Politics Sentence Examples

politics
  • The politics are changing slowly.

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  • Everything we understood about the world and politics changed.

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  • In politics he was a Democrat.

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  • You are cut out for politics and betrayal.

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  • Some of the guests might be important to his future in politics and he was dressed to impress.

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  • Despite his hatred for the politics, he knew he needed the Council's help.

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  • It was simply idle conversation about everything from the weather to politics.

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  • Right now, she didn't want the politics.

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  • Ferdinand de Lesseps steadily endeavoured to keep out of politics.

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  • With the opening of the diet in 1890, politics again obtruded themselves into newspaper columns, but as practical living issues now occupied attention, readers were no longer wearied by the abstract homilies of former days.

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  • The woman he married would have to pattern her life to the fickle fate of politics.

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  • To this chair was soon added that of Greek and politics.

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  • In this, and in some matters of home politics, the king disagreed with his ministers.

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  • With secular politics he had little to do, and he was never admitted to Elizabeth's privy council.

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  • But here we may point out the influence of the expedition on Egypt, on European politics and on the fortunes of Bonaparte.

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  • He was thought to be merely amusing himself with politics.

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  • The department he specially cultivated was that of continental history and foreign politics.

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  • Aristotle's brief suggestions respect ing the origin of society and governments in the Politics show a leaning to a naturalistic interpretation of human history as a development conditioned by growing necessities.

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  • Until the country had completely recovered from the exhaustion of the Crimean War the government remained in the back ground of European politics.

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  • A new factor now became apparent in Cretan politics.

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  • It is only by reference to the prevailing ideas in philosophy and politics that we can discover what was in the minds of their authors.

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  • But ecclesiastical politics gave him an infinity of trouble.

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  • There would perhaps have been more general satisfaction with the results of Mr. Churchill's undoubtedly energetic and patriotic administration at the Admiralty, if he had not shown himself so vehement a partisan in internal politics.

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  • These productions - incomparably the most remarkable and most absolutely good fruit of his genius - were usually composed as pamphlets, with a purpose of polemic in religion, politics, or what not.

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  • It was Whig in politics and Nonconformist in theology.

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  • From 1677 onwards William had carefully watched the politics of England.

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  • He took a narrow and monastic view of current politics; he was seldom in touch with the leading statesmen of his day.

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  • Towards the end of his life he devoted himself mainly to literary and general criticism, and was for many years one of the ablest contributors to He was a frequent visitor to England, and took a lively interest in English politics and literature.

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  • As a young man Henry had been chivalrous and adventurous, and in politics anxious for good government and justice.

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  • Not until the silver currency question became a political issue did Nevada take a prominent part in national politics.

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  • He kept in touch, however, with foreign politics, and having refused to join the ministry of George Canning in 1827, became a member of the cabinet of the duke of Wellington as 'chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster in January 1828.

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  • In politics Nordin was a royalist from pure conviction.

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  • He left the regiment La Fere with regret on the 14th of June 1791; but at Valence he renewed former friendships and plunged into politics with greater ardour.

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  • In the sphere of European diplomacy, no less than in that of French politics, the results of the coup d'etat of Fructidor were momentous.

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  • The solitary and desolate frontier life became now more dreary than ever; he flung himself into politics the only outside resource open to him, and his long and eventful public career began.

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  • He strove to make literature ancillary to politics and to objects of practical utility, and thus started prose literature on the chief lines that it afterwards followed.

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  • Yet he has great value as a painter of historical portraits, some of them those of his contemporaries,and as an author who had been a political partisan and had taken some part in making history before undertaking to write it; and he gives us, from the popular side, the views of a contemporary on the politics of the time.

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  • After the fall of Napoleon he took part in Wurttemberg politics, was expelled from Stuttgart and Heidelberg, and soon afterwards arrested at Frankfurt, delivered over to the Prussian authorities and condemned to fourteen years' fortress imprisonment for his alleged publication of state secrets in his memoirs.

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  • Thomas, who reigned until 1222, was a Ghibelline in politics and greatly increased the importance of Savoy, for he was created Imperial Vicar and acquired important extensions of territory in the Bugey, Vaud and Romont to the west of the Alps, and Carignano, Pinerolo, Moncalieri and Vigone to the east; he also exercised sway over Geneva, Albenga, Savona and Saluzzo.

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  • He continued, however, to take a warm interest in politics, both home and foreign, and especially in the war against France, of which he was an enthusiastic supporter.

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  • Edward Blake from Canadian politics to accept a seat in the British parliament as a member of the Home Rule party.

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  • The Politics (B 10) mentions as having happened lately (vecouri) the expedition of Phalaecus to Crete, which occurred towards the end of the Sacred War in 346.

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  • She declared that in politics a capable ruler must be guided by "circumstances, conjectures and conjunctions."

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  • Judged by its influence on Bosnian politics, the Orthodox community was relatively unimportant at the Turkish conquest; and its subsequent growth is perhaps due to the official recognition of the Greek Church, as the representative of Christianity in Turkey.

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  • The various parties meanwhile had split up into some half a dozen sub-sections; but the expected fusion of the party of independence and the government fell through, and the barren struggle continued till the celebration of the millennium of the foundation of the monarchy produced for some months a lull in politics.

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  • Caussin was sent into Brittany, and the judicious and learned Jesuit, Jacques Sirmond, who succeeded him, kept clear of politics.

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  • Like all statesmen of his time, Richelieu made money out of politics.

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  • Disunion had reduced the Yugosla y s to an almost negligible quantity in Balkan politics.

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  • Among the Yugosla y s the students had always dabbled unduly in politics, and this tend-.

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  • Prague, Val in Zagreb and Jedinstvo in Spalato - which advocated more radical action alike in politics and literature.

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  • During 1919 internal politics centred in a struggle between the Radicals, who still possessed the best party machine and stood for a narrowly Serbian as opposed to a Yugoslav programme, and the newly constituted Democratic party, which absorbed most of the Serbian Opposition parties, the old Serbo-Croat coalition of Zagreb, and the Slovene Liberals.

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  • In internal politics he became, by degrees, the absolute ruler of the country.

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  • In the troublous state of European politics the earl's conduct and experience were more useful abroad than at home, and he was sent to the Hague as ambassador a second time.

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  • Deafness, however, was gradually affecting him, and he withdrew little by little from society and the practice of politics.

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  • Henceforward he neglected politics, and Louis of France ceased to consider him as a political factor.

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  • For some time he took little part in active politics, chiefly on account of his growing blindness.

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  • If in regard to France his policy appeared to lack suavity and circumspection, it must be remembered that the French republic was then engaged in active anti-Italian schemes and was working, both at the Vatican and in the sphere of colonial politics, to create a situation that should compel Italy to bow to French exigencies and to abandon the Triple Alliance.

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  • In imperial politics Albert was fairly active.

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  • The Athenian siege (415-13) is of the deepest importance for the topography of Syracuse, and it throws some light on the internal politics.

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  • Lamartine was in Switzerland, not in Paris, at the time of the Revolution of July, and, though he, put forth a pamphlet on "Rational Policy," he did not at that crisis take any active part in politics, refusing, however, to continue his diplomatic services under the new government.

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  • Like many other French histories, it was a pamphlet as well as a chronicle, and the subjects of Lamartine's pen became his models in politics.

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  • The result of the two years was undoubtedly to revive the confidence of the Opposition, who found that they had outlived the criticisms of the general election, and both on the question of tariff reform and on matters of general politics were again holding their own.

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  • Giry took a keen interest in politics, joining the republican party and writing numerous articles in the republican newspapers, mainly on historical subjects.

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  • The difficulty he found in obtaining supplies was very great, for the coast towns - and notably Bilbao - were constitutional in politics.

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  • He next entered into relations with the family of Bonaparte, and in 1799, after the 18th Brumaire, again entered politics, becoming successively prefect of the lower Seine, councillor of state, and finance minister to Jerome Bonaparte, king of Westphalia.

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  • Opposition to France was the inspiring principle of the Historisches Journal founded by him in 1799-1800, which once more held up English institutions as the model, and became in Germany the mouthpiece of British policy towards the revolutionary aggressions of the French republic. In 1801 he ceased the publication of the Journal, because he disliked the regularity of journalism, and issued instead, under the title Beitrdge zur Geschichte, &c., a series of essays on contemporary politics.

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  • In 1785 his father retired, leaving the direction of the business to Pierre and his two brothers, but in 1788 Pierre turned aside to politics, and was sent by his fellow-citizens as deputy suppleant to Versailles, where he was little more than a spectator.

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  • In politics, while he held aloof from the clubs, and even from parties, he was an ardent defender of the new institutions.

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  • The hour of Bestuzhev's triumph coincided with the peace congress of Aixla-Chapelle, which altered the whole situation of European politics and introduced fresh combinations, the breaking away of Prussia from France and a rapprochement between England and Prussia, with the inevitable corollary of an alliance between France and the enemies of Prussia.

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  • After studying law he soon entered politics, and was on the staff of the ministry of justice after the revolution of February 1848.

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  • His Theorie des lois civiles (London, 1767) is a vigorous defence of absolutism and attack on the politics of Montesquieu.

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  • Layard now turned to politics.

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  • He studied law, and was called to the bar at Paris, but soon went into politics, contributing to various newspapers, particularly to the Temps.

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  • On his death in 1897 his nephew Abdul-Aziz, son of the murdered amir Matab, succeeded; during his reign a new element has been introduced into Nejd politics by the rising importance of Kuwet (Koweit) and the attempts R t g P () P history.

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  • The commercial relations with the North cannot be regarded as an important element in the union of the Hanse towns, but the geographical position of the Scandinavian countries, especially that of Denmark, commanding the Sound which gives access to the Baltic, compelled a close attention to Scandinavian politics on the part of Lubeck and the League and thus by necessitating combined political action in defence of Hanseatic sea-power exercised a unifying influence.

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  • He studied law with the intention of becoming an advocate, but soon became absorbed in politics.

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  • He was also, as he tells us himself, alderman of a London ward and an active partisan in municipal politics.

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  • For ten years he practised his profession with success, and with only casual interest in politics.

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  • Arequipa, like Cordoba and Chuquisaca, is a stronghold of clericalism and exercises a decisive influence in politics as well as in church matters.

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  • Hitherto Grant had taken little part in politics.

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  • She was educated, principally, by the learned Johannes Matthiae, in as masculine a way as possible, while the great Oxenstjerna himself instructed her in politics.

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  • Its editors were Numa Morikage, Shimada Saburo and Koizuka Ryu, all destined to become celebrated not only in the field of journalism but also in that of politics.

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  • Defoe's Review (1704-1713) dealt chiefly with politics and commerce, but the introduction in it of what its editor fittingly termed the "scandalous club " was another step nearer the papers of Steele and the periodical essayists, the first attempts to create an organized popular opinion in matters of taste and manners.

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  • It has always remained Liberal in literature and Conservative in politics.

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  • It was Radical in politics, and had Roebuck as one of its founders.

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  • The first attempt to carry on an American review was made by Robert Walsh in 1811 at Philadelphia with the quarterly American Review of History and Politics, which lasted only a couple of years.

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  • Simms in defence of the politics and finance of the South, enjoyed a shorter career.

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century we find the Erlanger Literaturzeitung (1799-1810), which had replaced a Gelehrte Zeitung (1746); the Leipziger Literaturzeitung (1800-1834); the Heidelbergische Jahrbucher der Literatur (1808-1872); and the Wiener Literaturzeitung (1813-1816), followed by the Wiener Jahrbucher der Literatur (1818-1848), both of which received government support and resembled the English Quarterly Review in their conservative politics and high literary tone.

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  • During the eight years between his expulsion from office in 1774 and the fall of Lord North's ministry in March 1782 he may indeed be said to have done one very great thing in politics.

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  • In domestic politics Fox had no time to do more than insist on the abolition of the slave trade.

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  • But in the last years during which this circle kept together a new spirit appeared in Roman politics and a new power in Roman literature, the revolutionary spirit evoked by the Gracchi in opposition to the long-continued ascendancy of the senate, and the new power of Roman satire, which was exercised impartially and unsparingly against both the excesses of the revolutionary spirit and the arrogance and incompetence of the extreme party among the nobles.

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  • The tempestuous politics of the war and reconstruction period suited his aggressive nature and constructive talent.

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  • His apprenticeship to politics was served in the Colonial Assembly of Bourbon, where he fought successfully to preserve the colony from the consequences of perpetual interference from the authorities in Paris, and on the other hand to prevent local discontent from appealing to the English for protection.

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  • An advanced and vehement Radical in politics and Progressive in municipal affairs, Mr Harrison in 1886 stood unsuccessfully for parliament against Sir John Lubbock for London University.

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  • Unrestrained conversation on the topics which most interested him - philosophy, politics, morals, religion - was at this time to be had in Holland with less danger and in greater abundance than in any other country in the world.

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  • After the first few weeks of Anne's reign, Shaftesbury, who had been deprived of the vice-admiralty of Dorset, returned to his retired life, but his letters to Furly show that he retained a keen interest in politics.

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  • Interested as he was in soldiering, his eager temperament impelled him still more to adventure in politics and letters.

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  • Casimir belongs to that remarkable group of late medieval sovereigns who may be called the fathers of modern diplomacy, inasmuch as they relegated warfare to its proper place as the instrument of politics, and preferred the councilchamber to the battle-field.

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  • He had early become connected with the brilliant band of authors and politicians who then led the Whig party, a connexion to which he owed his appointment to the well-paid and easy post of commissioner of stamps; but in practical politics, for which he was by nature unsuited, he took no active share.

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  • He was unwilling to excite the prejudices of modern politics which seemed to him to run back through the whole period of the reign of George III.

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  • In this he was helped by his legal training, and it was doubtless this fact which made the Constitutional History one of the text-books of English politics, to which men of all parties appealed, and which, in spite of all the work of later writers, still leaves it a standard authority.

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  • The Copenhagen post gave him, as well as some other diplomats, an exceptional opportunity of watching the principal moving powers of European politics from a point of vantage, as the matrimonial alliances of the Danish royal family occasionally brought together in a friendly family circle the widow of Alexander III, Nicholas II and the Prince of Wales who was to become King Edward VII.

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  • He was a second cousin to the elder John Adams. His father, whose Christian name was also Samuel, was a wealthy and prominent citizen of Boston, who took an active part in the politics of the town, and was a member of the Caucus (or Caulker's) Club, with which the political term "caucus" is said to have originated; his mother was Mary Fifield.

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  • He repeatedly failed in business, notably as manager of a malt-house, largely because of his incessant attention to politics; but in the Boston townmeeting he became a conspicuous example of the efficiency of that institution for training in statecraft.

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  • He took no part in politics till the assembling of the first protectorate parliament, on the 3rd of September 1654, in which he sat as member for Oxfordshire.

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  • In politics Temple was a follower of Mr Gladstone, and he approved of the disestablishment of the Irish Church.

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  • The reports of Venetian and Florentine ambassadors at this epoch contain the first germs of an attempt to study politics from the point of view of science.

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  • His originality consists in having extended the positive intelligence of his century from the sphere of contemporary politics and special interests to man at large regarded as a political being.

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  • He founded the science of politics for the modern world, by concentrating thought upon its fundamental principles.

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  • Lastly, when we once have freed ourselves from the antipathy engendered by his severance of ethics from the field of politics, when we have once made proper allowance for his peculiar use of phrases like frodi onorevoli or scelleratezze gloriose, nothing is left but admiration for his mental attitude.

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  • He was by no means indifferent to private virtue, which indeed he judged the basis of all healthy national existence; but in the realm of politics he postponed morals to political expediency.

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  • He was colour-blind to commonplace morality, and we are angry with him because he merged the hues of ethics in one grey monotone of politics.

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  • In December 1439 he was created cardinal, and during the next few years took less share in politics.

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  • She was young, a foreigner, a member of a state that had almost no weight in the great world of politics, had not given any proof of great ability, and was thrown into the shade by more important persons.

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  • In spite of his activity at the bar, Tilden maintained an interest in politics, serving in the State Assembly in 1846 and in the state constitutional conventions of 1846 and 1867.

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  • Until the 4th century B.C. it was a dependency of Orchomenus, and at all times it played but a subordinate part in Boeotian politics.

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  • His official duties brought him into direct relations with many who were well versed in the politics of the time.

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  • He was strongly anti-Macedonian in politics, and a bitter opponent of Demetrius Poliorcetes.

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  • Further, he not only created a style of his own, but, instead of taking the substance of his writings from Greek poetry, or from a remote past, he treated of the familiar matters of daily life, of the politics, the wars, the administration of justice, the eating and drinking, the money-making and money-spending, the scandals and vices, which made up the public and private life of Rome in the last quarter of the and century B.C. This he did in a singularly frank, independent and courageous spirit, with no private ambition to serve, or party cause to advance, but with an honest desire to expose the iniquity or incompetence of the governing body, the sordid aims of the middle class, and the corruption and venality of the city mob.

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  • During the last three years of the war Espartero, who had been elected a deputy, exercised from his distant headquarters such influence over Madrid politics that he twice hastened the fall of the cabinet, and obtained office for his own friends.

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  • Espartero, deeming resistance useless, embarked at Cadiz on the 30th of July 1843 for England, and lived quietly apart from politics until 1848, when a royal decree restored to him all his honours and his seat in the senate.

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  • After 1856 Espartero resolutely declined to identify himself with active politics, though at every stage in the onward march of Spain towards more liberal and democratic institutions he was asked to take a leading part.

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  • He at once became a dominant factor in New York politics, and for the next quarter of a century he played a leading role in the history of the commonwealth.

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  • On this account Clinton has generally been regarded as the originator of the "spoils system" in New York; but he was really opposed to the wholesale proscription of opponents that became such a feature of American politics in later years.

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  • In addition to his interest in politics and public improvements, he devoted much study to the natural sciences; among his published works are a Memoir on the Antiquities of Western New York (1818), and Letters on the Natural History and Internal Resources of New York (1822).

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  • In 1869 he succeeded to the post of secretary of the joint departments of the interior and of finance, and for the next fourteen years he devoted himself wholly to politics.

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  • In 1768 and 1774 he was again elected a representative peer for Scotland, but took no further part in politics, and in 1778 refused to have anything to do with the abortive attempt to effect an alliance between himself and Chatham.

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  • Since 1896 there has been a strong independent movement in politics, marked by the organization of a League for Better City Government (1896) and a Municipal League (1900), and by the organization of postal primaries to secure the co-operation of electors pledged to independent voting.

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  • Protestantism was clearly becoming inextricably associated with politics of a very intricate sort.

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  • Still more manifestly in his Ethics and Politics Aristotle makes it clear that it is the common or universal will that gives substance and reality to the individual.

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  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.

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  • During the interval till the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Massachusetts held a distinguished place in national life and politics.

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  • Though opposed to the government of Louis Philippe, he took no part in politics, but devoted himself to his pastoral work.

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  • The change thus established de facto owed its first diplomatic consecration to the developments of international politics in the Old World.

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  • Though the vast ultimate consequences of this sudden appearance of the great western republic in the arena of international politics were not realized even by those in sympathy with Monroe's action, the weight of the United States thrown into the scale on the side of Great Britain made any effective protest by the European powers impossible; Russia, Austria and Prussia contented themselves with joining in a mild expression of regret that the action of Great Britain "tended to encourage that revolutionary spirit it had been found so difficult to control in Europe."

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  • From 1869 to 1879 he took part in local politics, and was premier from 1876-1879; in 1882 he entered the Canadian parliament as a Liberal, and from 1896 to 1901 was minister of marine and fisheries.

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  • He had taken no part in politics, and, so far as is known, had not said a word or raised a hand against Mary.

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  • He would have made an admirable successor to Howley in the primacy, but such was the complexion of ecclesiastical politics that the elevation of the most impartial prelate of his day would have been resented as a piece of party spirit.

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  • His connexion with Ludendorff led to his becoming an influence behind the scenes in German politics, and, after the revolution, to his entering the Reichstag, as well as to his debut as a newspaper proprietor on a grand scale.

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  • He returned to New York in 1798, resumed the practice of his profession, re-entered politics, and sat in the United States Senate as a Federalist from 1800 to 1803.

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  • The seat of authority in Discipline, the means by which the church strives to preserve the Christian standard of living from serious dishonour in its own members, is the touch-stone of church politics.

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  • The majority, indeed, even of determined opponents of personal rule in state and church favoured Presbyterianism, particularly before 1641, when Henry Burton's Protestation Protested brought before educated men generally the principles of Congregationalism, as distinct from Puritanism, by applying them to a matter of practical politics.

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  • He was allowed to return to France in 1819, but took no further active part in politics, although he presented himself unsuccessfully for parliamentary election in 1824 and 1827.

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  • In politics he allied himself with the Republican party on its organization, being a frequent speaker in presidential campaigns, beginning with that of 1856.

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  • The Republican leaders straightway quarrelled among themselves, thus starting the long series of factional strifes which have characterized the party politics of New York state; the bitterness of the factions and the irresponsible council of appointment are also responsible for the firm establishment early in the Republican regime of the " spoils system."

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  • The factions had their origin in canal politics, the conservatives advocating the use of canal revenues to complete the canals, the radicals insisting that they should be used to pay the state debt.

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  • Politics, cleared of the cross-issues of provincialism and Maori warfare, took the usual shape of a struggle between wealth and radicalism.

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  • Sir George Grey, entering colonial politics as a Radical leader, had appealed eloquently to the work-people as well as to the Radical "intellectuals," and though unable to retain office for very long he had compelled his opponents to pass manhood suffrage and a triennial parliaments act.

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  • He, however, withdrew from party politics when, in December 1890, he was overthrown by the Progressives under John Ballance.

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  • The change was emphasized by the active intervention in politics of the trade unions.

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  • Politics he made his business, and to this he devoted all his energies.

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  • Claviere, afterwards known in politics.

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  • In politics the state has been Republican in national elections, except in 1896, when it was carried by a fusion of Democrats and Populists.

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  • Here he soon became a good workman, developed a passion for politics and especially for political statistics, came to be depended upon for more or less of the editing of the paper, and was a figure in the village debating society.

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  • Determining to enter active politics, he gave up his legal studies without qualifying for the bar, and in 1881 was elected to the New York legislature as a regular Republican, although in opposition to the "boss" of the assembly district for which he was a candidate.

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  • In the history of the United States the politician has been too often the man who, in connexion with some other trade or profession, has taken up politics as a tool to carve out some personal ambition or manufacture a financial profit.

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  • Mr Roosevelt from the beginning apparently believed with the lexicographers that politics is the science and practice of government.

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  • His position in the Blaine campaign, his attitude in tariff discussions and legislation, his relations with United States senators, congressional representatives, and other party leaders, his methods in making official appointments, were entirely consistent with his constantly reiterated conviction that in politics permanent good is achieved not by guerilla warfare, but by working through and within the party.

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  • He was so often accused by political purists for associating politically with men of discredited reputation that his own picturesque statement of his conversion to a belief that in legislative or administrative politics one must work with all sorts and conditions of men is illuminating.

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  • That was my first lesson in real politics.

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  • There are many instances in American politics of nominations made solely on a war record which have led to hopeless defeat in election.

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  • Growing interest in politics produced dissatisfaction with the compromise of 1831, and the Liberal opposition grew in numbers and influence.

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  • Under this prince the course of politics in Saxony presented little of general interest, except perhaps the spread of the doctrines of Social Democracy, which was especially remarkable in Saxony.

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  • Large sections of the old history are devoted to the religion and politics of the ten tribes, which are altogether unintelligible and uninteresting when measured by a strictly Levitical standard; and in general the whole problems and struggles of the prophetic period turn on points which had ceased to be cardinal in the life of the New Jerusalem, which was no longer called to decide between the claims of the Word of Yahweh and the exigencies of political.

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  • Such was the condition of things in Greece, as considered by Aristotle in his Politics.

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  • Sovereignty is used in a further sense when Plato and Aristotle speak of the sovereignty of the laws (Laws, 4.715; Politics, 4.4; 3.15).

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  • For many years one of the burning questions in the politics of ' The distinction between the Staatenbund and the Bundesstaat is discussed in the articles Confederation and Federal Government.

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  • The epoch-making events which occurred in England, while he was at Oxford profoundly interested him, and coinciding with the Revolution in Denmark, which threw open a career to the middle classes, convinced him that his proper sphere was politics.

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  • Schumacher seems to have been profoundly impressed by the administrative superiority of a strong centralised monarchy in the hands of an energetic monarch who knew his own mind; and, in politics, as in manners, France ever afterwards was his model.

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  • Italian politics first occupied his attention.

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  • The young professor soon began to take an interest in politics, and in 1846 entered the provincial diet as representative of his university.

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  • The difficulty arose from the general complication of Mahratta politics, and especially from the weak and treacherous character of the peshwa, which Elphinstone rightly read from the first.

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  • To the curial system, so evolved, and continually fortifying its position in the domains of theology, ecclesiastical law and politics, the episcopal system stands in diametrical opposition.

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  • A second peculiarity of Ultramontanism is its confusion of religion with politics; it claims for the Roman Catholic Church the functions of a political power, and asserts that it is the duty of the secular state to carry out its instructions and wishes.

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  • The only temporary embarrassment was the queen's continued private correspondence with Lord Melbourne, which led Stockmar to remonstrate with him; but Melbourne used his influence sensibly; moreover, he gradually dropped out of politics, and the queen got used to his not being indispensable.

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  • As regards internal politics, it may be remarked that the queen and Prince Albert were much relieved when Peel, who had come in as the leader of the Protectionist party, adopted Free Trade and repealed the Corn Laws, for it closed a dangerous agitation which gave them much anxiety.

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  • The correspondence of which this letter forms a part is one of the few published witnesses to the queen's careful and active interest in home politics during the latter half of her reign; but it is enough to prove how wise, how moderate and how steeped in the spirit of the Constitution she was.

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  • From 1880 onwards Ireland almost monopolized the field of domestic politics.

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  • In politics, on the other hand, Rousseau was a sincere and, as far as in him lay, a convinced republican.

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  • Moreover, in some minor branches of politics and economics Rousseau was a real reformer.

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  • On the 10th of April 1895 he was returned for Tapolca and in 1896 for Cegled, and from that time took an active part in Hungarian politics.

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  • Richelieu's own Memoirs are chiefly concerned with politics and diplomacy.

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  • Zunz was always interested in politics, and in 1848 addressed many public meetings.

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  • His heart was now all in politics; and he decided to start a paper.

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  • He was a studious and precocious boy, more interested in religious matters, history and foreign politics than in boyish things.

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  • He was deeply interested in politics, was a follower of Mr Gladstone, and approved the Home Rule Bill of 1886, but objected to the later proposal to retain the Irish members at Westminster.

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  • Foreign rather than domestic politics had the first place with him.

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  • His saying that "history is past politics and politics are present history" is significant of this limitation of his work, which left on one side subjects of the deepest interest in a nation's life.

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  • Czartoryski found the tsar still suffering from remorse at his father's assassination, and incapable of doing anything but talk religion and politics to a small circle of private friends.

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  • The principle that reason is the one only guide of life, the supreme arbiter of all questions, politics and religion included, has its earliest and most complete exemplar in Erasmus.

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  • In the same year his coolness and courage in a duel with Captain George Johnstone, M.P., assisted to rehabilitate him, and in 1775, having meantime taken an active part in politics, he became secretary of state for the colonies in the North cabinet.

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  • But his health was failing and he withdrew from politics, spending his last years as a benevolent and autocratic country magnate.

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  • The reform movement had originally no connexion with ecclesiastical politics; but that came later when the leaders turned their attention to the abuses prevalent among the clergy, to the conditions obtaining in the Church in defiance of the ecclesiastical law.

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  • In north German politics he interfered vigorously to protect his brotherin-law the Margrave Louis of Brandenburg against the lords of Mecklenburg and the dukes of Pomerania, with such success that the emperor, Charles IV., at the conference of Bautzen, was reconciled to the Brandenburger and allowed Valdemar an annual charge of 16,000 silver marks on the city of Lubeck (1349) Some years later Valdemar seriously thought of reviving the ancient claims of Denmark upon England, and entered into negotiations with the French king, John, who in his distress looked to this descendant of the ancient Vikings for help. A matrimonial alliance between the two crowns was even discussed, and Valdemar offered, for the huge sum of 600,000 gulden, to transport 12,000 men to England.

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  • In domestic politics they were strongly Nationalist and suspicious of the Germans.

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  • Between these two were Questions in Political Economy, Politics, Morals, &c. (1823), and a Critical Dissertation on the Nature, Measure, and Causes of Value (1825), directed against the opinions of Ricardo and his school.

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  • Meanwhile Maine had published in 1885 his one work of speculative politics, a volume of essays on Popular Government, designed to show that democracy is not in itself more stable than any other form of government, and that there is no necessary connexion between democracy and progress.

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  • The Union of Horodlo also established absolute parity between the nobility of Poland and Lithuania, but the privileges of the latter were made conditional upon their profession of the Roman Catholic faith, experience having shown that difference of religion in Lithuania meant difference of politics, and a tendency Moscow-wards, the majority of the Lithuanian boyars being of the Greek Orthodox Confession.

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  • From the chaos of creeds resulted a chaos of ideas on all imaginable subjects, politics included.

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  • First, however, it is necessary to describe briefly the origin and previous history of these romantic freebooters who during the second half of the 17th century were the determining factor of Polish and Muscovite politics.

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  • The Czartoryscy, who were to dominate Polish politics for the next half-century, came of an ancient Ruthenian stock which had intermarried with the Jagiellos at an early date, and had always been remarkable for their civic virtues and political sagacity.

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  • His adventurous life, his forcible character, the position of his state as a barrier between the Indian and the Russian empires, and the skill with which he held the balance in dealing with them, combined to make him a prominent figure in contemporary Asiatic politics and will mark his reign as an epoch in the history of Afghanistan.

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  • During the hundred and thirty years that elapsed between the early translations of Aristotle executed at Toledo about 1150 and the death in 1281 of William of Moerbeke, the translator of the Rhetoric and the Politics, the knowledge of Aristotle had been greatly extended in Europe by means of translations, first from the Arabic, and, next, from the original Greek.

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  • From the first he managed to combine his solicitor's work with politics, becoming secretary of the South Carnarvonshire Anti-tithe League; and his local reputation was made by a successful fight, carried to the High Court, in defence of the right of Nonconformists to burial in the parish churchyard.

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  • He was admitted to the Scotch bar in December 1794, but, having abandoned the Tory principles in which he had been educated, he found that his Whig politics seriously prejudiced his legal prospects.

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  • The particular work which provided the starting-point 'of an article was in many cases merely the occasion for the exposition, always brilliant and incisive, of the author's views on politics, social subjects, ethics or literature.

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  • But the essential narrowness and timidity of his general outlook prevented him from detecting and estimating latent forces, either in politics or in matters strictly intellectual and moral; and this lack of understanding and sympathy accounts for his distrust and dislike of the passion and fancy of Shelley and Keats, and for his praise of the half-hearted and elegant romanticism of Rogers and Campbell.

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  • It will be seen that Evelyn's politics were not of the heroic order.

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  • From 1824 to 1839 Costa Rica joined the newly formed Republic of the United States of Central America; but the authority of the central government proved little more than nominal, and the Costa Ricans busied themselves with trade and abstained from politics.

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  • Calvo, The Republic of Costa Rica (Chicago, 1890), gives a partisan account of local politics, trade and finance, authorized by the government.

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  • These measures show that the state was Democratic-Republican in its politics and pro-French in its sympathies, and that it was inclined to follow the leadership of that state from which most of its people had come.

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  • The old court party followed the lead of Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams in national politics, and became National Republicans and later Whigs.

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  • During the next thirty years Clay's conservative influence dominated the politics of the state.'

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  • It was no time for brilliant initiative or adventurous politics; the need was to avoid Scylla and Charybdis, and a via media had to be found in church and state, at home and abroad.

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  • Elisha still stands firmly planted on the old national conception of the religion of Yahweh; his ideals are such as do not lie beyond the range of practical politics.

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  • In Everett's life and career was a combination of the results of diligent training, unflinching industry, delicate literary tastes and unequalled acquaintance with modern international politics.

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  • During 1888 his personality was the dominating feature of French politics, and, when he resigned his seat as a protest against the reception given by the chamber to his revisionist proposals, constituencies vied with one another in selecting him as their representative.

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  • Caesar made the most of his divine ancestry and built a temple in his forum to Venus Genetrix; but his patrician descent was of little importance in politics and disqualified Caesar from holding the tribunate, an office to which, as a leader of the popular party, he would naturally have aspired.

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  • After these failures Caesar determined to take no active part in politics for a time, and retraced his steps to the East in order to study rhetoric under Molon, at Rhodes.

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  • He soon turned to the law, though for a time he was teacher of physics in a small local college; eventually went into politics, and did excellent work in 1847 as governor of his native state.

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  • But as the French harboured leaders of the Mexican reactionaries, pressed the Jecker claims and showed a disposition to interfere in Mexican domestic politics, which lay beyond the terms of the joint convention, Great Britain and Spain withdrew their forces in March 1862.

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  • National elections in New Hampshire were carried by the Federalists until 1816, except in 1804 when President Thomas Jefferson won by a small majority; but within this period of Federalist supremacy in national politics the Democrat-Republicans elected the governor from 1805 to 1812 inclusive except in 1809.

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  • He now had little to do with politics for some years, and spent his 'time on his Histoire du Consulat et de l'Empire, the first volume of which appeared in 1845.

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  • In the first place, he had small interest in politics,.

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  • By this time he had already entered into politics; he had been chef du cabinet of Jules Ferry (1879-1881), though this did not distract him from his literary work.

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  • The extreme sensitiveness of his temperament, however, disqualified him for politics; he proved impracticable in his relations with Hardenberg and other ministers, and in 18ro retired for a time from public life, accepting the more congenial appointment of royal historiographer and professor at the university of Berlin.

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  • He at once took a lively interest in politics, and from 1829 to 1833 served in the state House of Representatives, for the last two years as Speaker.

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  • In 1842, before the expiration of his term, he resigned his seat, and at Concord, New Hampshire, began his career at the bar in earnest, though still retaining an interest in politics.

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  • For many years Archdeacon Denison represented the extreme High Tory party not only in politics but in the Church, regarding all "progressive" movements in education or theology as abomination, and vehemently repudiating the "higher criticism" from the days of Essays and Reviews (1860) to those of Lux Mundi (1890).

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  • Joachim took a prominent part in imperial politics as an advocate of peace, though with a due regard for the interests of the house of Habsburg.

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  • In domestic politics he sought to consolidate and strengthen the power of his house by treaties with neighbouring princes, and succeeded in secularizing the bishoprics of Brandenburg, Havelberg and Lebus.

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  • Through the influence of Lieut.-Governor Gore, supplemented by that of Sir Isaac Brock, Strachan was prevailed upon in 1812 to transfer himself to York, where he was soon deeply involved in civil and ecclesiastical politics.

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  • They can have exercised their public rights but seldom, owing to their distance from Rome; but the consulships of C. Marius, a municeps of Arpinum (between 107 and 100 B.C.), and the strength of the support given to Tiberius Gracchus in the assembly by the voters from Italian towns (133 B.C.) show what an important influence the members of these municipia could occasionally exercise over Roman politics.

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  • The local senate, or curia, always exercised an important influence on municipal politics.

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  • Pechlin first appears prominently in Swedish politics in 1760, when by suddenly changing sides he contrived to save the "Hats" from impeachment.

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  • In character the Indians are, as a rule, peaceable, though conscious of their numerical superiority and at times driven to join in the revolutions which so often disturb the course of local politics; they are often intensely religious, but with a few exceptions are thriftless, indolent and inveterate gamblers.

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  • So the practice of securing places for persons who have served the party, in however humble a capacity, has sprung from the maxim that in the strife of politics the spoils belong to the victors, and has furnished a motive of incomparable and ever-present activity ever since the administration (1829-1837) of President Andrew Jackson.

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  • A gloom was cast over the first parliament of the Dominion by the assassination in 1868 of one of the most brilliant figures in the politics of the time, D'Arcy McGee (q.v.).

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  • From the election of 1887 the Riel agitation ceased to seriously influence politics, but the fiscal controversy continued under new forms. Between 1887 and 1891 a vigorous agitation was kept up under Liberal auspices in favour of closer trade relations with the United States, at first under the name of Commercial Union and later under that of Unrestricted Reciprocity.

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  • Pro vincial control has caused some diversity of management; the interpretation of the denominational agreement has led to acute differences of opinion which have invaded the field of politics.

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  • Some of these questions have played a considerable part in Canadian politics, but are of too complicated a nature to be dealt with in the present brief sketch.

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  • Moreover, by adding (Politics, H 7, 1327 b 29-33) that the Greek race could govern the world by obtaining one constitution (was Tvy X b.vov 7roXtmeias), he indicated some leaning to a universal monarchy under such a king as Alexander.

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  • So probably were the rhetorical works, especially the Theodectea; since both politics and oratory were the subjects which the father wanted the tutor to teach his son, and, when Alexander came to Phaselis, he is said by Plutarch (Alexander, 17) to have decorated the statue of Theodectes in honour of his association with the man through Aristotle and philosophy.

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  • The philosophy of Plato is dialogue trying to become science; that of Aristotle science retaining traces of dialectic. Secondly as regards subjectmatter, even in his early writings Aristotle tends to widen the scope of philosophic inquiry, so as not only to embrace metaphysics and politics, but also to encourage rhetoric and poetics, which Plato tended to discourage or limit.

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  • After Plato's death, coming to his third period he made a further departure from Platonism in his didactic works on politics and rhetoric, written in connexion with Alexander and Theodectes.

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  • After his master's death, in the third period of his own life, and during his connexion with Alexander, but before the final construction of his philosophy into a system, he was tending to write more and more in the didactic style; to separate from dialectic, not only metaphysics, but also politics, rhetoric and poetry; to admit by the side of philosophy the arts of persuasive language; to think it part of their legitimate work to rouse the passions; and in all these ways to depart from the ascetic rigidity of the philosophy of Plato, so as to prepare for the tolerant spirit of his own, and especially for his ethical doctrine that virtue consists not in suppressing but in moderating almost all human passions.

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  • It is true that the Politics also mentions much later events, e.g.

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  • Finally he died without completing some of his works, such as the Politics, and notably that work of his whole philosophic career and foundation of his whole philosophy - the Metaphysics - which, projected in his early criticism of Plato's philosophy of universal forms, gradually developed into his positive philosophy of individual substances, but remained unfinished after all.

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  • Although, however, we may concede that such great works as the Metaphysics, the Politics and the logical writings did not receive their present form from Aristotle himself, that concession does not deprive Aristotle of the authorship, but only of the arrangement of those works.

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  • On the contrary, Theophrastus and Eudemus, his immediate followers, both wrote works presupposing Aristotle's Metaphysics and his logical works, and Dicaearchus, their contemporary, used his Politics for his own Tripoliticus.

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  • But in the gradual process of composition, by which a work once begun was kept going with the rest, although a work such as the Politics (begun in 357) was begun early, and some works more rudimentary came earlier than others, the general body of writings was so kept together in Aristotle's library, and so simultaneously elaborated and consolidated into a system that it soon becomes impossible to put one before another.

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  • But Zeller does not give enough weight either to the evidence of early composition contained in the Politics and Meteorology, or to the evidence of subsequent contemporaneous composition contained in the cross-references, e.g between the Physics and the Metaphysics.

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  • Ethics then is a kind of Politics.

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  • To turn from Ethics to Politics, the good of the individual on a small scale becomes on a large scale the good of the citizen and the state, whose end should be no far-off form of good, and no mere guarantee of rights, but the happiness of virtuous action, the life according to virtue, which is the general good of the citizen.

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  • Such is Aristotle's practical philosophy, contained in his matured Nicomachean Ethics, and his unfinished Politics.

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  • Such is Aristotle's productive science or art, contained in his Rhetoric and Poetics, compared with his Ethics and Politics.

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  • In politics he was at first an anti-slavery Whig and then from the time of its organization in 1854 until his death was a member of the Republican party.

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  • Besides his scientific labours Robins took an active part in politics.

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  • In politics he carried on the feuds of his family with the Berbers, and in his efforts to extend his dominions could be as faithless as his father.

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  • In politics he was a follower of Capo d'Istria.

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  • Although he was defeated at the elections of 1898 and was for four years outside the chamber, his eloquent speeches made him a force in politics as an intellectual champion of socialism.

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  • Johnson began in politics to oppose the aristocratic element .and became the spokesman and champion of the poorer and labouring classes.

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  • But, whether because he drew a distinction between the treason of individuals and of states, or was influenced by Seward, or simply, once in responsible position, separated Republican party politics from the question of constitutional interpretation, at least he speedily showed that he would be influenced by no acrimony, and adopted the lenient reconstruction policy of Lincoln.

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  • The misguided animus of the impeachment as a piece of partisan politics was soon very generally admitted; and the importance of its failure, in securing the continued power and independence of the presidential element in the constitutional system, can hardly be over-estimated.

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  • Prior to the Revolution he took only a minor part in politics, but when it broke out he soon became, with the queen, the chief of the reactionary party at court.

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  • The struggle between the Pharisees and Sadducees, between the party of the scribes and the aristocracy, was a struggle for mastery between a secularized hierarchy whose whole interests were those of their own selfish politics, and a party to which God and the exact fulfilment of the law according to the scribes were all in all.

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  • Michaelis's Introduction to the New Testament, with notes of his own, in which he may be said to have introduced German methods of research into English biblical scholarship. His History of the Politics of Great Britain and France (1799) brought him much notice and a pension from William Pitt.

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  • In early life the archbishop was very intimate with Gilbert Burnet, then bishop of Salisbury, and in later life he was a prominent figure in Irish politics.

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  • In the period of reconstruction under British rule, General Botha, who was still looked upon as the leader of the Boer people, took a prominent part in politics, advocating always measures which he considered as tending to the maintenance of peace and good order and the re-establishment of prosperity in the Transvaal.

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  • Poincare ceased for some years to take an active part in politics.

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  • During 1920 and 1921 it was Poincare's influence that was mainly dictating the aggressiveness of French feeling in international politics; and during the latter part of Briand's premiership, culminating in Briand's visit to the United States for the Washington Conference at the end of 1921, it was Poincare who was fomenting the criticism that French interests were being undermined.

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  • Having been placed in his fourteenth year under the charge of his maternal great-uncle Dr Gem, physician to the English embassy at Paris, in 1783 he passed his early years amidst a political fermentation which led him to take a deep interest in politics.

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  • Blackie was a Radical and Scottish nationalist in politics, but of a fearlessly independent type; he was one of the "characters" of the Edinburgh of the day, and was a well-known figure as he went about in his plaid, worn shepherd-wise, wearing a broadbrimmed hat, and carrying a big stick.

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  • Its members have been keen evangelists, trusting largely to "revivals" for their success, staunch Radicals in politics and total abstainers to a man.

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  • He had specially prepared himself, as he thought, for "teaching imaginative men, and political men, and legal men, and scientific men who bear the world in hand"; and he did not attempt to win their attention to abstract and worn-out theological arguments, but discussed the opinions, the poetry, the politics, the manners and customs of the time, and this not with philosophical comprehensiveness, not in terms of warm eulogy or measured blame, but of severe satire varied by fierce denunciation, and with a specific minuteness which was concerned primarily with individuals.

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  • It was a concession to the rising popular party, to which it was supposed that More's politics inclined him.

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  • His broad churchmanship placed him in opposition to the dominant tendency in the Church of England, and he was also a strong and militant Liberal in politics, being an ardent advocate of the disestablishment of the Church in Wales.

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  • When George Grenville, whose principles leaned to Toryism, quarrelled with the 'court, Wedderburn affected to regard him as his leader in politics.

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  • The new law officer defended his conduct with the assertion that his alliance in politics had been with Mr George Grenville, and that the connexion had been severed on his death.

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  • The determining factor in politics was the conduct of the war.

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  • In religion, the chief feature was the priesthood of Druids, who here, as in Gaul, practised magical arts and barbarous rites of human sacrifice, taught a secret lore, wielded great influence, but, at least as Druids, took ordinarily no part in politics.

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  • Elected deputy in 1831 and member of the chamber of peers in 1839, he withdrew for the most part from politics, to devote himself to his great work, the Histoire de France sous Napoleon (IC) vols.

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  • He was active as a Republican in state and national politics; was chairman of the Committee on Resolutions of the New York State Republican Conventions from 1874 to 1880 (excepting 1877), and was president of the convention of 1879; and was a delegate to several National Republican Conventions, drafting much of the Republican platforms of 1876 and 1896.

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  • As a public speaker he had an inborn Irish readiness and vehemence of expression; and, though a thorough Liberal, he split from Mr Gladstone on Irish home rule, and took an active part in politics in opposing it.

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  • His constant obligations to the emperor drained Brandenburg of money which might have been employed more profitably at home, and prevented her sovereign from interfering in the politics of northern Europe.

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  • In the 4th century the Aetolians began to take a greater part in Greek politics, and, in return for helpingEpaminondas (367) and Philip of Macedon (338), recovered control of their sea-board, to which they annexed the Acarnanian coast and the Oeniadae.

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  • Stevens was an extreme partisan in politics; and his opponents and critics have always charged him with being vindictive and revengeful toward the South.

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  • The main result of the threefold division of 1392 was a succession of civil wars which led to the temporary eclipse of Bavaria as a force in German politics.

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  • The recovery of the Upper Palatinate made Bavaria compact; the acquisition of the electoral vote made it influential; and the duchy was able to play a part in European politics which intestine strife had rendered impossible for the past four hundred years.

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  • The Jesuits now gained the upper hand; one by one the liberal provisions of the constitution were modified or annulled; the Protestants were harried and oppressed; and a rigorous censorship forbade any free discussion of internal politics.

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  • But they were compelled to abandon all claim to the Spanish Netherlands, which were formally handed over to the United Provinces, as trustees, to be by them, after the conclusion of a satisfactory barrier treaty, given up to the emperor, of European politics.

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  • With 1713 the influence of the United Netherlands upon European politics comes almost to an end.

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  • After the publication of the Treatise Hume retired to his brother's house at Ninewells and carried on his studies, mainly in the direction of politics and political economy.

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  • He came of a family which had shone conspicuously in 15thcentury politics, though it generally took the anti-national side.

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  • The king also sought as much as possible to remove from the domain of politics every irritating question, believing that a union of the different parties was most for the advantage of the state.

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  • He held a unique position among foreign residents in Japan, alike as a profound student of its history and art, and as a powerful factor in international politics.

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  • At the outbreak of the Revolution, intoxicated with republican ideas, he threw himself with enthusiasm into politics, was elected an officer in the National Guard of the Aisne, and by fraud - he being yet under age - admitted as a member of the electoral assembly of his district.

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  • On the other hand, the increased knowledge of Gambetta's attitude towards European politics which later information has supplied confirms the view that in him France lost prematurely a master mind, whom she could ill spare.

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  • He practised in Boston, became active in politics as a Republican, was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in1875-1878and its speaker in 1876-1878, lieutenant-governor of the state in 1879, and governor in 1880-1882.

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  • In spite of the exacting and severe routine of the Round Hill school, Bancroft contributed frequently to the North American Review and to Walsh's American Quarterly; he also made a translation of Heeren's work on The Politics of Ancient Greece.

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  • His History of Italian Literature (1844) brought him to the front, and in 1848 he became professor of Italian literature at Pisa, but after a few months was deprived of the chair on account of his liberal views in politics.

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  • His politics might therefore have been described as Toryism tempered by sympathy, or as Radicalism tempered by hereditary scorn of subject races.

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  • But no collection has been made of some of his more characteristic writings in the Christian Socialist and Politics for the People, many of them signed by the pseudonym he then assumed, "Parson Lot."

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  • The Spanish scheme had to wait, and when John got back to England he was soon absorbed in domestic politics.

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  • The duke's politics were opposed by the chief ecclesiastics, and in resisting them he had made use of Wycliffe.

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  • The lord lieutenant and his chief secretary continued to be appointed by the English ministers; their tenure of office depended on the vicissitudes of English, not Irish, party politics; the royal prerogative was exercised in Ireland on the advice of English ministers.

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  • It is a curious circumstance, in view of the subsequent history of Irish politics, that it was from the Protestant Established Church, and particularly from the Orangemen, that the bitterest opposition to the union proceeded; a,nd that the proposal found support chiefly among the Roman Catholic clergy and especially the bishops, while in no part of Ireland was it received with more favour than in the city of Cork.

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  • In politics the revulsion from his particuar conclusions did not prevent the more clear-sighted of his opponents from recognizing the force of his supreme demonstration of the practical irresponsibility of the sovereign power, wherever seated, in the state; and, when in a later age the foundations of a positive theory of legislation were laid in England, the school of Bentham - James Mill, Grote, Molesworth - brought again into general notice the writings of the great publicist of the 17th century, who, however he might, by the force of temperament, himself prefer the rule of one, based his whole political system upon a rational regard to the common weal.

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  • He was a stout Tory in politics and had many friends among the Anglican clergy; he opposed the movement for Roman Catholic emancipation.

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  • In politics he was originally a Republican, and was a delegate to the national convention of the party in 1880, and chairman of its finance committee.

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  • Mill played a great part also in English politics, and was, more than any other man, the founder of what was called "philosophic radicalism."

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  • On the fall of the Combes ministry he became less prominent in French politics.

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  • His philosophical works include annotations to Garve's translation of the Politics of Aristotle (1799-1800), and a large share in the Beitrage zur Geschichte der Philosophie (published in twelve parts between 1791 and 1799), in which he collaborated with Forberg, Reinhold and Niethammer.

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  • To understand, however, O'Connell's greatness we must look to the field of Irish politics.

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  • On the History of Animals no commentary at all exists, and Plato's Republic is substituted for the then inaccessible Politics.

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  • Apart from the intrinsic value of his work, it is admitted that it had the effect of promoting the study of philosophy and of stimulating freedom of thought in religion and politics.

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  • Of the newspapers of Havana the most notable is the El Diario de la Marina (established in 1838; under its present name, 1844 morning and evening), which was almost from its foundation an official organ of the Spanish government, and generally the mouthpiece of the most intransigent peninsular opinion in all that concerned the politics of the island.

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  • It is probable that he turned, therefore, the more willingly to politics; at any rate, soon after entering public life he abandoned practice (1774).

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  • His theories had a deep and broad basis in English whiggism; and though he may well have found at least confirmation of his own ideas in French writers - and notably in Condorcet - he did not read sympathetically the writers commonly named, Rousseau and Montesquieu; besides, his democracy was seasoned, and he was rather a teacher than a student of revolutionary politics when he went to Paris.

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  • Separation from European politics - the doctrine of" America for Americans "that was embodied later in the Monroe declaration - was a tenet cherished by Jefferson as by other leaders (not, however, Hamilton) and by none cherished more firmly, for by nature he was peculiarly opposed to war, and peace was a fundamental part of his politics.

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  • However deep, therefore, his French sympathies, he drew the same safe line as did Washington between French politics and American politics,' and handled the Genet complications to the satisfaction of even the most partisan Federalists.

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  • By family tradition and an idealistic outlook a Liberal, Alfred Lyttelton had always taken a great interest in politics; and he formed one of the party at Dalmeny, when his uncle Gladstone carried his Midlothian campaign to a successful issue in the general election of 1880.

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  • Nevertheless, so long as Gladstone was in active politics he felt he could not publicly join a party in opposition to an uncle whom he revered.

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  • It gave him great satisfaction to serve his apprenticeship to politics under the leadership of Mr. Arthur Balfour, to whom he was personally much attached.

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  • The last owed success to Payindah's son, Fatteh Khan (known as the "Afghan Warwick "), a man of masterly ability in war and politics, the eldest of twenty-one brothers, a family of notable intelligence and force of character, and many of these he placed over the provinces.

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  • These misunderstandings, frequently wilful, extended often beyond the domain of pure politics.

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  • Each of these predominated in its turn, though not to the exclusion of others, the sophistry of culture beginning about 447, and leading to the sophistry of eristic, and the sophistry of rhetoric taking root in central Greece about 427, and merging in the sophistry of politics.

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  • It was only natural then that some of those who professed to prepare young Athenians for public life should give to their teaching a distinctively political direction; and accordingly we find Isocrates recognizing teachers of politics, and discriminating them at once from those earlier sophists who gave popular instruction in the arts and from the contemporary eristics.

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  • While the sophistry of rhetoric led to the sophistry of politics, the sophistry of culture led to the sophistry of disputation.

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