Pollen sentence examples

pollen
  • Bees store honey and pollen to serve as food for their young.

  • A beekeeper, seeing the bee collect pollen from flowers and carry it to the hive, says that it exists to gather honey.

  • The anthers shed their pollen into this groove, either of themselves or when the pistil is shaken by the insertion of the bee's proboscis.

  • POLLINATION, in botany, the transference of the pollen from the stamen to the receptive surface, or stigma, of the pistil of a flower.

  • 2.Various Stages in the Nuclear Division of the Pollen i Mother-cells of Lilium.

  • A botanist notices that the bee flying with the pollen of a male flower to a pistil fertilizes the latter, and sees in this the purpose of the bee's existence.

  • In such plants, the pollen grains are sometimes fihiform and not spherical in shape.

  • The conclusion at which he arrives is that the pollen is not in all flowering plants necessary for impregnation, for fertile seeds can be produced without its influence.

  • In Mirabilis Jalapa and others the filaments and style finally become intertwined, so that pollen is brought in contact with the stigma.

  • (X 6 times.) The dotted lines with the arrow show the directions in which pollen must be carried to each stigma to ensure full fertility.

  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.

  • Botanists were for a long time content to know that the scattering of the pollen from the anther, and its application to the stigma, were necessary for the production of perfect seed, but the stages of the process of fertilization remained unexplored.

  • The sulphur-like pollen of the pitch pine soon covered the pond and the stones and rotten wood along the shore, so that you could have collected a barrelful.

  • Cross fertilization, or the impregnation of any given flower by pollen from another flower of the same species on the same or on another plant, has been proved to be of great - g advantage to the plant by securing a more FIG.

  • His transcripts were brought to light by Father Pollen, S.

  • Many plants produce, in addition to ordinary open flowers, so-called cleistogamous flowers, which remain permanently closed but which notwithstanding produce fruit; in these the corolla is inconspicuous or absent and the pollen grows from the anther on to the stigma of the same flower.

  • Besides the internal or centripetal growth, some cell-walls are thickened on the outside, such as pollen grains, oospores of Fungi, cells of Peridineae, &c. This centrifugal growth must apparently take place by the activity of protoplasm external to the cell.

  • For them the pollen is an attraction as food, or some other part of the flower offers an inducement to them for a like object.

  • The proboscis, passing down this groove to the spur, becomes dusted with pollen; as it is drawn back, it presses up the lip-like valve of the stigma so that no pollen can enter the stigmatic chamber; but as it enters the next flower it leaves some pollen on the upper surface of the valve, and thus cross-fertilization is effected.

  • terminating the short annual shoot which bears a whorl of four or more leaves below the flower; in this and in some species of the nearly allied genus Trillium (chiefly temperate North America) the flowers have a fetid smell, which together with the dark purple of the ovary and stigmas and frequently also of the stamens and petals, attracts carrion-loving flies, which alight on the stigma and then climb the anthers and become dusted with pollen; the pollen is then carried to the stigmas of another flower.

  • In very many cases the pollen is carried to the stigma by elongation, curvature or some other movement of the filament, the style or stigma, or corolla or some other part of the flower, or by correlated movements of two or more parts.

  • The eggs are deposited in the ovary-wall, usually just below an ovule; after each deposition the moth runs to the top of the pistil and thrusts some pollen into the opening of the stigma.

  • Owing, however, to the close proximity of stigma and anthers, very slight irregularity in the movements of the visiting insect will cause self-pollination, which may also occur by the dropping of pollen from the anthers of the larger stamens on to the stigma.

  • Hybridization can also be readily controlled in the case of tobaccos, and in this connexion it is useful to note that, if pollen is desired of some variety growing at a distance, it will retain its vitality for several weeks if kept perfectly dry, and so can readily be sent by post from one place to another.

  • The flowers appear generally before the leaves and are thus rendered more conspicuous, while passage of pollen by the wind is facilitated.

  • e pt pollen tube.

  • c, The one-celled ovary cut a, The anther, con transversely, having three taining pollen parietal placentas.

  • The insects visit the plant in large numbers, attracted by the foetid smell, and act as carriers of the pollen from one spathe to another.

  • In 1703 Samuel Morland, in a paper read before the Royal Society, stated that the farina (pollen) is a congeries of seminal plants, one of which must be conveyed into every ovum or seed before it can become prolific. In this remarkable statement he seems to anticipate in part the discoveries afterwards made as to pollen tubes, and more particularly the peculiar views promulgated by Schleiden.

  • The ANGIOSFERMS, which are much the larger class, derive their name from the fact that the carpel or carpels form a closed chamber, the ovary, in which the ovules are developedassociated with this is the development of a receptive or stigmatic surface on which the pollen grain is deposited.

  • Bees carry the spores of Scierotinia as they do the pollen of the bilberries, and flies convey the conidia of ergot from grain to grain.

  • Mottier, The Development of the Heterotype Chromosomes in Pollen Mother-cells, Ann.

  • The male gametophyte is represented by one or few cells and, except in a few primitive forms where the male cell still retains the motile character as in the Pteridophyta, is carried passively to the macrospore in a development of the pollen grain, the pollen tube.

  • In such cases the contact of an insect or other body with those processes is sufficient to liberate the pollen often with elastic force, even when the anther itself is not touched.

  • The scales around the throat of the corolla protect the pollen and honey from wet or undesirable visitors, and by their difference in colour from the corolla-lobes, as in the yellow eye of forget-me-not, may serve to indicate the position of the honey.

  • There is a close relation between the pollination of many yuccas and the life of a moth (Pronuba yuccasella); the flowers are open and scented at night when the female moth becomes active, first collecting a load of pollen and then depositing her eggs, generally in a different flower from that which has supplied the pollen.

  • cell, which is non-motile, is carried to the oosphere by means of a pollen tube.

  • Moreover, the pollen, instead of consisting of separate cells or grains, consists of cells aggregated into "pollen-masses," the number varying in different genera, but very generally two, four, or eight, and in many of the genera provided at the base with a strap-shaped stalk or "caudicle" ending in a flattish gland or "viscid disk" like a boy's sucker.

  • They are present from the beginning of the development of the cell-wail, and arise from the spindle fibres, all of which may be continued as connecting threads (endosperm of Tamus communis), or part of them may be overlaid by cellulose lamellae (endosperm of Lilium Martagon), or they may be all overlaid as in pollen mother-cells and pollen grains of Helleborus foetidus.

  • snip off the pollen covered anthers.

  • Pollen may be transferred to the stigma of the same flower - self-pollination (or autogamy), or to the stigma of another flower on the same plant or another plant of the same species - crosspollination (or allogamy).

  • Bees feed on honey and pollen.

  • With respect to the production of hybrids, the genus is remarkable for its power of resisting the influence of foreign pollen, for the seedlings of any species, when crossed, generally resemble that which bears them.

  • In many cases pollen has no effect on the stigma of the same flower, the plants are selfsterile, in other cases external pollen is more effective (pre-potent) than pollen from the same flower; but in a very large number of cases experiment has shown that there is little or no difference between the effects of external pollen and that from the same flower.

  • The former, which is a somewhat less favourable method than the latter, is effected by air-currents, insect agency, the actual contact between stigmas and anthers in neighbouring flowers, where, as in the family Compositae, flowers are closely crowded, or by the fall of the pollen from a (From Darwin's by permission.) FIG.

  • The smoothie menu has non-dairy selections and is backed with healthy additions such as protein powder, bee pollen and ginseng.

  • The anthers are so situated that the pollen on escaping comes into contact with the stigma; in such flowers self-fertilization is compulsory and very effectual, as seeds in profusion are produced.

  • Some importance attaches to the form of the pollen grains; the two principal forms are ellipsoidal with longitudinal bands forming the Convolvulus-type, and a spherical form with a spiny surface known as the Ipomaea-type.

  • See Lampel, Urkundenbuch des Chorherrenstifts Sankt Pollen (Wien, 1891-1901, 2 vols.).

  • Amici discovered the existence of pollen tubes, and he was followed by A.

  • This causes them to be drawn to those flowers in their search of pollen.

  • The spores, as in the heterosporous Pteridophyta, are of two kindsmicrospores (pollen grains) borne in microsporangia (pollen sacs) on special leaves (sporophylls) known as stamens, and macrospores (embryo-sac) borne in macrosporangia (ovules) on sporophylls known as carpels.

  • 7), so called from the seal-like scars on the rhizome of stems of previous seasons, the hanging flowers of which contain no honey, but are visited by bees for the pollen.

  • The general view was, that the embryo originated in the ovule, which was in some obscure manner fertilized by the pollen.

  • The small pendulous bellshaped flowers contain no honey but are visited by bees for the pollen.

  • G, Level of stigma; S, level of anthers; P, N, pollen grains and stigmatic papillae of long-styled form; p, n, ditto of short-styled form.

  • Najas where the pollen grains are rather heavier than water, and sinking down are caught by the stigmas of the extremely simple female flowers.

  • In these the pollen floats on the surface and reaches the stigmas of the female flowers as in Callitriche, Ruppia, Zostera, Elodea.

  • - In these the pollen grains are smooth and light so as to be easily blown about, and are produced in great quantity; the stigmas are brushlike or feathery, and usually long and protruding so as readily to catch the pollen.

  • A male flower has floated alongside a female and one of its anthers, which have opened to set free the pollen, is in contact with a stigma.

  • - A Freycinetia, native of Java, and a species of Bauhinia in Trinidad are visited by bats which transfer the pollen.

  • In small flowers which are crowded at the same level or in flat flowers in which the stigmas and anthers project but little, slugs or snails creeping over their surface may transfer to the stigma the pollen which clings to the slimy foot.

  • aid is sought, and there are also numerous devices for protecting the pollen and nectar from rain and dew or from the visits of those insects which would not serve the purpose of pollen-transference (unbidden guests).'

  • Pollen Flowers.

  • - Pollination I, Flower visited by a humblebee, showing the projection of the curved connective bearing the anther from the helmetshaped upper lip and the deposition of the pollen on the back of the humble-bee.

  • The flowers have an attractive floral envelope, are scented and often contain honey or a large amount of pollen by these means the insect is enticed to visit it.

  • - I, anther; 2, pollen grain of Hollyhock (Althaea rosea) enlarged.

  • The pollen grain bears numerous spines, the dark spots indicate thin places in the outer wall.

  • In Broom there is an explosive machanism; the pressure of the insect visitor on the keel of the corolla causes a sudden release of the stamens and the scattering of a cloud of pollen over its body.

  • Sprengel came very near to appreciating the meaning of cross-pollination in the life of plants when he states that "it seems that Nature is unwilling that any flower should be fertilized by its own pollen."

  • pratense, each whorl of stamens ripens in turn, becoming erect and shedding their pollen; as the anthers wither the filaments bend outwards, and when all the anthers have diverged the stigmas become mature and ready for pollination.

  • self-pollination is rendered possible, since the divisions of the stigma begin to separate before the outer stamens have shed all their pollen; the nearness of the stigmas to the dehiscing anthers favours self-pollination.

  • Self-fertilization occurs when the pollen of a given flower affects the egg-cell of the same individual flower.

  • In the simplest instances the pollen of one flower fertilizes the ovules of another on the same plant, owing to the stamens arriving at maturity in any one flower earlier or later than the pistils.

  • The conveyance of pollen from one flower to another in crossfertilization is effected naturally by the wind, or by the agency of insects and other creatures.

  • The colour and markings of a flower often serve to guide the insects to the honey, in the obtaining of which they are compelled either to remove or to deposit pollen.

  • In wind-fertilized plants the flowers are comparatively inconspicuous and devoid of much attraction for insects; and their pollen is smoother and smaller, and better adapted for transport by the wind, than that of insectfertilized plants, the roughness of which adapts it for attachment to the bodies of insects.

  • In a vinery, tomatohouse or a peach-house it is often good practice at the time of flowering to tap the branches smartly with a stick so as to ensure the dispersal of the pollen.

  • Sometimes more delicate and direct manipulation is required, and the gardener has himself to convey the pollen from one flower to another, for which purpose a small camel's-hair pencil is generally suitable.

  • To prevent self-fertilization, or the access of insects, it is advisable to remove the stamens and even the corolla from the flower to be impregnated, as its own pollen or that of a flower of the same species is often found to be " prepotent."

  • some passion-flowers and rhododendrons, in which a flower is more or less sterile with its own, but fertile with foreign pollen, even when this is from a distinct species.

  • It is a singular circumstance that reciprocal crosses are not always or even often possible; thus, one rhododendron may afford pollen perfectly potent on the stigma of another kind, by the pollen of which latter its own stigma is unaffected.

  • Standard fruit trees must be left to take their chance; and, indeed from the lateness of their flowering, they are generally more injured by blight, and by drenching rains, which wash away the pollen of the flowers, than by the direct effects of cold.

  • Uredospores, septa of Basidiomycetes), spirals, reticulations, rings, &c. (capillitium fibres of Podaxon, Calostoma, Battarrea), occur as in the vessels of higher plants, while sculptured networks, pittings and so forth are as common on fungus-spores as they are on pollen grains.

  • In many cases the slimy masses of spermatia (Uredineae), conidia (Claviceps), basidiospores (Phallus, Coprinus), &c., emit more or less powerful odours, which attract flies or other insects, and it has been shown that bees carry the flagrant oidia of Sclerotinia to the stigma of Vaccinium and infect it, and that flies carry away the foetid spores of Phallus, just as pollen is dispersed by such insects.

  • They are usually included in Oomycetes, but their simple structure, minute size, usually uniciliate zoospores, and their negative characters would justify their retention as a separate group. It contains less than 200 species, chiefly parasitic on or in algae and other water-plants or animals, of various kinds, or in other fungi, seedlings, pollen and higher plants.

  • The conidia are fragrant and are carried by bees to the stigma of the bilberry; here they germinate with the pollen and the hyphae pass with the pollen tubes down the style; the former infect the ovules and produce sclerotia, therein reducing the fruits to a mummified condition.

  • The development of the microsporangia and the contained spores (pollen -grains) P (P g is closely comparable with that of the microsporangia in Gymnosperms or heterosporous ferns.

  • The pollen is set free by the opening (dehiscence) of the anther, generally by means of longitudinal slits, but sometimes by pores, as in the heath family (Ericaceae), or by valves, as in the barberry.

  • If this is so, and the endosperm like the embryo is normally the product of a sexual act, hybridization will give a hybrid endosperm as it does a hybrid embryo, and herein (it is suggested) we may have the explanation of the phenomenon of xenia observed in the mixed endosperms of hybrid races of maize and other plants, regarding which it has only been possible hitherto to assert that they were indications of the extension of the influence of the pollen beyond the egg and its product.

  • A week earlier Mary, without waiting for the necessary papal dispensation (Pollen, Papal Negotiations with Mary Stuart), had publicly married Darnley, who bore the title of king, but never received the crown matrimonial.

  • P, Pollen grains, and N, stig K, Short-styled flowers.

  • 7) for gathering pollen.

  • Each cell is provided with a store of honey and pollen beside which an egg is laid; and after eight or nine cells have been successively built and stored, the whole is covered by a dome-like mass of cement.

  • If this "royal jelly" continue to be given to the grub throughout its life, it will grow into a queen; if the ordinary mixture of honey and digested pollen be substituted, as is usually the case from the fourth day, the grub will become a worker.

  • In his book on the fertilization of flowers, Hermann Muller distinguishes four types of papilionaceous flowers according to the way in which the pollen is applied to the bee: (I) Those in which the stamens and stigma return within the carina and thus admit of repeated visits, such are the clovers, Melilotus and laburnum.

  • The numerous male catkins are generally arranged in dense whorls around the bases of the young shoots; the anther-scales, surmounted by a crest-like appendage, shed their abundant pollen by longitudinal slits; the two ovules at the base of the inner side of each fertile cone-scale develop into a pair of winged seeds, which drop from the opening scales when mature - as in the allied genera.

  • The leaves are rather short, curved, and often twisted; the male catkins, in dense cylindrical whorls, fill the air of the forest with their sulphur-like pollen in May or June, and fecundate the purple female flowers, which, at first sessile and erect, then become recurved on a lengthening stalk; the ovate cones, about the length of the leaves, do not reach maturity until the autumn of the following year, and the seeds are seldom scattered until the third spring; the cone-scales terminate in a pyramidal FIG.

  • This is remarkable in that it contains the first account of any value of the development of the pollen; as also a description of the structure of the pollen-grain, the confirmation of G.

  • The staminate contain 8 to 20 stamens which produce an enormous amount of dusty yellow pollen, some of which gets carried by wind to the protruding stigmas of the pistillate flowers.

  • 18, and Paniceae), and in these the male flower of a spikelet always blooms later than the hermaphrodite, so that its pollen can only effect cross-fertilization upon other spikelets in the same or another plant.

  • 7), but generally the anthers protrude first and discharge the greater part of their pollen before the stigmas appear.

  • The filaments elongate rapidly at flowering-time, and the lightly versatile anthers empty an abundance of finely granular smooth pollen through a longitudinal slit.

  • Thus the species' of wheat are usually selffertilized, but cross-fertilization is possible since the glumes are open above, the stigmas project laterally, and the anthers empty only about one-third of their pollen in their own flower and the rest into the air.

  • Pollen, Father Henry Garnet and the Gunpowder Plot (1888); S.

  • Pollination in cycads has always been described as anemophilous, but according to recent observations by Pearson on South African species it seems probable that, at least in some cases, the pollen is conveyed to the ovules by animal agency.

  • the fertilization of the flowers of one description of wheat by the pollen of another.

  • Under natural circumstances wheat is selffertilized: that is to say, the pollen of any given flower impregnates the stigma and ovule of the same flower; the glumes and coverings of the flower being tightly pressed round the stamens and stigmas in such a way as to prevent the access of insects and to ensure the deposit of the pollen upon the stigmas of the same flower.

  • The stamens of the wheat plant may frequently be seen protruding beyond the glumes, and their position might lead to the inference that cross-fertilization was the rule; but on closer examination it will be found that the anthers are empty or nearly so, and that they are not protruded till after they have deposited the pollen upon the stigma.

  • The glumes have to be separated and the anthers cut away before the pollen is fully formed, care being taken at the same time not to injure the stigma, and specially not to introduce, on the scissors or otherwise, any pollen except that of the variety desired.

  • Thus, De Vilmorin records the presence of turgid wheats among seedlings raised from a common wheat fertilized with the pollen of a hard variety, and spelt wheats among the descendants of a common crossed with a turgid wheat.

  • - Vertical section of the ovule of the Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris) in May of the second year, showing the enlarged embryo-sac b, full of endosperm cells, and pollen-tubes c, penetrating the summit of the nucellus after the pollen has entered the large micropyle.

  • z 1, Flower visited by a bumblebee, showing the projection of the curved connective from the helmet-shaped upper lip and the deposition of the pollen on the back of the bumble-bee.

  • gamous flowers (that is, male, female and hermaphrodite), solitary, in slender, tubular spathes; the male flowers become detached and rise to the surface; the females are raised to the surface when mature, and receive the floating pollen from the male.

  • p, Pollen.

  • The vertical section (A) shows the lower portion of the combs devoted to brood-rearing, the higher and thicker combs being reserved for honey, and midway between the brood and food is stored the pollen required for mixing with honey in feeding the larvae.

  • Launched upon an unknown world, and guided by unerring instinct to the very flowers it seeks, the bee fertilizes fruit and flowers while winging its happy flight among the blossoms, gathering pollen for the nurslings of its own home and honey for the use of man.

  • The earliest pollen is sought out from far and near, and has its immediate effect upon the mother bee of the colony.

  • It also shows sealed honey and pollen in cells, &c. To familiarize himself with the various objects depicted, all of which are drawn from nature, will not only help the reader to understand the different phases of bee-life during the swarming season, but tend to increase the interest of beginners in the pursuit.

  • If pollen is scarce, a substitute in the form of either pea-meal or wheaten flour must be supplied to the bees, as brood-rearing cannot make headway without the nitrogenous element indispensable in the food on which the young are reared.

  • Another indispensable feature of good bee-management is " forethought," coupled with order and neatness; the rule of where pollen (the fertilizing dust of flowers) is P (g)lentiful plentifu FIG.

  • In the early spring stores must be seen to and replenished where required; breeding stimulated when pollen begins to be gathered; and appliances cleaned and prepared for use during the busy season.

  • As the seed develops from the ovule which has been fertilized by the pollen, the essential structures for seed-production are two, viz.

  • 25, f), supporting at its summit the anther (a), consisting of the pollen-sacs which contain the powdery pollen (p), the microspores, which is ultimately discharged therefrom.

  • 26, o), which is the lower portion enclosing the ovules destined to become seeds, and the stigma (g), a portion of loose cellular tissue, the receptive surface on which the pollen is deposited, which is either sessile on the apex of the ovary, as in the poppy, or is separated from it by a prolonged portion called the style (s) .

  • - Stamen, consisting of a filament (stalk) f and an anther a, containing the pollen p, which is discharged through slits in the two lobes of the anther.

  • The honey secreted by flowers attracts insects, which, by conveying the pollen to the stigma, effect fertilization.

  • The function of the stamen is the development and distribution of the pollen.

  • 25 f), and a broader portion, usually of two lobes, termed the anther (a), containing the powdery pollen (p), and supported upon the end of the filament.

  • The anther consists of lobes containing the minute powdery pollen grains, which, when mature, are discharged by a fissure or opening of some sort.

  • The walls of the cells are frequently absorbed, so that when the anther attains maturity the fibres are alone left, and these by their elasticity assist in discharging the pollen.

  • Those central cells are the mother-cells of the pollen, whilst the small-celled layer of tissue external to them becomes the endothecium, the exothecium being formed from the epidermal layer.

  • 72), one only of which contains pollen, the other being imperfectly developed and sterile.

  • 74), where there are two, and Poranthera, where there are four; whilst in the mistletoe the anther has numerous pores for the discharge of the pollen.

  • These variations are intimately connected with the arrangements for transference of pollen.

  • lf, fertile lobe full of pollen; ls, barren lobe without pollen; e, connective; f, filament.

  • - The stamen of the Barberry (Berberis vulgaris), showing one of the valves of the anther (v) curved upwards, bearing the pollen on its inner surface.

  • They then either remain united in fours, or multiples of four, as in some acacias, Periploca graeca and Inga anomala, or separate into individual grains, which by degrees become mature pollen.

  • In some orchids, as Cypripedium, the pollen has its ordinary character of separate grains.

  • The pollen masses (p) are supported on stalks or caudicles (c).

  • The intine is uniform in different kinds of pollen, thin and transparent, and possesses great power of extension.

  • - Pollen of Hollyhock (Althaea rosea), highly magnified.

  • When the perianth (p) expands, the filaments are thrown out with force as at a, so as to scatter the pollen.

  • When the pollen-grains are ripe, the anther dehisces and the pollen is shed.

  • In order that fertilization may be effected the pollen must be conveyed to the stigma of the pistil.

  • 83), the mere elasticity of the filaments is sufficient to effect this; in other plants pollination is effected by the wind, as in most of our forest trees, grasses, &c., and in such cases enormous quantities of pollen are produced.

  • It sometimes bears hairs, which aid in the application of the pollen to the stigma, and are called collecting hairs, as in Campanula, and also in Aster and other Compositae.

  • These hairs, during the upward growth of the style, come into contact with the already ripened pollen, and carry it up along with them, ready to be applied by insects to the mature stigma of other flowers.

  • The length of the style is determined by the relation which should subsist between the position of the stigma and that of the anthers, so as to allow the proper application of the pollen.

  • It consists of loose cellular tissue, and secretes a viscid matter which detains the pollen, and causes it to germinate.

  • The neck of the flask-shaped pollen-chamber projected a little from the micropyle and no doubt received the pollen directly.

  • Some of the pollen-sacs had dehisced, while others still retained their pollen.

  • The amber yields such things as fallen flowers, perfect catkins of oak, pollen grains and fungi.

  • Trials on the regulation of IgE response in mice using modified birch pollen allergens.

  • Poor digestion and a weakened immune system can lead to this pollen allergy.

  • amplification of DNA preserved in fossil pollen.

  • Spring squill has blue anthers, these are the parts on the ends of the stamens which carry the pollen grains.

  • The moment the flower opens, on the plant chosen to be female, snip off the pollen covered anthers.

  • anther development, so no pollen is produced.

  • anther tubes have a collection of pollen grains at their tip.

  • Only a small percentage of people with hay fever develop pollen asthma as well.

  • bee pollen and Eucalyptus honey.

  • The Museum has its own beehive: safe behind glass, you can watch the bees constructing their honeycomb from London pollen.

  • Over-wintering of transgenic sugar beet was found to be a source for dispersal of transgenic pollen [9] .

  • bindweed flower - complete with pollen attached to its hairs!

  • botany students is, What mechanism could explain 50% pollen sterility in a hybrid plant?

  • burst into bloom, they fill the air with pollen.

  • Despite the generally calcareous environment, it is also possible that the samples contain pollen and diatom evidence.

  • The pollen sheds Onto small erect female catkins on the same branch.

  • cedar pollen.

  • cereal pollen numbers increase or feature for the first time.

  • pollen counts are taken during the summer months to warn hay fever sufferers of high levels.

  • cowslip crossed with Pollen of both forms of the Oxlip.

  • Lily Pollen stains gently dab a cello tape onto the stain.

  • Larvae which consume high levels of the pollen do grow poorly and have a higher death rate.

  • Samples of pollen taken from cores bored from deep peat bogs or lake sediments are stratified, with the earliest part lying deepest.

  • Such particles can include small pieces of silica, pollen grains, fungal hyphae and other organic detritus 1.

  • A multi basin study will be carried out using diatom, pigment and pollen analysis.

  • dispersal of transgenic pollen [9] .

  • Bower, MA, 1992, Cereal pollen dispersal: a pilot study.

  • The picture above shows a worker in close-up, with large dollops of pollen sticking to the hind legs.

  • Poisoning gases like ozone are also destroyed along with all allergens such as pollen, dust mite feces and pet dander.

  • Pollen Substitute Toasted soya flour 1 part by weight.

  • Then it starts to follow the dances of foragers and to go out and forage for nectar and pollen itself.

  • I have studied long-term fire history of boreal forests in Finland by using fine resolution pollen and charcoal analyzes of varied lake sediments.

  • In flowering plants, anther s produce pollen which contains male gametes, and the embryo sac within the ovary contains a female gamete.

  • Pollen must be strong to protect the male gametes on their journey.

  • One approach would be to engineer pollen lethality by taking advantage of promoters that are active specifically in the male gametophyte.

  • As the tube grows, the contents of the pollen grain - essentially genetic material - passes down the tube.

  • The male germ cells, called pollen, are produced in a part of the flower called the stamen.

  • pollen grains from a variety of common plants can cause hay fever.

  • grass pollen for their honey, which is supposed to contain a fair dosage of THC.

  • Pollen grains from a variety of common plants can cause hay fever.

  • A unique fusion of fresh bee pollen and eucalyptus honey.

  • honeybee pollen.

  • humming bird to cactus Many flowers rely on insects for pollination, which fly from flower to flower, covered in pollen.

  • Under the microscope, using dark-ground illumination, a single pollen covered filament can be seen to have spiked ridges.

  • sublingual immunotherapy with a standardized grass pollen extract; a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

  • insects for pollination, which fly from flower to flower, covered in pollen.

  • interglacial cycle using pollen data.

  • NBS in the UK supply a special grade of glycerine jelly for mounting pollen which contains a red dye.

  • longhorn bees, which specialize in collecting pollen from wild peas.

  • meadowsweet pollen.

  • milkweed leaves heavily dusted with Bt pollen.

  • muggy air helped to keep the pollen close to the ground.

  • They build and repair the nest and gather nectar and pollen from the flowers.

  • The pollen grains grow down from the stigma to fertilize the ovules in the ovary at the base of the style.

  • Eventually the tip of the pollen tube finds its way through the small hole in the integuments surrounding the ovule and penetrates it.

  • Short-styled oxlip, by pollen of long-styled oxlip: 10 flowers fertilized, did not produce one capsule.

  • Short-styled primrose, by pollen of short-styled oxlip: 8 flowers fertilized, did not produce one capsule.

  • Gymnosperms have mainly paternal (pollen) transmission while most flowering plants seem to have maternal inheritance.

  • Some have the stigma, to which the pollen adheres during pollination, like a little pinhead protruding from the flower.

  • The little devils collect the grass pollen for their honey, which is supposed to contain a fair dosage of THC.

  • This means that any female flower can be fertilized by pollen from any male.

  • Grass pollen affects about 95% of all hay fever sufferers and birch tree pollen affects about 20% .

  • The daily average pollen counts of airborne pollen have been monitored in Tirana since 1995.

  • Or couldn't transgenic pollen be modified to self-destruct when it reaches the air?

  • This has been made possible by radio-carbon analysis augmented with the more recent analysis of fossil pollen.

  • pollen germination.

  • pollen allergens.

  • pollen dispersal.

  • Pollen sac ~ the bag that holds the pollen sac ~ the bag that holds the pollen at top of the filament.

  • pollen allergy.

  • So we see how highly fertile these short-styled plants were when illegitimately fertilized with their own-form pollen by the aid of bees.

  • Impact of Bt corn pollen on monarch butterfly populations: A risk assessment.

  • Those which do have some supporting evidence are saw palmetto and beta-sitosterol plant extracts and rye grass pollen extract.

  • In fact, regular consumption of bee pollen can provide significant relief from allergies.

  • Japanese cedar pollen allergic disease (pollinosis) is the most predominant pollen allergy in Japan.

  • pollen of short-styled oxlip: 8 flowers fertilized, did not produce one capsule.

  • pollen from a mature flower on the same plant can then be transferred onto the young stigma.

  • Pollen tube When a pollen grain lands on the stigma of a flower, it is stimulated to produce a pollen tube When a pollen grain lands on the stigma of a flower, it is stimulated to produce a pollen tube.

  • wind pollinated crops also spread their pollen a good deal further than the guidelines imply.

  • pollinated by the wind, which blows male pollen to the female flowers.

  • The pollen can cause pollinosis (Wodehouse 1971 ).

  • Controlled trial of homeopathic potency, with pollen in hayfever as model.

  • queen bumblebees Bombus terrestris collecting pollen in winter demonstrate the point.

  • ragweed pollen.

  • reconstructed from fossil pollen data.

  • reseda lutea and odorata, many individuals sterile with their own pollen.

  • rosebay willow-herb Chamerion angustifolium; male stage When the flower opens the anthers are beginning to mature and shed pollen.

  • pollen sac ~ the bag that holds the pollen at top of the filament.

  • showy flowers with strong scents rely on insects to carry the pollen.

  • sneezetoms include sneezing, runny nose, watery and itchy eyes, and are often worse when the pollen count is high.

  • Avoiding pollen There may be some useful things you could do, from closing windows to going abroad, or even wearing special spectacles.

  • Under the microscope, an anther can be seen to have many spherical to ellipsoidal pollen grains on its surface.

  • They always have many male stamens, which produce pollen.

  • stamens in the red flowers appeared to have shed their pollen.

  • stimulated to produce a pollen tube.

  • The second is likely to be an increased stringency in requirements for pollen germination to ensure more specificity.

  • Absence of toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis pollen to black swallowtails under field conditions.

  • All pollen grains develop initially in groups of four called tetrads.

  • There is a close association with bird's-foot trefoil, which is probably the main source of pollen.

  • The specific method of pollen transfer from flower to flower in creeping ladies tresses is unknown.

  • The remainder of their journey remained thankfully uneventful, save for various delays caused by pollen on the line.

  • wind-borne pollen.

  • worker bees collect nectar and pollen for the queen and new larvae to eat, and keep the burrow tidy.

  • The sporophylls (stamens and carpels) are generally associated with other leaves, known as the perianth, to form a flower; these subsidiary leaves are protective and attractive in function and their development is correlated with the transport of pollen by insect agency (see ANGI0sPERM5; POLLINATION, and FLOWER).

  • .;.:~~: cilia are grouped along .~ the cytoplasmic anterior D portion of the spiral In Zamia (fig 4 A), Cycas and Ginkgo they consist of large spherical or oval cells with a coiled band of cilia at one end, and ~ ~ a large nucleus which nearly fills the cell They are carried by the pollen tube to the apex of the prothallus, where they are extruded, and by means of their ciba swim through a small quantity .D of liquid, contained in a slight depression to the oosphere.

  • LTTERATURE.The following is a list of a few of the more important papers in which further information and a more complete list of literature will be found: Allen, Nuclear Division in the Pollen Mother-cells of Lilium canadense, Annals of Botany (1905), vol.

  • There is a very wide range in the general structure and arrangement of the parts of the flower, associated with the means for ensuring the transference of pollen; in the simplest cases the flower consists only of a few stamens or carpels, with no enveloping sepals or petals, as in the willow, while in, the more elaborate type each series is represented, the whole forming a complicated structure closely correlated with the size, form and habits of the pollinating agent (see Flower).

  • They are attracted to the flower by its colour or its perfume; they seek, collect or feed on its honey, and while so doing they remove the pollen from the anther and convey it to another flower, there to germinate on the stigma when its tubes travel down the style to the ovary where their contents ultimately fuse with the "oosphere" or immature egg, which becomes in consequence fertilized, and forms a seed which afterwards develops into a new plant (see article Angiosperms).

  • To facilitate the operations of such insects, by compelling them to move in certain lines so as to secure the due removal of the pollen and its subsequent deposit on the right place, the form of the flower and the conformation of its several parts are modified in ways as varied as they are wonderful.

  • In the simplest case the anthers are close to the stigmas, covering these with pollen when they open; this occurs in a number of small annual plants, also in Narcissus, Crocus, &c. In snowdrop and other pendulous flowers the anthers form a cone around the style and the pollen falls on to the underlying stigmas, or in erect flowers the pollen may fall on to the stigmas which lie directly beneath the opening anthers (e.g.

  • species of Cactaceae), or the style bends so that the stigma is brought within the range of the pollen (e.g.

  • - These offer only pollen to their visitors, as species of anemone, poppy, rose, tulip, &c. They are simple in structure and regular in form, and the generally abundant pollen is usually freely exposed.

  • A large bee in probing for honey comes in contact with the end of the short arm of the lever and causes the longer arm to descend and the pollen is deposited on the back of the insect (fig.

  • Insect-pollinated, Entomophilae, a very large class characterized by sticky pollen grains, the surface of which bears spines, warts or other projections (fig.

  • When white Emily Henderson (the race having round pollen grains) is crossed with a blue-flowered pea, purple offspring result.

  • Similarly, when white Emily Henderson (long pollen grains) is crossed with white Emily Henderson (round pollen grains), the offspring wholly consists of the reversionary purple type, and sometimes wholly of a red bicolor form known as "Painted Lady."

  • - In fertilization - the influence in flowering plants of the male-cell in the pollen tube upon the eggcell in the ovule (see Botany) - there are many circumstances of importance horticulturally, to which, therefore, brief reference must be made.

  • The food, too, is always placed in the cell after a fixed routine - first honey disgorged from the mouth, then pollen brushed off the hairs beneath the body (fig.

  • c, Feathered hairs with pollen d, Fore-leg of Apis showing grains, magnified.

  • cabbages, cucumbers, potatoes, &c. In the carnation disease and in certain diseases of tobacco and other plants the seat of bacterial action appears to be the parenchyma, and it may be that Aphides or other piercing insects infect the plants, much as insects convey pollen from plant to plant, or (though in a different way) as mosquitoes infect man with malaria.

  • As with few exceptions the stamen represents a leaf which has been specially developed to bear the pollen or microspores, it is spoken of in comparative morphology as a microsporophyll; similarly the carpels which make up the pistil are the megasporophylls (see Angiosperms).

  • Alan Morley 's observations of queen bumblebees Bombus terrestris collecting pollen in winter demonstrate the point.

  • I just found out a few days ago, that I 'm very allergic to ragweed pollen.

  • The observed distributions are reconstructed from fossil pollen data.

  • Reseda lutea and odorata, many individuals sterile with their own pollen.

  • Rosebay willow-herb Chamerion angustifolium; male stage When the flower opens the anthers are beginning to mature and shed pollen.

  • Plants with showy flowers with strong scents rely on insects to carry the pollen.

  • Symptoms include sneezing, runny nose, watery and itchy eyes, and are often worse when the pollen count is high.

  • However, they also noticed that the turned down stamens in the red flowers appeared to have shed their pollen.

  • Look closely and you might just be able to see pollen at the tips of the stamens of the male tree flowers.

  • Any shading on subjects, such as pollen, should be done using the stipple technique described earlier.

  • Each one has its stigma hanging out to catch any wind-borne pollen.

  • Pollen from wind-pollinated plants can travel very much further.

  • Very high Corylus pollen percentages are often recorded following the creation of woodland clearings.

  • Worker bees collect nectar and pollen for the queen and new larvae to eat, and keep the burrow tidy.

  • There's a high pollen count today, ergo, I will not be going outside because my seasonal allergies have flared up.

  • This could be pollen, grass, dust mites, etc. If you happen to bathe your cat, the absence of dander could also provide him with temporary relief.

  • Everything from kelp to bee pollen can be ground into a cat's food.

  • Cases of asthma will increase as will pollen and ragweed related allergies.

  • Bee pollen - A valuable source of naturally occurring vitamins.

  • Some people also swear by taking bee pollen produced by local bees.

  • Do this under the supervision of your health care provider because it is possible to have a reaction to the bee pollen.

  • Bee pollen can be mixed into yogurt or oatmeal.

  • To find local bee pollen, contact local beekeepers in your area or check at local farmer's markets or health food stores.

  • Whether it's tree pollen, grass, pet dander or another source, allergens often trigger uncomfortable reactions in adults and children alike.

  • Instead of ignoring pet dander or pollen, it mistakenly identifies it as a foreign body such as a virus, and trigger's the body's immune system response to combat it.

  • To combat seasonal pollen allergies, keep windows in your home and car closed and run an air conditioner equipped with an air filter that screens out tiny pollen particles.

  • An air filtering system that scrubs pollen from the air placed in your child's room may also reduce any lingering pollen or dust.

  • Since pollen clings to clothing and hair, have your child change clothing and shower or bathe nightly so she doesn't track pollen into bed.

  • Remove shoes at the door to prevent pollen clinging to the soles from traveling inside, too.

  • Allergies: If the bride or groom, members of the wedding party, or close family members and friends have severe allergies to dust, pollen, flowers, or insects, an outdoor wedding may be less suitable.

  • You see, as the years went on, I became allergic to dogs, cats, dust, pollen and grasses.

  • Does he have pollen, mold or grass allergies?

  • In the spring, seeds, leaf buds and pollen accumulate and cause fungi to grow and attract bugs.

  • Over time, heating and cooling system components can become coated with dust, dirt, pollen and microbes.

  • Metal awnings are easy to maintain and in most cases just need to be hosed off to remove dust, dirt or pollen.

  • You'll also find other staples at this site, such as bulk superfoods, maca root powder, bee pollen granules and green powders.

  • Chamomile can set off an allergic reaction in people that have pollen allergies or are allergic to grass.

  • By definition all natural bee pollen is essentially the materials that bees gather when they collect plant matter for use in making their hives and making honey.

  • More specifically, it is entomophile pollen; male seed from the stamens of flowers.

  • People gather the pollen from the bees as they enter their hives to deposit their collections, using a screen device that brushes it off of their legs.

  • Bee pollen must be harvested from bees and cannot be artificially manufactured.

  • True all natural bee pollen will be a yellow-orange color, not too different from the color of unprocessed honey.

  • Most who buy bee pollen use it as a nutritional supplement.

  • Note that since bee pollen is considered an herbal supplement, statements related to its benefits have not been validated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • Also note that people that are allergic to bees or bee products should not try bee pollen or its byproducts.

  • There are any number of online sources where people can purchase bee pollen, whether as a powder, tablet or capsule.

  • Local Harvest, a site which specializes in natural and locally sourced foods, sells honeybee pollen granules in 8 ounce, one pound, and two pound bags.

  • Durham's Bee Farm sells both bee pollen capsules and bee pollen granules.

  • A complex of bee pollen, propolis and royal jelly, known as Queen's Delight, is also available.

  • It sells free range bee pollen tablets in a six month supply.

  • CC Pollen sells High Desert Bee Pollen in one pound bags.

  • Taking all natural bee pollen as a supplement is pretty easy.

  • Those taking tablets need to follow the instructions on the container, as it depends on the amount of pollen each tablet contains.Children can also take bee pollen.

  • For bee pollen to be considered certified organic it should come from ethically treated bees whose hives are not treated with pesticides.

  • People who are strict vegans do not purchase bee pollen or other bee products because they feel that bees are exploited by being used for commercial purposes.

  • The pollen from a GMO crop could easily mix with non-GMO crops until there were no non-GMO crops left.

  • This actually did occur in Canada when Monsanto was growing a test crop and the pollen blew into surrounding farmer's fields creating genetically modified crops without their permission or knowledge.

  • Modified corn pollen killed not only the corn root worms that it was supposed to kill, it also killed thousands of Monarch butterfly caterpillars.

  • Allergy tests evaluate levels of allergic sensitivity to commonly encountered allergens, which may be foods, pollen, chemicals, or other substances in the environment.

  • It is normal for the immune system to respond to foreign microorganisms and particles, like pollen or dust, by producing antibodies against those substances.

  • Common inhaled allergens include pollen, dust, cat dander, and insect parts from tiny house mites.

  • Monitor weather and seasonal changes in an effort to minimize exposure to pollen.

  • Schedule outdoor playtime or exercise at non-peak pollen periods, such as afternoons or early evening.

  • Common allergens include dog and cat hair, dust mites, grass and tree pollen, and molds and mildew.

  • Conjunctivitis may also be caused by environmental hazards, such as wind, smoke, dust, and allergic reactions caused by pollen, dust, or grass.

  • Allergic rhinitis is caused by allergens such as pollen, animal dander, dust mites, or grass.

  • Unlike most other allergens, such as pollen or mold spores, drug molecules often are too small to be detected by the immune system.

  • Honey intolerance and bee pollen administration have also been suggested as a causative agent for EG.

  • In fact, the term hay fever is really a misnomer, since allergy to grass pollen is only one cause of symptoms for most children.

  • Normally, the immune system responds to foreign microorganisms, or particles like pollen or dust, by producing specific proteins, called antibodies.

  • Seasonal AR is most commonly caused by grass and tree pollens, since their pollen is produced in large amounts and is dispersed by the wind.

  • Showy flowers like roses or lilacs that attract insects produce a sticky pollen that is less likely to become airborne.

  • Different plants release their pollen at different times of the year, so seasonal AR sufferers may be most affected in spring, summer, or fall, depending on which plants provoke a response.

  • The amount of pollen in the air is reflected in the pollen count, often broadcast on the daily news during allergy season.

  • Pollen counts tend to be lower after a good rain that washes the pollen out of the air and higher on warm, dry, windy days.

  • Bee pollen may also be effective in alleviating or eliminating AR symptoms.

  • Reducing exposure to pollen may improve symptoms of seasonal AR.

  • Moving to a region with lower pollen levels is rarely effective, since new allergies often develop in children.

  • Many patients with asthma are prone to react to such "foreign" substances as pollen, house dust mites, or animal dander.

  • For example, childhood ragweed allergy may progress to year-round dust and pollen allergy.

  • Local weather reports on television and on Web sites provide detailed allergen maps of pollen and mold/mildew spores.

  • Allergic rhinitis-Swelling and inflammation of the nasal membranes caused by sensitivity to airborne matter like pollen or cat hair.

  • Limit the child's exposure to dust, pollen, and animal dander.

  • Some doctors recommend installing special filters in the house to remove dust and pollen from the air, removing carpets from the floors, or encasing mattresses and pillows with special covers to control dust mites.

  • Carb products, notably energy bars and drinks, often come with some Ginseng, bee pollen, creatine and more fringe-esque energy supplements.

  • Are you interested in taking a bee pollen powder supplement?

  • Bee pollen is made when bees gather pollen from flowers and then process it into a form that's easier for them to deal with.

  • Pollen starts life as a microscopic powder, but bees mix it with a few other substances to pack it into a thicker, more granular form that is easier to carry and store.

  • The pollen is then digested by the colony and turned into honey, which can keep indefinitely.

  • As a supplement, bee pollen is very high in all sorts of important nutrients; it has to be if bees are going to rely on it as their primary nutritional source!

  • Bee pollen is full of protein, carbohydrates, iron, magnesium, and other trace minerals.

  • Where pollen truly shines, though, is in its antioxidant content.

  • When combined with a healthy lifestyle that includes a good diet, plenty of water and an adequate sleep schedule, bee pollen can help you look and feel younger.

  • There are many brands of bee pollen to choose from, and you need to decide which is right for your particular needs.

  • Now Foods sell a great bee pollen product which can be found at most natural and health foods stores.

  • If you want to buy bee pollen, you can usually find it at local health food stores.

  • Bee pollen can be used to treat allergies by helping to build your body's defenses against the allergen particles, but if you have a known pollen allergy, you should talk to a health care provider before you begin taking the supplement.

  • If you are taking bee pollen (or any other supplement) and begin to notice the symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, contact a physician immediately!

  • Bee Pollen Secrets is an entire website dedicated to this wonder food.

  • House of Nutrition has an article about the benefits of bee pollen.

  • MotherNature.com talks about bee pollen and what it can do for you.

  • The US National Library of Medicine has a fact sheet about bee pollen.

  • Natural News talks about how bee pollen can potentially increase your sex drive.

  • Here is a case study about one rare side effect that can occur from taking bee pollen.

  • More and more Americans are choosing to benefit from all-natural bee pollen granules supplement.

  • So what's all the buzz about bee pollen?

  • Well, bee pollen is a very unique substance - it actually contains all of the vitamins and minerals needed to sustain life.

  • In studies, mice fed only bee pollen thrived and remained healthy for an indefinite period of time.

  • Forty percent of bee pollen consists of protein, and the human body has to do little to break this type of protein down, making bee pollen very easy to digest and good for the metabolism.

  • In addition to containing 96 different nutrients, bee pollen combines 22 amino acids, vitamin C, B-complex and folic acid, polyunsaturated fatty acids, enzymes, and carotene - all major antioxidants.

  • Bee pollen in its pure form consists of mainly indigestible, chewy husks - so the pollen must be processed into a supplement form.

  • Bee pollen can be bought in capsule form or powder form.

  • However, these forms also require the bee pollen to go through a longer, more intense manufacturing process; causing the bee pollen to lose some of its potency.

  • On the other hand, bee pollen granules are only slightly processed and highly potent.

  • This also allows the bee pollen to retain more of its natural, beneficial properties.

  • First you must soak your bee pollen granules supplement in juice or water for about twelve hours.

  • This will crack the shells of the individual grains of pollen and allow the bee pollen to be easily absorbed by your body.

  • Once you start taking your bee pollen supplement, what positive effects can you expect?

  • Strengthens immune system - Bee pollen has both mono and polyunsaturated fats, proteins, vitamins B, C, D, E, and beta-carotene, calcium, magnesium, selenium, nucleic acids, lecithin, and cysteine.

  • Helps allergies - Some allergists prescribe bee pollen to help lower sensitivity to local plant pollens.

  • Cope with stress - Bee pollen is a mood regulator and contains the perfect mix of chemicals and amino acids that promote feelings of serenity.

  • Increase endurance and performance - Bee pollen has bee used by athletes for years as it gives them more energy and helps them perform their sport better.

  • Prevents cancer - The potent concoction of antioxidants in bee pollen work together to prevent cancers.

  • Anti-aging - Bee pollen has several rejuvenating properties, which combat the effects of aging.

  • Bee pollen only has one mild side effect and that is an upset stomach.

  • However, a major danger of bee pollen, although it is not considered a side effect, is an allergic reaction.

  • Taking a few precautions can minimize the risks of an allergic reaction to bee pollen.

  • First and foremost if you're allergic to bee stings, never take bee pollen.

  • Secondly, try only a little bee pollen at first, and gradually increase the amounts.

  • If you experience any symptoms of allergies, then stop taking the pollen.

  • Bee pollen granules are the most potent bee pollen supplement you can buy.

  • Bee pollen granules are also highly beneficial and can be found in most health food stores and vitamin retailers.

  • The reasons for this line of thought are perfectly clear: no matter how spic-and-span your home might be, dust particles, pet dander, and pollen will remain in the air.

  • A quality filter is capable of taking care of several different types of pollutants, such as mold, pollen, and dust mites.

  • This innovative model captures 99.97% of dust, allergens, dander, pollen and smoke from the air.

  • This model will capture 99% of dust, allergens, pet dander, pollen and smoke from the air as they pass through its filter.

  • These particulates can range from simple dust or pollen to mold and mildew as well as dust mites.

  • Since this stage removes the pollen from the herbs being ground, it is sometimes referred to as a pollinator.

  • Asthmatics and allergy sufferers are highly sensitive to dust, pollen and mold particles in the air, and can result in acute bronchitis, asthma attacks and susceptibility to respiratory infections.

  • This includes pollen, smoke, dust, mold and pet dander.

  • An air ionizer creates negatively charged ions which bond to the positively charged particles, which can include dust, pollen, smoke, bacteria and other allergens.

  • Air ionizers use electricity to discharge electrons into the air which attach themselves to positively-charged particles like dust, pollen and other pollutants.

  • The Windmere air ionizer, Model WE5007, features a HEPA carbon filter to help trap dust, pollen and other positively charged airborne particles.

  • The gadgets are also favored by those with asthma or allergies aggravated by airborne allergens like pollen and dust.

  • An ionic air purifier works by removing pollutants such as dust, dander and pollen from the air in your home.

  • It is designed to trap the smallest particles of dust and allergens such as pollen.

  • The real flowers, located at the base of each bract cluster, should be young and fresh, without any yellow pollen visible.

  • Gluten intolerance is a function of an allergic reaction similar to ragweed, pollen, or pet dander.

  • For example, manyorbs turn out to be particles of dust, pollen or moisture in the air.

  • For example, imagine parting the petals of a lily into four butterfly wings, and creating the butterfly body and antennae from the pollen stamens.

  • Since the air is being re-circulated it is easy to understand that microbes, dust, and pollen in the atmosphere will end up in your air ducts.

  • It resembles Juncaceae in the general plan of the flower, which, however, has become much more elaborate and varied in the form and colour of its perianth in association with transmission of pollen by insect agency; a link between the two orders is found in the group of Australian genera referred to above under Asphodeloideae.

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