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pleas

pleas Sentence Examples

  • Her parent's pleas for her return produced front page news.

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  • declares that common pleas must henceforward be heard in a fixed place.

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  • Although not a trained lawyer, he was chief justice of the court of common pleas from 1730 until his death.

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  • of three judges each, ten districts (some with sub-divisions) of the common pleas court, the superior court of Cincinnati, probate courts, courts of insolvency in Cuyahoga and Hamilton counties, juvenile courts (established in 1904), justice of the peace courts and municipal courts.

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  • In 1850 Guthrie published A Plea on behalf of Drunkards and against Drunkenness, which was followed by The Gospel in Ezekiel (1855); The City: its Sins and Sorrows (1857); Christ and the Inheritance of the Saints (1858); Seedtime and Harvest of Ragged Schools (1860), consisting of his three Pleas for Ragged Schools.

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  • In the same year he became judge of the court of common pleas for Essex county, and sole judge of the maritime court for the counties of Suffolk, Essex and Middlesex.

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  • He was a member of Rogers' Rangers in the Seven Years' War, served in the War of Independence, was for several years a member of the New Hampshire legislature, was a delegate to the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution, and was a justice of the court of common pleas for his county.

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  • to register, the pleas of the crown, an important duty hitherto left to the sheriff.

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  • to register, the pleas of the crown, an important duty hitherto left to the sheriff.

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  • In 1785 he became a commission merchant in Philadelphia; but in October 1786, soon after the legislature of Pennsylvania had passed a bill for erecting Wyoming district into the county of Luzerne, he was appointed prothonotary and a judge of the court of common pleas and clerk of the court of sessions and orphans, court for the new county, and was commissioned to organize the county.

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  • The epistle was not written until Paul had visited Thessalonica, 2 The historical and geographical facts concerning Galatia, which lead other writers to support the south Galatian theory, are stated in the preceding article on Galatia; and the question is still a matter of controversy, the division of opinion being to some extent dependent on whether it is approached from the point of view of the archaeologist or the Biblical critic. The ablest re-statements of the north Galatian theory, in the light of recent pleas for south Galatia as the destination of this epistle, may be found by the English reader in P. W.

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  • He used all his influence to hamper the president and to advance the political interests of Alexander Hamilton, until he was dismissed, after refusing to resign, in May 1800, Returning to Massachusetts, he served as chief justice of the court of common pleas of Essex county in 1802-1803.

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  • Superior court and common pleas judges serve for ten years, and justices of the peace for five.

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  • The first charter was granted by John in 1204, and conferred a gild merchant, together with freedom from all pleas except pleas of the Crown and from all secular exactions by sea and land.

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  • Its founder was a Norfolk lawyer, William Howard or Haward, who was summoned to parliament as a justice in 1295, being appointed a justice of the common pleas in 1297.

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  • " The Four Pleas of the Crown," murder, arson, rape and robbery, were relegated to the king's court, under Alexander II.

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  • The death of Sir Thomas Fleming made a vacancy in the chief justiceship of the king's bench, and Bacon, after some deliberation, proposed to the king that Coke should be removed from his place in the court of comman pleas and transferred to the king's bench.

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  • We find the records of it in the second volume of Marsden's Select Pleas in the Court of Admiralty, and in Lord Coke's writings: Reports, part xiii.

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  • Marsden, Select Pleas in the Court of Admiralty, published by the Selden Society; Godolphin, View of the Admiral Jurisdiction.

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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1817, was tutor in mathematics there in 1820-1821, was admitted to practice in the court of common pleas in December 1821, and began the practice of law in Newburyport, Mass., in 1824.

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  • They arrived in December 1676, and the case was tried before the Lords Chief Justices of the King's Bench and Common Pleas in April 1677.

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  • On the abolition of that court by the Judicature Act 1873, the jurisdiction was transferred to the common pleas division, and again on the abolition of that division was transferred to the king's bench division, in whom it is now vested.

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  • In June 1780 he was created chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, with the title of Baron Loughborough.

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  • There were in 1910 fifty-six district courts of common pleas, one for each county of forty thousand inhabitants and not more than four counties in a district.

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  • In 1380-1381 at an inquisition into the liberties of Corfe Castle, the jurors declared that from time immemorial the constable and his steward had held all pleas and amerciaments except those of the mayor's court of Pie Powder, but that the town had judgment by fire, water and combat.

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  • Thus the court of king's bench (curia regis de banco) was founded, and the foundation of the court of common pleas was provided for in one of the articles of Magna Carta.

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  • He was a judge of the New Hampshire Court of Common Pleas in 17761 777, a member (and speaker) of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1776 until 1782, a member of the state Constitutional Convention of 1778 and of the state Senate in 1784-1785, and in1783-1784was again a member of Congress.

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  • The forests of Peak and Duffield had their separate courts and officers, the justice seat of the former being in an extra-parochial part at equal distances from Castleton, Tideswell and Bowden, while the pleas of Duffield Forest were held at Tutbury.

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  • 1523), commonly ascribed to Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, a judge of the Common Pleas in the reign of Henry VIII., but more probably written by his elder brother John.

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  • In 1219 the prior secured the right of holding a court there for all crown pleas and of sitting beside the justices itinerant, .and this led to serious collision between the monks and burgesses.

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  • King John (1201) constituted Helleston a free borough, established a gild merchant, and granted the burgesses freedom from toll and other similar dues throughout the realm, and the cognizance of all pleas within the borough except crown pleas.

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  • This court was formerly the county court for the city and was held before the lord mayor, the sheriffs and aldermen, for pleas of land, common pleas and appeals from the sheriffs.

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  • Faversham was probably a member of Dover from the earliest association of the Cinque Ports, certainly as early as Henry III., who in 1252 granted among other liberties of the Cinque Ports that the barons of Faversham should plead only in Shepway Court, but ten years later transferred certain pleas to the abbot's court.

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  • At the head of the judicial system is the supreme court (1747), divided since 1893 into an appellate division and a common pleas division, with final revisory and appellate jurisdiction upon all questions of law and equity.

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  • to Henry VI., that of 1401 (2 Henry IV.) granting further to the mayor and bailiffs cognisance of all pleas to be held in the Gildhall (guyhalda).

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  • Encouraged by these and other conventions in order to obstruct the collection of debts and taxes, a mob prevented a session of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace at Northampton on the 29th of August, and in September other mobs prevented the same court from sitting in Worcester, Middlesex and Berkshire counties.

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  • At the close of the colonial era there were a court of chancery, a supreme court, circuit courts and courts of oyer and terminer which were held in the several counties by the justices of the supreme court, a court of common pleas and a court of sessions in each county, and courts held by justices of the peace in the several towns.

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  • He edited numerous volumes for the Selden Society, including Select Pleas for the Crown, 1200-1225, Select Pleas in Manorial Courts and The Court Baron; and among his principal works were Gloucester Pleas (1884), Justice and Police (1885), Bracton's Note-Book (1887), History of English Law (with Sir F.

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  • The bishops, to whom the manor belonged until the Reformation, had difficulty in enforcing their warren and other rights; in 1351 Bishop Grandison obtained an exemplification of judgments of 1282 declaring that he had pleas of withernam, view of frank pledge, the gallows and assize of bread and ale.

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  • In July 1765 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Camden, of Camden Place, in the county of Kent; and in the following year he was removed from the court of common pleas to take his seat as lord chancellor (July 30, 1766).

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  • Pleas of debt, whether involving a question of good faith or not, were to be in the jurisdiction of the king's courts.

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  • The forests of Peak and Duffield had their separate courts and officers, the justice seat of the former being in an extra-parochial part at equal distances from Castleton, Tideswell and Bowden, while the pleas of Duffield Forest were held at Tutbury.

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  • to Henry VI., that of 1401 (2 Henry IV.) granting further to the mayor and bailiffs cognisance of all pleas to be held in the Gildhall (guyhalda).

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  • in 1189 granted the burghers leave to choose their bailiffs and a justice to hold the pleas of the crown within the borough, freedom from the obligation of duel, freedom of passage and pontage through England, free warren, fishery and custom as in the time of Henry I., and other privileges.

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  • Her parent's pleas for her return produced front page news.

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  • bemoan the lack of articles - I won't, my pleas fall on deaf ears.

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  • clemency pleas to Mr Stillman's family.

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  • There were many favorable comments, and many pleas for more.

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  • Quite rightly this was said to be a misdirection, as otherwise there would be no scope for pleas of mistaken duress at all.

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  • Be to move huge expanse of to your pleas job to the.

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  • eyre rolls before 1278 can be divided into two main sections; civil pleas and crown pleas.

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  • guilty pleas are entered.

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  • ignored pleas for an inquiry.

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  • pervert justice have yet entered pleas.

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  • Bouyeri twice ignored pleas for mercy from van Gogh, prosecutors said.

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  • Fines are reduced in cases where guilty pleas are entered.

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  • This is a bit strange considering that very few cases actually get to the stages of not-guilty pleas in the Crown Court.

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  • pleas for leniency to the Committee for Compounding, but a pardon was only forthcoming in 1646, and his estate restored.

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  • Or will he simply ignore the pleas of the man recently branded an " irrelevant runt "?

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  • Archbishop talks tosh at memorial service Most Recent Comments: Pleas help Fear factor atheists say oh god during sex?

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  • unmoved by pleas for pity.

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  • On March 31, 1656, the trial of two of the alleged witches was held in the Commonhall of Pleas, Chester.

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  • Thus the court of king's bench (curia regis de banco) was founded, and the foundation of the court of common pleas was provided for in one of the articles of Magna Carta.

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  • and his successor, in place of the justiciar - who had presided over all causes vice regis- separate heads were established in the three branches into which the curia regis as a judicial body had been divided: justices of common pleas, justices of the king's bench and barons of the exchequer.

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  • declares that common pleas must henceforward be heard in a fixed place.

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  • declared that the sheriffs and other officers of the king must not hold the pleas of the crown.

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  • No bishop or archdeacon " shall any longer hold pleas in the Hundred concerning episcopal law nor draw a cause which concerns the rule of such to the judgment of men of the world " (Stubbs, Select Charters, part iii.).

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  • In the 13th century abbots sue each other in the royal court for advowsons (Selden Soc. Select Civil Pleas, i.

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  • Its founder was a Norfolk lawyer, William Howard or Haward, who was summoned to parliament as a justice in 1295, being appointed a justice of the common pleas in 1297.

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  • He was a judge of the New Hampshire Court of Common Pleas in 17761 777, a member (and speaker) of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1776 until 1782, a member of the state Constitutional Convention of 1778 and of the state Senate in 1784-1785, and in1783-1784was again a member of Congress.

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  • The judicial functions are discharged by four grades of officials - the local magistrates, the courts of common pleas, the quarterly courts (five in number) and the supreme court.

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  • He was a member of Rogers' Rangers in the Seven Years' War, served in the War of Independence, was for several years a member of the New Hampshire legislature, was a delegate to the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution, and was a justice of the court of common pleas for his county.

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  • 1523), commonly ascribed to Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, a judge of the Common Pleas in the reign of Henry VIII., but more probably written by his elder brother John.

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  • In 1850 Guthrie published A Plea on behalf of Drunkards and against Drunkenness, which was followed by The Gospel in Ezekiel (1855); The City: its Sins and Sorrows (1857); Christ and the Inheritance of the Saints (1858); Seedtime and Harvest of Ragged Schools (1860), consisting of his three Pleas for Ragged Schools.

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  • of three judges each, ten districts (some with sub-divisions) of the common pleas court, the superior court of Cincinnati, probate courts, courts of insolvency in Cuyahoga and Hamilton counties, juvenile courts (established in 1904), justice of the peace courts and municipal courts.

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  • The constitution provides that the terms of supreme and circuit judges shall be such even number of years not less than six as may be prescribed by the legislature - the statutory provision is six years - that of the judges of the common pleas six years, that of the probate judges four years, that of other judges such even number of years not exceeding six as may be prescribed by the legislature - the statutory provision is six years - and that of justices of the peace such even number of years not exceeding four as may be thus prescribed - the statutory provision is four years.

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  • c. 3) provided that "of all manner of contracts, pleas and quarrels, and other things rising within the bodies of the counties as well by land as by water, and also of wreck of the sea, the admiral's court shall have no manner of cognizance, power, nor jurisdiction; but all such manner of contracts, pleas and quarrels, and all other things rising within the bodies of counties, as well by land as by water, as afore, and also wreck of the sea, shall be tried, determined, discussed and remedied by the laws of the land, and not before nor by the admiral, nor his lieutenant in any wise.

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  • We find the records of it in the second volume of Marsden's Select Pleas in the Court of Admiralty, and in Lord Coke's writings: Reports, part xiii.

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  • and President and Judge of the same," and gives to him power to take cognizance of "all causes, civil and maritime, also all contracts, complaints, offences or suspected offences, crimes, pleas, debts, exchanges, accounts, policies of assurance, loading of ships, and all other matters and contracts which relate to freight due for the use of ships, transportation, money or bottomry; also all suits civil and maritime between merchants or between proprietors of ships and other vessels for matters in, upon, or by the sea, or public streams, or fresh-water ports, rivers, nooks and places overflown whatsoever within the ebbing and flowing of the sea and high-water mark, or upon any of the shores or banks adjacent from any of the first bridges towards the sea through England and Ireland and the dominions thereof, or elsewhere beyond the seas."

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  • Marsden, Select Pleas in the Court of Admiralty, published by the Selden Society; Godolphin, View of the Admiral Jurisdiction.

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  • Under this code a Board of Education, consisting of 15 members appointed by the Common Pleas judges, took control.

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  • In 1219 the prior secured the right of holding a court there for all crown pleas and of sitting beside the justices itinerant, .and this led to serious collision between the monks and burgesses.

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  • King John (1201) constituted Helleston a free borough, established a gild merchant, and granted the burgesses freedom from toll and other similar dues throughout the realm, and the cognizance of all pleas within the borough except crown pleas.

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  • THOMAS FITZHERBERT (1552-1640), English Jesuit, was the eldest son and heir of William Fitzherbert of Swynnerton in Staffordshire, and grandson of Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, judge of the common pleas.

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  • This court was formerly the county court for the city and was held before the lord mayor, the sheriffs and aldermen, for pleas of land, common pleas and appeals from the sheriffs.

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  • Faversham was probably a member of Dover from the earliest association of the Cinque Ports, certainly as early as Henry III., who in 1252 granted among other liberties of the Cinque Ports that the barons of Faversham should plead only in Shepway Court, but ten years later transferred certain pleas to the abbot's court.

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  • Although not a trained lawyer, he was chief justice of the court of common pleas from 1730 until his death.

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  • At the head of the judicial system is the supreme court (1747), divided since 1893 into an appellate division and a common pleas division, with final revisory and appellate jurisdiction upon all questions of law and equity.

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  • The first charter was granted by John in 1204, and conferred a gild merchant, together with freedom from all pleas except pleas of the Crown and from all secular exactions by sea and land.

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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1817, was tutor in mathematics there in 1820-1821, was admitted to practice in the court of common pleas in December 1821, and began the practice of law in Newburyport, Mass., in 1824.

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  • Encouraged by these and other conventions in order to obstruct the collection of debts and taxes, a mob prevented a session of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace at Northampton on the 29th of August, and in September other mobs prevented the same court from sitting in Worcester, Middlesex and Berkshire counties.

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  • At the close of the colonial era there were a court of chancery, a supreme court, circuit courts and courts of oyer and terminer which were held in the several counties by the justices of the supreme court, a court of common pleas and a court of sessions in each county, and courts held by justices of the peace in the several towns.

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  • The abbot of Peterborough about the 13th century confirmed to his men of Oundle freedom from tallage, "saving to himself pleas of portmanmoot and all customs pertaining to the market," and they agreed to pay 8 marks, 12S.

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  • He edited numerous volumes for the Selden Society, including Select Pleas for the Crown, 1200-1225, Select Pleas in Manorial Courts and The Court Baron; and among his principal works were Gloucester Pleas (1884), Justice and Police (1885), Bracton's Note-Book (1887), History of English Law (with Sir F.

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  • They arrived in December 1676, and the case was tried before the Lords Chief Justices of the King's Bench and Common Pleas in April 1677.

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  • Questions of law were to be referred to the decision of the court of common pleas.

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  • On the abolition of that court by the Judicature Act 1873, the jurisdiction was transferred to the common pleas division, and again on the abolition of that division was transferred to the king's bench division, in whom it is now vested.

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  • In June 1780 he was created chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, with the title of Baron Loughborough.

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  • in 1189 granted the burghers leave to choose their bailiffs and a justice to hold the pleas of the crown within the borough, freedom from the obligation of duel, freedom of passage and pontage through England, free warren, fishery and custom as in the time of Henry I., and other privileges.

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  • In the same year he became judge of the court of common pleas for Essex county, and sole judge of the maritime court for the counties of Suffolk, Essex and Middlesex.

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  • In 1785 he became a commission merchant in Philadelphia; but in October 1786, soon after the legislature of Pennsylvania had passed a bill for erecting Wyoming district into the county of Luzerne, he was appointed prothonotary and a judge of the court of common pleas and clerk of the court of sessions and orphans, court for the new county, and was commissioned to organize the county.

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  • He used all his influence to hamper the president and to advance the political interests of Alexander Hamilton, until he was dismissed, after refusing to resign, in May 1800, Returning to Massachusetts, he served as chief justice of the court of common pleas of Essex county in 1802-1803.

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  • There were in 1910 fifty-six district courts of common pleas, one for each county of forty thousand inhabitants and not more than four counties in a district.

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  • The judges of the common pleas are also judges of the courts of oyer and terminer, quarter sessions of the peace and general gaol delivery, and the orphans' courts, although there are separate orphans' courts in the counties (ten in 1909) having a population of more than one hundred and fifty thousand.

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  • The constitution of 1776 provided for terms of seven years, that of 1790 restored the life term, and that of 1838 fixed the terms for judges of the common pleas at ten years and judges of the supreme court at fifteen.

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  • Superior court and common pleas judges serve for ten years, and justices of the peace for five.

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  • His dying depositions, which were taken by Sir Francis North, chief justice of the common pleas, revealed nothing of importance.

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  • These personal merits and this political necessity were the only pleas advanced in a letter to her ambassador in England.

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  • The mittimus was pronounced illegal and irregular, and Baxter procured a habeas corpus in the court of common pleas.

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  • In 1606 Coke was made chief justice of the common pleas, but in 1613 he was removed to the office of chief justice of the king's bench, which gave him less opportunity of interfering with the court.

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  • He was judge of the New York court of common pleas in 1890-1894, and of the New York supreme court in 18 941899.

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  • In 1380-1381 at an inquisition into the liberties of Corfe Castle, the jurors declared that from time immemorial the constable and his steward had held all pleas and amerciaments except those of the mayor's court of Pie Powder, but that the town had judgment by fire, water and combat.

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  • The archbishops appear to have had almost royal power throughout the liberty, including the rights of trying all pleas of the crown in their court, of taking inquisitions and of taxation.

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  • " The Four Pleas of the Crown," murder, arson, rape and robbery, were relegated to the king's court, under Alexander II.

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  • This, as Wolsey saw, was quite inadequate for the purpose in view; and he again instructed Gardiner, while thanking the pope for the commission actually granted, to press him once more by very urgent pleas, to send the desired decretal on, even if the latter was only to be shown to the king and himself and then destroyed.

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  • Richard (1225-1272), king of the Romans, constituted Dunheved a free borough, and granted to the burgesses freedom from pontage, stallage and suillage, liberty to elect their own reeves, exemption from all pleas outside the borough except pleas of the crown, and a site for a gild-hall.

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  • The bishops, to whom the manor belonged until the Reformation, had difficulty in enforcing their warren and other rights; in 1351 Bishop Grandison obtained an exemplification of judgments of 1282 declaring that he had pleas of withernam, view of frank pledge, the gallows and assize of bread and ale.

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  • In January 1762 Pratt was raised to the bench as chief-justice of the common pleas.

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  • In July 1765 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Camden, of Camden Place, in the county of Kent; and in the following year he was removed from the court of common pleas to take his seat as lord chancellor (July 30, 1766).

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  • The chancellor took the place of the justiciar in council, the treasurer in the exchequer, while the two offshoots from the curia regis, the common pleas and the exchequer, received chiefs of their own.

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  • Before the Judicature Act the king's bench and the common pleas were each presided over by a lord chief justice, and the lord chief justice of the king's bench was nominal head of all the three courts, and held the title of lord chief justice of England.

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  • The titles of lord chief justice of the common pleas and lord chief baron were abolished by the Judicature Act 1873, and all the common law divisions of the High Court united into the king's bench division, the president of which is the lord chief justice of England.

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  • The death of Sir Thomas Fleming made a vacancy in the chief justiceship of the king's bench, and Bacon, after some deliberation, proposed to the king that Coke should be removed from his place in the court of comman pleas and transferred to the king's bench.

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  • There are no early charters extant, but in 1586 Elizabeth acknowledged the right of the mayor and burgesses to be a body corporate and to hold a court for pleas under forty shillings, two weekly markets and four annual fairs - which rights they claimed to have exercised from time immemorial.

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  • The epistle was not written until Paul had visited Thessalonica, 2 The historical and geographical facts concerning Galatia, which lead other writers to support the south Galatian theory, are stated in the preceding article on Galatia; and the question is still a matter of controversy, the division of opinion being to some extent dependent on whether it is approached from the point of view of the archaeologist or the Biblical critic. The ablest re-statements of the north Galatian theory, in the light of recent pleas for south Galatia as the destination of this epistle, may be found by the English reader in P. W.

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  • Pleas of debt, whether involving a question of good faith or not, were to be in the jurisdiction of the king's courts.

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  • The indictments were dismissed in 1628 by Sir James Whitelocke, chief justice of Chester and a judge of the King's Bench, and in 1629 by Sir Henry Yelverton, a judge of Common Pleas and himself a strong Puritan (see Hierurgia Anglicana, ii.

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  • In 1799 the office of chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas falling vacant, Sir John Scott's claim to it was not overlooked; and after seventeen years' service in the Lower House, he entered the House of Peers as Baron Eldon.

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  • Skipwith, a judge of the common pleas, cited a statute under which for any erasure in the rolls to the deceit of the king z oo marks fine was imposed for every penny, and so Wykeham owed 960,000 marks.

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  • Later he became clerk of the court of common pleas of Hamilton (disambiguation)|Hamilton county - a lucrative position that was then most acceptable to him.

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  • His son Edmund earl of Cornwall in 1275 granted to the burgesses for a yearly rent of r8 (sold by William to Lord Somers) the borough in fee farm with its mills, tolls, fines and pleas, pleas of the crown excepted.

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  • Edward the Black Prince secured to the burgesses in 1355 immunity from pleas outside their franchise for trespass done within the borough.

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  • The state is divided into nine judicial districts, and each supreme court justice holds circuit courts within each county of a judicial district, besides being associated with the " president " judge of the court of common pleas of each county in holding the court of common pleas, the court of quarter sessions, the court of oyer and terminer and the orphans' court.

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  • One of five additional judges may hold a circuit court in the absence of a justice of the supreme court, or the " president " judge of a court of common pleas may do so if the supreme court justice requests it.

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  • The court of common pleas, which may be held either by the " president " judge or by a justice of the supreme court, may hear appeals from the " small cause court," and has original jurisdiction in all civil matters except those in which the title to real estate is in question.

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  • The court of quarter sessions, which may likewise be held by either the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court, has jurisdiction over all criminal cases except those of treason or murder.

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  • Except in counties having a population of 300,000 or more, a justice of the supreme court must preside over it, and the judge of the court of common pleas may or may not sit with him; in a county having a population of 300,000 or more the judge of the court of common pleas may sit alone.

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  • The orphans court may be held either by the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court; and it has jurisdiction over controversies respecting the existence of wills, the fairness of inventories, the right of administration and guardianship, the allowance of accounts to executors, administrators, guardians or trustees, and over suits for the recovery of legacies and distributive shares, but it may refer any matter coming before it to a master in chancery.

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  • Maitland, Select Pleas in Manorial Courts, Selden Soc. Publications I.

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  • 2 William Trent (c. 1715-1778) was a native of Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, became a captain in the state militia in 1746 and served against the French and Indians, was for many years, after 1 749, a justice of the court of common pleas and general sessions of the peace for Cumberland (disambiguation)|Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and in1750-1756was the partner of George Crogan in an extensive trade with the Indians.

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  • Soon after (22nd of January 1647) the Academy at last (it had twice rejected him on frivolous pleas) admitted the greatest of living French writers.

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  • Consistently with his desire to remain neutral, Hale took the engagement to the Commonwealth as he had done to the king, and in 1653, already serjeant, he became a judge in the court of common pleas.

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  • Of Hale's legal works the only two of importance are his Historia placitorum coronae, or History of the Pleas of the Crown (1736);; and the History of the Common Law of England, with an Analysis of the Law, &c. (1713).

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen by the lord from six men elected by the burgesses, and was to hold pleas for breach of measures and assizes.

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  • Patrick Hamilton, the Scottish martyr, was one of his pupils; and it was at Lambert's instigation that Hamilton composed his Loci communes, or Patrick's Pleas as they were popularly called in Scotland.

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  • Another constitutional ~dvance was that which substituted coroners, knights chosen by the county court, for the kings old factotum the sheriff in the duty of holding the pleas of the crown, i.e.

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  • During that period the Curia Regis threw off three offshootsthe courts of exchequer, kings bench and common pleas; and records of their judicial proceedings survive in the Plea Rolls and Year Books, some of which have been edited for the Rolls series, the Selden and other societies.

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  • pleas for the colonists with that on which they erected their ow theoretic declaration of independence.

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  • He distinguished himself as a barrister, and in 1828 was promoted to the bench as a chief-justice of the common pleas.

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  • Thus Locke's pleas for religious toleration resolve at last into his philosophical view of the foundation and limits of human knowledge.

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  • Alexander Wedderburn was created Baron Loughborough in 1780 when he became chief justice of the common pleas.

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  • After serving as United States district attorney (1839-1843), as mayor of St Louis (1842-1843), and as judge of the court of common pleas (1843-1849), he removed to Maryland (1852), and devoted himself to law practice principally in the Federal supreme cout t.

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  • He now became a professional writer of speeches or pleas (Xoyoypb40s) for the law courts, sometimes speaking himself.

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  • in 1718; and Sir Thomas (1694-1753), his literary executor and biographer, became in 1741 judge in the court of common pleas.

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  • The judicial power is vested in a Supreme Court and two circuit courts, a court of common pleas having civil jurisdiction, and a court of general sessions having criminal jurisdiction.

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  • in 1253 granted that a court of pleas should be held at Scarborough by the justices who went to hold common pleas at York; he also gave the corporation a gild merchant.

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  • His grandfather was that Spencer Cowper who, after being tried for his life on a charge of murder, lived to be a judge of the court of common pleas, while his elder brother became lord chancellor and Earl Cowper, a title which became extinct in 1905.

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  • The executive and legislative officials are chosen by the electors for a term of two years; the attorney general for four years; the judges of the supreme court of errors and the superior court, appointed by the general assembly on nomination by the governor, serve for eight, and the judges of the courts of common pleas (in Hartford, New London, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield counties) and of the district courts, chosen in like manner, serve for four years.

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  • Women may have used them as requests for children or pleas to the mother goddess to be reborn in the next world.

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  • Or will he simply ignore the pleas of the man recently branded an " irrelevant runt "?

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  • Archbishop talks tosh at memorial service Most Recent Comments: Pleas help Fear factor atheists say oh god during sex?

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  • Gentlemen, I must ask you to remain unmoved by pleas for pity.

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  • On March 31, 1656, the trial of two of the alleged witches was held in the Commonhall of Pleas, Chester.

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  • Two days before her burial, a Florida court upheld a ruling that the former Playboy model should be buried in the Bahamas despite pleas from her estranged mother, Virgie Arthur, who wanted Smith buried in Texas.

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  • Internet dating scams often involve pleas for emergency cash because the scammer owes money, had an accident, or needs an emergency visa.

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  • Ignoring pleas from his students to turn West toward the mainland, Taylor insisted on heading North - inadvertently flying Northeast and missing the mainland.

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  • The Rock Hall opened in 1995 after more than 15 years of petitions, pleas, and planning.

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  • Franchisee pleas and requests for assistance can be ignored.

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  • Marsden in his Select Pleas of the Court of Admiralty, II.

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  • declared that the sheriffs and other officers of the king must not hold the pleas of the crown.

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  • He corresponded frequently with Mary, but there being no hopes whatever of his restoration, and a new suitor being found in the duke of Norfolk, Mary demanded a divorce, on pleas which recall those of Henry VIII.

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  • The judicial functions are discharged by four grades of officials - the local magistrates, the courts of common pleas, the quarterly courts (five in number) and the supreme court.

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  • The constitution provides that the terms of supreme and circuit judges shall be such even number of years not less than six as may be prescribed by the legislature - the statutory provision is six years - that of the judges of the common pleas six years, that of the probate judges four years, that of other judges such even number of years not exceeding six as may be prescribed by the legislature - the statutory provision is six years - and that of justices of the peace such even number of years not exceeding four as may be thus prescribed - the statutory provision is four years.

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  • c. 3) provided that "of all manner of contracts, pleas and quarrels, and other things rising within the bodies of the counties as well by land as by water, and also of wreck of the sea, the admiral's court shall have no manner of cognizance, power, nor jurisdiction; but all such manner of contracts, pleas and quarrels, and all other things rising within the bodies of counties, as well by land as by water, as afore, and also wreck of the sea, shall be tried, determined, discussed and remedied by the laws of the land, and not before nor by the admiral, nor his lieutenant in any wise.

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  • Under this code a Board of Education, consisting of 15 members appointed by the Common Pleas judges, took control.

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  • THOMAS FITZHERBERT (1552-1640), English Jesuit, was the eldest son and heir of William Fitzherbert of Swynnerton in Staffordshire, and grandson of Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, judge of the common pleas.

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  • The abbot of Peterborough about the 13th century confirmed to his men of Oundle freedom from tallage, "saving to himself pleas of portmanmoot and all customs pertaining to the market," and they agreed to pay 8 marks, 12S.

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  • Questions of law were to be referred to the decision of the court of common pleas.

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  • The judges of the common pleas are also judges of the courts of oyer and terminer, quarter sessions of the peace and general gaol delivery, and the orphans' courts, although there are separate orphans' courts in the counties (ten in 1909) having a population of more than one hundred and fifty thousand.

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  • The constitution of 1776 provided for terms of seven years, that of 1790 restored the life term, and that of 1838 fixed the terms for judges of the common pleas at ten years and judges of the supreme court at fifteen.

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  • His dying depositions, which were taken by Sir Francis North, chief justice of the common pleas, revealed nothing of importance.

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  • These personal merits and this political necessity were the only pleas advanced in a letter to her ambassador in England.

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  • In 1606 Coke was made chief justice of the common pleas, but in 1613 he was removed to the office of chief justice of the king's bench, which gave him less opportunity of interfering with the court.

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  • He was judge of the New York court of common pleas in 1890-1894, and of the New York supreme court in 18 941899.

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  • The archbishops appear to have had almost royal power throughout the liberty, including the rights of trying all pleas of the crown in their court, of taking inquisitions and of taxation.

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  • This, as Wolsey saw, was quite inadequate for the purpose in view; and he again instructed Gardiner, while thanking the pope for the commission actually granted, to press him once more by very urgent pleas, to send the desired decretal on, even if the latter was only to be shown to the king and himself and then destroyed.

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  • Richard (1225-1272), king of the Romans, constituted Dunheved a free borough, and granted to the burgesses freedom from pontage, stallage and suillage, liberty to elect their own reeves, exemption from all pleas outside the borough except pleas of the crown, and a site for a gild-hall.

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  • In January 1762 Pratt was raised to the bench as chief-justice of the common pleas.

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  • The chancellor took the place of the justiciar in council, the treasurer in the exchequer, while the two offshoots from the curia regis, the common pleas and the exchequer, received chiefs of their own.

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  • Before the Judicature Act the king's bench and the common pleas were each presided over by a lord chief justice, and the lord chief justice of the king's bench was nominal head of all the three courts, and held the title of lord chief justice of England.

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  • The titles of lord chief justice of the common pleas and lord chief baron were abolished by the Judicature Act 1873, and all the common law divisions of the High Court united into the king's bench division, the president of which is the lord chief justice of England.

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  • There are no early charters extant, but in 1586 Elizabeth acknowledged the right of the mayor and burgesses to be a body corporate and to hold a court for pleas under forty shillings, two weekly markets and four annual fairs - which rights they claimed to have exercised from time immemorial.

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  • In 1799 the office of chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas falling vacant, Sir John Scott's claim to it was not overlooked; and after seventeen years' service in the Lower House, he entered the House of Peers as Baron Eldon.

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  • Later he became clerk of the court of common pleas of Hamilton (disambiguation)|Hamilton county - a lucrative position that was then most acceptable to him.

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  • His son Edmund earl of Cornwall in 1275 granted to the burgesses for a yearly rent of r8 (sold by William to Lord Somers) the borough in fee farm with its mills, tolls, fines and pleas, pleas of the crown excepted.

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  • Edward the Black Prince secured to the burgesses in 1355 immunity from pleas outside their franchise for trespass done within the borough.

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    1
  • The state is divided into nine judicial districts, and each supreme court justice holds circuit courts within each county of a judicial district, besides being associated with the " president " judge of the court of common pleas of each county in holding the court of common pleas, the court of quarter sessions, the court of oyer and terminer and the orphans' court.

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  • One of five additional judges may hold a circuit court in the absence of a justice of the supreme court, or the " president " judge of a court of common pleas may do so if the supreme court justice requests it.

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  • The court of common pleas, which may be held either by the " president " judge or by a justice of the supreme court, may hear appeals from the " small cause court," and has original jurisdiction in all civil matters except those in which the title to real estate is in question.

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    1
  • The court of quarter sessions, which may likewise be held by either the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court, has jurisdiction over all criminal cases except those of treason or murder.

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  • Except in counties having a population of 300,000 or more, a justice of the supreme court must preside over it, and the judge of the court of common pleas may or may not sit with him; in a county having a population of 300,000 or more the judge of the court of common pleas may sit alone.

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  • The orphans court may be held either by the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court; and it has jurisdiction over controversies respecting the existence of wills, the fairness of inventories, the right of administration and guardianship, the allowance of accounts to executors, administrators, guardians or trustees, and over suits for the recovery of legacies and distributive shares, but it may refer any matter coming before it to a master in chancery.

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  • Maitland, Select Pleas in Manorial Courts, Selden Soc. Publications I.

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    1
  • 2 William Trent (c. 1715-1778) was a native of Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, became a captain in the state militia in 1746 and served against the French and Indians, was for many years, after 1 749, a justice of the court of common pleas and general sessions of the peace for Cumberland (disambiguation)|Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and in1750-1756was the partner of George Crogan in an extensive trade with the Indians.

    0
    1
  • Soon after (22nd of January 1647) the Academy at last (it had twice rejected him on frivolous pleas) admitted the greatest of living French writers.

    0
    1
  • Consistently with his desire to remain neutral, Hale took the engagement to the Commonwealth as he had done to the king, and in 1653, already serjeant, he became a judge in the court of common pleas.

    0
    1
  • Of Hale's legal works the only two of importance are his Historia placitorum coronae, or History of the Pleas of the Crown (1736);; and the History of the Common Law of England, with an Analysis of the Law, &c. (1713).

    0
    1
  • The bailiff was to be chosen by the lord from six men elected by the burgesses, and was to hold pleas for breach of measures and assizes.

    0
    1
  • Patrick Hamilton, the Scottish martyr, was one of his pupils; and it was at Lambert's instigation that Hamilton composed his Loci communes, or Patrick's Pleas as they were popularly called in Scotland.

    0
    1
  • During that period the Curia Regis threw off three offshootsthe courts of exchequer, kings bench and common pleas; and records of their judicial proceedings survive in the Plea Rolls and Year Books, some of which have been edited for the Rolls series, the Selden and other societies.

    0
    1
  • pleas for the colonists with that on which they erected their ow theoretic declaration of independence.

    0
    1
  • He distinguished himself as a barrister, and in 1828 was promoted to the bench as a chief-justice of the common pleas.

    0
    1
  • Thus Locke's pleas for religious toleration resolve at last into his philosophical view of the foundation and limits of human knowledge.

    0
    1
  • Alexander Wedderburn was created Baron Loughborough in 1780 when he became chief justice of the common pleas.

    0
    1
  • After serving as United States district attorney (1839-1843), as mayor of St Louis (1842-1843), and as judge of the court of common pleas (1843-1849), he removed to Maryland (1852), and devoted himself to law practice principally in the Federal supreme cout t.

    0
    1
  • He now became a professional writer of speeches or pleas (Xoyoypb40s) for the law courts, sometimes speaking himself.

    0
    1
  • in 1718; and Sir Thomas (1694-1753), his literary executor and biographer, became in 1741 judge in the court of common pleas.

    0
    1
  • The judicial power is vested in a Supreme Court and two circuit courts, a court of common pleas having civil jurisdiction, and a court of general sessions having criminal jurisdiction.

    0
    1
  • in 1253 granted that a court of pleas should be held at Scarborough by the justices who went to hold common pleas at York; he also gave the corporation a gild merchant.

    0
    1
  • His grandfather was that Spencer Cowper who, after being tried for his life on a charge of murder, lived to be a judge of the court of common pleas, while his elder brother became lord chancellor and Earl Cowper, a title which became extinct in 1905.

    0
    1
  • The executive and legislative officials are chosen by the electors for a term of two years; the attorney general for four years; the judges of the supreme court of errors and the superior court, appointed by the general assembly on nomination by the governor, serve for eight, and the judges of the courts of common pleas (in Hartford, New London, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield counties) and of the district courts, chosen in like manner, serve for four years.

    0
    1
  • Marsden in his Select Pleas of the Court of Admiralty, II.

    0
    1
  • He corresponded frequently with Mary, but there being no hopes whatever of his restoration, and a new suitor being found in the duke of Norfolk, Mary demanded a divorce, on pleas which recall those of Henry VIII.

    0
    1
  • In the 13th century abbots sue each other in the royal court for advowsons (Selden Soc. Select Civil Pleas, i.

    0
    2
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