to his ambitions.

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  • Etretat sprang into popularity during the latter half of the 19th century, largely owing to the frequent references to it in the novels of Alphonse Karr.

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  • His great personal popularity, as the representative Swedish student, did not prevent him, however, from pursuing his studies, and he became an authority on Spinoza.

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  • After the Restoration the importance and wealth of Tenby showed a constant tendency to decline, but towards the close of the 18th century it rose into great popularity as a watering-place, and it has since maintained its reputation as the most picturesque seaside resort of South Wales.

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  • The popularity of this collection is attested by the twenty-three MSS.

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  • Thanks to his popularity with the army, Nicephorus was crowned emperor by the side of Romanus's infant sons, and in spite of the patriarch's opposition married their mother Theophano.

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  • By his heavy imposts and the debasement of the coinage he forfeited his popularity with the rest of the community, and gave rise to riots.

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  • But he overlooked the possibility of increasing the distance between the objectives; Camille Nachet introduced this improvement in 1875, but his instruments did not meet with much popularity.

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  • In England a parish-ale or feast was always held after the perambulation, which assured its popularity, and in Henry VIII.'s reign the occasion had become an excuse for so much revelry that it attracted the condemnation of a preacher who declared "these solemne and accustomable processions and supplications be nowe growen into a right foule and detestable abuse."

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  • In the districts last named well-wooded hills rise above 300 ft., and this is an especially favoured residential quarter, its popularity being formerly increased by the presence of medicinal springs, discovered in 1640, on Sydenham Common.

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  • Due to the immense popularity, all available spaces for September have been taken.

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  • The true proposition cannot be derived because of its popularity.

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  • admitted guilt fleeting popularity of much bigger position.

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  • This meme-driven altruism might even explain the popularity of activities like recycling bottles, in spite of their arguable value.

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  • ambienceelaxing resort is becoming a bit busier as popularity grows, but it still boasts a genteel ambiance and a lovely location.

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  • attained great popularity in the following century.

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  • Part of the reason for the popularity of caffeine-containing beverages is that caffeine is a central nervous stimulant.

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  • The Fairtrade churches movement started in May 2004 and the idea has quickly gained popularity among churches of different denominations across the country.

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  • click throughs and from improving your search engine link popularity ratio.

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  • This isn't a popularity contest, I just save dogs ' lives.

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  • contrived arrangements grew in popularity.

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  • These two crazy critters aren't going anywhere as there popularity crossed the generation gap and continues to entertain kids and adults alike!

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