Plough Sentence Examples

plough
  • The plough consists of several parts made of seasoned wood.

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  • The plough used has a 16-in.

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  • I plough and sow and earn my food; you should do the same."

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  • Aloe, stump of a tree, as forming the original plough.

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  • No plough is used, all work being done by a long-handled spade; and oxen are only employed to tread out the soft mud preparatory to transplanting.

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  • Each asana is named for a common thing it resembles, like the sun salutation, cobra, locust, plough, bow, eagle, tree, and the head to knee pose, to name a few.

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  • The quick-witted peasant lad ran away from the plough at an early age, finally settling down as a friar in the Johannite cloister of Antvorskov near Slagelse.

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  • Another ritual, fascinating for the glimpse it affords of very old-world thought, is that of the Diipolia, the yearly sacrifice to Zeus Polieus on the Acropolis at Athens.6 In this an ox was slaughtered with ceremonies unique in Greece; the priest who slew him fled and remained in exile for a period, and the axe that was used was tried, condemned and flung into the sea; the hide of the slain ox was stuffed with hay, and this effigy of the ox was yoked to the plough and feigned to be alive.

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  • Whilst much grass land has been laid down with the intention from the outset that it should be permanent, at the same time some considerable areas have through stress of circumstances been allowed to drift from the temporary or rotation grass area to the permanent list, and have thus still further diminished the area formerly under the dominion of the plough.

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  • He does not believe in home-spun wisdom; "How shall he become wise that holdeth the plough ?"

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  • The plough, often replaced on the steeper slopes by the hoe, is similar to that depicted in ancient Egyptian drawings, and hand irrigation is usual.

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  • Unfortunately the spread of cultivation is fatal to these oases (they are often called " islands " by the inhabitants); the axe and the plough ruthlessly destroy them.

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  • Double furrow or multiple ploughs are a combination of two or more ploughs arranged in echelon so as to plough two or more furrows.

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  • In this arrangement, a pair of locomotive engines, each having a plain winding drum fixed underneath the boiler, are placed opposite to each other at the ends of the field to be operated upon; the rope of each of the engines is attached to the plough, or other tillage implement, which is drawn to and fro betwixt them by each working in turn.

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  • The ploughing for the lord, for instance, was not only imposed in the shape of a certain number of days in the week, but took sometimes the shape of a certain number of acres which the village had to plough and to sow for the lord irrespectively of the time employed on it.

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  • Then the hide was stuffed with grass and yoked to a plough; the participants were charged with ox murder and each laid the blame on the other; finally the axe was thrown into the sea.

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  • The controlling levers and draught arrangements are similar to those in the "sulky" plough.

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  • In 1852 he began experiments in steam cultivation, and in 1858 the Royal Agricultural Society awarded him the prize of £50o which it had offered for a steam-cultivator that should be an economic substitute for the plough or the spade.

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  • Although on the large farms iron ploughs, and threshing and grain-cleaning machines, have been introduced, the small cultivator prefers the simple native plough made of wood.

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  • They drew the plough, trampled the corn sheaves round the circular threshing floor, and were sometimes employed to drag heavy weights.

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  • With the handle lengthened (86) and turned forward, this became the plough (87 is the hieroglyph, 88 the drawing, of a plough); this was always sloping, and never the upright post of the Italic type.

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  • It has cotton and knitting mills, cotton-seed oil factories, machine shops, and wagon, stove, plough and fertilizer factories; and is a market and jobbing centre for a fertile agricultural region.

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  • The name of the oasis appears in hieroglyphics as and that of its capital as Hebi (the plough).

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  • They have settled down as husbandmen, till their fields with the plough, and live in villages or towns.

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  • The labours of the United States government have much extended and very greatly improved this navigation, materially lessening also the frequency and havoc of floods along the rich bottom-lands through which the rivers plough a tortuous way in the eastern and southern portions of the state.

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  • Thus, amongst agricultural castes, those engaged in vegetable-growing or market-gardening are inferior to the genuine peasant or yeoman, such as the Jat and Rajput; whilst of these the Jat who practises widow-marriage ranks below the Rajput who prides himself on his tradition of ceremonial orthodoxy - though racially there seems little, if any, difference between the two; and the Rajput, again, is looked down upon by the Babhan of Behar because he does not, like himself, scruple to handle the plough, instead of invariably employing low-caste men for this manual labour.

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  • Twice he was called from the plough to the dictatorship of Rome in 458 and 439 In 458 he defeated the Aequians in a single day, and after entering Rome in triumph with large spoils returned to his farm.

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  • One form of plough still used consists of a crooked bough, with an iron share attached.

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  • He called into existence a formidably large number of officers to govern it, but his charter was in conflict with the other (mutually conflicting) grants of the Council for New England, east of the Piscataqua; and Gorges and his agents met with a determined opposition under the leadership of George Cleeve, the deputy-president of the Lygonia, or " Plough " Patent, which extended along the coast from 1 By this charter, issued in 1578, Sir Humphrey Gilbert was entitled to all territory lying within two hundred leagues of any colony that he might plant within six years; although it had long since lapsed, Raleigh Gilbert seems not to have been aware of it.

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  • The methods of culture are primitive, the plough commonly used being a long pole with two vertical iron teeth and a smaller pole at right angles to which oxen are attached.

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  • The smallest agricultural implement used upon them is a plough, and the largest is the elevator.

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  • Each plough covers about 250 acres in a season, travelling an average of 20 m.

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  • If one stands a few rods ahead of them they seem to be following one another in a line; but, if one stands to the right of the "gang," one sees that the line is broken, and that the second plough is a width farther in the field than the leader, and so on for the entire number.

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  • Experience shows that it costs about 70 cents an acre to plough the land in this way.

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  • They cannot be sold or mortgaged entire; the law forbids the alienation for debt of a peasant's cottage, his garden or courtyard, his plough, his last six yutara 1 of land and the cattle necessary for working his farm.

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  • A law of 1898 authorizes the government to grant concessions on very favourable terms to foreign capitalists willing to promote mining and manufactures in Servia; but in 1910 the number of large industrial establish ' One yutro is the area which two oxen can plough in a day.

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  • There are native names for the plough, so it may be assumed that some form of that implement, worked by oxen, yoked together with a simple straight yoke, was in use in early times.

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  • The plough is merely a pointed stick shod with iron, crossed by another stick which serves as a share, scratching the ground to the depth of a few inches.

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  • He is adapted alike for the plough, for heavy draught, and for slow saddle work.

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  • The men seemed to be very lazy, and may be frequently observed to plough in their cloaks.

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  • In the first half of the 18th century a plough with a short convex mould-board of wood was introduced from the Netherlands into England and, as improved at Rotherham in Yorkshire, became known as the Rotherham plough and enjoyed considerable vogue.

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  • It is in dry and sandy soil that the ant-lion lays its trap. Having marked out the chosen site by a circular groove, it starts to crawl backwards, using its abdomen as a plough to shovel up the soil.

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  • The chief implements were a wooden plough of simple and light construction, a hoe or mattock, and a light harrow.

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  • The story of Cincinnatus, twice summoned from the plough to the highest offices in the state, illustrates the status of the Roman husbandman.

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  • In the introductory paper in Maxwell's collection we are told that " The practice of draining, enclosing, summer fallowing, sowing flax, hemp, rape, turnip and grass seeds, planting cabbages after, and potatoes with, the plough, in fields of great extent, is introduced; and that, according to the general opinion, more corn grows now yearly where it was never known to grow before, these twenty years last past, than perhaps a sixth of all that the kingdom was in use to produce at any time before."

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  • The land that has been lost to the plough is found to be still further augmented when an inquiry is instituted into the area devoted to clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation.

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  • Of his three sons the youngest Colaxais is preferred by an ordeal of picking up certain objects which fell from heaven, - a plough, a yoke, an axe and a cup, - and becomes the ancestor of the ruling clan of Paralatae; from the other sons, Lipoxais and Harpoxais, are descended minor clans, and the name of the whole people is Scoloti, not Scythae, which is used by the Greeks alone.

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  • The first recorded form of plough is found on the monuments of Egypt, where it consists simply of a wooden wedge tipped with iron and fastened to a handle projecting backwards and a beam, pulled by men or oxen, projecting forwards.

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  • Many references to the plough are found in the Old Testament, notably that in I Sam.

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  • The hake is notched so that, by moving the draught-chain higher or lower thereon, the plough is caused to go more or less deeply into the ground.

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  • But in nothing was this so apparent as in agriculture; the high prices of produce holding out a great inducement to improve lands then arable, to reclaim others that had previously lain waste, and to bring much pasture-land under the plough.

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  • The turf is taken off either with the breast plough - a paring tool pushed forward from the breast or thighs by the workman - or with specially constructed paring ploughs or shims. The depth of the sod removed should not be too thick or burning is difficult and too much humus is destroyed unnecessarily, nor should it be too thin or the roots of the herbage are not effectually destroyed.

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  • When the crop is luxuriant it is necessary to put a roller over it first, to facilitate proper burial by the plough.

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  • In the latter part of the 10th century there were numerous improvements but no fundamental alterations in the construction of the ordinary plough.

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  • Except on extremely heavy soils or on shallow soils with a subsoil which it is unwise to bring upon the surface, the modern tendency is in favour of the digging plough.

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  • The land wheel and the forward furrow wheel are adjustable vertically with reference to the frame, for the purpose of controlling the action of the plough.

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  • Steam is employed as motive power when it is necessary to plough large areas in a short time.

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  • While the engine in gear is coiling in its rope and drawing the plough towards itself, the rope of the other engine is paid out with merely so much drag on it as to keep it from kinking or getting ravelled on the drum.

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  • In the United States and elsewhere engines drawing behind them a number of ploughs, arranged in echelon and taking perhaps The sub-soil plough has the beam and body but not the mould-board of an ordinary plough.

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  • Following in the furrow of an ordinary plough it breaks through the sub-soil to a depth of several inches, making it porous and penetrable by plant roots.

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  • They do not use the plough; nor do they possess buffaloes, bullocks or cows; their only agricultural implement is a long-handled iron hoe.

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  • An apocalyptic pamphlet of 1508 shows on its cover the Church upside down, with the peasant performing the services, while the priest guides the plough outside and a monk drives the horses.

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  • They have no word for plough in their language, and they still follow the nomadic form of tillage known as jum cultivation.

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  • The chief occupation of the people is agriculture, and every available patch of land has been brought under the plough.

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  • This is made clear above all by the representation of a plough drawn by two oxen in one of the very ancient rock-carvings at Tegneby in Bohuslan.

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  • In Domesday Book the heavy plough with eight oxen seems to be universal, and it can be traced back in Kent to the beginning of the 9th century.

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  • The unit was the sulung (aratrum) or ploughland (from sulk, " plough"), the fourth part of which was the geocled or geoc (jugum), originally a yoke of oxen.

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  • The soil along the foot of the mountains is generally good, and the district between Ratibor and Liegnitz, where 70 to 80% of the surface is under the plough, is reckoned one of the most fertile in Germany.

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  • It is well, therefore, to burn the tops of the plants in the fall, rather than to plough them under or to throw them on the compost heap.

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  • Plough all empty ground if practicable, and, whenever time will permit, do trenching and subsoiling.

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  • Of the whole of the Campagna less than one-tenth comes annually under the plough.

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  • In November the waters have passed off; and whenever a man can walk over the mud with a pair of bullocks, it is roughly turned over with a wooden plough, or merely the branch of a tree, and the wheat or barley crop is immediately sown.

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  • The construction of irrigation canals and ditches was for the most part brought about by farmers joining to plough out or dig ditches from the rivers, descending on a gentle grade.

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  • The skim-coulter is shaped like a miniature plough, substituted for or fixed in front of the coulter; it is used chiefly on lea land, to pare off the surface of the soil together with the vegetation thereon, and turn it into the previous furrow, where it is immediately buried by the furrow slice.

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  • The one-way plough lays the furrows alternately to its left and right, so that they all slope in the same direction.

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  • One-way ploughs also leave the land level and dispense with the wide open furrows between the ridges which are left by the ordinary plough.

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  • The advantage of this plough over the ordinary form is in the absence of sliding friction, and in the mellow and porous condition in which it leaves the bottom of the furrow.

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  • Unwilling to go, he feigned madness, ploughing a field sown with salt with an ox and an ass yoked together; but Palamedes discovered his deceit by placing his infant child Telemachus in front of the plough; Odysseus afterwards revenged himself by compassing the death of Palamedes.

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  • A mattock with which to break the clods is often found represented in Anglo-Saxon drawings as subsidiary to the plough.

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  • Ptolemy catalogued 8 stars, Tycho 7 and Hevelius Of these, the seven brightest (a of the 1st magnitude, 0, y, of the 2nd magnitude, and b of the 3rd magnitude) constitute one of the most characteristic figures in the northern sky; they have received various names - Septentriones, the wagon, plough, dipper and Charles's wain (a corruption of " churl's wain," or peasant's cart).

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  • While in Sweden the free and energetic peasant was a salutary power in the state, which he served with both mind and plough, the Danish peasant was sinking to the level of a bondman.

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  • Phrygia Parorius and all the river-valleys are exceedingly fertile, and agriculture was the chief occupation of the ancient inhabitants; according to the myth, Gordius was called from the plough to the throne.

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  • And as their crews were trained warriors chosen for their high spirit, contending with a raw militia fresh from the plough, they were generally successful.

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  • As the plough is ill-suited to the rugged surface of the land, the ground is usually turned up with the spade, care being taken not to destroy the roots of the grass, as hay is the principal crop. Horses and cows are few, and the cows give little milk, in consequence of the coarse hay upon which they are fed.

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  • The furrow wheels are placed on inclined axles, the plough beam being carried on swing links, operated by a hand lever when it is necessary to raise the plough out of the furrow.

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  • He devoted much time to explaining the meaning of the various parts of the Prayer-Book, and held services twice every day, at which many of the parishioners attended, and some "let their plough rest when Mr Herbert's saints-bell rung to prayers, that they might also offer their devotions to God with him."

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  • An implement, sometimes propelled by steam, known as the draining plough, can be used for opening the trenches.

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  • The working parts of the plough are the coulter, the share, and the breast or mould-board.

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  • Improvements in the plough, harrow and roller were introduced, adapting those implements to different soils and purposes.

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  • At Eleusis also, Triptolemus, the son of Celeus, who was said to have invented the plough and to have been sent by Demeter round the world to diffuse the knowledge of agriculture, had a temple and threshing-floor.

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  • In the wheeled plough some of the weight and downward pull due to its action on the ground is taken by the wheels; the sliding friction is thus to some extent converted into a rolling friction, and the draught is correspondingly diminished.

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  • Tearing up the soil with the plough is regarded as an invasion of the domain of the earth-mother, punished by the all-devouring hunger for wealth, that increases with increasing produce.

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  • The decrease in the demand for labour is attributable chiefly to the reduction of the cultivated area and the laying down to pasture of land once under the plough, and to the increasing use of agricultural machinery.

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  • The "sulky" or riding plough is little known in the United Kingdom, but on the larger arable tracts of other countries where quick work is essential and the character of the surface permits, it is in general use.

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  • The hillsides have gradually to be terraced with the plough, upon almost an exact level.

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  • In the moist bottom-lands along the rivers it is the custom to throw the soil up in high beds with the plough, and then to cultivate them deep. This is the more common method of drainage, but it is expensive, as it has to be renewed every few years.

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  • A third type is made on the "balance" principle, two plough beams with mould-boards being placed at right angles to one another, so that while the right-hand plough is at work the left-hand is elevated above the ground.

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  • The Book of Husbandry begins with a description of the plough and other implements, after which about a third part of it is occupied with the several operations as they succeed one another throughout the year.

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  • Athena was said to have invented the plough, and to have taught men to tame horses and yoke oxen.

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  • On his farm Smith carried out his experiments in deep and thorough draining, and also invented a reaping machine, the subsoil plough and numerous other valuable appliances.

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  • This operation, performed in the garden by means of the spade, is carried on in the field on a larger scale by the plough,' which breaks the soil and by inverting the furrow-slice, exposes fresh surfaces to the disintegrating influence of air, rain and frost.

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  • All these types of plough are virtually hoes pulled through the ground, breaking but not inverting the soil.

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  • Plough the fallow in early spring, and plough frequently - twice in winter, twice in summer unless your land is poor, when a light ploughing in September will do.

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  • By feeding the sheep, the land is dunged as if it had been folded; and those turnips, though few or none be carried off for human use, are a very excellent improvement, nay, some reckon it so, though they only plough the turnips in without feeding."

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  • Their implements are very primitive, consisting of a plough fashioned from a fork of a tree, and a rude harrow.

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  • The ultimate origin of "plough" is unknown.

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  • In the disk plough, which is built both as a riding and a walking plough, the essential feature is the substitution of a concavo convex disk, pivoted on the plough beam, for the mould-board and share of the ordinary plough.

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  • Subsequently the digging plough came into vogue; the share being wider, a wider furrow is cut, while the slice is inverted by a short concave mould-board with a sharp turn which at the same time breaks up and pulverizes the soil after the fashion of a spade.

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  • The weight of these implements necessitates some provision for turning them at the headlands, and this is supplied either by a bowl wheel, enabling the plough to be turned on one side, or by a pair of wheels cranked so that they can be raised by a lever when the plough is working.

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  • Small's swing plough and Andrew Meikle's threshing-machine, although invented some years before this, were now perfected and brought into general use, to the great furtherance of agriculture.

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  • As these waste places have been gradually brought under the plough, in England and Scotland particularly, the haunts and means of subsistence of the linnet have been curtailed, and hence its numbers have undergone a very visible diminution throughout Great Britain.

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  • Aeetes required of Jason that he should first yoke to a plough his bulls, given him by Hephaestus, which snorted fire and had hoofs of brass, and with them plough the field of Ares.

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  • On some of the strongest land it was formerly the practice to add to and plough into it burnt clay, with the object of making the land work more easily.

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  • The hake moves laterally on a quadrant and it is thus possible to give the plough a tendency to left or right by moving the hake in the reverse direction.

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  • In this form of plough the frame is mounted on three wheels, one of which runs on the land, and the other two in the furrow.

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  • The steam-engine first took the place of horses as a threshing power in 1803, but it was not until after 1850 that it was applied to the plough and cultivator.

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  • Small, of Berwickshire, brought out a plough in which beam and handle were of wrought iron, the mould-board of cast iron.

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