Polar axis sentence example

polar axis
  • In its simplest form the mounting of an equatorial telescope consists of an axis parallel to the earth's axis, called" the polar axis "; a second axis at right angles to the polar axis called" the declination axis "; and the telescope tube fixed at right angles to the declination axis.
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  • A vertical plane passing through A A is therefore in the meridian, and the polar axis is inclined to the horizon at an angle equal to that of the latitude of the place of observation.
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  • Thus one important attribute of an equatorially mounted telescope that, if it is directed to any fixed star, it will follow the diurnal motion of that star from rising to setting by rotation of the polar axis only.
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  • If we now attach to the polar axis a graduated circle D D, called the" hour circle,"of which the microscope or vernier R reads o h when the declination axis is horizontal, we can obviously read off the hour angle from the meridian of any star to which the telescope may be directed at the instant of observation.
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  • The declination axis rests on bearings attached to opposite sides of the polar axis.
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  • Mountings of types A and B - that is, with a long polar axis supported at both ends - are often called the" English mounting,"and type C, in which the declination axis is placed on the extension of the upper pivot of the polar axis, is called the" German mounting,"from the first employment of type C by Fraunhofer.
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  • The polar axis was similar in shape to that of fig.
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  • In Smyth's celebrated Bedford telescope the polar axis was of mahogany.
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  • Probably the best example of this type of mounting applied to a refractor is that made by the elder Cooke of York for Fletcher of Tarnbank; the polar axis is of cast iron and the mounting very satisfactory and convenient, but unfortunately no detailed description has been published.
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  • The double polar axis is composed of hollow metal beams of triangular section.
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  • Slow motion in declination can be cornmunicated by a screw acting on a long arm, which latter can be clamped at pleasure to the polar axis.
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  • The driving circle is also much too small, so that a very slight mechanical freedom of the screw in the teeth involves a large angular freedom of the telescope in right ascension, while its position at the lower end of a too weak polar axis tends to create instability from torsion of that axis.
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  • The observer's eye is applied to the small telescope E, which (by means of prisms numbered I, 2, 3, 4) views the vernier attached to the cross-head simultaneously with the hour circle attached to the upper end of the polar axis.
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  • Through the eyepiece of the bent 1 telescope E' another hour circle attached to the lower end of the polar axis can be seen; thus an assistant is able to direct the telescope by a handle at H to any desired hour angle.
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  • The end friction of the polar axis is relieved by a ring of conical rollers shown in section beside the principal figure.
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  • There is in this instrument a remarkably elegant method of relieving the friction of the polar axis.
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  • The declination axis is here represented by what are practically the trunnions or pivots of the tube, resting in bearings which are supported by the arms of a very massive cast-iron fork bolted to the upper end of the polar axis.
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  • The base plate rests upon levelling screws which permit the adjustment of the polar axis to be made with great precision.
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  • Common's telescope presents many ingenious features, especially the relief-friction by flotation of the polar axis in mercury, and in the arrangements of the observatory for giving ready access to the eye-piece of the telescope.
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  • They then meet a small plane mirror supported at the point of intersection of the polar and declination axes, whence they are reflected down through the hollow polar axis as shown in fig.
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  • The difficulties of relief friction could probably be best overcome by a large hollow cylinder concentric with the polar axis fixed near the centre of gravity of the whole instrument and floated in mercury, on the plan adopted in the Mount Wilson 60-in.
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  • A flanged cast-iron box, strongly r i bbed and open on one side, forms the centre of the polar axis.
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  • One pivot of the polar axis is attached to the lower end of this box, and a strong hollow metal cone, terminating in the other pivot, forms the upper part of the polar axis.
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  • If then the objective tube is directed to any star, the convergent beam from the object-glass is received by the plane mirror from which it is reflected upwards along the polar axis and viewed through the hollow upper pivot.
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  • Thus, any fixed telescope directed towards the mirror of a properly adjusted coelostat in motion will show all the stars in the field of view at rest; or, by rotating the polar axis independently of the clockwork, the observer can pass in review all the stars visible above the horizon whose declinations come within the limits of his original field of view.
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  • Upon an axis concentric with the declination axis is carried a plane mirror, which is geared so as always to bisect the angle between the polar axis and the optical axis of the telescope.
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