Plymouth sentence example

plymouth
  • Part of Plymouth was established as Plympton in 1707, and part as Kingston in 1726.
    18
    10
  • The settlement was founded in 1841 by the Plymouth Company under the auspices of the New Zealand Company, and chiefly consisted of emigrants from Devonshire and Cornwall.
    6
    3
  • It is served by the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Central of New Jersey, the Delaware & Hudson, and the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley railways; there is an electric railway from Pittston to Scranton, and a belt-line electric railway connects Pittston with Avoca, Nanticoke, Plymouth and Wilkes-Barre.
    4
    2
  • At Merry Mount, in that part of Braintree which is now Quincy, a settlement was established by Thomas Morton in 1625, but the gay life of the settlers and their selling rum and firearms to the Indians greatly offended the Pilgrims of Plymouth, who in 1627 arrested Morton; soon afterward Governor John Endecott of Massachusetts Bay visited Merry Mount, rebuked the inhabitants and cut down their Maypole.
    4
    2
  • What she expected to see when she turned was Sarah's white Plymouth, but the car that stopped before the house was Allen's red Eagle Talon.
    9
    8
    Advertisement
  • Plymouth is served by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railroad.
    10
    9
  • They returned in September with a glowing account of what is now the coast of North Carolina, and on the 9th of April 1585 a colony of about 108 men under Ralph Lane (c. 1530-1603) sailed from Plymouth in a fleet of seven small vessels commanded by Sir Richard Grenville.
    4
    3
  • In 1890, at Plymouth, competitions took place of light portable engines (a) using solid fuel, (b) using liquid or gaseous fuel, grist mills for use on a farm, disintegrators, and cider-making plant for use on a farm.
    2
    1
  • The British government, on hearing of his arrival at Plymouth, decided to send him to St Helena, the formation of that island being such as to admit of a certain freedom of movement for the august captive, with none of the perils for the world at large which the tsar's choice, Elba, had involved.
    2
    1
  • David Thomson with a small company from Plymouth, England, in the spring or early summer of 1623 built and fortified a house at Little Harbor (now Odiorne's Point in the township of Rye) as a fishing and trading station.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • A physician of Plymouth, John Huxham (1694-1768), made researches on epidemic fevers, in the spirit of Sydenham and Hippocrates, which are of the highest importance.
    1
    0
  • In 1689 Was held here the first inter-colonial convention in America, when delegates from Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, Connecticut and New York met to treat with representatives of the Five Nations and to plan a system of colonial defence.
    1
    0
  • He was an accomplished musician, and assisted in the selection and arrangement of music in the Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes.
    1
    0
  • On the 16th of August he had an encounter off Plymouth with Ayscue, whom he worsted, and then cruised at the Land's End.
    1
    0
  • On the 18th of February 1653 the Dutch admiral, who had now collected the homeward-bound convoys, was off Plymouth on his way back to Holland, and was attacked by the English fleet.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Few, if any, other places in America contain so many interesting landmarks as Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Every lineal descendant, over eighteen years of age, of any passenger of the "Mayflower" is eligible to membership. Branch societies have since been organized in several of the states and in the District of Columbia, and a triennial congress is held in Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • In 1640 the Generar Court of Massachusetts declared that the representatives of Aquidneck were " not to be capitulated withal either for themselves or the people of the isle where they inhabit," and in 1644 and again in 1648 the application of the Narragansett settlers for admission to the New England Confederacy was refused except on condition that they should pass under the jurisdiction of either Massachusetts or Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • The south-east corner of the state is a sandy lowland, generally level with a slightly elevated ridge (Manomet) south of Plymouth, and well watered by ponds.
    0
    0
  • Gold has been found in small quantities in Middlesex, Norfolk and Plymouth counties.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Other ports of entry in the state in 1909 were Newburyport, Gloucester, Salem, Marblehead, Plymouth, Barnstable, Nantucket, Edgartown, New Bedford and Fall River.
    0
    0
  • In 1 9 051906 the percentage of average attendance in the public schools to the number of children (between 5 and 15 years) in the state was 80; in Barnstable county it was 95, and in Plymouth 92; and the lowest rate of any county was 68, that of Bristol.
    0
    0
  • After some exploration of the coast they made a permanent landing on the 21st of December 1620 (N.S.) at Plymouth, a harbour which had already been so named by John Smith in his maps of 1614 and 1616.
    0
    0
  • The abandonment of the communal system was begun in the latter year, and with the dissolution of the partnership with the adventurers of the London Company in 1627 Plymouth became a corporate colony with its chief authority vested in the whole body of freemen convened in the General Court.
    0
    0
  • The whole body of freemen composed the General Court until other towns than Plymouth had been organized, the first of which were Scituate in 1636 and Duxbury in 1637, and then the representative form of government was adopted and there was a gradual differentiation between Plymouth the town and Plymouth the 1882 the assessment of realty increased nearly twelve times as much as personalty.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • But all attempts to procure a royal charter for Plymouth Colony were unsuccessful, and in 1691 it was annexed to the Colony of Massachusetts Bay under what is termed the Provincial Charter.
    0
    0
  • The early history was rendered unquiet at times by wars with the Indians, the chief of which were the Pequot War in 1637, and King Philip's War in 16 75-7 6; and for better combining against these enemies, Massachusetts, with Connecticut, New Haven and New Plymouth, formed a confederacy in 1643, considered the prototype of the larger union of the colonies which conducted the War of American Independence (1 7758 3).
    0
    0
  • Plymouth Colony, acting through its agent in London, endeavoured to secure a separate existence by royal charter, but accepted finally union with Massachusetts when association with New York became the probable alternative.
    0
    0
  • They sailed in a single ship, the "Mayflower," and landed near Cape Cod, where they founded the colony of Plymouth, afterwards (1621) obtaining a patent from the council for New England.
    0
    0
  • Self-educated and early thrown upon his own resources, he began in 1814 to earn his living by working in a clock factory in Plymouth, Conn., and for many years after 1815 he peddled books and merchandise, chiefly in the southern states.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • But they realized that " the Lord had more truth and light yet to break forth of his Holy Word "; and this gave them an open-minded and tolerant spirit, which continued to mark the church in Plymouth Colony, as distinct from the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay.
    0
    0
  • It may be said to begin with the arrival in 1620 of a small company including William Brewster, elder of the refugee church in Leiden, which founded Plymouth in the modern Massachusetts in the winter of that year.
    0
    0
  • By the end of ten years the Plymouth colony numbered about 300.
    0
    0
  • But the new conditions, backed by the special influence of the Plymouth settlement, were too much for them; they became Independent, - first, perhaps, of necessity, then of conviction and choice.
    0
    0
  • The remarkable junction or fusion of the Independents or " Separatists " who emigrated from Leiden to Plymouth, Massachusetts, with the Puritan Nonconformists of Massachusetts Bay, modified Independency by the introduction of positive fraternal relations among the churches.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Notwithstanding the good claim to their province which the Dutch had established by discovery and occupancy, the government of Great Britain, basing its claim to the same territory on Cabot's discovery (1498), the patent to the London and Plymouth companies (1606), and the patent to the Council for New England (1620), contended that the Dutch were intruders.
    0
    0
  • At his call, delegates from Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and Maryland met in New York City with delegates from New York on the 1st of May 1690 to consider concerted action against the enemy, and although the expedition which they sent out was a failure it numbered 855 men, New York furnishing about one-half the men, Massachusetts one of the two commanders and Connecticut the other.
    0
    0
  • Petroleum springs have been tapped near New Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • There were in its early years six distinct settlements - Auckland, Wellington, Nelson, New Plymouth, Canterbury and Otago - between which communication was for several years irregular and infrequent.
    0
    0
  • Other bands of company's settlers in like manner landed at Nelson, Wanganui and New Plymouth, to be met with the news that the British government would not recognize the company's purchases.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In American history the name " Pilgrims " is applied to the earliest settlers of the colony of Plymouth, Massachusetts, and more specifically to the first company of emigrants, who sailed in the " Mayflower " in 1620.
    0
    0
  • They sailed from Delftshaven late in July 1620, from Southampton on the 5th of August, from Plymouth on the 6th of September, and late in December 1620 founded the colony of Plymouth, Massachusetts.
    0
    0
  • See Massachusetts; Plymouth, and Mayflower.
    0
    0
  • His parents were Quakers, and he himself for many years was in communion with the (Darbyite) Plymouth Brethren, but afterwards became a Presbyterian.
    0
    0
  • He died at Plymouth on the 24th of April 1875.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The great girder bridges over the Menai Strait and at Saltash near Plymouth, erected in the middle of the i 9th century, were entirely of wrought iron, and subsequently wrought iron girder bridges were extensively used on railways.
    0
    0
  • Brunel adopted this principle for the Saltash bridge near Plymouth, built soon after the Britannia bridge.
    0
    0
  • In Milwaukee are St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral and All Saints Protestant Episcopal Cathedral - the city is the see of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (established in 1892) and of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. Among other church structures are Plymouth Congregational, Westminster Presbyterian, Church of Gesu (Roman Catholic) and Trinity Lutheran.
    0
    0
  • In 1686 he became governor, with Boston as his capital, of the "Dominion of New England," into which Massachusetts (including Maine), Plymouth, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire were consolidated, and in 1688 his jurisdiction was extended over New York and the Jerseys.
    0
    0
  • In 1847, and again in 1853, Palmer was returned as member of Parliament for Plymouth, as a Peelite, and in the House of Commons he took an active and independent part.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At the general election on March 1857, Palmer, finding that the independent part he had taken, especially in reference to the Chinese question, had alienated from him many of his constituents in Plymouth, abandoned the prospect of re-election for that borough, and did not seek for election elsewhere.
    0
    0
  • Middleboro was settled about 1662 under the Indian name Nemasket; became a part of the township of Plymouth in 1663; and in 1669 was incorporated as a separate township, taking its name probably from Middlesbrough, North Riding, York.
    0
    0
  • Making his way up the Roanoke as far as Plymouth he there sank the ironclad at her wharf by exploding a spar-torpedo (October 27).
    0
    0
  • The plan of 1821 to use the Literary Fund for founding and maintaining a state college for instruction in the higher branches of science and literature was abandoned in 1828 and the only state institutions of learning are the Plymouth Normal School (1870) at Plymouth, the Keene Normal School (1909) at Keene, and the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, organized as a department of Dartmouth College in 1866, but removed to Durham, Strafford county, as a separate institution in 1891.
    0
    0
  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.
    0
    0
  • In 1637 he emigrated to America, and from 1638 until 1641 was an associate pastor at Plymouth, where, however, his advocacy of the baptism of infants by immersion caused dissatisfaction.
    0
    0
  • In this he played a prominent part, but the indecisive battle off Plymouth (August 16th, 1652) cost him his command, though an annuity was assigned him.
    0
    0
  • At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to a London apothecary named Bevans, and he afterwards returned to the neighbourhood of his birthplace, and carried on business at Plymouth with the co-operation of his master, under the title of Bevans & Cookworthy.
    0
    0
  • With a certain amount of financial assistance from Mr Thomas Pitt of Boconnoc (afterwards Lord Camelford) he established the Plymouth China Factory at least as early as 1768.
    0
    0
  • Apart from its historic interest there is little to be said for the Plymouth porcelain.
    0
    0
  • Little is known of him before 1628, when he was one of the six "joint adventurers" who purchased from the Plymouth Company a strip of land about 60 m.
    0
    0
  • By his associates Endecott was entrusted with the responsibility of leading the first colonists to the region, and with some sixty persons proceeded to Naumkeag (later Salem) where Roger Conant, a seceder from the colony at Plymouth, had begun a settlement two years earlier.
    0
    0
  • In 1542 he warmly supported the privileges of the Commons in the case of George Ferrers, member for Plymouth, arrested and imprisoned in London, but his conduct was inspired as usual by subservience to the court, which desired to secure a subsidy, and his opinion that the arrest was a flagrant contempt has been questioned by good authority.
    0
    0
  • Darby induced many of the inhabitants of Plymouth; England, to associate themselves with him for the promulgation of his opinions.
    0
    0
  • These divisions began at Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • The majority of the Brethren out of Plymouth supported Darby, but a minority remained with Newton.
    0
    0
  • Salem was settled in 1626 by Roger Conant (1593-1679) and a company of "planters," who in 1624 (under the Sheffield patent of 1623 for a settlement on the north shore of Massachusetts Bay) had attempted a plantation at Cape Ann, whither John Lyford and others had previously come from Plymouth through "dissatisfaction with the extreme separation from the English church."
    0
    0
  • He published Mourt's Relation, or Journal of the Beginning and Proceedings of the English Plantation at Plimoth (1622), apparently written by William Bradford and Edward Winslow, and went to Plymouth, Mass., in the "Anne" in 1623.
    0
    0
  • Fertilization has been observed at Naples; but it apparently depends on climatic conditions, as at Plymouth the oospheres have been observed to germinate parthenogenetically.
    0
    0
  • In January 1903 he addressed a Liberal meeting at Plymouth, and appeared to be attempting to concentrate Opposition criticism upon the points in the government policy which did not involve the Imperialist difference; and in discussing War Office reform he advocated the appointment of Lord Kitchener as secretary of state for war.
    0
    0
  • The occurrence of anchovies in the English Channel has been carefully studied at the laboratory of the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • In November 5890 a thousand of the fish were obtained in two days from the pilchard boats fishing near Plymouth; these were caught near the Eddystone.
    0
    0
  • In 1855 Wiseman applied for a coadjutor, and George Errington, bishop of Plymouth, his friend since boyhood, was appointed, with the title of archbishop of Trebizond.
    0
    0
  • Plymouth was a separate colony until its union with Massachusetts under the charter of 1691.
    0
    0
  • Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and New Haven constituted in their early years a group of neighbouring colonies, substantially independent of the mother country, and possessing a unity of purpose and similar institutions but in need of mutual protection from the Indians, the Dutch and the French, and also needing an arbiter to whom they might refer their own disputes, especially those relating to boundaries and trade.
    0
    0
  • This board was to meet annually in September, two years of every five at Boston, one year of every five at Hartford, one at New Haven, and one at Plymouth; special meetings also might be called by three magistrates of any of the four colonies.
    0
    0
  • Ezekiel Holliman, who had been with him at Plymouth and shared his separatist views, first baptized Williams and Williams baptized the rest of the company.
    0
    0
  • It is beautifully situated on the wooded shore of the Tamar estuary, on the lower part of which lies the great port and naval station of Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • His later years were clouded with many sorrows and disappointments; his relations with Governor Joseph Dudley were unfriendly; he lost much of his former prestige in the Church - his own congregation dwindled - and in the college; his uncle John Cotton was expelled from his 8 8 4 _ Mather, Increase charge in the Plymouth Church; his son Increase turned out a ne'er-do-well; four of his children and his second wife died in November 1713; his wife's brothers and the husbands of his sisters were ungodly and violent men; his favourite daughter Katherine, who "understood Latin and read Hebrew fluently," died in 1716; his third wife went mad in 1719; his personal enemies circulated incredible scandals about him; and in 1724-1725 he saw a Liberal once more preferred to him as a new president of Harvard.
    0
    0
  • In 1815 he was appointed to the chief command at Plymouth, which he held until his death on the 14th of April 1817.
    0
    0
  • The Cape of Good Hope subsequently " became not a colony of the Republic of the United Provinces, but a dependency of the ` Netherlands Chartered General East India Company ' for mercantile purposes; and to this fact principally can be traced the slow progress, in all but extension of territory, of a country which was settled by Europeans within thirty years of the time when the Pilgrim Fathers, the founders of a mighty empire, landed at Plymouth to plant democratic institutions and European civilization in the West."
    0
    0
  • By Barbara Villiers, Mrs Palmer, afterwards countess of Castlemaine and duchess of Cleveland, mistress en titre till she was superseded by the duchess of Portsmouth, he had Charles Fitzroy, duke of Southampton and Cleveland, Henry Fitzroy, duke of Grafton, George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, Anne, countess of Sussex, Charlotte, countess of Lichfield, and Barbara, a nun; by Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, Charles Lennox, duke of Richmond; by Lucy Walter, James, duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch, and a daughter; by Nell Gwyn, Charles Beauclerk, duke of St Albans, and James Beauclerk; by Catherine Peg, Charles Fitz Charles, earl of Plymouth; by Lady Shannon, Charlotte, countess of Yarmouth; by Mary Davis, Mary Tudor, countess of Derwentwater.
    0
    0
  • The hatching of eggs, whether of fresh-water or salt-water fishes, presents no serious difficulties, if suitable apparatus is employed; but the rearing of fry to an advanced stage, without serious losses, is less easy, and in the case of sea-fishes with pelagic eggs, the larvae of which are exceedingly small and tender, is still an unsolved problem, although recent work, carried out at the Plymouth laboratory of the Marine Biological Association, is at least promising.
    0
    0
  • See Justin Winsor, History of Duxbury (Boston, 1849); and Laurence Bradford, Historic Duxbury in Plymouth County (Boston, 1900) .
    0
    0
  • The passenger steamers to Great Britain, mainly under the control of the City of Cork Steam Packet Company, serve Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Plymouth and Southampton, London and other ports, starting from Penrose Quay on the North Channel.
    0
    0
  • In 1627 Governor William Bradford of Plymouth protested by letter to the Dutch against their occupancy, and this warning from the Pilgrims was repeated at least twice.
    0
    0
  • Many of the early converts to the New Church were among the most fervent advocates of the abolition of slavery, one was the medical officer of the first batch of convicts sent to Botany Bay; from the house of another, William Cookworthy of Plymouth, Captain Cook sailed on his last voyage.
    0
    0
  • He was chosen a member of the council of state by the restored Rump, and made colonel and governor of Plymouth, but presenting with other officers a seditious petition from the army council, on the 5th of October, was about a week later dismissed.
    0
    0
  • The great variety of the rocks which meet the sea along the south of Cornwall and Devon has led to the formation of a singularly picturesque coast - the headlands being carved from the hardest igneous rocks, the bays cut back in the softer Devonian strata, The fjord-like inlets of Falmouth, Plymouth and Dartmouth are splendid natural harbours, which would have developed great commercial ports but for their remoteness from the centres of commerce and manufactures.
    0
    0
  • The Brethren, generally known, from their place of origin, as the Plymouth Brethren, have " rooms " and adherents throughout England; the Catholic Apostolic Church ("Irvingites ") have some 80 churches; the New Jerusalem Church(Swedenborgians) had (1908) 75 " societies "; the Christian Scientists, the Christadelphians, the British Israelites and similar societies, such as the New and Latter House of Israel, the Seventh Day Baptists, deserve mention.
    0
    0
  • He was equally successful at Plymouth, where the squadron was also in a state of effervescence.
    0
    0
  • He was at Plymouth when Napoleon surrendered and was brought to England in the "Bellerophon" by Captain Maitland (1777-1839).
    0
    0
  • In 1607 the Plymouth Company, of which he was an influential member and which had received a grant of this region from James I.
    0
    0
  • In the autumn of 1835 he married Miss Lydia Jackson of Plymouth, having previously purchased a spacious old house and garden at Concord.
    0
    0
  • Ashtabula township was created in 1808, and from it the townships of Kingsville, Plymouth and Sheffield have subsequently been formed.
    0
    0
  • In 1858 appeared The Courtship of Miles Standish, based on a charming incident in the early history of the Plymouth colony, and, along with it, a number of minor poems, included under the modest title, Birds of Passage.
    0
    0
  • He studied men rather than books; became acquainted with the vices in what was then a pioneer town; and in his Seven Lectures to Young Men (1844) treated these with genuine power of realistic description and with youthful and exuberant rhetoric. Eight years later (1847) he accepted a call to the pastorate of Plymouth Church (Congregational), then newly organized in Brooklyn, New York.
    0
    0
  • There is regular communication by steamer with Cork, with Dublin and Belfast, with Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Bristol, Plymouth, Southampton, London and other ports.
    0
    0
  • Unitarian congregations were organized at Portland and Saco in 1792 by Thomas Oxnard; in 1800 the First Church in Plymouth accepted the more liberal faith.
    0
    0
  • In 1633 Captain William Holmes, of the Plymouth Colony, established near the mouth of the Farmington river a trading post, the first settlement by Englishmen in Connecticut; a more important and a permanent settlement (until 1637 called New Dorchester) was made in 1635 by immigrants from Dorchester, Massachusetts, led by the Rev. John Wareham, Roger Ludlow and others.
    0
    0
  • Among the hospitals and charitable institutions are the Minneapolis city hospital, the state hospital for crippled and deformed children, and Asbury Methodist, the Northwestern, the Deaconess', the Swedish, the St Mary's, the Maternity and the St Barnabas hospitals, Bethany Home, the Catholic orphan asylum, the Washburn orphans' home, the Pillsbury House (1906) where settlement work is carried on by the Plymouth Congregational Church, and several free dispensaries.
    0
    0
  • In London he actively promoted the colonization of the regions he had visited and, by arousing the interest of Sir Ferdinando Gorges and other influential persons, contributed toward securing the grants of the charters to the London and Plymouth Companies in 1606.
    0
    0
  • In the same year a trading post was established on the Connecticut river, near Windsor, by members of the Plymouth Colony, and John Oldham (1600-1636) of Massachusetts explored the valley and made a good report of its resources.
    0
    0
  • Their most original feature was the omission of a religious test for citizenship, though a precedent for this is to be found in the Plymouth Colony; on the other hand, the union of church and state was presumed in the preamble, and in 1659 a property qualification (the possession of an estate of X30) for suffrage was imposed by the general court.
    0
    0
  • But the Connecticut authorities in their effort to establish a legal claim to the country and to thwart the efforts of the Hamilton family to assert its claims to the territory between the Connecticut river and Narragansett Bay - claims derived from a grant of the Plymouth Company to James, marquess of Hamilton (1606-1649) in 1635 - elaborated the theory that the Plymouth Company had made a grant to Warwick, and that consequently his quit claim conferred jurisdiction upon the Say and Sele Company; but even in this event, Fenwick had no right to make his sale, for which he never secured confirmation.
    0
    0
  • Yet the newly organized squadron which in 1827 set out on the cruise which ended at Navarino only reached Plymouth with difficulty, and there had to be completely refitted.
    0
    0
  • Fairfax was there with his army on the 10th of January, 1646, about which time the blockade of Plymouth was finally abandoned.
    0
    0
  • He sat out yesterday's 3-1 defeat by Plymouth Argyle after injuring an ankle during training on Saturday.
    0
    0
  • I'll re-check once I get home, coz I'm in Plymouth atm and it's a good 3+ hours drive back.
    0
    0
  • Nobel Prize winning work on giant squid axons was undertaken at Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Heroes and Villains, Plymouth Rock, and Surf's Up, are as hauntingly beautiful as advertised.
    0
    0
  • The first of Remploy's high-street branches are opening in Birmingham, Plymouth and Leeds.
    0
    0
  • In these the Richmond cachet is in black and the New Plymouth cachet in red as in the second example.
    0
    0
  • These pages have been specially adapted for partner college students from a series of study guides at the University of Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Plymouth classical Music is a non-commercial website run to help classical concertgoers in the.. .
    0
    0
  • Proposed to establish a dockyard at Plymouth, but little was done until after the Revolution of 1688.
    0
    0
  • The daily Plymouth Bristol operation will also dovetail into the new Leeds route.
    0
    0
  • Growing up on Carswell Farm, a traditional cattle and arable farm near Plymouth, Sayers studied agricultural economics at Edinburgh University.
    0
    0
  • In 1954, checkpoints ranged from the farthest north in Berwick, Scotland, to the farthest north in Berwick, Scotland, to the farthest south, in Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • In 1954, checkpoints ranged from the farthest north in Berwick, Scotland, to the farthest south, in Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Confirmation of the starting eleven and substitutes named for this afternoon's fixture away to Plymouth Argyle.
    0
    0
  • Facilities Plymouth track has recently been awarded funding from Sport England to improve facilities including floodlights which will enable all year round training.
    0
    0
  • On 15th November 1577 Drake, with the approval of Queen Elizabeth 1, set out from Plymouth Sound with his small flotilla.
    0
    0
  • Plymouth City Council produces and tests the off-site emergency arrangements in response to a radiological hazard extending beyond the Devonport site.
    0
    0
  • So how will Plymouth gun down the high-flying hornets?
    0
    0
  • Smeaton's Tower is perhaps Plymouth's most recognizable landmark.
    0
    0
  • His Dad in Plymouth had been " not totally legit " .
    0
    0
  • It all started 12 years ago when Griff arrived in Plymouth and met up with musically like-minded Pete via the Uni's Entertainments Officer.
    0
    0
  • For a truly memorable outing ask for Melvin Clifton in Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • There's a council run apple orchard somewhere near Plymouth, built to be a bank of the English apples.
    0
    0
  • The main Plymouth Collection consists of some 280 strains from 71 genera of marine phytoplankton.
    0
    0
  • The design for the development has emerged from the university's strategic development plan for its Plymouth campus.
    0
    0
  • Mayoral referendums are being held today in Plymouth and Harlow.
    0
    0
  • He was also very interested in his family history and his ancestors the Banks family shipbuilders of Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • He moved to Plymouth in the autumn of 1971 and went on to establish a reputation based on work inspired by traditional English slipware.
    0
    0
  • The card, which has been on trial in Plymouth and Norwich, uses computer chip technology rather than a magnetic strip.
    0
    0
  • They arrived on the 4th June 1937 at Plymouth and caught a train to London.
    0
    0
  • The Royal Navy's own first training ship was HMS Implacable at Plymouth in 1855 followed by HMS Illustrious at Portsmouth.
    0
    0
  • The township of Plymouth was settled in 1769 by immigrants from New England - many originally from Plymouth, Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, Connecticut, whence the name - under the auspices of the Susquehanna Company, which claimed this region as a part of Connecticut, and Plymouth became a centre of the contest between the "Pennamites" and the "Yankees" (representing respectively Pennsylvania and Connecticut), which grew out of the conflict of the royal charter of Pennsylvania (granted in 1681) with the royal charter of Connecticut (granted in 1662), a matter which was not settled until 1799.
    0
    0
  • Two brothers, Abijah and John Smith, originally of Derby, Conn., settled in Plymouth in 1806 and began shipping coal thence in 1808; this was the beginning of the anthracite coal trade in the United States.
    0
    0
  • The borough was incorporated in 1866, being then separated from the township of Plymouth, which had a population in 1890 of 8363 and in 1900 of 9655.
    0
    0
  • The first group arrived on the 8th of February, the first division of the larger body on the 12th of May, and the five original towns of WilkesBarre (q.v.), Kingston, Hanover, 2 Plymouth and Pittston were soon founded.
    0
    0
  • The Plymouth colony was rather of the Congregational type, and the Massachusetts Bay colony rather of the Presbyterian.
    0
    0
  • The famous Plymouth Rock, a granite boulder on which the Pilgrims are said to have landed from the shallop of the "Mayflower," lies on the harbour shore near the site of the first houses built on Leyden Street, and is now sheltered by a granite canopy.
    0
    0
  • As to the truth of the tradition that the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock, consult the Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1903), 2nd series, vol.
    0
    0
  • It was in this harbour that the "Mayflower" compact (see Massachusetts) was drawn up and signed by the Pilgrims before they proceeded to Plymouth, in 1620; here John Carver was chosen the first governor of Plymouth Colony, and Provincetown was the first landing place (on Saturday the 11th [o.s.] of November) of the Pilgrims in the New World.
    0
    0
  • I was more interested, I think, in the great rock on which the Pilgrims landed than in anything else in Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • I will tell you a little story about Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Plymouth Sound and Estuaries Cornwall; Devon; Plymouth This site is representative of a ria system in southwest England.
    0
    0
  • Plymouth Sound and Estuaries Cornwall; Devon; Plymouth Plymouth Sound and Estuaries is representative of ria estuaries in southwest England.
    0
    0
  • Similar patterns were observed in the numbers of sardine eggs sampled by conventional plankton net tows at be time-series Station L5 off Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Help organize and run ' seashore safaris ' and school events around Plymouth Sound.
    0
    0
  • Cawlett sold off the Smith business in 1994 to a Plymouth businessman called Rimmer.
    0
    0
  • A slow-moving cold front was sliding up the Irish Sea giving rain from Wick to Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • The Royal Navy 's own first training ship was HMS Implacable at Plymouth in 1855 followed by HMS Illustrious at Portsmouth.
    0
    0
  • In June 2006, a wheel fell off a bus as it was traversing speed humps on Dunnet Road in Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Royal William Yard - regeneration of the former naval victualling yard in Plymouth designed by Sir John Rennie in the 1830s.
    0
    0
  • The first car he bought for himself, however, had a bit larger price tag -- a Plymouth Prowler.
    0
    0
  • It is easily accessible form Green Bay, Milwaukee and Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • In the 1980s, Chrysler's Lee Iacocca created the idea of developing the Plymouth Voyager and the Dodge Caravan on the same basic platform.
    0
    0
  • Interestingly, the harvest feast was a tradition among many Native American groups, not just those who lived near Plymouth.
    0
    0
  • Until 1939, Thanksgiving Day feasts, which commemorated the original feast in Plymouth, were held by the individual colonies and then states.
    0
    0
  • David Chokachi was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts on January 16, 1968.
    0
    0
  • It is pleasant to think that there is foundation for the familiar story of Sir Francis Drake playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe as the Armada was beating up Channel, and finishing his game before tackling the Spaniards.
    13
    13
  • Augusta occupies the site of the Indian village, Koussinoc, at which the Plymouth Colony established a trading post about 1628.
    1
    1
  • In 1661 Plymouth sold its interests, and soon afterward the four purchasers abandoned the post.
    1
    1
  • They left Plymouth on the Toth of June, but owing to a terrific storm it was not till the 25th that they met at the rendezvous.
    1
    1
  • Plymouth is a popular resort for visitors,, having, in addition to its wealth of historic associations and a healthy summer climate, thousands of acres of hilly woodland and numerous lakes and ponds well stocked with fish.
    1
    1
  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.
    1
    2
  • From it have been transferred to the fireproof building of the Registry of Deeds many interesting historical documents, among them the records of the Plymouth colony, the will of Myles Standish, and the original patent.
    2
    2
  • Modern Plymouth has varied and important manufactures comprising cordage, woollens, rubber goods, &c. In 1905 the total value of the factory products was $11,115,713, the worsted goods and cordage constituting about nine-tenths of the whole product.
    2
    2
  • Large quantities of cranberries are raised in the township. Plymouth is a port of entry, but its foreign commerce is unimportant; it has a considerable coasting trade, especially in coal and lumber.
    1
    2
  • Plymouth was the first permanent white settlement in New England, and dates its founding from the landing here from the "Mayflower" shallop of an exploring party of twelve Pilgrims, including William Bradford, on the 21st of December (N.s.) 1620.
    2
    2
  • The Indian name of the place was Patuxet, but the colonists called it New Plymouth, because they had sailed from Plymouth, England, and possibly because they were aware that the name of Plymouth had been given to the place six years before by Captain John Smith.
    2
    2
  • When and how the town and the colony of Plymouth became differentiated is not clear.
    5
    6
  • Plymouth was never incorporated as a township, but in 1633 the General Court of the colony recognized it as such by ordering that "the chiefe government be tyed to the towne of Plymouth."
    1
    1
  • He died in Plymouth on the 15th of August 1875.
    5
    6
  • His oration at Plymouth, on the 22nd of December 1820, on the second centennial anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims, placed him in this rank.
    1
    1
  • It was of about 180 tons burden, and in company with the "Speedwell" sailed from Southampton on the 5th of August 1620, the two having on board 120 Pilgrims. After two trials the "Speedwell" was pronounced unseaworthy, and the "Mayflower" sailed alone from Plymouth, England, on the 6th of September with the zoo (or 102) passengers, some 41 of whom on the lzth of November (o.s.) signed the famous "Mayflower Compact" in Provincetown Harbor, and a small party of whom, including William Bradford, sent to choose a place for settlement, landed at what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 11th of December (21st N.s.), an event which is celebrated, as Forefathers' Day, on the 22nd of December.
    1
    2
  • In Plymouth alone a fleet of some two hundred boats,assembles; and on the French side of the Channel no less capital and labour are invested in it, the vessels employed being, though less in number, larger in size than on the English side.
    1
    1
  • Those who quitted the Society maintained, for some little time, a separate organization of their own, but sooner or later most of them joined the Evangelical Church or the Plymouth Brethren.
    1
    1
  • The city has, besides, numerous fine office buildings, including that of the Society for Savings (an institution in which each depositor is virtually a stockholder), the Citizens', Rose, Williamson, Rockefeller, New England and Garfield buildings; and several beautiful churches, notably the Roman Catholic and Trinity cathedrals, the First Presbyterian ("Old Stone"), the Second Presbyterian, the First Methodist and Plymouth (Congregational) churches.
    1
    1
  • At the close of King Philip's War in 1676, Mount Hope Neck (which had been the seat of the vanquished sachem), with most of what is now the township of Bristol, was awarded to Plymouth Colony.
    2
    2
  • In 1680, immediately after Plymouth had conveyed the "Neck" to a company of four, the village was laid out; the following year, in anticipation of future commercial importance, the township and the village were named Bristol, from the town in England.
    1
    1
  • The South Australian Twopenny Magazine was published at Plymouth, England, in 1839, and the South Australian Miscellany and New Zealand Review at London in the same year.
    1
    1
  • The encounter, which lasted from the 18th to the 10th of February and ranged from Plymouth to Calais, is commonly named the "Three Days' Battle" and was described by Clarendon as "stupendous."
    1
    1
  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    1
    1
  • I have often held in my hand a little model of the Plymouth Rock which a kind gentleman gave me at Pilgrim Hall, and I have fingered its curves, the split in the centre and the embossed figures "1620," and turned over in my mind all that I knew about the wonderful story of the Pilgrims.
    1
    3
  • Her visit to Plymouth was in July.
    3
    5
  • Mother and teacher and Mrs. Hopkins and Mr. Anagnos and Mr. Rodocanachi and many other friends went to Plymouth to see many old things.
    1
    4
  • I did see the rock in Plymouth and a little ship like the Mayflower and the cradle that dear little Peregrine slept in and many old things that came in the Mayflower.
    1
    5
  • The next day we went to Plymouth by water.
    4
    16