Poor law sentence example

poor law
  • Hospitals.-The Metropolitan Asylums Board, though established in 1867 purely as a poor-law authority for the relief of the sick, insane Metro- and infirm paupers, has become a central hospital authority for infectious diseases, with power to receive into politan its hospitals persons, who are not paupers, suffering from Asylums fever, smallpox or diphtheria.
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  • Metropolitan borough councils have to obtain the sanction of the Local Government Board to loans for baths, washhouses, public libraries, sanitary conveniences and certain other purposes under the Public Health Acts; for cemeteries the sanction of the Treasury is required, and for all other purposes that of the London County Council; poor law authorities, the metropolitan asylums board, the metropolitan water board and the central (unemployed) body require the sanction of the Local Government Board the receiver for the metropolitan police district that of the Home Office, and the London County Council that of parliament and the Treasury.
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  • The creation, in 1834, of poor law unions, and the establishment, in 1836, of civil registration districts, as a rule coterminous with them, provided a new basis for the taking of a census, and the operations in 1841 were made over accordingly to the supervision of the registrar-general and his staff.
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  • The poor law of the state defines the town poor as those who have gained a settlement in some town or city, by residing there for one year prior to their application for public relief and who are unable to maintain themselves; the county poor as the poor who have not resided in any one town or city for one year before their application for public relief, but have been in some one county for sixty days; and the state poor as all other poor persons within the state.
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  • In December 1868 he was appointed parliamentary secretary to the poor law board.
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  • The problem is very much the same as that met by the British Poor Law system.
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  • We now find him making extracts from the English newspapers on the Poor-Law Bill of 1796; criticising the Prussian land laws, promulgated about the same time; and writing a commentary on Sir James Steuart's Inquiry into the Principles of Political Economy.
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  • The noblest survivals of Buddhism in India are to be found, not among any peculiar body, but in the religion of the people; in that principle of the brotherhood of man, with the reassertion of which each new revival of Hinduism starts; in the asylum which the great Hindu sects afford to women who have fallen victims to caste rules, to the widow and the out-caste; in the gentleness and charity to all men, which takes the place of a poor-law in India, and gives a high significance to the half satirical epithet of the " mild " Hindu.
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  • As a matter of fact the diminution in crime was traceable to general causes, such as a general exodus by emigration, the introduction of a poor law and an increase in the facilities for earning an honest livelihood.
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  • By the Poor Law Act of 1845 parishes were enabled to remove the care of the poor from the minister and the kirksession, in whom it was formerly vested, and to appoint a parochial board with power to assess the ratepayers.
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  • Gradually too stipends for most Scottish parishes were assigned to the ministers out of the yearly teinds; and the Church received - what it retained even down to recent times - the administration both of the public schools and of the Poor Law of Scotland.
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  • From the Poor Law Act of 160r till the act of 1834 by which poor-law administration was transferred to guardians, the beadle in England was an officer of much importance in his capacity of agent for the overseers.
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  • The poor law was also amended, absolute religious liberty was proclaimed, and he even succeeded in inventing and popularizing a national costume which was in general use from 1778 till his death.
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  • As a member of the Royal Commission on the Poor Law he signed the Minority Report.
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  • The areas here given, excepting the Poor Law Union, are those utilized in the Census Returns (see the General Report, 1901).
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  • The Civil Parish is defined (Poor Law Amendment Act 1866) as "a place for which a separate poor-rate is or can be made," but the parish council has local administrative functions beyond the administration of the poor law.
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  • Poor-law unions are groups of parishes for the local administration of the Poor Laws.
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  • Within the unions the local poor-law authorities are the Board of Guardians.
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  • Each civil or " poor law " parish was governed by the vestry and the overseers of the poor, dating from the Poor Law of 1601; the vestry, which dealt with general affairs, being presided over by the rector, and having the churchwardens as its chief officials.
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  • In 1782 Gilbert's Act introduced the grouping of parishes for poor law purposes, and boards of guardians appointed by the justices of the peace.
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  • Reform began with the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, grouping the parishes into Unions, making the boards of guardians mainly elective, and creating a central poor law board in London.
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  • In addition to the grants above mentioned, the county council is required to grant to the guardians of every poor-law union wholly or partly in their county an annual sum for the costs of the officers of the union and of district schools to which the union contributes.
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  • Before the year 1894 the rural district consisted of the area of the poor-law union, exclusive of any urban district which might be within it, and the guardians of the poor were the rural sanitary authority.
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  • They must give notice of any infectious disease to the medical officer of health and to the poor-law relieving officer, and they must give free access for inspection.
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  • No attempt has been made to deal with poor law (q.v.) or education (q.v.).
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  • It passed an Irish poor law and a measure commuting tithes in Ireland into a rent charge.
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  • The poor law of 1838 had made no provision for the relief of the poor outside the workhouse, and outdoor relief was sanctioned by an act of 1847.
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  • The island is further divided into 18 syslur (counties), and these again into 169 hreppur (rapes) or poor-law districts.
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  • The provisions made for the administration of the Poor Law by the act under consideration are very complicated, but roughly it may be said that it was handed over to these new subordinate local bodies.
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  • The famine, emigration and the new poor law nearly got rid of starvation, but the people never became frankly loyal, feeling that they owed more to their own importunity and to their own misfortunes than to the wisdom of their rulers.
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  • The boundaries of the old ecclesiastical parishes are usually identical with those of the township or townships comprised within its precinct; they are determined by usage, in the absence of charters or records, and are evidenced by perambulations, which formerly took place on the "gang-days" in Rogation week, but are now, where they still survive, for the most part held triennially, the Poor-Law Act of 1844 permitting the parish officers to charge the expense on the poor-rate, "provided the perambulations do not occur more than once in three years."
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  • The select committee of 1873, appointed to inquire into parochial boundaries, reported to the effect that the parish bears no definite relation to any other administrative area, except indeed to the poor-law union.
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  • This district may of itself constitute a poor law union; but in the great majority of cases the unions, or areas under the jurisdiction of boards of guardians according to the Poor-Law Amendment Act of 1834, are made up of aggregated poor-law parishes.
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  • Each of these poor-law parishes may represent the extent of an old ecclesiastical parish, or a township separately rated by custom before the practice was stayed in 1819 or separated from a large parish under the act of 1662, or it may represent a chapelry, tything, borough, ward, quarter or hamlet, or other subdivision of the ancient parish, or, under various acts, an area formed by the merger of an extra-parochial place with an adjoining district by the union of detached portions with adjoining parishes, or by the subdivision of a large parish for the better administration of the relief of the poor.
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  • The civil importance of the poor-law parishes may be dated from the introduction of the poor law by the statute of 43 Elizabeth, which directed overseers of the poor to be appointed in every parish, and made the churchwardens into ex-officio overseers.
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  • The Poor Law is restrictive in that by deterrent devices it confines help to relieving destitution.
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  • The Poor Law Commissioners authorized the expenditure of £ 2,200 on its construction which to accommodate 120 inmates.
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  • In 1838, the Poor Law Commissioners approved an expenditure of £ 2,649 on a workhouse for 100 inmates.
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  • Workhouses were built by the Poor Law Unions, committees of mainly local grandees and clergy and paid for by local; taxation.
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  • Return to top of page poorhouses, Poor Law, etc Details of Poor Law Unions in Warwickshire, from Rossbret.
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  • Around 1600, the Elizabethan Poor Law came into effect and lasted more than two centuries.
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  • After 1834 The Bridgwater (occasionally seen spelled as Bridgewater) Poor Law Union formally came into being on 11th May 1836.
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  • In Great Britain nearly all the general and special hospitals and many of the poor-law infirmaries offer systematic professional training to nurses.
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  • In 1864 he was returned to parliament as a Conservative for East Gloucestershire, the county in which his estates of Williamstrip Park were situated; and during 1868 he acted both as parliamentary secretary to the Poor Law Board and as under-secretary for the Home Department.
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  • This office is divided into four departments, dealing with (i.) the business of the Bundesrat, the Rcichstag, the elections, citizenship, passports, the press, and military and naval matters, so far as the last concern the civil authorities; (ii.) purely social matters, such as old age pensions, accident insurance, migration, settlement, poor law administration, &c.; (iii.) sanitary matters, patents, canals, steamship lines, weights and measures; and (iv.) commercial and economic relationssuch as agriculture, industry, commercial treaties and statistics.
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