This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

poetic

poetic

poetic Sentence Examples

  • Maybe it was poetic justice that her soul was doomed.

    118
    76
  • It shows me that I could express my appreciation of beautiful and poetic ideas in clear and animated language.

    49
    43
  • Gives a whole new dimension to poetic license, don't it?

    35
    34
  • The historical traditions are to be supplemented by the great body of prophetic, legal and poetic literature which reveal contemporary conditions in various internal literary, theological or sociological features.

    35
    36
  • He has a humorous and poetic side, too.

    22
    27
  • First come the works on poetic literature, art, language and religion as special regions of development.

    18
    19
  • So they went through their memories, smiling with pleasure: not the sad memories of old age, but poetic, youthful ones--those impressions of one's most distant past in which dreams and realities blend--and they laughed with quiet enjoyment.

    15
    14
  • But, as a rule, Wagner's poetic diction must simply be tolerated by the critic who would submit himself to Wagner's ideas.

    15
    17
  • Its poetic merits are few, and its historical accuracy is easily impugned.

    13
    13
  • p. 99) "For sure our souls were near allied, and thine Cast in the same poetic mould with mine."

    13
    21
  • His power of initiative in poetry was very small, and the range of poetic ground which he could cover strictly limited.

    12
    11
  • Wordsworth's theories of poetry - the objects best suited for poetic treatment, the characteristics of such treatment and the choice of diction suitable for the purpose - may be said to have grown out of the soil and substance of the lakes and mountains, and out of the homely lives of the people, of Cumberland and Westmoreland.

    11
    13
  • It was a labor of loving service, untouched by the spirit of material gain, conferring upon the work of the older masters a dignity and poetic feeling which we vainly seek in much of the later work.

    7
    6
  • At first court jealousies and intrigues preventied Firdousi from being noticed by the sultan; but at length one of his friends, Mahek, undertook to present to Mahmud his poetic version of one of the well-known episodes of the legendary history.

    7
    7
  • At first court jealousies and intrigues preventied Firdousi from being noticed by the sultan; but at length one of his friends, Mahek, undertook to present to Mahmud his poetic version of one of the well-known episodes of the legendary history.

    7
    7
  • It is true that there is nothing, or hardly anything, that properly deserves the name of poetry in them - no passion, no sense of the beauty of nature, only a narrow "criticism of life," only a conventional and restricted choice of language, a cramped and monotonous prosody, and none of that indefinite suggestion which has been rightly said to be of the poetic essence.

    7
    8
  • It is true that there is nothing, or hardly anything, that properly deserves the name of poetry in them - no passion, no sense of the beauty of nature, only a narrow "criticism of life," only a conventional and restricted choice of language, a cramped and monotonous prosody, and none of that indefinite suggestion which has been rightly said to be of the poetic essence.

    7
    8
  • Exquisite as was already his susceptibility to beauty and his mastership of the rarest poetic material, we cannot doubt that Chenier was preparing for still higher flights of lyric passion and poetic intensity.

    7
    9
  • In a fragment of autobiography printed in the Athenaeum (12th of January 1850) he says that he was entirely self-taught, and attributes his poetic development to long country walks undertaken in search of wild flowers, and to a collection of books, including the works of Young, Barrow, Shenstone and Milton, bequeathed to his father by a poor clergyman.

    6
    7
  • It is a mosaic from Virgil, Ovid, Lucan and Fortunatus, composed in the manner of Einhard's use of Suetonius, and exhibits a true poetic gift.

    6
    8
  • It is a mosaic from Virgil, Ovid, Lucan and Fortunatus, composed in the manner of Einhard's use of Suetonius, and exhibits a true poetic gift.

    6
    8
  • He was past eighty when he published the collection of new verses entitled Demeter and other Poems (1889), which appeared almost simultaneously with the death of Browning, an event which left Tennyson a solitary figure indeed in poetic literature.

    5
    4
  • Vico undoubtedly considered the poetic wisdom of the Middle Ages to be different from that of the Greeks and Romans, and Christianity to be very superior to the pagan religion.

    5
    5
  • The memory of Natasha was his most poetic recollection.

    5
    6
  • His drama, Franz von Sickingen, published in 1859, is a work of no poetic value.

    5
    7
  • Although Ken wrote much poetry, besides his hymns, he cannot be called a great poet; but he had that fine combination of spiritual insight and feeling with poetic taste which marks all great hymnwriters.

    4
    3
  • Within the limits imposed by the nature of his task, his treatment of his sources is remarkably free, the details unsuited for poetic handling being passed over, or, in some instances, boldly altered.

    4
    3
  • It is usually maintained that this work was written before the Old Testament poems. The arguments for this view are that the Heliand contains no allusion to any foregoing poetical treatment of the antecedent history, and that the Genesis fragments exhibit a higher degree of poetic skill.

    4
    3
  • His Megacosmus and Microcosmus are little more than a poetic gloss upon the Timaeus.

    4
    4
  • Among successful dramatic pieces may be mentioned the Falu rossza (Village Scamp) of Edward Toth (1875), which represents the life of the Hungarian peasantry, and shows both poetic sentiment and dramatic skill; A szerelem harcza (Combat of Love), by Count Geza Zichy; Iskdriot (1876) and the prize tragedy Tamora (1879), by Anthony Varady; Janus (1877), by Gregory Csiky; and the dramatized romance Szep Mikhal (Handsome Michal), by Maurus Jokai (1877).

    4
    4
  • Provost Robertson belonged to the Clan Donachie, and by this marriage the robust and business-like qualities of the Lowlander were blended with the poetic imagination, the sensibility and fire of the Gael.

    4
    5
  • Cooking was then, for the most part, no longer a poetic, but merely a chemic process.

    4
    5
  • German literature tells of several literary schools, or groups of writers animated by the same ideas, and working in the spirit of the same principles and by the same poetic methods.

    4
    6
  • German literature tells of several literary schools, or groups of writers animated by the same ideas, and working in the spirit of the same principles and by the same poetic methods.

    4
    6
  • BEATRICE CENCI (1577-1599), a Roman woman, famous for her tragic story; poetic fancy has woven a halo of romance about her, which modern historic research has to a large extent destroyed.

    4
    7
  • As in glyptic so in poetic art, the Hellenism of the time was decadent and Alexandrine rather than Attic of the best period.

    4
    7
  • BEATRICE CENCI (1577-1599), a Roman woman, famous for her tragic story; poetic fancy has woven a halo of romance about her, which modern historic research has to a large extent destroyed.

    4
    7
  • As in glyptic so in poetic art, the Hellenism of the time was decadent and Alexandrine rather than Attic of the best period.

    4
    7
  • These two works interrupted the execution of the Ring and formed the stepping-stones to Parsifal, a work which may perhaps be said to mark a further advance in that subtlety of poetic conception which, as we have seen, gave the determining impulse to Wagner's true musical style.

    3
    3
  • Whatever other gifts Comte may have had - and he had many of the rarest kind, - poetic imagination was not among them, any more than poetic or emotional expression was among them.

    3
    4
  • He seems to have been interested in the poetic diction of Milton and Thomson, and a few of his verses are remotely inspired by Shakespeare and Gray.

    3
    4
  • He seems to have been interested in the poetic diction of Milton and Thomson, and a few of his verses are remotely inspired by Shakespeare and Gray.

    3
    4
  • But how can we explain the formation of this poetic wisdom, which, albeit the work of ignorant men, has so deep and intrinsic a philosophic value?

    3
    5
  • Another literary seaman of this period was Sidi Ali, celebrated under his poetic pseudonym of Katibi (or Katibi Rumi, to distinguish him from the Persian poet of the same name).

    3
    5
  • His diction is still very artificial, the poetic diction of Delille transformed in the direction of Hugo, but not very much.

    3
    6
  • Her favorite sonata bore her into a most intimately poetic world and the look she felt upon her made that world still more poetic.

    3
    6
  • Unfortunately, however, the brilliant epoch of the alliance of Liberalism and Catholicism, represented on its literary side by Chateaubriand and by Lamartine, to whose poetic school Herculano had belonged, was past, and fanatical attacks and the progress of events drove this former champion of the Church into conflict with the ecclesiastical authorities.

    2
    3
  • The Az utolso Bebek (The Last of the Bebeks), by the late Charles Petery, is a work rich in poetic invention, but meagre in historical matter.

    2
    3
  • As the medieval lyric decayed, more and more attention was given to the externals of poetic composition, the form, the number of syllables, the melody; and it was such externals that attracted the interest of these burgher-poets.

    2
    3
  • In the house that poetic dullness and quiet reigned which always accompanies the presence of a betrothed couple.

    2
    3
  • Gay visited him in Edinburgh, and Pope praised his pastoral - compliments which were undoubtedly responsible for some of Ramsay's unhappy poetic ventures beyond his Scots vernacular.

    2
    4
  • Of a genuine poetic temperament, fervid and mobile in feeling, and of a prolific fancy, he had also the sense and wit that come of varied contact with men.

    2
    4
  • While a new spirit which compares and tolerates thus sprang from the Crusades, the large sphere of new knowledge and experience which they gave brought new material at once for scientific thought and poetic imagination.

    2
    4
  • But the new field of poetic literature afforded by the Crusades is still more striking than this development of science.

    2
    4
  • Afewyearsafter Constantinople passed into the hands of the Ottomans, some ghazels, the work of the contemporary Tatar prince, Mir `Ali Shir, who under the nom de plume of Nevayi wrote much that shows true talent and poetic feeling, found their way to the Ottoman capital, where they were seen and copied by Ahmed Pasha, one of the viziers of Mahommed II.

    2
    4
  • He was the boldest and most original of Japanese landscape artists, leaving powerful and poetic records of the scenery of his own land as well as that of China, and trusting more to the sure and sweeping stroke of the brush than to color.

    2
    4
  • Mr. Anagnos, in speaking of my composition on the cities, has said, "These ideas are poetic in their essence."

    2
    5
  • True, her view of life is highly coloured and full of poetic exaggeration; the universe, as she sees it, is no doubt a little better than it really is.

    2
    6
  • Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?

    2
    12
  • In these and other dramatic writings, more remarkable perhaps for poetic than for stage effects, Doczi still maintains his brilliancy of diction and the delicacy of his poetic touch.

    1
    2
  • The main value of the last is historical, but it too shows Dunbar's mastery of form, even when dealing with lists of poetic predecessors.

    1
    2
  • They are repelled by the dryness of much of the matter, the unsuitableness of many of the topics discussed for poetic treatment, the arbitrary assumption of premises, the entire failure to establish the connexion between the concrete phenomena which the author professes to explain and these assumptions, and the erroneousness of many of the doctrines which are stated with dogmatic confidence.

    1
    2
  • The present feeling, though not so bright and poetic as the former, was stronger and more serious.

    1
    4
  • The millions are awake enough for physical labor; but only one in a million is awake enough for effective intellectual exertion, only one in a hundred millions to a poetic or divine life.

    1
    5
  • It may be true, as some maintain, that language cannot express to us much beyond what we have lived and experienced; but I have always observed that children manifest the greatest delight in the lofty, poetic language which we are too ready to think beyond their comprehension.

    1
    9
  • They may have contributed to the formation of the style of comedy which appears at the very outset much more mature than that of serious poetry, tragic or epic. They gave the name and some of the characteristics to that special literary product of the Roman soil, the satura, addressed to readers, not to spectators, which ultimately was developed into pure poetic satire in Lucilius, Horace, Persius and Juvenal, into the prose and verse miscellany of Varro, and into something approaching the prose novel in Petronius.

    0
    0
  • The Sabellian races of central and eastern Italy and the Italo-Celtic and Venetian races of the north, in whom the poetic susceptibility of Italy was most manifest two generations later, were not, until after the Social war, sufficiently in sympathy with Rome, and were probably not as yet sufficiently educated to induce them to contribute their share to the national literature.

    0
    0
  • The conditions which enabled the poetic genius of Italy to come to maturity in the person of T.

    0
    0
  • His greatest contribution to poetic art consisted in the perfection which he attained in the phalaecian, the pure iambic, and the scazon metres, and in the ease and grace with which he used the language of familiar intercourse, as distinct from that of the creative imagination, of the rostra, and of the schools, to give at once a lifelike and an artistic expression to his feelings.

    0
    0
  • The poetic impulse and culture communicated to Roman literature in the last years of the republic passed on without any break of continuity into the literature of the of imperial succeeding age.

    0
    0
  • But he has ever in form so far surpassed his originals that he alone has gained for the pure didactic poem a place among the highest forms of serious poetry, while he has so transmuted his material that, without violation of truth, he has made the whole poem alive with poetic feeling.

    0
    0
  • As Virgil marks the point of maturest excellence in poetic diction and rhythm, Ovid marks that of the greatest facility.

    0
    0
  • Herodotus distinguished the " local "from the " poetic " versions of events in early Spartan history, but much seems to be referable to Ephorus and the 4th-century political and rhetorical historians: - e.g.

    0
    0
  • It was in the East especially that preaching flourished: Eusebius of Caesarea, Eusebius of Emesa, Athanasius, Macarius, Cyril of Jerusalem, Ephraem Syrus among the orthodox; and of the Arians, Arius himself and Ulfilas the great Gothic missionary, are all of high quality; but above even these stand out the three Cappadocians,Basil (q.v.) of Caesarea,cultured, devout and practical; his brother Gregory of Nyssa, more inclined to the speculative and metaphysical, and Gregory (q.v.) of Nazianzus, richly endowed with poetic and oratorial gifts, the finest preacher of the three.

    0
    0
  • The Charlemagne legend was fully developed in Italy, where it was to have later a great poetic development at the hands of Boiardo, Ariosto and Tasso.

    0
    0
  • His Dramatic Works (1798) fill three, his Poetic (1735) two volumes.

    0
    0
  • As the haggada is the poetic, so the halakha is the legal element of the Talmud (q.v.), and arose out of the faction between the Sadducees, who disputed the traditions, and the Pharisees, who strove to prove their derivation from scripture.

    0
    0
  • Yet, for the most part, they either relate to objects thoroughly incapable of poetic treatment, where the writer's endeavour is rather to expound the matter fully than to render it poetically beautiful, or else expend themselves on short isolated subjects, generally myths, and are erotic in character.

    0
    0
  • He dwelt upon the illumination of the mind and soul by direct communion with the Creative Spirit; upon the spiritual and poetic monitions of external nature; and upon the benefit to man of a serene mood and a simple way of life.

    0
    0
  • Le Fatiche d'Ercole (1475) is a romance in poetic prose by Pietro Bassi, and the Dodeci Travagli di Ercole (1544) a poem by J.

    0
    0
  • The best-known poetic work produced is Domett's Ranolf and Amohia (London, 1867).

    0
    0
  • But such Huckleberry Finn is, beyond all question; it is a story of very varied interest, now comic, now almost tragic, frequently poetic, unfailingly truthful, although not always sustained at its highest level.

    0
    0
  • He was without command of poetic form, and he could only be called a philosopher in an age when the term was used with such meaningless laxity as was customary in the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • In natural soothsaying this frenzy is the necessary physical accompaniment of an afflatus which, though it seems supernatural to a rude people, is really akin to poetic inspiration.

    0
    0
  • Early distinguished by her excellence as a pianist, organist and singer, she also showed considerable ability in painting and illuminating; but a lively poetic imagination led her to the path of literature, and more especially to poetry, folk-lore and ballads.

    0
    0
  • In a poetic theophany (Ps.

    0
    0
  • These descriptive names are highly poetic, as also that of the Portuguese, " beija-flor " (flower-kisser); but the humming-bird is insectivorous, and thrusts his long bill into flowers in search of insects instead of honey.

    0
    0
  • Not only were the forms of classical poetry to be imitated, but a separate poetic language and style, distinct from those employed in prose, were to be used.

    0
    0
  • HIPPOCRENE (the " fountain of the horse," 11 "airirov xpnvn), the spring on Mt Helicon, in Boeotia, which, like the other spring there, Aganippe, was sacred to the Muses and Apollo, and hence taken as the source of poetic inspiration.

    0
    0
  • Al-Mufaddal was a contemporary of IIammad ar-Rawiya and Khalaf al-Ahmar, the famous collectors of ancient Arab poetry and tradition, and was somewhat the junior of Abu 'Amr ibn al-'Ala, the first scholar who systematically set himself to preserve the poetic literature of the Arabs.

    0
    0
  • The collection is one of the highest importance as a record of the thought and poetic art of Arabia during the time immediately preceding the appearance of the Prophet.

    0
    0
  • We are thus presented with a view of the literature of the age which is much more characteristic and comprehensive than that given by the brilliant poet to whom we owe the Ilamasa, and enables us to form a better judgment on the general level of poetic achievement.

    0
    0
  • The mythic and religious legends of the people were preserved in chants, handed down from generation to generation; and in like poetic form was kept the knowledge of the people of botany, medicine and other sciences.

    0
    0
  • At court much time was given to poetic recitation, often accompanied by music, and accomplished poets received liberal rewards.

    0
    0
  • These beings are doubtless due in part to poetic imagination, but underlying this there may be a substratum of primitive religious belief.

    0
    0
  • The king is a hero of the chivalric type common in contemporary romance; freedom is a "noble thing" to be sought and won at all costs; the opponents of such freedom are shown in the dark colours which history and poetic propriety require; but there is none of the complacency of the merely provincial habit of mind.

    0
    0
  • The story of the Creation in the book of Genesis is shown, from the point of view of chronology, to be a poetic or symbolic account by the discovery of civilizations of much greater antiguity.

    0
    0
  • 2 In a series of writings, however, extending over so long a period as those of the Old Testament, some variation or development in language is to be expected apart from the natural differences between the poetic (or prophetic) and prose styles.

    0
    0
  • In Nathan der Weise, written in the winter of 1778-1779, he gave poetic form to the ideas which he had already developed in prose.

    0
    0
  • At Lesbos she was head of a great poetic school, for poetry in that age and place was cultivated as assiduously and apparently as successfully by women as by men.

    0
    0
  • He had, moreover, considerable poetic faculty, and wrote a drama in three acts, entitled Die Entsagung (Berlin, 182 3).

    0
    0
  • He wrote, at his best, in the grand manner, melody and thought according with perfection of expression, and his finest poems have that indefinable air of the inevitable which is after all the touchstone of the poetic quality.

    0
    0
  • One may notice the great part taken by natives of the Phoenician cities in the history of later Greek philosophy, and in the poetic movement of the last century B.C., which led to fresh cultivation of the epigram.

    0
    0
  • Descriptions of heaven and hell, and allusions to God's working in Nature, not unfrequently show a certain amount of poetic power.

    0
    0
  • Only now and then a gleam of poetic power Snras.

    0
    0
  • Under the immediate direction of Steffens, Ohlenschldger began an entirely new poetic style, and destroyed all his earlier verses.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and comic poet he followed Baggesen, and in all branches of the poetic art stood a little aside out of the main current of romanticism.

    0
    0
  • Besides writing Tell, Schiller had found time in 1803 and 1804 to translate two French comedies by Picard, and to prepare a German version of Racine's Phedre; and in the last months of his life he began a new tragedy, Demetrius, which gave every promise of being another step forward in his poetic achievement.

    0
    0
  • The rest of this wonderful storehouse of poetic romance appeared in two volumes in 1869 and 1870.

    0
    0
  • This splendid burst of poetic activity, however, had raised him to a place among the first poets of his time; and in 1877 an attempt was made to induce him to accept the professorship of poetry at Oxford.

    0
    0
  • This defence of the poetic point of view against brute force and common sense was admirably constructed and it proved one of the most popular of his plays.

    0
    0
  • Still less historical justification is to be found for the vacillating Weisslingen in whom Goethe executed poetic justice on himself as the lover of Friederike, or in the women of the play, the gentle Maria, the heartless Adelheid.

    0
    0
  • Again poetic justice is effected on the unfortunate hero who has chosen his own personal advancement in preference to his duty to the woman he loves; more pointedly than in Gotz is the moral enforced by Clavigo's worldly friend Carlos, that the ground of Clavigo's tragic end lies not so much in the defiance of a moral law as in the hero's vacillation and want of character.

    0
    0
  • The calm beauty of Greek tragedy is seen in the new iambic version of Iphigenie auf Tauris (1787); the classicism of the Renaissance gives the ground-tone to the wonderful drama of Torquato Tasso (1790), in which the conflict of poetic genius with the prosaic world is transmuted into imperishable poetry.

    0
    0
  • The change of plan explains, although it may not exculpate, the formlessness and loose construction of the work, its extremes of realistic detail and poetic allegory.

    0
    0
  • Wilhelm Meister is a work of extraordinary variety, ranging from the commonplace realism of the troupe of strolling players to the poetic romanticism of Mignon and the harper; its flashes of intuitive criticism and its weighty apothegms add to its value as a Bildungsroman in the best sense of that word.

    0
    0
  • The poem had accompanied him from early manhood to the end and was the repository for the fullest "confession" of his life; it is the poetic epitome of his experience.

    0
    0
  • The lover of Gretchen had, as far as poetic continuity is concerned, disappeared with the close of the first part.

    0
    0
  • The intrinsic value of his poetic work, regarded apart from his personality, is smaller in proportion to its bulk than is the case with many lesser German poets and with the greatest poets of other literatures.

    0
    0
  • In this last, as in his other poetic attempts, Wolfgang showed a considerable measure of inherited or acquired ability, in his wealth of language and his easy mastery of the difficulties of rhythm and rhyme.

    0
    0
  • The poems of Homer are full of descriptions of elaborate works in bronze, gold and silver, which, even when full allowance is made for poetic fancy, show clearly enough very advanced skill in the working and ornamenting of these metals.

    0
    0
  • Maeterlinck's poetic yet scientific La vie des abeilles (Paris, 1901).

    0
    0
  • Lowell was already looked upon by his companions as a man marked by wit and poetic sentiment; Miss White was admired for her beauty, her character and her intellectual gifts, and the two became thus the hero and heroine among a group of ardent young men and women.

    0
    0
  • Lowell himself had already turned his studies in dramatic and early poetic literature to account in another magazine, and continued the series in The Pioneer, besides contributing poems; but after the issue of three monthly numbers, beginning in January 1843, the magazine came to an end, partly because of a sudden disaster which befell Lowell's eyes, partly through the inexperience of the conductors and unfortunate business connexions.

    0
    0
  • This is perfectly true, and from the time of Malherbe dates that great and deplorable falling off of French poetry in its more poetic qualities, which was not made good till 1830.

    0
    0
  • The explanation is that outer speech is more obvious than inner thought, and that grammar and poetic criticism, rhetoric and dialectic preceded logic, and that out of those arts of language arose the science of reasoning.

    0
    0
  • Chalmers's, in his Poetic Remains of some of the Scottish Kings (1824); Rogers's Poetical Remains of King James the First (1873); Skeat's edition published by the Scottish Text Society (1884).

    0
    0
  • Now, with one brilliant exception - the story of the swimming-match, which is felicitously introduced and finely told - these retrospective passages are brought in more or less awkwardly, interrupt inconveniently the course of the narrative, and are too condensed and allusive in style to make any strong poetic impression.

    0
    0
  • However detrimental these redundancies may be to the poetic beauty of the epic, they add enormously to its interest for students of Germanic history or legend.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore evident that the personality of Hygelac, and the expedition in which, according to Beowulf, he died, belong not to the region of legend or poetic invention, but to that of historic fact.

    0
    0
  • There is, as we shall see afterwards, some ground for believing that there were circulated in England two rival poetic versions of the story of the encounters with supernatural beings: the one referring them to Beowulf the Dane, while the other (represented by the existing poem) attached them to the legend of the son of Ecgtheow, but ingeniously contrived to do some justice to the alternative tradition by laying the scene of the Grendel incident at the court of a Scylding king.

    0
    0
  • While, however, it thus appears that the mythic part of the Beowulf story is a portion of primeval Angle tradition, there is no proof that it was originally peculiar to the Angles; and even if it was so, it may easily have passed from them into the poetic cycles of the related peoples.

    0
    0
  • This was generally said to be done by " poetic licence," or metri gratia.

    0
    0
  • This suggested to him a distinction between what he called primary and secondary poets - the first employing poetry to relieve their own hearts, the second, poetic artists, composing poetry from some other and less impulsive motive.

    0
    0
  • The result of their endeavour was immediately apparent in the new force added to French rhythm, the new pomp, richness, colouring and polish conferred upon poetic diction.

    0
    0
  • It was under these conditions that Spenser gave his romantic epic to the world, a poem which derived its allegory from the middle ages, its decorative richness from the Italian Renaissance, its sweetness, purity, harmony and imaginative splendour from the most poetic nation of the modern world.

    0
    0
  • Depicting feudalism in the vivid colours of an age at war with feudal institutions, breathing into antique histories the breath of actual life, embracing the romance of Italy and Spain, the mysteries of German legend, the fictions of poetic fancy and the facts of daily life, humours of the moment and abstractions of philosophical speculation, in one homogeneous amalgam instinct with intense vitality, this extraordinary birth of time, with Shakespeare for the master of all ages, left a monument of the Re- naissance unrivalled for pure creative power by any other product of that epoch.

    0
    0
  • Although he was at least sixty-five years of age at this period, his poetic faculty displayed itself with more than usual warmth and lustre in the glowing series of elegies, styled Eridanus, which he poured forth to commemorate the rapture of this union.

    0
    0
  • The sentence quoted above 1 can therefore have been meant only as an apology for the absence of those poetic graces that necessarily disappear in translations into another tongue.

    0
    0
  • This reputation he owes partly to the vast fertility of his pen - according to the historian Sozomen he was credited with having written altogether 3,000,000 lines - partly to the elegance of his style and a certain measure of poetic inspiration, more perhaps to the strength and consistency of his personal character, and his ardour in defence of the creed formulated at Nicaea.

    0
    0
  • It must be confessed that, judged by Western standards, the poems of Ephraim are prolix and wearisome in the extreme, and are distinguished by few striking poetic beauties.

    0
    0
  • And so far as they are made the vehicle of reasoning, their efficiency is seriously hampered by their poetic form.

    0
    0
  • Mannhardt, and a lower stratum of beliefs and rites began to emerge into view beneath the poetic forms of the more developed mythologies.

    0
    0
  • They possess very slight poetic merit in their Swedish form.

    0
    0
  • But Runeberg is the only great poetic name of this period.

    0
    0
  • He does not possess the fiery pulse and humaneness of Burns, but the exquisite perfection of his metre and the subtle alliance of his thought and expression must always secure for him the warmest admiration of true lovers of poetic art.

    0
    0
  • Ausonius was rather a man of letters than a poet; his wide reading supplied him with material for a great variety of subjects, but his works exhibit no traces of a true poetic spirit; even his versification, though ingenious, is frequently defective.

    0
    0
  • Nor is anything more remarkable than the way in which Livy's fine taste and sense of proportion, his true poetic feeling and genuine enthusiasm, saved him from the besetting faults of the mode of treatment which he adopted.

    0
    0
  • From the tendency to use a poetic diction in prose, which was so conspicuous a fault in the writers of the silver age, Livy is not wholly free.

    0
    0
  • In his earlier books especially there are numerous phrases and sentences which have an unmistakably poetic ring, recalling sometimes Ennius and more often his contemporary Virgil.

    0
    0
  • But in Livy this poetic element is kept within bounds, and serves only to give warmth and vividness to the narrative.

    0
    0
  • He impressed every one as a man of extraordinary acuteness and originality; and these solid gifts were set off to the highest advantage by quickness of thought and speech, a lucid style, wit and poetic fancy, and a social warmth which made him delightful as a friend and companion.

    0
    0
  • His style ranges from the brilliancy of his youth to the sternness and sombre gravity of age, passing almost to poetic expression in its epigrammatic terseness.

    0
    0
  • But the spirit in which Emerson conceived the laws of life, reverenced them and lived them out, was the Puritan spirit, elevated, enlarged and beautified by the poetic temperament.

    0
    0
  • The bonds of conventionalism were silently dissolving in the rising glow of his poetic nature.

    0
    0
  • They were chiefly on scientific subjects, approached in a poetic spirit.

    0
    0
  • The book of laws (Vendidad) is characterized by an arid didactic tone; only here and there the legislator clothes his dicta in the guise of graceful dialogues and tales, or of poetic descriptions and similitudes; and then the book of laws is transformed into a didactic poem.

    0
    0
  • Nor can we deny to the Yashts, in their depiction of the Zoroastrian angels and their presentment of the old sagas, a certain poetic feeling, at times, and a pleasant diction.

    0
    0
  • They wrote in the Ionic dialect, in what was called the unperiodic style, and preserved the poetic character of their epic model.

    0
    0
  • To the odd terminology of Donne's poetic philosophy Dryden gave the name of "metaphysics," and Johnson, borrowing the suggestion, invented the title of the "metaphysical school" to describe, not Donne only, but all the amorous and philosophical poets who succeeded him, and who employed a similarly fantastic language, and who affected odd figurative inversions.

    0
    0
  • His nature was essentially poetic, and his life the greatest of his poems. Those who knew only the poems he wrote could form but a faint notion of the harmony, the sweetness, the manliness and the tenderness of that which he lived.

    0
    0
  • Echegaray succeeded to the literary inheritance of Lopez de Ayala and of Tamayo y Baus; and though he possesses neither the poetic imagination of the first nor the instinctive tact of the second, it is impossible to deny that he has reached a larger audience than either.

    0
    0
  • By nature the Spanish-American loves art and literature, and the poetic faculty is developed in him to a degree rarely found among the Teutonic races.

    0
    0
  • When Burke had become one of the most famous men in Europe, no visitor to his house was more welcome than the friend with whom long years before he had tried poetic flights, and exchanged all the sanguine confidences of boyhood.

    0
    0
  • These letters, which were still popular a hundred years later, were the first example of a distinct class of Roman poetry - the poetic epistle.

    0
    0
  • The site of lolcus, the centre of so many poetic legends, is at no great distance from the modern Volo.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, it is in Snorri's Edda, a poetic grammar of a very perfect kind, that the best examples of the whole of northern poetry are to be found.

    0
    0
  • There is a fine prose translation of the Odyssey by Sweinbjorn Egillson, the lexicographer, both faithful and poetic in high degree.

    0
    0
  • The idea that he had anything to do with the poetic Edda in general, or the Sun's Song in particular, is unfounded.

    0
    0
  • These biographies are more literary and medieval and less poetic than the Icelandic sagas and king's lives; their simplicity, truth, realism and purity of style are the same.

    0
    0
  • Influenced by Jonas Hallgrimsson with regard to language and poetic diction, but keeping unbroken the traditions of Icelandic medieval poetry maintained by Sigur5r Breic fjorc6 (1798-1846), is another school of poets, very unlike the first.

    0
    0
  • To the harmful race of giants (demons), on the other hand, he was an implacable foe, and many stories are told in the poetic and prose Eddas of the destruction which he brought upon them at various times with his hammer.

    0
    0
  • The old Irish gods in the poetic romances appear to have the same origin and shade away into the fairies.

    0
    0
  • The system of Hesiod is a medley of later physical speculation and of poetic allegory, with matter which we, at least, regard as savage survivals, like the mutilation of Heaven and the swallowmyth.'

    0
    0
  • It is usual with mythologists to say that Zeus is the " All-Father," and that his amours are only a poetic way of stating that he is the parent of men.

    0
    0
  • But by a kind of poetic justice, Louis XI.

    0
    0
  • Old Portuguese, and more especially the poetic language of the I3th century, received from the language of the troubadours, in whose poetry the earlier Portuguese poets found much of their inspiration, certain words and certain turns of expression which have left upon it indelible traces.

    0
    0
  • His first book had been a failure, one critic even declaring that " Mr Cowper was certainly a good, pious man, but without one spark of poetic fire."

    0
    0
  • xi.; Letters of Lady Hesketh to John Johnson (1901); John Newton, by the Rev. Josiah Bull (1868); Cowper and Mary Unwin, by Caroline Gearey (1900); and A Concordance to the Poetic Works of William Cowper, by John Neave (1887).

    0
    0
  • At most we can only fill up the portrait by reference to the tinge of simple old-fashioned scholarship, which on its historic side made him an eager searcher for antiquities and among old records, and on its poetic occasionally stirred him to an excursion as far as that gentlest slope of Parnassus inhabited by the descriptive muse.

    0
    0
  • They showed the blase modern reader that a world no less poetic, no less primitive than that of the Origins of Christianity exists, or still existed within living memory, on the north-western coast of France.

    0
    0
  • What might be taken as poetic fancies in our text are recounted as historical facts in rabbinical literature.

    0
    0
  • You ought to see some poetic justice in that—he ragged you enough during the debate about your line-of-duty-shot-in-the-ass wound.

    0
    0
  • Maybe it was poetic justice that her soul was doomed.

    0
    0
  • Gives a whole new dimension to poetic license, don't it?

    0
    0
  • Jackson felt it poetic justice that their gala should benefit the organization that supplied blood to the masses.

    0
    0
  • The brevity of a poetic text has its own reward.

    0
    0
  • Poetic diction describes the range of language used in poems.

    0
    0
  • Poetic law has its place, as does poetic justice, but imprecise legal writing is poor legal writing.

    0
    0
  • The poetic afflatus, here, works not so much in accordance with fancy, as with quick viscera.

    0
    0
  • Maybe it's poetic justice, maybe creative anachronism, or maybe a circle of interpretation.

    0
    0
  • It is poetic artifice and not nature that is the key term here.

    0
    0
  • UPDATE 2004/08/31: ow tolouene bogy Next up, Stuart, with his infinitely more poetic Two Bone Eulogy.

    0
    0
  • bulk mailers, who have met strict licensing conditions, are allowed to use the poetic marker.

    0
    0
  • anonymous correspondent " TL " followed Andrew Brice's poetic example and wrote the following: " Grecians forsooth!

    0
    0
  • The poem is in the form of rhyming pentameter couplets, sometimes called heroic couplets, the favorite poetic form of the eighteenth century.

    0
    0
  • The Turkish colonel who first enunciates this to him has got a poetic that actually happened.

    0
    0
  • The synonyms are often poetic, evocations of the many spirits resident within a single word.

    0
    0
  • Her love life is a wasteland, littered with poetic couplets and masturbatory fantasy.

    0
    0
  • felicitous lines that show the genuine poetic touch.

    0
    0
  • Colin Parker Tumbling clouds, wheeling gulls... You see, the scenery has a poetic effect on you!

    0
    0
  • A poetic description of a storm that included hailstones is known from Ugarit.

    0
    0
  • Golf writers have always waxed poetic about the unique challenge of golf caused by the offset hosel.

    0
    0
  • Finally, Jill Walker's innovatively written hypertext pays homage to the text it studies by taking on a poetic, evocative style.

    0
    0
  • Guns can become hypnotic, poetic: pulled the guns down from the rack.

    0
    0
  • This new body of work, with its highly-charged poetic imagery, has a deliberate ambiguity which enriches it no end.

    0
    0
  • Or, it is enough, but the poetic imagination involved doesn't extend far enough to make it compelling.

    0
    0
  • These are all gems, songs with poetic lyrics and unforgettable melodies, all infused with true spirit.

    0
    0
  • Others sought inspiration from the old masters, exotic or poetic subjects.

    0
    0
  • An elegant embossed logo of the ottoman becomes a poetic a kansas city.

    0
    0
  • The rich, poetic lyrics were listened to in hushed silence, creating a great sense of atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • Verlaine's poetic lyricism and crystalline guitar lines made for a new music that was a genre in itself.

    0
    0
  • Heaney may be using it comically - it comes from the bleak opening of T.S. Eliot's modernist poetic manifesto, The Waste Land.

    0
    0
  • Its mead is representative of the moon's light, the true mead of poetic inspiration, which has its origin in the sun.

    0
    0
  • In Paris, he hoped for peace and to rediscover his poetic muse.

    0
    0
  • The Miltonic narrator 's central strategy here is to empty himself of poetic agency.

    0
    0
  • pentameter couplets, sometimes called heroic couplets, the favorite poetic form of the eighteenth century.

    0
    0
  • I Hamlet's mourning black seems to be a form of armor which Milton's poetic personae prefer to wear.

    0
    0
  • pithy phrases of almost poetic quality.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, the narration is too self-consciously poetic, so judging by his gallery comments Frankie wouldn't think much of his own voiceover.

    0
    0
  • In the early 70's I purchased JM's album Bless The Weather solely on the premise of the wonderfully poetic cover art.

    0
    0
  • The reverse is also attractively painted, showing a truly poetic landscape.

    0
    0
  • Every move is beautiful, in sequence almost poetic.

    0
    0
  • His is a tough and deeply poetic vision that will always be relevant.

    0
    0
  • Much of their early work is highly poetic, also very much in the Romantic mode.

    0
    0
  • poetic diction, some by awkwardness of expression.

    0
    0
  • poetic sensibility that colored every action.

    0
    0
  • poetic lyrics were listened to in hushed silence, creating a great sense of atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • poetic prose that can carry an enormous punch.

    0
    0
  • poetic imagery is very vivid in this chapter.

    0
    0
  • poetic genius " together with an early poem.

    0
    0
  • To a hidden most feds resist him waxing poetic effectively undermined the.

    0
    0
  • Jahnke is all soul and this makes him sound poetic.

    0
    0
  • poetic in places.

    0
    0
  • Darwin credited her with inventing a poetic form, the epic elegy and she is clearly a major contributor to romantic poetry.

    0
    0
  • None of the above restrictions prevents the writer from producing the kind of resonant and even poetic prose that can carry an enormous punch.

    0
    0
  • quart in a poetic pint pot.

    0
    0
  • As an esthetic or poetic this is entirely retrograde and reveals a mistaken view of the creative process.

    0
    0
  • Her failure, tho, has a poetic rightness in this double bill.

    0
    0
  • But even more exciting was the poetic sensibility that colored every action.

    0
    0
  • It is only syntactic irregularity, then, that requires a special poetic license.

    0
    0
  • This is a poetic way of thinking about it, via the poetic trope of personification.

    0
    0
  • As reconstructed by Lowes, the poetic utterance is a latent presence that speaks in and through the poet.

    0
    0
  • stunning visuals & music & a lot of water combine in this playful and poetic production.

    0
    0
  • One may say of him, what Auden said of Cavafy, that his attitude toward poetic vocation was an aristocratic one.

    0
    0
  • The desert and time's collapsing a wooden shack and cross but leaving erect a flimsy wood windmill, is poetic license.

    0
    0
  • To suppose that all mythical stories are fables invented by the philosophers is to write history backwards avid confound the instinctive, impersonal, poetic wisdom of the earliest times with the civilized, rational and abstract occult wisdom of our own day.

    0
    0
  • But how can we explain the formation of this poetic wisdom, which, albeit the work of ignorant men, has so deep and intrinsic a philosophic value?

    0
    0
  • From the savage state, through the terror that gives birth to religions, through the creation of families by marriage, through burial rites and piety towards the dead, men approach civilization with the aid of poetic wisdom, and pass through three periods - the divine, heroic and human - in which they have three forms of government, language, literature, jurisprudence and civilization.

    0
    0
  • Vico undoubtedly considered the poetic wisdom of the Middle Ages to be different from that of the Greeks and Romans, and Christianity to be very superior to the pagan religion.

    0
    0
  • His poetic facundia, or command of striking and appropriate language, is more noticeable still.

    0
    0
  • Alexander himself first visited the site of Troy and there went through those dramatic acts of sacrifice to the Ilian Athena, assumption of the shield believed to be that of Achilles and offerings to the great Homeric dead, which are significant of the poetic glamour shed, in the young king's mind, over the whole enterprise, and which men will estimate differently according to the part they assign to imagination in human affairs.

    0
    0
  • A word must be given to one of Bruno's contemporary compatriots, namely Campanella, who gave poetic expression to that system of universal vitalism which Bruno developed.

    0
    0
  • Nor can he equal the sublime lyrism of his model; but he is little inferior in poetic conception, in dignified idealization, and in picturesque imagery.

    0
    0
  • When writing The Lover's Melancholy, it would seem that Ford had not yet become fully aware of the bent of his own dramatic genius, although he was already master of his powers of poetic expression.

    0
    0
  • The historical traditions are to be supplemented by the great body of prophetic, legal and poetic literature which reveal contemporary conditions in various internal literary, theological or sociological features.

    0
    0
  • The poetic imagery in which the prophets clothed the doom of Babylon, like the romantic account of Herodotus (i.

    0
    0
  • Gay visited him in Edinburgh, and Pope praised his pastoral - compliments which were undoubtedly responsible for some of Ramsay's unhappy poetic ventures beyond his Scots vernacular.

    0
    0
  • Of a genuine poetic temperament, fervid and mobile in feeling, and of a prolific fancy, he had also the sense and wit that come of varied contact with men.

    0
    0
  • p. 99) "For sure our souls were near allied, and thine Cast in the same poetic mould with mine."

    0
    0
  • While a new spirit which compares and tolerates thus sprang from the Crusades, the large sphere of new knowledge and experience which they gave brought new material at once for scientific thought and poetic imagination.

    0
    0
  • But the new field of poetic literature afforded by the Crusades is still more striking than this development of science.

    0
    0
  • Full closes and repeated sentences no longer confuse the issue, but in their absence we begin to notice the incessant squareness of the ostensibly free rhythms. The immense amount of pageantry, though (as in Tannhauser) good in dramatic motive and executed with splendid stage-craft, goes far to stultify Wagner's already vigorous attitude of protest against grand-opera methods; by way of preparation for the ethereally poetic end he gives us a disinfected present from Meyerbeer at the beginning of the last scene, where mounted trumpeters career round the stage in full blast for three long minutes; and the prelude to the third act is an outburst of sheer gratuitous vulgarity.

    0
    0
  • In Tannhauser and Lohengrin Wagner's intellectual power develops far more rapidly in the drama than in the music. The Sangerkrieg, with its disastrous conflict between the sincere but unnatural asceticism of the orthodox Minnesingers and the irrepressible human passion of Tannhauser, is a conception the vitality of which would reduce Tannhauser's repentance to the level of Robert le Diable, were it not that the music of the Sangerkrieg has no structural power, and little distinction beyond a certain poetic value in the tones of violas which had long ago been fully exploited by Mozart and Mehul, while the music of Tannhauser's pilgrimage ranks with the Vorspiel to Lohengrin as a wonderful foreshadowing of Wagner's mature style.

    0
    0
  • But, as a rule, Wagner's poetic diction must simply be tolerated by the critic who would submit himself to Wagner's ideas.

    0
    0
  • These two works interrupted the execution of the Ring and formed the stepping-stones to Parsifal, a work which may perhaps be said to mark a further advance in that subtlety of poetic conception which, as we have seen, gave the determining impulse to Wagner's true musical style.

    0
    0
  • Wordsworth's theories of poetry - the objects best suited for poetic treatment, the characteristics of such treatment and the choice of diction suitable for the purpose - may be said to have grown out of the soil and substance of the lakes and mountains, and out of the homely lives of the people, of Cumberland and Westmoreland.

    0
    0
  • His drama, Franz von Sickingen, published in 1859, is a work of no poetic value.

    0
    0
  • Another literary seaman of this period was Sidi Ali, celebrated under his poetic pseudonym of Katibi (or Katibi Rumi, to distinguish him from the Persian poet of the same name).

    0
    0
  • Afewyearsafter Constantinople passed into the hands of the Ottomans, some ghazels, the work of the contemporary Tatar prince, Mir `Ali Shir, who under the nom de plume of Nevayi wrote much that shows true talent and poetic feeling, found their way to the Ottoman capital, where they were seen and copied by Ahmed Pasha, one of the viziers of Mahommed II.

    0
    0
  • Its poetic merits are few, and its historical accuracy is easily impugned.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, however, the brilliant epoch of the alliance of Liberalism and Catholicism, represented on its literary side by Chateaubriand and by Lamartine, to whose poetic school Herculano had belonged, was past, and fanatical attacks and the progress of events drove this former champion of the Church into conflict with the ecclesiastical authorities.

    0
    0
  • His Megacosmus and Microcosmus are little more than a poetic gloss upon the Timaeus.

    0
    0
  • Among successful dramatic pieces may be mentioned the Falu rossza (Village Scamp) of Edward Toth (1875), which represents the life of the Hungarian peasantry, and shows both poetic sentiment and dramatic skill; A szerelem harcza (Combat of Love), by Count Geza Zichy; Iskdriot (1876) and the prize tragedy Tamora (1879), by Anthony Varady; Janus (1877), by Gregory Csiky; and the dramatized romance Szep Mikhal (Handsome Michal), by Maurus Jokai (1877).

    0
    0
  • The Az utolso Bebek (The Last of the Bebeks), by the late Charles Petery, is a work rich in poetic invention, but meagre in historical matter.

    0
    0
  • 1850) leans towards the poetic manner of Tompa, with perhaps a greater power of expression than the author of the Virdgregek (" Flower-fables "); Jakab wrote Hangok az ifjusdgbol (" Sounds of Youth "), Nydr (" Summer "), both collections of lyrical poems. Louis Posa (b.

    0
    0
  • In these and other dramatic writings, more remarkable perhaps for poetic than for stage effects, Doczi still maintains his brilliancy of diction and the delicacy of his poetic touch.

    0
    0
  • The beauty and incisiveness of the poetic prophecy in xxxvii.

    0
    0
  • The cycle of poetic passages on the character and work of this "Servant," or commissioned agent of the Most High, may have formed originally a separate collation which was somewhat later inserted in the Prophecy of Restoration (i.e.

    0
    0
  • There are indeed 'but few specimens of Syriac verse which exhibit high poetic quality; except for a fairly copious and occasionally skilful use of simile and metaphor, there is little of soaring imagination in Syriac poets.

    0
    0
  • His power of initiative in poetry was very small, and the range of poetic ground which he could cover strictly limited.

    0
    0
  • The main value of the last is historical, but it too shows Dunbar's mastery of form, even when dealing with lists of poetic predecessors.

    0
    0
  • They are repelled by the dryness of much of the matter, the unsuitableness of many of the topics discussed for poetic treatment, the arbitrary assumption of premises, the entire failure to establish the connexion between the concrete phenomena which the author professes to explain and these assumptions, and the erroneousness of many of the doctrines which are stated with dogmatic confidence.

    0
    0
  • Although Ken wrote much poetry, besides his hymns, he cannot be called a great poet; but he had that fine combination of spiritual insight and feeling with poetic taste which marks all great hymnwriters.

    0
    0
  • As a hymn-writer he has had few equals in England; it can scarcely be said that even Keble, though possessed of much rarer poetic gifts, surpassed him in his own sphere (see Hymns).

    0
    0
  • The conservatism which is a feature of proper names everywhere, in consequence of which the archaic traits of a language are frequently preserved in them, just as they are preserved in terms used in the ritual and in poetic diction, is sufficient to account for the interesting fact that the Semitic settlers of the Euphrates valley in handing down their names from one generation to another retained the custom of writing them in " Sumerian " fashion, or, as we might also put it, in "ideographic" form.

    0
    0
  • As the medieval lyric decayed, more and more attention was given to the externals of poetic composition, the form, the number of syllables, the melody; and it was such externals that attracted the interest of these burgher-poets.

    0
    0
  • Within the limits imposed by the nature of his task, his treatment of his sources is remarkably free, the details unsuited for poetic handling being passed over, or, in some instances, boldly altered.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore certain that the Versus, as well as the Praefatio, attribute to the author of the Heliand a poetic rendering of the Old Testament.

    0
    0
  • It is usually maintained that this work was written before the Old Testament poems. The arguments for this view are that the Heliand contains no allusion to any foregoing poetical treatment of the antecedent history, and that the Genesis fragments exhibit a higher degree of poetic skill.

    0
    0
  • In a fragment of autobiography printed in the Athenaeum (12th of January 1850) he says that he was entirely self-taught, and attributes his poetic development to long country walks undertaken in search of wild flowers, and to a collection of books, including the works of Young, Barrow, Shenstone and Milton, bequeathed to his father by a poor clergyman.

    0
    0
  • Whatever other gifts Comte may have had - and he had many of the rarest kind, - poetic imagination was not among them, any more than poetic or emotional expression was among them.

    0
    0
  • He was past eighty when he published the collection of new verses entitled Demeter and other Poems (1889), which appeared almost simultaneously with the death of Browning, an event which left Tennyson a solitary figure indeed in poetic literature.

    0
    0
  • The hardships of his early years drove him to introspection and to solitary communion with nature, and thus favoured a more than proportionate development of the sentimental and poetic side of his mind.

    0
    0
  • First come the works on poetic literature, art, language and religion as special regions of development.

    0
    0
  • Provost Robertson belonged to the Clan Donachie, and by this marriage the robust and business-like qualities of the Lowlander were blended with the poetic imagination, the sensibility and fire of the Gael.

    0
    0
  • He was the boldest and most original of Japanese landscape artists, leaving powerful and poetic records of the scenery of his own land as well as that of China, and trusting more to the sure and sweeping stroke of the brush than to color.

    0
    0
  • It was a labor of loving service, untouched by the spirit of material gain, conferring upon the work of the older masters a dignity and poetic feeling which we vainly seek in much of the later work.

    0
    0
  • Exquisite as was already his susceptibility to beauty and his mastership of the rarest poetic material, we cannot doubt that Chenier was preparing for still higher flights of lyric passion and poetic intensity.

    0
    0
  • His diction is still very artificial, the poetic diction of Delille transformed in the direction of Hugo, but not very much.

    0
    0
  • They may have contributed to the formation of the style of comedy which appears at the very outset much more mature than that of serious poetry, tragic or epic. They gave the name and some of the characteristics to that special literary product of the Roman soil, the satura, addressed to readers, not to spectators, which ultimately was developed into pure poetic satire in Lucilius, Horace, Persius and Juvenal, into the prose and verse miscellany of Varro, and into something approaching the prose novel in Petronius.

    0
    0
  • The Sabellian races of central and eastern Italy and the Italo-Celtic and Venetian races of the north, in whom the poetic susceptibility of Italy was most manifest two generations later, were not, until after the Social war, sufficiently in sympathy with Rome, and were probably not as yet sufficiently educated to induce them to contribute their share to the national literature.

    0
    0
  • The conditions which enabled the poetic genius of Italy to come to maturity in the person of T.

    0
    0
  • His greatest contribution to poetic art consisted in the perfection which he attained in the phalaecian, the pure iambic, and the scazon metres, and in the ease and grace with which he used the language of familiar intercourse, as distinct from that of the creative imagination, of the rostra, and of the schools, to give at once a lifelike and an artistic expression to his feelings.

    0
    0
  • The poetic impulse and culture communicated to Roman literature in the last years of the republic passed on without any break of continuity into the literature of the of imperial succeeding age.

    0
    0
  • But he has ever in form so far surpassed his originals that he alone has gained for the pure didactic poem a place among the highest forms of serious poetry, while he has so transmuted his material that, without violation of truth, he has made the whole poem alive with poetic feeling.

    0
    0
  • As Virgil marks the point of maturest excellence in poetic diction and rhythm, Ovid marks that of the greatest facility.

    0
    0
  • The wealth and luxury of successive generations, the monotonous routine of life, the separation of the educated class from the higher work of the world, have produced their enervating and paralysing effect on the mainsprings of poetic and imaginative feeling.

    0
    0
  • Martial represents his age in his Epigrams, as Horace does his in his Satires and Odes, with more variety and incisive force in his sketches, though with much less poetic charm and serious meaning.

    0
    0
  • Herodotus distinguished the " local "from the " poetic " versions of events in early Spartan history, but much seems to be referable to Ephorus and the 4th-century political and rhetorical historians: - e.g.

    0
    0
  • It was in the East especially that preaching flourished: Eusebius of Caesarea, Eusebius of Emesa, Athanasius, Macarius, Cyril of Jerusalem, Ephraem Syrus among the orthodox; and of the Arians, Arius himself and Ulfilas the great Gothic missionary, are all of high quality; but above even these stand out the three Cappadocians,Basil (q.v.) of Caesarea,cultured, devout and practical; his brother Gregory of Nyssa, more inclined to the speculative and metaphysical, and Gregory (q.v.) of Nazianzus, richly endowed with poetic and oratorial gifts, the finest preacher of the three.

    0
    0
  • The Charlemagne legend was fully developed in Italy, where it was to have later a great poetic development at the hands of Boiardo, Ariosto and Tasso.

    0
    0
  • His Dramatic Works (1798) fill three, his Poetic (1735) two volumes.

    0
    0
  • As the haggada is the poetic, so the halakha is the legal element of the Talmud (q.v.), and arose out of the faction between the Sadducees, who disputed the traditions, and the Pharisees, who strove to prove their derivation from scripture.

    0
    0
  • Yet, for the most part, they either relate to objects thoroughly incapable of poetic treatment, where the writer's endeavour is rather to expound the matter fully than to render it poetically beautiful, or else expend themselves on short isolated subjects, generally myths, and are erotic in character.

    0
    0
  • Its merit lies in the genuine scientific enthusiasm and interest in nature which pervade it; and of any other poetic quality - except a certain, sometimes felicitous but oftener ill-placed, elaborated pomp of words - it may without injustice be said to be almost destitute.

    0
    0
  • He dwelt upon the illumination of the mind and soul by direct communion with the Creative Spirit; upon the spiritual and poetic monitions of external nature; and upon the benefit to man of a serene mood and a simple way of life.

    0
    0
  • Le Fatiche d'Ercole (1475) is a romance in poetic prose by Pietro Bassi, and the Dodeci Travagli di Ercole (1544) a poem by J.

    0
    0
  • The best-known poetic work produced is Domett's Ranolf and Amohia (London, 1867).

    0
    0
  • But such Huckleberry Finn is, beyond all question; it is a story of very varied interest, now comic, now almost tragic, frequently poetic, unfailingly truthful, although not always sustained at its highest level.

    0
    0
  • He was without command of poetic form, and he could only be called a philosopher in an age when the term was used with such meaningless laxity as was customary in the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • In natural soothsaying this frenzy is the necessary physical accompaniment of an afflatus which, though it seems supernatural to a rude people, is really akin to poetic inspiration.

    0
    0
  • Early distinguished by her excellence as a pianist, organist and singer, she also showed considerable ability in painting and illuminating; but a lively poetic imagination led her to the path of literature, and more especially to poetry, folk-lore and ballads.

    0
    0
  • In a poetic theophany (Ps.

    0
    0
  • These descriptive names are highly poetic, as also that of the Portuguese, " beija-flor " (flower-kisser); but the humming-bird is insectivorous, and thrusts his long bill into flowers in search of insects instead of honey.

    0
    0
  • Not only were the forms of classical poetry to be imitated, but a separate poetic language and style, distinct from those employed in prose, were to be used.

    0
    0
  • HIPPOCRENE (the " fountain of the horse," 11 "airirov xpnvn), the spring on Mt Helicon, in Boeotia, which, like the other spring there, Aganippe, was sacred to the Muses and Apollo, and hence taken as the source of poetic inspiration.

    0
    0
  • Al-Mufaddal was a contemporary of IIammad ar-Rawiya and Khalaf al-Ahmar, the famous collectors of ancient Arab poetry and tradition, and was somewhat the junior of Abu 'Amr ibn al-'Ala, the first scholar who systematically set himself to preserve the poetic literature of the Arabs.

    0
    0
  • The collection is one of the highest importance as a record of the thought and poetic art of Arabia during the time immediately preceding the appearance of the Prophet.

    0
    0
  • We are thus presented with a view of the literature of the age which is much more characteristic and comprehensive than that given by the brilliant poet to whom we owe the Ilamasa, and enables us to form a better judgment on the general level of poetic achievement.

    0
    0
  • Dr Neree Beauchemin Keeps Within Somewhat Narrow Limits In Les Floraisons Matutinales (1897); But Within Them He Shows True Poetic Genius, A Fine Sense Of Rhythm, Rhyme And Verbal Melody, A Curiosa Felicitas Of Epithet And Phrase, And So Sure An Eye For Local Colour That A Stranger Could Choose No Better Guide To The Imaginative Life Of Canada.

    0
    0
  • Although the last of these works has come down to us only in a prose version, it contains unmistakable signs of a previous poetic form, and what we possess is really only a rendering into prose similar to the transformations undergone by many of the chansons de geste (cf.

    0
    0
  • The mythic and religious legends of the people were preserved in chants, handed down from generation to generation; and in like poetic form was kept the knowledge of the people of botany, medicine and other sciences.

    0
    0
  • At court much time was given to poetic recitation, often accompanied by music, and accomplished poets received liberal rewards.

    0
    0
  • These beings are doubtless due in part to poetic imagination, but underlying this there may be a substratum of primitive religious belief.

    0
    0
  • The king is a hero of the chivalric type common in contemporary romance; freedom is a "noble thing" to be sought and won at all costs; the opponents of such freedom are shown in the dark colours which history and poetic propriety require; but there is none of the complacency of the merely provincial habit of mind.

    0
    0
  • The story of the Creation in the book of Genesis is shown, from the point of view of chronology, to be a poetic or symbolic account by the discovery of civilizations of much greater antiguity.

    0
    0
  • A comparison between Phoenician and Hebrew reveals close resemblances both in grammatical forms and in vocabulary; in some respects older features have been preserved in Phoenician, others are later, others again are peculiar to the dialect; many words poetic or rare or late in Hebrew are common in Phoenician.

    0
    0
  • 2 In a series of writings, however, extending over so long a period as those of the Old Testament, some variation or development in language is to be expected apart from the natural differences between the poetic (or prophetic) and prose styles.

    0
    0
  • In Nathan der Weise, written in the winter of 1778-1779, he gave poetic form to the ideas which he had already developed in prose.

    0
    0
  • At Lesbos she was head of a great poetic school, for poetry in that age and place was cultivated as assiduously and apparently as successfully by women as by men.

    0
    0
  • He had, moreover, considerable poetic faculty, and wrote a drama in three acts, entitled Die Entsagung (Berlin, 182 3).

    0
    0
  • He wrote, at his best, in the grand manner, melody and thought according with perfection of expression, and his finest poems have that indefinable air of the inevitable which is after all the touchstone of the poetic quality.

    0
    0
  • One may notice the great part taken by natives of the Phoenician cities in the history of later Greek philosophy, and in the poetic movement of the last century B.C., which led to fresh cultivation of the epigram.

    0
    0
  • Descriptions of heaven and hell, and allusions to God's working in Nature, not unfrequently show a certain amount of poetic power.

    0
    0
  • Of course, with such a variety of material, we cannot expect every part to be equally vivacious, or imaginative, or poetic. A decree about the right of inheritance, or a point of ritual, must necessarily be expressed in prose, if it is to be intelligible.

    0
    0
  • Mahomet himself had to disclaim such titles, because he felt himself to be a divinely inspired prophet; but we too, from our standpoint, shall fully acquit him of poetic genius.

    0
    0
  • Like many other predominantly religious characters, he had no appreciation of poetic beauty; and if we may believe one anecdote related of him, at a time when every one made verses, he affected ignorance of the most elementary rules of prosody.

    0
    0
  • Only now and then a gleam of poetic power Snras.

    0
    0
  • Under the immediate direction of Steffens, Ohlenschldger began an entirely new poetic style, and destroyed all his earlier verses.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and comic poet he followed Baggesen, and in all branches of the poetic art stood a little aside out of the main current of romanticism.

    0
    0
  • Many are the pet names, the poetic epithets bestowed upon it - the harbour of refuge, the cool cave, the island amidst the floods, the place of bliss, emancipation, liberation, safety, the supreme, the transcendent, the uncreated, the tranquil, the home of peace, the calm, the end of suffering, the medicine for all evil, the unshaken, the ambrosia, the immaterial, the imperishable, the abiding, the farther shore, the unending, the bliss of effort, the supreme joy, the ineffable, the detachment, the holy city, and many' others.

    0
    0
  • Besides writing Tell, Schiller had found time in 1803 and 1804 to translate two French comedies by Picard, and to prepare a German version of Racine's Phedre; and in the last months of his life he began a new tragedy, Demetrius, which gave every promise of being another step forward in his poetic achievement.

    0
    0
  • The rest of this wonderful storehouse of poetic romance appeared in two volumes in 1869 and 1870.

    0
    0
  • This splendid burst of poetic activity, however, had raised him to a place among the first poets of his time; and in 1877 an attempt was made to induce him to accept the professorship of poetry at Oxford.

    0
    0
  • This defence of the poetic point of view against brute force and common sense was admirably constructed and it proved one of the most popular of his plays.

    0
    0
  • Still less historical justification is to be found for the vacillating Weisslingen in whom Goethe executed poetic justice on himself as the lover of Friederike, or in the women of the play, the gentle Maria, the heartless Adelheid.

    0
    0
  • Again poetic justice is effected on the unfortunate hero who has chosen his own personal advancement in preference to his duty to the woman he loves; more pointedly than in Gotz is the moral enforced by Clavigo's worldly friend Carlos, that the ground of Clavigo's tragic end lies not so much in the defiance of a moral law as in the hero's vacillation and want of character.

    0
    0
  • The calm beauty of Greek tragedy is seen in the new iambic version of Iphigenie auf Tauris (1787); the classicism of the Renaissance gives the ground-tone to the wonderful drama of Torquato Tasso (1790), in which the conflict of poetic genius with the prosaic world is transmuted into imperishable poetry.

    0
    0
  • The change of plan explains, although it may not exculpate, the formlessness and loose construction of the work, its extremes of realistic detail and poetic allegory.

    0
    0
  • Wilhelm Meister is a work of extraordinary variety, ranging from the commonplace realism of the troupe of strolling players to the poetic romanticism of Mignon and the harper; its flashes of intuitive criticism and its weighty apothegms add to its value as a Bildungsroman in the best sense of that word.

    0
    0
  • The poem had accompanied him from early manhood to the end and was the repository for the fullest "confession" of his life; it is the poetic epitome of his experience.

    0
    0
  • The lover of Gretchen had, as far as poetic continuity is concerned, disappeared with the close of the first part.

    0
    0
  • The intrinsic value of his poetic work, regarded apart from his personality, is smaller in proportion to its bulk than is the case with many lesser German poets and with the greatest poets of other literatures.

    0
    0
  • In this last, as in his other poetic attempts, Wolfgang showed a considerable measure of inherited or acquired ability, in his wealth of language and his easy mastery of the difficulties of rhythm and rhyme.

    0
    0
  • The poems of Homer are full of descriptions of elaborate works in bronze, gold and silver, which, even when full allowance is made for poetic fancy, show clearly enough very advanced skill in the working and ornamenting of these metals.

    0
    0
  • Maeterlinck's poetic yet scientific La vie des abeilles (Paris, 1901).

    0
    0
  • Lowell was already looked upon by his companions as a man marked by wit and poetic sentiment; Miss White was admired for her beauty, her character and her intellectual gifts, and the two became thus the hero and heroine among a group of ardent young men and women.

    0
    0
  • Lowell himself had already turned his studies in dramatic and early poetic literature to account in another magazine, and continued the series in The Pioneer, besides contributing poems; but after the issue of three monthly numbers, beginning in January 1843, the magazine came to an end, partly because of a sudden disaster which befell Lowell's eyes, partly through the inexperience of the conductors and unfortunate business connexions.

    0
    0
  • This is perfectly true, and from the time of Malherbe dates that great and deplorable falling off of French poetry in its more poetic qualities, which was not made good till 1830.

    0
    0
  • The explanation is that outer speech is more obvious than inner thought, and that grammar and poetic criticism, rhetoric and dialectic preceded logic, and that out of those arts of language arose the science of reasoning.

    0
    0
  • Chalmers's, in his Poetic Remains of some of the Scottish Kings (1824); Rogers's Poetical Remains of King James the First (1873); Skeat's edition published by the Scottish Text Society (1884).

    0
    0
  • Now, with one brilliant exception - the story of the swimming-match, which is felicitously introduced and finely told - these retrospective passages are brought in more or less awkwardly, interrupt inconveniently the course of the narrative, and are too condensed and allusive in style to make any strong poetic impression.

    0
    0
  • However detrimental these redundancies may be to the poetic beauty of the epic, they add enormously to its interest for students of Germanic history or legend.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore evident that the personality of Hygelac, and the expedition in which, according to Beowulf, he died, belong not to the region of legend or poetic invention, but to that of historic fact.

    0
    0
  • His swimming exploit among the Hetware, allowance being made for poetic exaggeration, fits remarkably well into the circumstances of the story told by Gregory of Tours; and perhaps his contest with Breca may have been an exaggeration of a real incident in his career; and even if it was originally related of some other hero, its attribution to the historical Beowulf may have been occasioned by his renown as a swimmer.

    0
    0
  • There is, as we shall see afterwards, some ground for believing that there were circulated in England two rival poetic versions of the story of the encounters with supernatural beings: the one referring them to Beowulf the Dane, while the other (represented by the existing poem) attached them to the legend of the son of Ecgtheow, but ingeniously contrived to do some justice to the alternative tradition by laying the scene of the Grendel incident at the court of a Scylding king.

    0
    0
  • While, however, it thus appears that the mythic part of the Beowulf story is a portion of primeval Angle tradition, there is no proof that it was originally peculiar to the Angles; and even if it was so, it may easily have passed from them into the poetic cycles of the related peoples.

    0
    0
  • This was generally said to be done by " poetic licence," or metri gratia.

    0
    0
  • This suggested to him a distinction between what he called primary and secondary poets - the first employing poetry to relieve their own hearts, the second, poetic artists, composing poetry from some other and less impulsive motive.

    0
    0
  • The result of their endeavour was immediately apparent in the new force added to French rhythm, the new pomp, richness, colouring and polish conferred upon poetic diction.

    0
    0
  • It was under these conditions that Spenser gave his romantic epic to the world, a poem which derived its allegory from the middle ages, its decorative richness from the Italian Renaissance, its sweetness, purity, harmony and imaginative splendour from the most poetic nation of the modern world.

    0
    0
  • Depicting feudalism in the vivid colours of an age at war with feudal institutions, breathing into antique histories the breath of actual life, embracing the romance of Italy and Spain, the mysteries of German legend, the fictions of poetic fancy and the facts of daily life, humours of the moment and abstractions of philosophical speculation, in one homogeneous amalgam instinct with intense vitality, this extraordinary birth of time, with Shakespeare for the master of all ages, left a monument of the Re- naissance unrivalled for pure creative power by any other product of that epoch.

    0
    0
  • Although he was at least sixty-five years of age at this period, his poetic faculty displayed itself with more than usual warmth and lustre in the glowing series of elegies, styled Eridanus, which he poured forth to commemorate the rapture of this union.

    0
    0
  • The sentence quoted above 1 can therefore have been meant only as an apology for the absence of those poetic graces that necessarily disappear in translations into another tongue.

    0
    0
  • As the hymn is said to have been C ae dmon's first essay in verse, its lack of poetic merit is rather an argument for its genuineness than against it.

    0
    0
  • This reputation he owes partly to the vast fertility of his pen - according to the historian Sozomen he was credited with having written altogether 3,000,000 lines - partly to the elegance of his style and a certain measure of poetic inspiration, more perhaps to the strength and consistency of his personal character, and his ardour in defence of the creed formulated at Nicaea.

    0
    0
  • It must be confessed that, judged by Western standards, the poems of Ephraim are prolix and wearisome in the extreme, and are distinguished by few striking poetic beauties.

    0
    0
  • And so far as they are made the vehicle of reasoning, their efficiency is seriously hampered by their poetic form.

    0
    0
  • Mannhardt, and a lower stratum of beliefs and rites began to emerge into view beneath the poetic forms of the more developed mythologies.

    0
    0
  • Such artifices are not in themselves greater clogs on poetic expression than the excessive alliteration of old Saxon verse or the strict rhymes of modern lyrics.

    0
    0
  • They possess very slight poetic merit in their Swedish form.

    0
    0
  • This is a bombastic and vainglorious epic in honour of Charles XI., whom Eurelius adored; it is not, however, without great merits, richness of language, flowing metre, and the breadth of a genuine poetic enthusiasm.

    0
    0
  • But Runeberg is the only great poetic name of this period.

    0
    0
  • He does not possess the fiery pulse and humaneness of Burns, but the exquisite perfection of his metre and the subtle alliance of his thought and expression must always secure for him the warmest admiration of true lovers of poetic art.

    0
    0
  • Ausonius was rather a man of letters than a poet; his wide reading supplied him with material for a great variety of subjects, but his works exhibit no traces of a true poetic spirit; even his versification, though ingenious, is frequently defective.

    0
    0
  • But the glory of Agra, the most splendidly poetic building in the world, is the Taj Mahal, the mausoleum built (A.D.

    0
    0
  • Nor is anything more remarkable than the way in which Livy's fine taste and sense of proportion, his true poetic feeling and genuine enthusiasm, saved him from the besetting faults of the mode of treatment which he adopted.

    0
    0
  • From the tendency to use a poetic diction in prose, which was so conspicuous a fault in the writers of the silver age, Livy is not wholly free.

    0
    0
  • In his earlier books especially there are numerous phrases and sentences which have an unmistakably poetic ring, recalling sometimes Ennius and more often his contemporary Virgil.

    0
    0
  • But in Livy this poetic element is kept within bounds, and serves only to give warmth and vividness to the narrative.

    0
    0
  • He impressed every one as a man of extraordinary acuteness and originality; and these solid gifts were set off to the highest advantage by quickness of thought and speech, a lucid style, wit and poetic fancy, and a social warmth which made him delightful as a friend and companion.

    0
    0
  • Though these Triumphs, as a whole, are deficient in poetic inspiration, the second canto of the Trionfo della morte, in which Petrarch describes a vision of his dead love Laura, is justly famous for reserved passion and pathos tempered to a tranquil harmony.

    0
    0
  • His style ranges from the brilliancy of his youth to the sternness and sombre gravity of age, passing almost to poetic expression in its epigrammatic terseness.

    0
    0
  • But the spirit in which Emerson conceived the laws of life, reverenced them and lived them out, was the Puritan spirit, elevated, enlarged and beautified by the poetic temperament.

    0
    0
  • The bonds of conventionalism were silently dissolving in the rising glow of his poetic nature.

    0
    0
  • They were chiefly on scientific subjects, approached in a poetic spirit.

    0
    0
  • The book of laws (Vendidad) is characterized by an arid didactic tone; only here and there the legislator clothes his dicta in the guise of graceful dialogues and tales, or of poetic descriptions and similitudes; and then the book of laws is transformed into a didactic poem.

    0
    0
  • Nor can we deny to the Yashts, in their depiction of the Zoroastrian angels and their presentment of the old sagas, a certain poetic feeling, at times, and a pleasant diction.

    0
    0
  • They wrote in the Ionic dialect, in what was called the unperiodic style, and preserved the poetic character of their epic model.

    0
    0
  • To the odd terminology of Donne's poetic philosophy Dryden gave the name of "metaphysics," and Johnson, borrowing the suggestion, invented the title of the "metaphysical school" to describe, not Donne only, but all the amorous and philosophical poets who succeeded him, and who employed a similarly fantastic language, and who affected odd figurative inversions.

    0
    0
  • His nature was essentially poetic, and his life the greatest of his poems. Those who knew only the poems he wrote could form but a faint notion of the harmony, the sweetness, the manliness and the tenderness of that which he lived.

    0
    0
  • Echegaray succeeded to the literary inheritance of Lopez de Ayala and of Tamayo y Baus; and though he possesses neither the poetic imagination of the first nor the instinctive tact of the second, it is impossible to deny that he has reached a larger audience than either.

    0
    0
  • By nature the Spanish-American loves art and literature, and the poetic faculty is developed in him to a degree rarely found among the Teutonic races.

    0
    0
  • When Burke had become one of the most famous men in Europe, no visitor to his house was more welcome than the friend with whom long years before he had tried poetic flights, and exchanged all the sanguine confidences of boyhood.

    0
    0
  • In its literary form the cycle falls into three groups: - pseudohistoric: the Histories of Nennius and Geoffrey, the Brut of Wace and Layamon (see Arthur); poetic: the works of Chretien de Troyes, Thomas, Raoul de Houdenc and others (see Gawain, Perceval, Tristan, and the writers named above); prose: the largest and most important group (see Grail, Lancelot, Merlin, Tristan).

    0
    0
  • These letters, which were still popular a hundred years later, were the first example of a distinct class of Roman poetry - the poetic epistle.

    0
    0
  • The site of lolcus, the centre of so many poetic legends, is at no great distance from the modern Volo.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, it is in Snorri's Edda, a poetic grammar of a very perfect kind, that the best examples of the whole of northern poetry are to be found.

    0
    0
  • There is a fine prose translation of the Odyssey by Sweinbjorn Egillson, the lexicographer, both faithful and poetic in high degree.

    0
    0
  • The idea that he had anything to do with the poetic Edda in general, or the Sun's Song in particular, is unfounded.

    0
    0
  • These biographies are more literary and medieval and less poetic than the Icelandic sagas and king's lives; their simplicity, truth, realism and purity of style are the same.

    0
    0
  • Influenced by Jonas Hallgrimsson with regard to language and poetic diction, but keeping unbroken the traditions of Icelandic medieval poetry maintained by Sigur5r Breic fjorc6 (1798-1846), is another school of poets, very unlike the first.

    0
    0
  • To the harmful race of giants (demons), on the other hand, he was an implacable foe, and many stories are told in the poetic and prose Eddas of the destruction which he brought upon them at various times with his hammer.

    0
    0
  • The old Irish gods in the poetic romances appear to have the same origin and shade away into the fairies.

    0
    0
  • The system of Hesiod is a medley of later physical speculation and of poetic allegory, with matter which we, at least, regard as savage survivals, like the mutilation of Heaven and the swallowmyth.'

    0
    0
  • It is usual with mythologists to say that Zeus is the " All-Father," and that his amours are only a poetic way of stating that he is the parent of men.

    0
    0
  • But by a kind of poetic justice, Louis XI.

    0
    0
  • Old Portuguese, and more especially the poetic language of the I3th century, received from the language of the troubadours, in whose poetry the earlier Portuguese poets found much of their inspiration, certain words and certain turns of expression which have left upon it indelible traces.

    0
    0
  • His first book had been a failure, one critic even declaring that " Mr Cowper was certainly a good, pious man, but without one spark of poetic fire."

    0
    0
  • xi.; Letters of Lady Hesketh to John Johnson (1901); John Newton, by the Rev. Josiah Bull (1868); Cowper and Mary Unwin, by Caroline Gearey (1900); and A Concordance to the Poetic Works of William Cowper, by John Neave (1887).

    0
    0
  • At most we can only fill up the portrait by reference to the tinge of simple old-fashioned scholarship, which on its historic side made him an eager searcher for antiquities and among old records, and on its poetic occasionally stirred him to an excursion as far as that gentlest slope of Parnassus inhabited by the descriptive muse.

    0
    0
  • They showed the blase modern reader that a world no less poetic, no less primitive than that of the Origins of Christianity exists, or still existed within living memory, on the north-western coast of France.

    0
    0
  • What might be taken as poetic fancies in our text are recounted as historical facts in rabbinical literature.

    0
    0
  • But now it seemed to him that that meeting had had in it something very important and poetic.

    0
    0
  • It is very much a very high quality quart in a poetic pint pot.

    0
    0
  • As an esthetic or poetic this is entirely retrograde and reveals a mistaken view of the creative process.

    0
    0
  • Her failure, tho, has a poetic rightness in this double bill.

    0
    0
  • They and the new battleships with their graceful sheer and boiling wake evoked poetic similes.

    0
    0
  • It is only syntactic irregularity, then, that requires a special poetic license.

    0
    0
  • This is a poetic way of thinking about it, via the poetic trope of personification.

    0
    0
  • As reconstructed by Lowes, the poetic utterance is a latent presence that speaks in and through the poet.

    0
    0
  • Stunning visuals & music & a lot of water combine in this playful and poetic production.

    0
    0
  • One may say of him, what Auden said of Cavafy, that his attitude toward poetic vocation was an aristocratic one.

    0
    0
  • The desert and time 's collapsing a wooden shack and cross but leaving erect a flimsy wood windmill, is poetic license.

    0
    0
  • Her prose was quite lyrical, almost poetic in a way.

    0
    0
  • However, the descent poses nothing short of poetic trepidation that will lead a cat to freeze in its lofty position and howl into the night.

    0
    0
  • Shel Silverstein poetry is masterful because he introduces complex poetic elements in a way that appears to be simple on the surface.

    0
    0
  • The language in the book is simple yet poetic as the short story for babies unfolds a magical description of a night following a birth.

    0
    0
  • Making this type of scrapboook is a personal undertaking, so be creative and take poetic license.

    0
    0
  • Sample text for wedding invitations can be poetic or plain, formal or informal.

    0
    0
  • Christopher Knight waxed poetic about pork chops and apple sauce on The Brady Bunch.

    0
    0
  • Sure, his songs like Gravity and Say are poetic and lovely as they are, but when not writing songs, John Mayer has a decidedly bad way with words.

    0
    0
  • From there, you can further narrow your browsing in categories like Poetic, Animal Prints, Sports & Transportation and Favorites.

    0
    0
  • In fact, many of Paquin's jewelry choices have sparked interest among True Blood fans, including her popular poetic word necklace.

    0
    0
  • I Ching explanations can appear very poetic and speak to the deepest parts of us.

    0
    0
  • The ancient text is poetic and sometimes the meaning is elusive.

    0
    0
  • Bliss Poetic Cosmetic Waxing Kit is a home-use kit that contains everything you need to achieve professional waxing results in the comfort of your own bathroom.

    0
    0
  • At the very least, these areas of poetic education will provide a student with a lifetime's worth of cultural references that will enrich his conversation with erudition and elegance.

    0
    0
  • Poetic toast: The poetic toast contains a short poem or a line from a poem.

    0
    0
  • Verses for engagement announcement cards are a great option when you want to capture the sentiment of your joyous news in a poetic phrase.

    0
    0
  • Following these steps, you'll soon become comfortable with the writing style and confident in your poetic prowess.

    0
    0
  • Use online sources or local public venues to showcase your talents and amplify the volume of your poetic voice.

    0
    0
  • Born in December 1503 (scholars peg the precise date as either December 14 or December 21), Nostradamus was a French man known for writing down numerous poetic prophecies about the future.

    0
    0
  • He may be seen as secretive, mysterious and deeply poetic.

    0
    0
  • As Scorpio ponders the depths of his reality, he can become isolated by his thoughts; the result is a brooding, poetic individual.

    0
    0
  • Scorpio represents the poetic and pensive nature of water.

    0
    0
  • Aries doesn't have time for sentimentality, nostalgia, or the act of staring out windows and fostering a poetic sigh.

    0
    0
  • Dialogue (and Hindi scripts are often called dialogues) is typically cheesy by American standards, yet highly poetic at the same time.

    0
    0
  • In this way, it is reminiscent of the work of Shakespeare - written in poetic style and dealing with themes which are larger than the characters in the story.

    0
    0
  • Life Cycle: Compared to human existence, a butterfly's life cycle is the essence of poetic and purposeful simplicity.

    0
    0
  • For the poetic, and the deeply romantic, additional expressions can nuance your feelings of love for a person.

    0
    0
  • Whether you're dying to sing along with your favorite songs or you want to delve deeper into the poetic language of a particular piece, LoveToKnow Music is here to help you find music lyrics.

    0
    0
  • If you had never seen the Foo Fighters, you would never guess that the poetic and sometimes heavy lyrics come from the same guys.

    0
    0
  • Most of the songs by the male artists get a little poetic, like the first track, Ballad of Fire Starr.

    0
    0
  • In the 90s, she moved back to acting, this time taking to the big screen in Poetic Justice, opposite Tupac.

    0
    0
  • But that’s all rumors right now and I think it would be poetic.

    0
    0
  • Twitter Twitter is a perfect choice for anyone who does not enjoy waxing poetic on a given topic.

    0
    0
  • A word must be given to one of Bruno's contemporary compatriots, namely Campanella, who gave poetic expression to that system of universal vitalism which Bruno developed.

    0
    4
Browse other sentences examples →