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pollock

pollock

pollock Sentence Examples

  • As Pollock and Maitland (History of English Law) say "on the whole the charter contains little that is absolutely new.

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  • Pollock and F.

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  • Pollock has taken pains to show how nearly Spinoza approaches certain ideas contained in the modern doctrine of evolution, as for example that of sell-preservation as the determining force in things.

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  • The bishop or, failing him, the metropolitan, was to see such legacies properly paid and applied and might appoint persons to administer the funds (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • 1906, note by Pollock, p. 230; cf.

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  • Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • From the 13th century, however, inclusive, the king's courts insisted on their exclusive jurisdiction in regard to all realty, temporal or " spiritual " (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • In 1231, in such a suit, the bishop of London accepts wager of battle (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • For " misdemeanours," as yet unimportant, he had no exemption from secular jurisdiction (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • Pollock and Maitland, op. cit., as to Normandy).

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  • Stephen, History of the Criminal Law of England (London, 1883); Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law before Edward I.

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  • Thomas Carey contestants (Carey's rebellion) William Glover Edward Hyde, deputy-governor Thomas Pollock, president of the council.

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  • Thomas Pollock, president of the council William Reid, president of the council.

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  • Harrison, Sir Frederick Pollock and Lockyer were among the contributors.

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  • Palgrave, History of the English Commonwealth; Stubbs, Constitutional History of England, i.; Pollock and Maitland, history of English Law, i.; H.

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  • Pollock, The King's Peace (Oxford Lectures); F.

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  • (Cambridge, 1895), written in conjunction with Sir Frederick Pollock.

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  • Though cod is much the most important fish (in 1905 fresh cod were valued at $991,679, and salted cod at $696,928), haddock (fresh, $1,051,910; salted, $17,194), mackerel (value in 1905, including horse mackerel, $970,876), herring (fresh, $266,699; salted, $114,997), pollock ($267,927), hake ($258,438), halibut ($218,232), and many other varieties are taken in great quantities.

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  • - Russell, Arbitration (London, 1906); Annual Practice (London, yearly); Redman, Arbitration (London, 1897) Crewe, Arbitration Act of 1889 (London, 1898); Pollock, On Arbitrators (London, 1906).

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  • Pollock, "Sir Henry Maine and his Work," in Oxford Lectures, &c. (1890); "Sir H.

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  • POLLOCK, the name of an English family which has contributed many important members to the legal and other professions.

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  • David Pollock, who was the son of a Scotsman and built up a prosperous business in London as a saddler, had three distinguished sons: Sir David Pollock (1780-1847), chief justice of Bombay; Sir Jonathan Frederick Pollock, Bart.

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  • (1783-1870), chief baron of the exchequer; and Sir George Pollock, Bart.

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  • Frederick Pollock, who had been senior wrangler at Cambridge, and became F.R.S.

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  • The chief baron's eldest son, Sir William Frederick Pollock, 2nd Bart.

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  • (1815-1888), became a master of the Supreme Court (1846) and queen's remembrancer (1874); his eldest son, Sir Frederick Pollock, 3rd Bart.

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  • The chief baron's fourth son, Sir Charles Edward Pollock (1823-1897), had a successful career at the bar and in 1873 became a judge, being the last survivor of the old barons of the exchequer; he was thrice married and had issue by each wife.

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  • Pollock, 1895; new ed.

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  • Pollock's in the Quarterly Review (1907); G.

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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1898).

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  • The take of 1898 consisted chiefly of cod, haddock, lobsters, mackerel, alewives, pollock and hake, but was valued at only $48,987, which was a decrease of 67% from that of 1889; in 1905 the total take was valued at $51,944, of which $32,575 was the value of lobsters and $8166 was the value of fresh cod-the only other items valued at more than $loon were soft clams ($2770), Irish moss ($2400), alewives, fresh and salted ($1220), and haddock ($1048).

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  • The British army of occupation in southern Afghanistan continued to occupy Kandahar from 1839 till the autumn of 1842, when General Nott marched on Kabul to meet Pollock's advance from Jalalabad.

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  • Pollock and Maitland, Hist.

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  • On its evacuation in 1842 General Pollock destroyed the defences, but they were rebuilt in 1878.

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  • To avenge these disasters and recover the prisoners preparations were made in India on a fitting scale; but it was the 16th of April 1842 before General Pollock could relieve Jalalabad, after forcing the Khyber Pass.

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  • General Pollock, who was marching straight through the Punjab to relieve General Sale, was ordered to penetrate to Kabul, while General Nott was only too glad not to be forbidden to retire from Kandahar through Kabul.

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  • Pollock, there is no warrant for it in English common law.

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  • BIBLIOGRAPHY.-P. Vinogradoff, Villainage in England (Oxford, 1892) Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1895), book ii.

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  • Pollock, ed.

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  • (afterwards Baron) Pollock.

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  • Pollock fully recognized his abilities and they became and remained firm friends.

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  • Benjamin was naturally an apt and useful pupil; for instance, an opinion of Mr Pollock, which for long guided the London police in the exercise of their right to search prisoners, is mentioned by him as having been really composed by Benjamin while he was still his pupil.

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  • Many allusions to his English career will be found in works describing English lawyers of his period, and there are some interesting reminiscences of him by Baron Pollock in the Fortnightly Review for March 1898.

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  • The English version, also dating from 1706, was reprinted by Sir Frederick Pollock at the end of his Spinoza, his Life and Philosophy (1880).

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  • Wolf in the "Life" prefixed to his translation of the Short Treatise (1910), and the greater part of it also in the second edition of Sir Frederick Pollock's Spinoza (1899).

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  • In the following year the same mission, accompanied by the same Persian commissioner proceeded to Seistan, where it remained for more than five weeks, prosecuting its inquiries, until joined by another mission froni India, under Major-General (afterwards Sir Richard) Pollock accompanying the Afghan commissioner.

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  • Pollock, Land Laws (London, 1896); H.

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  • Pollock, "the conception is that mind is the one ultimate reality; not mind as we know it in the complex forms of conscious feeling and thought, but the simpler elements out of which thought and feeling are built up. The hypothetical ultimate element of mind, or atom of mind-stuff, precisely corresponds to the hypothetical atom of matter, being the ultimate fact of which the material atom is the phenomenon.

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  • Pollock (1879); Mathematical Papers, edited by R.

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  • Maine markets more clams than any other state in the Union, and the catches of cod, hake, haddock, smelt, mackerel, swordfish, shad, pollock, cusk, salmon, alewives, eels and halibut are of importance.

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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law, i.

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  • Pollock on evacuating Kabul in 1842 as a record of the treachery of the city.

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  • It was occupied by Sir John Keane in 1839, General Pollock in 1842, and again by Sir Frederick, afterwards Lord Roberts, in 1879.

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  • For legal history see Pollock and Maitlancis history of English Law (2 vols.

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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1895); G.

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  • Pollock and Fraser at the bicentenary commemoration by the British Academy of Locke's death, published in the Proceedings of the Academy (1904).

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  • Pollock.

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  • assistant chief constable agrees with Pollock.

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  • blenny of lobsters, Pollock, Spider crabs, common blennies and a smooth hound - a dog fish to you lot.

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  • Next best includes pollock, Cape hake, coley, herring and line-caught mackerel from Cornwall (in season now ).

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  • A couple of times, we were able to see large shoals of Pollock lit up by light from above.

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  • spatter the blood for a Jackson Pollock.

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  • As Pollock and Maitland (History of English Law) say "on the whole the charter contains little that is absolutely new.

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  • Pollock and F.

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  • Pollock has taken pains to show how nearly Spinoza approaches certain ideas contained in the modern doctrine of evolution, as for example that of sell-preservation as the determining force in things.

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  • All other questions of legitimacy arising in the king's courts were still sent for trial to the bishop and concluded by his certificate (see Pollock and Maitland, Hist.

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  • The bishop or, failing him, the metropolitan, was to see such legacies properly paid and applied and might appoint persons to administer the funds (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • 1906, note by Pollock, p. 230; cf.

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  • Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • From the 13th century, however, inclusive, the king's courts insisted on their exclusive jurisdiction in regard to all realty, temporal or " spiritual " (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • In 1231, in such a suit, the bishop of London accepts wager of battle (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • For " misdemeanours," as yet unimportant, he had no exemption from secular jurisdiction (Pollock and Maitland, op. cit.

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  • Pollock and Maitland, op. cit., as to Normandy).

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  • Stephen, History of the Criminal Law of England (London, 1883); Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law before Edward I.

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  • Thomas Carey contestants (Carey's rebellion) William Glover Edward Hyde, deputy-governor Thomas Pollock, president of the council.

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  • Thomas Pollock, president of the council William Reid, president of the council.

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  • Harrison, Sir Frederick Pollock and Lockyer were among the contributors.

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  • Palgrave, History of the English Commonwealth; Stubbs, Constitutional History of England, i.; Pollock and Maitland, history of English Law, i.; H.

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  • Pollock, The King's Peace (Oxford Lectures); F.

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  • (Cambridge, 1895), written in conjunction with Sir Frederick Pollock.

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  • Though cod is much the most important fish (in 1905 fresh cod were valued at $991,679, and salted cod at $696,928), haddock (fresh, $1,051,910; salted, $17,194), mackerel (value in 1905, including horse mackerel, $970,876), herring (fresh, $266,699; salted, $114,997), pollock ($267,927), hake ($258,438), halibut ($218,232), and many other varieties are taken in great quantities.

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  • - Russell, Arbitration (London, 1906); Annual Practice (London, yearly); Redman, Arbitration (London, 1897) Crewe, Arbitration Act of 1889 (London, 1898); Pollock, On Arbitrators (London, 1906).

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  • Pollock, "Sir Henry Maine and his Work," in Oxford Lectures, &c. (1890); "Sir H.

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  • POLLOCK, the name of an English family which has contributed many important members to the legal and other professions.

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  • David Pollock, who was the son of a Scotsman and built up a prosperous business in London as a saddler, had three distinguished sons: Sir David Pollock (1780-1847), chief justice of Bombay; Sir Jonathan Frederick Pollock, Bart.

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  • (1783-1870), chief baron of the exchequer; and Sir George Pollock, Bart.

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  • Field Marshal Sir George Pollock, who rendered valuable military service in India, and especially in Afghanistan in 1841-1843, ended his days as constable of the Tower of London, and was buried in Westminster Abbey; his baronetcy, created in 1872, descended to his son Frederick (d.

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  • Frederick Pollock, who had been senior wrangler at Cambridge, and became F.R.S.

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  • The chief baron's eldest son, Sir William Frederick Pollock, 2nd Bart.

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  • (1815-1888), became a master of the Supreme Court (1846) and queen's remembrancer (1874); his eldest son, Sir Frederick Pollock, 3rd Bart.

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  • 1845), being the well-known jurist and legal historian, fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and Corpus professor of jurisprudence at Oxford (1883-1903), and the second son, Walter Herries Pollock (b.

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  • The chief baron's third son, George Frederick Pollock (b.

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  • Rivers Pollock (1859-1909), Ernest Murry Pollock, K.C. (b.

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  • Rev. Bertram Pollock (b.

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  • The chief baron's fourth son, Sir Charles Edward Pollock (1823-1897), had a successful career at the bar and in 1873 became a judge, being the last survivor of the old barons of the exchequer; he was thrice married and had issue by each wife.

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  • Pollock, 1895; new ed.

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  • Pollock's in the Quarterly Review (1907); G.

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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1898).

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  • The take of 1898 consisted chiefly of cod, haddock, lobsters, mackerel, alewives, pollock and hake, but was valued at only $48,987, which was a decrease of 67% from that of 1889; in 1905 the total take was valued at $51,944, of which $32,575 was the value of lobsters and $8166 was the value of fresh cod-the only other items valued at more than $loon were soft clams ($2770), Irish moss ($2400), alewives, fresh and salted ($1220), and haddock ($1048).

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  • Pollock, The Popish Plot (1903).

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  • The British army of occupation in southern Afghanistan continued to occupy Kandahar from 1839 till the autumn of 1842, when General Nott marched on Kabul to meet Pollock's advance from Jalalabad.

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  • Pollock and Maitland, Hist.

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  • On its evacuation in 1842 General Pollock destroyed the defences, but they were rebuilt in 1878.

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  • To avenge these disasters and recover the prisoners preparations were made in India on a fitting scale; but it was the 16th of April 1842 before General Pollock could relieve Jalalabad, after forcing the Khyber Pass.

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  • General Pollock, who was marching straight through the Punjab to relieve General Sale, was ordered to penetrate to Kabul, while General Nott was only too glad not to be forbidden to retire from Kandahar through Kabul.

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  • Pollock, there is no warrant for it in English common law.

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  • BIBLIOGRAPHY.-P. Vinogradoff, Villainage in England (Oxford, 1892) Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1895), book ii.

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  • Pollock, ed.

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  • (afterwards Baron) Pollock.

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  • Pollock fully recognized his abilities and they became and remained firm friends.

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  • Benjamin was naturally an apt and useful pupil; for instance, an opinion of Mr Pollock, which for long guided the London police in the exercise of their right to search prisoners, is mentioned by him as having been really composed by Benjamin while he was still his pupil.

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  • Many allusions to his English career will be found in works describing English lawyers of his period, and there are some interesting reminiscences of him by Baron Pollock in the Fortnightly Review for March 1898.

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  • The English version, also dating from 1706, was reprinted by Sir Frederick Pollock at the end of his Spinoza, his Life and Philosophy (1880).

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  • Wolf in the "Life" prefixed to his translation of the Short Treatise (1910), and the greater part of it also in the second edition of Sir Frederick Pollock's Spinoza (1899).

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  • In the following year the same mission, accompanied by the same Persian commissioner proceeded to Seistan, where it remained for more than five weeks, prosecuting its inquiries, until joined by another mission froni India, under Major-General (afterwards Sir Richard) Pollock accompanying the Afghan commissioner.

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  • Pollock, Land Laws (London, 1896); H.

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  • Pollock, "the conception is that mind is the one ultimate reality; not mind as we know it in the complex forms of conscious feeling and thought, but the simpler elements out of which thought and feeling are built up. The hypothetical ultimate element of mind, or atom of mind-stuff, precisely corresponds to the hypothetical atom of matter, being the ultimate fact of which the material atom is the phenomenon.

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  • Pollock (1879); Mathematical Papers, edited by R.

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  • Maine markets more clams than any other state in the Union, and the catches of cod, hake, haddock, smelt, mackerel, swordfish, shad, pollock, cusk, salmon, alewives, eels and halibut are of importance.

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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law, i.

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  • Pollock on evacuating Kabul in 1842 as a record of the treachery of the city.

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  • It was occupied by Sir John Keane in 1839, General Pollock in 1842, and again by Sir Frederick, afterwards Lord Roberts, in 1879.

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  • For legal history see Pollock and Maitlancis history of English Law (2 vols.

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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1895); G.

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  • Pollock and Fraser at the bicentenary commemoration by the British Academy of Locke's death, published in the Proceedings of the Academy (1904).

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  • A couple of times, we were able to see large shoals of Pollock lit up by light from above.

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  • I 'm a puritanical Roundhead really: kill the king - spatter the blood for a Jackson Pollock.

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  • Freedom is what Hoyland owes to US art, exemplified by Jackson Pollock spattering paint across a sheet of canvas on the floor.

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  • Default logic also fails to represent Pollock 's undercutting defeaters.

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  • Salmon, pollock, catfish, and shrimp are among the recommended choices.

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