Pop Sentence Examples

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  • We pop some popcorn and drink some eggnog - just enjoy each other.

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  • I felt something pop in my neck, but I don't think it's serious.

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  • I hope I pop off to someplace fascinating!

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  • Then, after a pause he added, "Before Pop disappeared for good."

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  • He knows you can pop up anywhere, geographically; you've proved that to him.

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  • She's grounded too, but I can just pop in and out.

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  • We don't know that he won't pop back up sometime soon and want it.

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  • Before old Pop Dawkins croaked, those guys hardly spoke to each other.

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  • If he were just missing, you'd always wonder if he was going to pop in.

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  • The frozen sea beneath her feet was the color of tar, the black clouds above paused mid-swirl around a pop of blue sky in the storm's center.

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  • In 1905 West Bay City (pop. 1900, 13,119) and Bay City were consolidated.

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  • Pop. (1900), 141,131; (1905), 162,607 (of whom about 70,000 are Roman Catholics and 6000 Jews).

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  • The modern town of Megara is situated on two low hills which formed part of the ancient site; it is the chief town of the eparchy of Megaris; pop. about 6400.

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  • Pop. (1900) 12,681, of whom 4296 were foreign born; (estimated 1906) 14,085.

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  • Pop. (1890) 10,527; (1900) 11,683, of whom 2131 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 12, 379.

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  • The Russians in Turkestan form only about 5% of the total pop., and since most of the rural Mussulman pop. take no part in the voting, the country is governed to all intents and purposes by men elected by the very small proportion of Russians of the lower classes living in the towns.

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  • Pop. (1890) 15,361; (1900) 17,484, of whom 2750 were foreign-born; (1910) 21,122.

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  • Enniskillen (the county town, pop. 5412) is the only town of importance, the rest being little more than villages.

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  • The actual building dates from the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century, and contains a fine library with a collection of rare manuscripts and incunabula; near it is the small and old town of Tepl (pop. 2789).

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  • Pop. including a large rural district and several villages (1890), 31,498; (1908, estimate), 33,000.

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  • Pop. (1890) 5090; (1900) 6280, including 660 foreign-born; (1910) 6987.

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  • After the city of Adrianople (pop. 1905, about 80,000), which is the capital, the principal towns are Rodosto (35,000), [[Gallipoli (disambiguation)|Gallipoli (25,000), Kirk-Kilisseh (Kirk-Kilisse)|Kirk-Kilisseh]] (16,000), Xanthi (14,000), Chorlu (11,500), Demotica (10,000), Enos (8000), Gumuljina (8000) and Dedeagatch (3000).

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  • The capital and chief port is Lome (pop. about 5000), near the western frontier.

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  • The houses in Uzhitse are quite unlike those of more prosperous Servian towns, being tall, narrow structures of timber, frequently blackened by the damp. Pop. (1900) about 7000.

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  • Pop. (1890) 5195; (190o) 5400 (1127 being foreign-born); (1905, state census) 5378; (1910) 544 6.

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  • Pop. (1904), 2406, of whom 1139 were white.

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  • Pop. (1885) 95,725; (1905) including Burtscheid, 143,906.

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  • Pop. (1900) 2752; (1905, state census) 533 2, of whom 2975 were foreign-born, including 1145 Finns, 676 Austrians and 325 Swedes.

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  • Pop. (1903) 34,454; in 1903, after the census had been taken, the municipality of San Nicolas (pop. 1903, 10,880) was added to Laoag.

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  • It is divided into three districtsNovorossiysk, with the town (pop. in 1897, 16,208) of the same name, which acts as the capital of the Black Sea district; Velyaminovsk; and Sochi.

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  • Pop. (1903) 11,589; after the census enumeration, the town of Guiguinto (pop. 394 8) was annexed.

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  • Pop. (1906) 9749 It possesses iron mines and is the centre of the coal-fields of the Aveyron, which supply the ironworks established by the Duc Decazes, minister of Louis Xviii.

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  • Pop. (1900), 34,188, of which half were Jews.

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  • Pop. (1890) 5919; (1900) 7100, of whom 144 were foreign-born.

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  • Pop. (1 9 01) 3799 The church of the Holy Trinity, one of the most noteworthy in Staffordshire, is principally Early English, and has fine stained glass.

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  • Pop. (1910), about 30,000, of whom nearly one-half were foreign-born or of foreign parentage.

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  • Ardrishaig (pop. 1285), a seaport on the west of the mouth of Loch Gilp, is the east terminus of the Crinan Canal.

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  • Pop. (1890) 4284; (1900) 4922, of whom 1066 were foreign-born; area, about 17 sq.

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  • Pop. (1901) 52,216, showing an increase of io% in the decade.

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  • Pop. (1907) 19,893, of whom about one-third are Copts.

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  • Pop. (1906) 35,543 (town), 67,379 (commune) - a considerable increase, as the population of 1881 was only 34,270 (commune).

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  • The group is of volcanic origin, and includes Palmarola (anc. Palmaria), Zannone (Sinonia), Ventotene (Pandateria, pop. in 1901, 1986) and San Stefano.

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  • Pop. (1860) 23,761; (1897) 35,177, of whom one-half were Jews.

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  • Pop. (1866) 31,779, (1900) 33,607, comprising Great and Little Russians, Bulgarians, Jews and Gipsies.

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  • For administrative purposes the province is divided into eleven districts and one autonomous municipality, Laibach (pop. 36,547), the capital.

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  • In 1903, after the census had been taken, San Ildefonso (pop. 5326) was annexed to San Miguel.

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  • Candia, the former capital and the see of the archbishop of Crete (pop. in 1900, 22,501), is officially styled Herakleion; it is surrounded by remarkable Venetian fortifications and possesses a museum with a valuable collection of objects found at Cnossus, Phaestus, the Idaean cave and elsewhere.

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  • Canea (Xavia), the seat of government since 1840 (pop. 20,972), is built in the Italian style; its walls and interesting galley-slips recall the Venetian period.

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  • Retimo (PEOvyvos) is, like Canea, the see of a bishop (pop. 9 3 11).

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  • The nearest railway station is Luque (pop. 497 2), 4 m.

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  • Pop. (1890), 8914; (1900), 11,544, of whom 1590 were foreign-born; (1910 census) 13,374.

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  • The cotton mills are mostly in the Piedmont Plateau Region; durham|Durham, Durham county, and Winston, Forsyth county, are leading centres of tobacco manufacture; and High Point (pop. in 1900, 4163) in Randolph is noted for its manufacture of furniture.

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  • Pop. (1890) 3901; (1900) 5474; (1905, state census), 6489, of whom 913 were foreign-born.

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  • Mafeking was originally the headquarters of the Barolong tribe of Bechuana and is still their largest station, the native location (pop. 2860) being about a mile distant from the town.

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  • Pop. (1901), 4135 It is in the midst of the oil region of Canada, and numerous wells in the vicinity have an aggregate output of about 30,000,000 gallons of crude oil per annum, much of which is refined in the town.

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  • Pop. (1890) 2530; (1900) 3072; (1905, state census) 6117, of whom 2755 were foreign-born, including 716 Swedes, 689 Finns, 685 Canadians, and 334 Norwegians.

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  • Pop. (1890) 7346; (1900) 6438, of whom 969 were foreign-born.

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  • Pop. (1890) 995 6; (1900) 13,074, of whom 4417 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 14,808.

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  • Pop. (1890) 5611; (1900) 8791, of whom 1397 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 10,699.

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  • Pop. (1900) 10,588, of whom 1804 were foreign-born; (1 9 10 census) 9535 It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways, by interurban electric railways, and by the Illinois & Michigan Canal.

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  • The harbour of Elche is Santa Pola (pop. 4100), situated 6 m.E.S.E.,where the Vinalapo enters the Mediterranean,.

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  • The capital of the territory is Tepic (pop. 1900, 15,488), attractively situated on a small plateau 2 9 50 ft.

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  • The larger vessels enter at Port Tampa (pop. in 1905, 1049), 9 m.

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  • Pop. (1890), 7710; (1900), 11,786, of whom 29 9 8 were foreign-born; (1 9 10 census) 13,027.

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  • The municipal boroughs are Chesterfield (pop. 27,185), Derby, a county borough and the county town (114,848), Glossop (21,526), Ilkeston (2 5,384).

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  • Pop. (1904) 2 433, of whom 1214 were whites.

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  • Pop. (1890) 8090; (1900) 8925, of whom 3473 were foreign-born; (1910) 10,107; area, 27.5 sq.

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  • Pop. (1901), 5102, including the adjacent village of Hakin.

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  • Pop. of urban district (Igo') 3495 It is pleasantly situated in the rich valley of the small river Otter.

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  • This industrial centre is continued eastward in the urban district of East Ham (pop. 96,018), where the old village church of St Mary Magdalene retains Norman portions.

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  • The only towns are Temir-khan-shura (pop. 9208 in 1897), the capital of the government, Derbent (14,821) and Petrovsk (9806), the last two both on the Caspian.

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  • Its more important towns are the capital, Barcelona, Maturin (pop. 14,473), capital.

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  • In 1693 New Castle (pop. 1900, 581), then including the greater part of the present township of Rye, was set apart from Portsmouth, and in 1703 Greenland (pop. 1900, 607) was likewise set apart.

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  • Pop. (1900) 13,134, about 1500 being Jews.

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  • Pop. (1890) S303; (1900) 4686, of whom 881 were foreign-born; (1904, state census) 4852.

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  • For administrative purposes, the province is divided into seven districts, and an autonomous municipality, Klagenfurt (pop. 2 4, 314), the capital.

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  • Pop. (1900) 560,892, (197,129 being foreign born); (1905, state census) 595,580; (1910), 670,585.

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  • Pop. just under 10,000, Moslems being in a slight minority.

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  • Pop. (1890) 81,298; (1900) 108,027, of whom 30,802 were foreign-born, including 10,491 Irish, 5262 Italians, 4743 Germans, 3 1 93 Russians and 1376 Swedes; (1910 census) 133,605.

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  • Pop. (1890), 17,281; (1900), 21,766, of whom 4344 were foreign-born; (1906 estimate), 25,648.

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  • A steel bridge across the Missouri (built in 1872; rebuilt in 1906) connects the city with Elwood, Kansas (pop. 1905, 711), and is used by two railways.

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  • Across the river is Rock Falls (pop. in 1900, 2176), practically a suburb of Sterling, with foundries and machine-shops and manufactories of agricultural implements, barbed wire and bolts and rivets.

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  • Pop. (1890) 5905; (1900) 7786, of whom 723 were foreign-born.

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  • Three miles north-east is the urban district of Ludgvan (pop. 2274), and to the south is Paul (6332), which includes the village of Newlyn.

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  • This village (pop. 3435) is one of the richest lead-mining centres in Europe.

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  • Pop. (1890) 3945; (1900) 7790, of whom a large portion were of Dutch descent; (1904, state census) 8966.

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  • Pop. (1890), 11,414; (1900), 14,079, of whom 374 0 were foreign-born; (1910 census) 14,253; land area, 1 2.97 sq.

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  • Pop. (1890) 23,584; (1900) 31,051, of whom 9337 were foreign-born (6690 Swedes); (1910 census) 45,401.

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  • Pop. (1885), 26,320; (1905) - the area of the town having been increased since 18 9555,676.

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  • After the 1920 census was taken the township of Chartiers, with a pop. of 5,000, was annexed, petitions were filed for the annexation of the borough of Homestead with a pop. of 20,452, and a movement was on foot for the merger of the boroughs of Wilkensburg (24,403), Ingram (4,000), Grafton (5934) and others.

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  • In Allegheny county, of which Pittsburgh is the county seat and business centre, there were in 1920 1,184,832 persons, 13.6% of the total pop. of Pennsylvania.

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  • The area remained as fixed in 1876, but the increasing pop. and industries have spread beyond these limits.

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  • Pop. (1890) 18,020; (1900) 25,656, of whom 4478 were foreign-born, an unusually large and influential part being Bohemians; (estimate, 1906) 29,380.

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  • Daily stages connect the village with Farmville (pop. in 1900, 2471), the county-seat, 6 m.

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  • Across the Ouachita is the town of West Monroe (pop. in 1900, 775).

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  • It was a part of the township of Thomaston (pop. 2688 in 1900), from 1777 to 1848, when it was incorporated as a separate township under the name of East Thomaston.

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  • Pop. (1909) estimated at 24,000, including some 500 Europeans.

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  • Pop. (1890) 27,909; (1900) 34,072, of whom 11,203 were foreign-born; (1910) 32,452.

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  • Pop. (1900) 11,499, of whom 1533 were foreignborn; (1910 census) 13,J46.

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  • Rutland (pop. in 1900, 2914), and Proctor (pop. in 1900, 2136), which were parts of the township of Rutland until 1886.

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  • Pop. of the village (1890) 7014; (1900) 5671, of whom 1092 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 5251; of the township (1900) 8631; (1905) 8217.

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  • Scarborough (pop. 769), the capital, is on the south coast, 8 m.

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  • The chief town and seat of administration is Jibuti (q.v.), pop. about 15,000, which has taken the place of Obok, on the opposite (northern) side of the Gulf of Tajura.

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  • They are Mukdishu (q.v.), pop. about 5000, Brava (4000), Marka (5000), Warsheik (3000) and Yub.

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  • The village of Sheringham (pop. of urban district, 2359), lying to the west, is also frequented by visitors.

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  • Pop. (1890) 4361; (1900) 8241, of whom 407 were foreignborn; (1906, estimate) 10,569.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Pennsylvania railways, and is connected by an electric line with Byesville (pop. in 1900, 1267), about 7 m.

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  • On the south bank of the river is the township and urban district of Cowpen (pop. 17,879), with collieries and glass works; coal is shipped from this point by river.

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  • Pop. (1904), 2903, of whom a third were Griquas.

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  • Pop. (1900), 4526, of whom 1119 were foreignborn; (1910 census), 4894.

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  • Pop. (1895) 9 0, 97 8; (1900) 62,623, Leon ranking fourth in the latter year among the cities of Mexico.

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  • Pop. (1900), 20,967; (1906, estimate), 23,416, of whom many are Indians and cholos.

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  • Pop. (1905), 3735 It has a palace built about 1630 and now converted into a cadet school, a gymnasium and a biological station.

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  • Roanoke was the town of Big Lick (founded about 1852; incorporated in 1874; pop. in 1880, 669) until 1882, when it received its present name; in 1884 it was chartered as a city.

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  • Together with the town of Windermere it forms an urban district (pop. 5061 in 1901), but the two towns were separate until 1gos.

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  • Pop. (1891), 29,296; (igoi), 33373 It owes its popularity to its chalybeate spring and its beautiful situation in a hilly wooded district.

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  • To the north lies the urban district of Southborough (pop. 6977).

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  • Pop. (1900), 4258, including 522 foreignborn; (1910) 14,094.

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  • Pop. (1904), 997, including 144 whites.

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  • The parish lies a few miles south-east of Glasgow, and contains High Blantyre (pop. 2521), Blantyre Works (or Low Blantyre), Stonefield and several villages.

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  • Blantyre Works (pop. 1683) was the birthplace of David Livingstone (1813-1873) and his brother Charles (1821-1873), who as lads were both employed as piecers in a local cotton-mill.

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  • Pop. about 20,000, Mussulmans forming two-thirds.

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  • Pop. (1880) 5591; (1890) 9213; (1900) 11,134, of whom 4376 were foreign-born; (estimated 1906) 12,756.

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  • Pop. (1905) 31,128, of whom 3349 were foreigners.

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  • Pop. (1890) 22,907; (1900) 39,306, of whom 24,746 were males, 14,560 were females; about 10,000 were Hawaiians, 15,000 were Asiatics, and about 5000 were Portuguese.

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  • Pop. (1905), about 5000, of whom the majority are Greeks.

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  • The capital of Tamaulipas is Ciudad Victoria (pop. in 1900, 10,086), a small sierra town on the Monterrey and Tampico railway about 120 m.

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  • Pop. (1890) 12,790; (1900) 13,207, of whom 3298 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 1 3,459.

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  • Buckhurst Hill (an urban district; pop. 4786) lies to the N.E.

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  • Pop. (1890) 2524; (woo) 3250, of whom 764 were foreign-born.

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  • An electric line extends to Grass Valley (pop. in 1900, 47 1 9), 4 m.

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  • Pop. (1901) town 9586, commune 22,996.

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  • It consists principally of one long street (the Roman Watling Street) and the northern suburb of Milton, a separate urban district (pop. 7086), celebrated for its oysters, the fishery of which used to employ a large number of the inhabitants.

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  • In 1903, after the census had been taken, the population of the town was more than doubled by the addition of the municipalities of La Paz (pop. 5724), Mandurriao (pop. 4482), Molo (pop. 8551) and Jaro (pop. 10,681); in 1908 Jaro again became a separate town.

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  • The largest town in Galicia is Corunna (pop. 1900, 43,971) Santiago de Compostela is the ancient capital and an archiepiscopal see; Lugo, Tuy, Mondonedo and Orense are bishoprics.

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  • Pop. (1890) 25,858; (1900) 30,345, of whom 543 6 were foreign-born, 2084 being from Ireland and 1023 from England; (1910) 34,668.

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  • Pop. (1890) 3467; (1900) 5067, of whom 264 were foreign-born.

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  • Pop. (1900) 5930, of whom 1749 were foreign-born.

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  • Pop. (1900) 9491, of whom 621 were foreignborn; (1906, estimate) 11,047.

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  • Pop. (1890) 6218, (1900) 10,541, of whom 343 2 were foreign-born, (1910 census) 12,722.

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  • Pop. (1890), 6200; (1900) 9769, of whom 2020 were foreign-born; (1910 U.S. census) 14,532.

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  • Pop. (1897), 8727, including Russians, Armenians, Turkomans, Persians and Jews.

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  • Pop. 8000 and upward, about one-tenth Christians; except in the official classes, there are no Turks.

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  • The township in which the village is situated and which bears the same name (pop. in 1905, 3614) was settled about 1790 and was separated from the township of Paris in 1795.

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  • Pop. (1910) 8565; (1900) 6901, of whom 1923 were foreign-born; (1905; state census) 7512; area, 12 sq.

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  • Pop. of the municipality (1900), 2 9,33 1, a large percentage being summer residents, as the census was taken late in December; (1902, municipal census), 18, 373.

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  • The royal burgh of Earlsferry (pop. 317) is situated in the parish of Elie, which it adjoins on the west.

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  • Naupactus is an episcopal see; pop. about 2500.

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  • Pop. (1901) 395,570, showing an increase of 17 per cent.

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  • To the south-east of Kbszeg, at the confluence of the Giins with the Raab, is situated the town of Sarvar (pop. 3158), formerly fortified, where in 1526 the first printing press in Hungary was established.

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  • Pop. (1890) 3459; (Igo()) 5319; (1905, state census) 5329, of whom 872 were foreign-born.

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  • Pop. 30,000; Moslems about 20,000, of whom a large proportion are Kizilbash (Shia); Christians (mostly Armenians), 10,000.

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  • Pop. (1904) 2762, of whom 1003 were whites.

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  • Pop. (1901), It is situated about i m.

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  • A mile south of Dunkeld, on the left bank of the Tay, is the village of Birnam (pop. 389), where Sir John Everett Millais, the painter, made his summer residence.

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  • Pop. (1890) 9803; (1900) 13,103, of whom 2165 were foreign-born; (1910, census) 36,550.

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  • To the west lies Granton (pop. 1728), where the 5th duke of Buccleuch constructed a magnificent harbour.

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  • Still farther west lies the village of Cramond (pop. of parish, 3815), at the mouth of the river Almond, where Roman remains have often been found.

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  • Corstorphine (pop. 2725), once noted for its cream and also as a spa, is now to all intents and purposes a western suburb of the capital.

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  • To the south of the metropolis are Colinton (pop. 5499), on the Water of Leith, with several mansions that once belonged to famous men, such as Dreghorn Castle and Bonally Tower; and Currie (pop. 2513), which was a Roman station and near which are Curriehill Castle (held by the rebels against Queen Mary), the ruins of Lennox Tower, and Riccarton, the seat of the GibsonCraigs, one of the best-known Midlothian families.

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  • At Dalmahoy Castle, near Ratho (pop. 1946), the seat of the earl of Morton, are preserved the only extant copy of the bible of the Scottish parliament and the original warrant for committing Queen Mary to Lochleven Castle in Kinross-shire.

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  • Duddingston (pop. 2023), once a quiet village, has become a centre of the distilling and brewing industries.

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  • Liberton (pop. of parish, 7 2 33), a name that recalls the previous existence of a leper's hospital, is prominently situated on the rising ground to the south of Edinburgh, the parish church being a conspicuous landmark.

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  • Adjoining is the village of Gilmerton (pop. 1482), which used to supply Edinburgh with yellow sand, when sanded floors were a feature in the humbler class of houses.

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  • Portobello (pop. 9180), being within 3 m.

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  • Inveresk (pop. 2939), finely situated on the Esk some 6 m.

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  • Lasswade (pop. of parish, 9708), partly in the Pentlands, famous for its oatmeal, was often the summer resort of Edinburgh worthies.

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  • The two most celebrated resorts, however, amongst the environs of Edinburgh are Roslin (pop. 1805) and Hawthornden.

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  • Pop. (1904), 20,073, of whom 6946 were whites.

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  • Pop. (1890) 6553; (1900) 7104, of whom 1134 were foreign-born.

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  • Ladysmith, pop. 5568, ranks next in size.

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  • Guemar (pop. 6885), an ancient fortified town noted for its manufacture of carpets.

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  • Pop. (1890) 26,189; (1900) 30,667, of whom 4018 were foreign-born; and (1910) 50,217.

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  • Among the more important towns are Parras (pop. 6476 in 1 9 00), 9 8 m.

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  • Pop. (1890) 44,654, (1900) 62,559, of whom 28,577 were foreign-born (7058 being Irish, 6999 French Canadians, 5131 English, 2465 German, 1683 English Canadian), and (1910 census) 85,892.

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  • A census of the new State was taken in the spring of 1921, the total pop. being 12,162,900.

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  • Pop. (1900) 159,618, of whom over 80% were Poles, Io% Germans, and 8% Ruthenians; nearly 30% of the population were Jews.

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  • It is in the parish of Llandanwg (pop. in 1901, 931).

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  • Pop. of the city (1899) 3954; of the municipal district 20,246, of whom 10,715 were of mixed races.

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    0
  • Potchefstroom, in the south near the Vaal (pop. 9348), is the oldest town in the Transvaal.

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    0
  • Pop. about 18,000, including a considerable number of British Indians.

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  • The chief towns of Annam are Hue (pop. about 42,000), seat both of the French and native governments, Tourane (pop. about 4000), Phan-Thiet (pop. about 20,000) in the extreme south, Qui-Nhon, and Fai-Fo, a commercial centre to the south of Tourane.

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    0
  • Pop. (1904) 8300 (including troops 1921).

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    0
  • Pop. (1903) 21,008, including the population (7072) of Bustos, which was annexed to Balivag in that year after the census was taken.

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    0
  • Pop. (1895) 318,730; (1900) 360,799, a large proportion of which are Indians; area, 27,222 sq.

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    0
  • The capital, Tuxtla Gutierrez (pop. 9395 in 1900), is on the plateau, 31 m.

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    0
  • Pop. about 4000, of whom a third are Europeans, and some 300 Indians.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890), 10,302; (1900), 12,556, of whom 3394 were foreign-born; (1910 census), 16,267.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1904) 36,839, of whom 21,114 were whites.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1900), 8382, of whom 2006 were foreign-born; (1906 estimate), io,668.

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    0
  • The chief town is Temesvar (pop. 53,033), and other places of importance are Versecz (25,199), Lugos (16,126), Nagybecskerek (26,407), Nagykikinda (24,843) and Pancsova (19,044).

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 24,404, of whom 4710 were foreign-born; (1910 census) 31,433.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 221,682, a large part being Indian.

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    0
  • The capital of the state (since 1882) is Hermosillo (pop. 190o, 17,618), on the Sonora river, 110 m.

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    0
  • Other important towns are Alamos (pop. 1895, 61 9 7), 13 2 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 8723; (1900) 10,477, of whom 1 7 59 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 11,527.

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    0
  • Eshowe (pop. 1904, 1855 of whom 570 were whites) is about 95 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1909 census) 42,779, of whom 541 were Europeans.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1904) 1366, of whom 822 were whites.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890), 13,584; (1900), 7188, of whom 1 2 53 were foreign-born.

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    0
  • The town of Sibulan (pop. in 1903, 8413) was annexed to Dumaguete in 1903, after the census had been taken.

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    0
  • It was not complete but indicated that the pop. was little more than 7,000,000.

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  • Elisabethville (founded 1910), the capital of Katanga, had a white pop. in 1920 of about 1,600.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 4434; (1900) 4377, of whom 547 were foreign-born; (1905) 4148; (1910) 4917.

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    0
  • Pop. of the township (1900) 12,172, of whom 3271 were foreign-born; (1910) 16,463; of the borough (1910) 3886.

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    0
  • Cocentaina (pop. 1900, 7093) is a picturesque and ancient town, 4 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 25,523, half of whom were Jews.

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    0
  • Pop. of the township (1890), 1946; (1900) 4379; of the village (1900), about 2000, greatly increased during the summer season.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 4424; (1900) 5145, of whom 965 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 6663.

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    0
  • Pop. about 1 2,500, including a few Christians.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 3547; (1900) 3987, including 102 foreign-born; (1910) 4430.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 5603, of whom 1731 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 6808.

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    0
  • Pop. (1906) 4499 The town has a belfry, the finest in French Flanders, dating from the middle of the 16th century and restored in the 19th century.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 4848; (1900) 5 9 81, including 1250 foreign-born; (1905, state census) 6879; (1910) 8066.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 13,576, together with the adjoining township of Birkenberg, 19,119, almost exclusively Czech.

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    0
  • Bridgetown (pop. 21,000), the capital, situated on the S.W.

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    0
  • Pop. (1880) 4126; (1890) 10,741; (1900) 20,178, of whom 1081 were foreign-born; (estimate, 1906) 25,842.

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  • The church of St John the Baptist, principally Perpendicular, - has in its tower three bells presented by Charles Both this town and the adjacent urban district of Radstock (pop. 3355) have a considerable trade in coal, which is mined in the vicinity.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890), 3233; (1900), 52 I 6, of whom iii were foreign-born.

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    0
  • Pop. of the township, including the village (1900), 1615; (1905, state census) 1784.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 18,003, nearly all being Roman Catholics.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 6934, of whom 333 were foreign born; (1905, state census) 7727.

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  • Other towns of Tunisia are, on the east coast, Nabeul, pop. about 5000, the ancient Neapolis, noted for the mildness of its climate and its pottery manufactures; Hammamet with 37 00 inhabitants; Monastir (the Ruspina of the Romans), a walled town with 5600 inhabitants and a trade in cereals and oils; Mandiya or Mandia (q.v.; in ancient chronicles called the city of Africa and sometimes the capital of the country) with 8500 inhabitants, the fallen city of the Fatimites, which since the French occupation has risen from its ruins, and has a new harbour (the ancient Cothon or harbour, of Phoenician origin, cut out of the rock is nearly dry but in excellent preservation); and Gabes (Tacape of the Romans, Qabis of the Arabs) on the Syrtis, a group of small villages, with an aggregate population of 16,000, the port of the Shat country and a depot of the esparto trade.

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  • The chief town of the Majerda basin is Beja (pop. 5000), the ancient Vaga, an important corn market.

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    0
  • Pop. (1903) 19,524; subsequently, in October 1903, the town of Banna (pop. 4015) was annexed.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 11, 1 97; (1900) 1 3, 2 55, of whom 5970 were foreign-born; (1904, State census) 11,623.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 25,228; (1900) 35,416, of whom 2 994 were foreign-born, 1065 being of German birth; (1910) 51,913.

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    0
  • The capital is La Serena, and the principal cities are Coquimbo, Ovalle (pop. 5565), and Illapel (3170).

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 132,879, of which three-fourths are Italians, the remainder being composed of Germans, Jews, Greeks, English and French.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (woo) 4927, excluding visitors.

    0
    0
  • Pop. 45,000, including 5000 Christians.

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    0
  • Pop.(r 890) 8756; (1900) 9654, of whom 1136 were foreign-born; (1906 estimate) 11,194.

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    0
  • The capital of the province is SAN Juan, once called SAN Juan DE LA FRONTERA (pop. 1904, estimate, 11,500), in a great bend of the San Juan river, 95 m.

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  • Pop. (1905), 91,124 (including a garrison of 7 500 men), of whom two-thirds are Roman Catholic. The Rhine, which here attains the greatest breadth of its upper course, is crossed by a magnificent bridge of five arches, leading to the opposite town of Castel and by two railway bridges.

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  • Pop. (1890) 9118; (1900) 9 488, of whom 1788 were foreign-born; (1910 census) 9866.

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  • Pop. (1890) 44,007; (I goo) 56,383, of whom 13,470 were foreign-born, including 3696 Germans, 2458 Irish, 1661 Italians and 1165 Welsh; (1910, census) 74,419.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890), 17,565; (1900), 23,914, of whom 2 949 were foreign-born; (1910 census), 35,279.

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    0
  • Pop. (Igoi) town 4951, commune 16,816.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 7269; (1900) 12,392, of whom 2827 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 14,678.

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  • He was seen to the greatest advantage, and was most thoroughly at home, in the debates of the Eton Society, learnedly called " The Literati," and vulgarly " Pop," and in the editorship of the Eton Miscellany.

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  • Pop. (1900) 33,152, including a large Indian element.

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  • It comprises the royal and police burghs of Anstruther Easter (pop. 1190), Anstruther Wester (501) and Kilrenny (2542), and lies 9 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (I goo), 19,704.

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    0
  • New Arad (pop. 6124), situated on the opposite bank of the Maros, is practically a suburb of Arad, with which it is connected by a bridge.

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    0
  • In 1903 the adjacent municipality of Mapandan (pop. in 1903, 4198) was annexed to Magaldán.

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    0
  • Coburg (pop. 1905, 24,289) and Gotha (36,893) are the chief towns of the duchies, to which they respectively give name; the latter is the capital of the united duchy.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 21,933, of which two-thirds are Germans.

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  • The chief towns are Armagh (a city and the county town, pop. 7588), Lurgan (11,782), Portadown (10,092), Tanderagee (1427), Bessbrook (2977) and Keady (1466).

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  • For administrative purposes, the province is divided into 21 districts and 4 towns with autonomous municipalities, namely Graz (pop. 138,370), the capital, Cilli (6743), Marburg (24,501) and Pettau (4227).

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  • Pop. (1901) 9579 It is on a branch from the Chester line of the Great Western railway, and on the Cambrian main line.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1901) 75,760, showing an increase of 9% in the decade.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 27,601; (1900) 42,728, of whom 7127 were foreign-born (3227 being German, 1104 English, and b41 Irish); (1910) 69,067.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890), 20,798; (1900), 25,180, of whom 3 8 43 were foreign-born (1004 German, 941 English Canadian); (1910 census) 31,433.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 4146; (1900) 8448, of whom 2831 were foreign-born; (estimated, 1906) 11,028.

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  • Settled soon after the close of the War of Independence, the township of Barre (pop. in 1900, 334 6) was organized in 1793 and named in honour of Isaac Barre (1726-1802), a defender of American rights in the British parliament.

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    0
  • Pop. (woo), 42,855, mostly Sarts, with Tajiks and Jews.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 6567; (1900) 7010, of whom 5666 (including 1309 foreign-born) were inhabitants of the village of the same name.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 3305; (1900) 4500; (1905, state census) 5657, of whom 1206 were foreign-born, including 461 Norwegians, 411 Danes and 98 Swedes.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 8131, including Neu-Georgswalde, Wiesenthal and Philippsdorf, which form together a single commune.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 7930, of whom 2635 were foreign-born.

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    0
  • Across the Housatonic is the borough of Shelton (pop. 1900, 2837), which is closely related, socially and industrially, to Derby, the two having a joint board of trade.

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    0
  • Pop of urban district, which includes several neighbouring parishes (1901), 16,665.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 9735; (1900) 10,054, of whom 1554 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 10,246.

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    0
  • Geneva College (Reformed Presbyterian, co-educational), established in 1849 at Northwood, Logan county, Ohio, was removed in 1880 to the borough of College Hill (pop. in 1900, 899), 1 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 14,991; (1900) 15,343, of whom 2527 were foreign-born; (1910, census) 20,497.

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    0
  • A neighbouring centre of the serge industry is the urban district of Buckfastleigh (pop. 2520), 3 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1895) 113,165; (1902, official estimate based on civil registry returns) 131,255.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 7016; (1900) 7987, of whom 1355 were foreign born; (1905, state census) 8497.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 161,697, including a large percentage of Indians and mixed bloods.

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    0
  • After the capital the largest city in the state is Cuautla Morelos, or Ciudad Morelos (pop. 6269 in 1900), 27 m.

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    0
  • The capital is Temuco, on the Rio Cautin; pop. (1895) 7078.

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    0
  • The principal village within the forest is Lyndhurst (pop. 2167 in 1901); its church contains a fresco by Lord Leighton, and here is held the verderers' court, which since 1887 has had charge of the crown portion of the forest.

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  • The principal peaks are Rusky Put (4264 ft.), Popadje (5690 ft.), Bistra (5936 ft.), Pop Ivan (6214 ft.), Tomnatik (5035 ft.), Giumaleu (6077 ft.) and Cserna Gora (6505 ft.), the culminating peak of the whole range.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 11,250; (1900) 12,951, of whom 2076 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 13,971.

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    0
  • Pop. (1889), 34, 28 4; (5905), 49,817; there is a considerable German element in the vicinity.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 3545; (190o)' 3126, of whom 547 were foreign-born.

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    0
  • Pop. of parish, which includes East Sheen (1901), 7774.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 30,368, half of which are Jews.

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    0
  • The capital is named after its founder, the Grand Master de la Valette, but from its foundation it has been called Valletta (pop. 1901, 24,685); it contains the palace of the Grand Masters, the magnificent Auberges of the several " Langues " of the Order, the unique cathedral of St John with the tombs of the Knights and magnificent tapestries and marble work; a fine opera house and hospital are conspicuous.

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  • Between the inner fortifications of Valletta and the outer works, across the neck of the peninsula, is the suburb of Floriana (pop. 7278).

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  • To the southeast of Valletta, at the other side of the Grand Harbour, are the cities of Senglea (pop. 8093), Vittoriosa (pop. 8 993); and Cospicua (pop. 12,184); this group is often spoken of as " The Three Cities."

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  • Pop. (1880) 17,317; (1890) 35,005; (1900) 39,647, of whom 42, 72 were foreign-born; (1910), 48,443.

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    0
  • In the village of Lestershire (pop. in 1905, 4 0 35; incorporated in 1892), about 2 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 3746; (1900) 5302, of whom 133 were foreign-born.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 50,093; (1900) 62,139, of whom 7946 were foreign-born, including 1907 from Sweden and 1432 from Germany; (1906, estimate) 78,323.

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  • Estimated pop. about io,000.

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    0
  • The principal town (pop. about 3000) is on the north-west, upon the only harbour (only fit for small steamers), which is fortified.

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  • Bilbao (pop. 83,306), the capital and principal port, and Baracaldo (15,013), an important industrial town, are described'.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 5467; (1900) 5 2 97, of whom 686 were foreign-born.

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    0
  • Stonehouse (pop. 2961), a mining and weaving town about 4 m.

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    0
  • Pop. (1904, estimated) 12,000, chiefly of Indian descent.

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    0
  • It is the seat of a bishopric; pop. (1905) 3182.

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    0
  • Pop. (1905) about 32,000, consisting chiefly of Slays (Serbs and Bulgars), Turks, Albanians and a few gipsies.

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    0
  • Its chief town, Victoria, formerly called Rabato (pop. in 1901, 5 0 57) stands near the middle of the island on one of a cluster of steep conical hills, 31-- m.

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    0
  • Pop. (I goo) 1308.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 14,443; (1900) 16,145, of whom 7,149 were foreign-born (mostly French Canadians); (estimated, 1906) 17,165.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 6083; (1900) 6364, of whom 784 were foreign-born; (1910, U.S. census) 8317.

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    0
  • Across Oneida Creek, to the south-east, in Oneida county, is the village of Oneida Castle (pop. in 1905, 357), situated in the township of Vernon (pop. in 1905, 3072), and the former gathering place of the Oneida Indians, some of whom still live in the township of Vernon and in the city of Oneida.

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  • Syra is also a province of the department of the Cyclades (pop. 1907, 31,939).

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  • Mehun-sur-Yevre (pop. 5227), a town with an active manufacture of porcelain, has a Romanesque church and a château of the 14th century.

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    0
  • The chief cities are Des Moines (pop. in 1905, 75,626), Dubuque (41,941), Davenport (39,797), Sioux City (40,952), Cedar Rapids (28,759), Council Bluffs (25,231) and Burlington (25,318).

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  • Adjoining the town on the south is the village of Oberwaldenburg, pop. (1905) 475 8, with a château and some coal mines.

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    0
  • Icaria (pop. about 8000) derives its name from the legend of Icarus.

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    0
  • Leros (pop. about 3000) was in ancient times a seat of the worship of Artemis.

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  • Nisyros (pop. about 2500) possesses hot sulphur springs.

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  • The seaports of the colony are Tanga (pop. about 6000), Bagamoyo 5000 (with surrounding district some 18,000), Dar-es-Salaam 24,000, Kilwa 5000, (these have separate notices), Pangani, Sadani, Lindi and Mikindani.

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  • Pangani (pop. about 3500) is situated at the mouth of the river of the same name; it serves a district rich in tropical products, and does a thriving trade with Zanzibar and Pemba.

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  • The town (pop. about 4000) is picturesquely situated on the north side of the bay.

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  • Tabora (pop. about 37,000), the chief town of the Wanyamwezi tribes, occupies an important position on the central plateau, being the meeting-place of the trade routes from Tanganyika, Victoria Nyanza and the coast.

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  • On the German coast of Tanganyika are Ujiji, pop. about 14,000, occupying a central position; Usumbura, at the northern end of the lake where is a fort built by the Germans; and Bismarckburg, near the southern end.

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  • Across the Ouzel in Buckinghamshire, where Leighton railway station is situated, is the urban district of Linslade (pop. 2157).

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  • The capital and the residence of the prince is Arolsen (pop. 2811 in 1905) in Waldeck; twelve smaller townships and about one hundred villages are also situated in the county.

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    0
  • The capital is Vitoria (pop. 1900, 30,701), which is the only town with more than 3 500 inhabitants.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 10,514; (1900) 15,029, of whom 2211 were foreignborn; (1906, estimate) 16,577.

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    0
  • Pop. (1880) 11,183, (1890) 50,395, (1900) 102,479, of whom 19,964 were foreign-born; s the growth in population since 1900 has been very rapid and in 1 9 10 it was 31 9, 1 9 8.

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  • In 1909 the township of Wilmington (pop. in 1900, 2983), including the city of San Pedro (pop. in 1900, 1787), Colegrove, a suburb W.N.W.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 18,060; (1900) 21,500, of whom 4577 were foreignborn; (1910 census) 28,946; land area (1906), about 6 sq.

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    0
  • Near the original site of the former, in the town of Santa Clara (pop. 1900, 3650), a suburb of San Jose, now stands Santa Clara College (Jesuit; founded 1851, chartered 1855).

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    0
  • The government of Brookline (pop. in 1905, 2 3,43 6) is an interesting example of the adaptation of the township system to urban conditions.

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    0
  • Pop. (1880), 140,800; (1890), 161,666; (1905), 219,862 (including the incorporated suburbs).

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  • In 1887 the township was divided in population, wealth and area by the creation of the township of North Attleborough - pOp. (1890) 6727; (1900) 7253, of whom 1786 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 7878.

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  • South Portland was part of the old town of Cape Elizabeth (pop. in woo, 887) until March 1895; the legislature granted it a city charter in 1895, which was not accepted by the town until December 1898.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 52,770, including the inhabitants of two suburbs, Mariinsk and Kara-su.

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    0
  • The town (pop. 1901, 12,845) is very ancient, and is said to have been at one time the capital of Arakan.

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    0
  • Pop. of the city (1900), 15,997, of whom 4078 were foreign-born; (1910, census) 25,138; of the township, including the city (1900), 18,839; (1910), 28,836.

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    0
  • Pop. (1904), 862, of whom 99 were Europeans.

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    0
  • Pop. (1905), about 8000, of whom three-fourths are Turks and the remainder Greeks, Jews or Armenians.

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    0
  • Birchington, immediately to the west (pop. 2128), is also a growing resort.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900), 25,141, nearly one-half Jews; the remainder are Little Russians, Poles and a few Armenians.

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    0
  • The village (pop. of urban district in 1901, 781) lies near the head of the lake, on the small river Rothay and the Keswick-Ambleside road, 122 m.

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    0
  • The estimated pop. in 1906 was 1,411,000.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 7141; (1900) 8439, of whom 1074 were foreign-born; (1 9 06, estimate) 921 9.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 3561; (1900) 4157, of whom 573 were foreign-born.

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    0
  • The town (pop. 5000, including about 100 Europeans) is the seat of the customs administration and of the judicial department, and is the largest centre for the trade of the colony.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 26,872; (1900) 35,254, including 8479 foreign-born (6 1 11 German), and 19,230 of foreign parentage (13,294 German); (1905, state census) 39,797; (1910) 43,0 2 8.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 10,424; (1900) 13,667, of whom 5504 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 13,105.

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    0
  • Clinton was a part of Lancaster, now a small farming township (pop. in 1905, 2406), until 1850, when it was set off as an independent township. The earliest settlement goes back to 1645.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 3533; (1900) 2441; this decrease was due to the separation from Camden during the decade of its suburb "Kirkwood," which was re-annexed in 1905.

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    0
  • Pop. (1900) 7061, of whom 986 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 7197.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 9509; (1900) 12,613, of whom 1762 were foreign-born; (1910 census) 15,243.

    0