Plays sentence example

plays
  • By these plays and by Rioja and Consuelo he is entitled to be judged.
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  • It plays house, as well as horse, having an instinct for it.
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  • Later, when I talked to the FBI, they mentioned this turkey we're chasing plays the switch game with plates all the time.
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  • It plays, doesn't it?
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  • The characters in his plays are the stock characters of the new comedy of Athens, and they remind us also of the standing figures of the Fabulae atellanae (Maccus, Bucco, Dossennus, &c.).
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  • A performance of one of the plays is given annually.
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  • The tongue plays between the poles of two straight electromagnets.
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  • As travelling companies never visited Guadalcanal, and as ladies took no part in the representations, these three plays were written for men only.
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  • Technically speaking, I have included a few that are not dependent on the Internet per se, but in which the Internet and technology plays some role.
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  • Timocreon was also known as a composer of scolia (drinking-songs) and, according to Suidas, wrote plays in the style of the old comedy.
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  • The former of these two appendixes plays an especially important part in hepatoscopy, and, according to its shape and peculiarities, furnishes a good or bad omen.
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  • Radermacher assigns the Asinaria to a date as early as 212 B.C. Of the extant plays the Cistellaria and the Stichus must be associated with the Miles as comparatively early works; for the former was clearly produced before (though not long before) the conclusion of the Second Punic War, see 1.201 seq.; and the Stichus is proved by its didascalia to have been produced in 200 B.C. The Pseudolus and the Truculentus fall within the last seven years of his life.
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  • The new comedy of Greece was probably limited for the most part to scenes written in the metres of dialogue; it remained for Plautus, as Leo has shown, to enliven his plays with cantica modelled on the contemporary lyric verse of Greece or Magna Graecia, which was in its turn a development of the dramatic lyrics of Euripides.
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  • He read plays, attended the village fairs, shot plovers in the fenland, and enjoyed a dance with his sisters.
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  • But their name plays a part in medieval legends and romances.
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  • A player who plays in the wrong ranking order is deemed ineligible.
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  • The cortex of a young stem is usually green, and plays a more or less important part in the assimilative function.
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  • The central body probably plays the part of a nucleus and some observers consider that it has the characters of a typical nucleus with mitotic division.
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  • After the death of Margaret Plays, her widower found, with the peculiar instinct of his race, a second well-endowed wife.
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  • The distinction between this Satura and the plays of Euripides or Menander was that it had no regular plot.
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  • To judge, however, from the dedications, prologues and epilogues of his various plays, he seems to have enjoyed the patronage of the earl, afterwards duke, of Newcastle, "himself a muse" after a fashion, and Lord Craven, the supposed husband of the ex-queen of Bohemia.
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  • These three (or four) plays were among those destroyed by Warburton's cook.
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  • A few notes may be added on some of the more remarkable of the plays enumerated.
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  • The Ethiopian fauna plays but a subordinate part in Asia, intruding only into the south-western corner, and occupying the desert districts of Arabia and Syria, although some of the characteristic species reach still farther into Persia and Sind, and even into western India.
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  • At Bankside were the Bear and the Paris Gardens, used for the popular sport of bear and bull baiting; and the Globe theatre, the scene of the production of many of Shakespeare's plays for fifteen years after its erection in 1599.
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  • It is useful and necessary, and plays somewhat the same part in economic investigation as ton-mile statistics do in the administration of a railway.
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  • Usually, however, he is styled son of Sualdam, an Ulster warrior who plays a very inferior part in the cycle.
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  • This cellular layer is called the hypodermis; it is protected externally by a cuticle, a layer of matter it itself excretes, or in the excretion of which it plays, at any rate, an important part.
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  • It is interesting, too, to notice the part which the laity already plays in directing the course of the Crusade.
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  • The representation of plays was perhaps transferred to this spot from the early Orchestra in the Agora at the beginning of the 5th century B.C.; it afterwards superseded the Pnyx as the meeting-place of the Ecclesia.
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  • The arrangements of the stage and orchestra as we now see them belong to Roman times; the cavea or auditorium dates from the administration of the orator Lycurgus (337-323 B.C.), and nothing is left of the theatre in which the plays of Sophocles were acted save a few small remnants of polygonal masonry.
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  • In such crystals each component plays its own part in determining the physical properties; in other words, any physical constant of a mixed crystal can be calculated as additively composed of the constants of the two components.
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  • Every critic could recognize the structural merits of the earlier plays, for their operatic conventionalities and abruptness of motive are always intelligible as stage devices.
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  • Pales plays a very subordinate part in the religion of Rome, even the sex of the divinity being uncertain.
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  • In its final form, the outcome of an extended and complicated literary process, the Gilgamesh Epic covered twelve tablets, each tablet devoted to one adventure in which the hero plays a direct or indirect part, and the whole covering according to the most plausible estimate about 3000 lines.
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  • It is related that, during the performance of one of his plays, the scaffolding of the wooden stage gave way, in consequence of which the Athenians built a theatre of stone; but recent excavations make it doubtful whether a stone theatre existed in Athens at so early a date.
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  • Plautus in more than one place thinks it necessary to explain to the spectators of his plays that slaves at Athens enjoyed such privileges, and even licence, as must be surprising to a Roman audience.
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  • The Public Debt Administration plays so considerable a part in the finances of the Ottoman Empire, and its history is of such importance that a special section of this article will be devoted to it below.
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  • In the Norse version of the Carolingian epic Guillaume appears in his proper historical environment, as a chief under Charlemagne; but he plays a leading part in the Couronnement Looys, describing the formal associations of Louis the Pious in the empire at Aix (813, the year after Guillaume's death), and after the battle of Aliscans it is from the emperor Louis that he seeks reinforcements.
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  • It plays a great part in Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe.
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  • Though the Uruguay plays a less important part, its relations to the country are similar to those of the Parana, and its tributaries from the plateau region are similarly broken by falls and rapids.
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  • It used to be a popular resort for fish dinners, and it plays a prominent part in Charles Reade's novel of Christie Johnstone.
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  • The knowledge of law shown in the plays is very much what a universal observer must have picked up. Lawyers always underestimate the legal knowledge of an intelligent layman.
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  • Until this time no plays had been acted in Denmark except in French and German, but Holberg now determined to use his talent in the construction of Danish comedy.
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  • Of these five plays, four at least are masterpieces; and they were almost immediately followed by others.
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  • Of the institutions thus borrowed and adapted the most notable was the famous county system which still plays so conspicuous a part in Hungarian national life.
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  • His plays bear a distinctive national character, the subjects of most of them referring to the golden era of the country.
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  • As popular plays the Sdrga csiko (Bay Foal) and A giros bugyelldris (The Red Purse), by Francis Csepreghy, have their own special merit, and were often represented in 1878 and 1879 at Budapest and elsewhere.
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  • He himself wrote several plays, including adaptations of Shakespeare.
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  • Notre Image, in which Rejane made one of her last appearances, Les Sc urs d'Amour (1919), L'Homme a la Rose (1920) and La Tendresse (1921), are among his recent successful plays.
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  • As his plays show, the spectacle struck Antonio's observation, but he had to criticize with caution.
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  • His plays were published in the first two volumes of a collection entitled Theatro comico portuguez, which went through at least five editions in the 18th century, while the Alecrim e Mangerona appeared separately in some seven editions.
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  • If Terence was born in 185, he published his six plays between the ages of eighteen and twenty-five.
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  • After bringing out these plays Terence sailed from Greek parts, either to escape from the suspicion of publishing the works of others as his own, or from the desire to obtain a more intimate knowledge of that Greek life which had hitherto been known to him only in literature and which it was his professed aim to reproduce in his comedies.
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  • According to one account he was lost at sea, according to another he died at Stymphalus in Arcadia, and according to a third at Leucas, from grief at the loss by shipwreck of his baggage, containing a number of new plays which he had translated from Menander.
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  • Living in the interval between Ennius and Lucilius, whose original force and genius survive only in rude and inartistic fragments, he produced six plays, which have not only reached our time in the form in which they were given to the world, but have been read in the most critical and exacting literary epochs, and still may be read without any feeling of the need of making allowance for the rudeness of a new and undeveloped art.
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  • The prologues to Terence's plays are of high interest.
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  • The chief charge which his detractor brings against him is that of contaminatio, the combining in one play of scenes out of different Greek plays.
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  • He recriminates upon his adversary as one who, by his close adherence to his original, had turned good Greek plays into bad Latin ones.
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  • He meets the charge of receiving assistance in the composition of his plays by claiming as a great honour the favour which he enjoyed with those who were the favourites of the Roman people.
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  • But the gossip, not discouraged by Terence, lived and throve; it crops up in Cicero and Quintilian, and the ascription of the plays to Scipio had the honour to be accepted by Montaigne and rejected by Diderot.
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  • Cicero frequently reproduces his expressions, applies passages in his plays to his own circumstances, and refers to his personages as typical representations of character.'
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  • The titles and considerable fragments (about 700 lines) of some fifty plays have been preserved.
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  • Starling does not accept this view, and cannot regard as an article of faith Heidenhain's dictum that normally filtration plays no part in the formation of lymph.
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  • The Hexapylon plays an important part in the Roman siege of Syracuse.
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  • Nor can there be much doubt that the great attention bestowed on acting - the Jesuits kept up the Renaissance practice of turning schools into theatres for the performance of plays both in Latin and in the vernacular - had much to do with Voltaire's lifelong devotion to the stage.
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  • But at last, on the 13th of August 1732, he produced Zaire, the best (with Merope) of all his plays, and one of the ten or twelve best plays of the whole French classical school.
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  • Zaire, among those where love is admitted as a principal motive, and Merope, among those where this motive is excluded and kept in subordination, yield to no plays of their classe in such interest as is possible on the model, in stage effect and in uniform literary merit.
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  • In the case of Jason and the Argonauts, she plays the part of a kindly, good-natured fairy; Euripides, however, makes her a barbarous priestess of Hecate, while the Alexandrian writers depicted her in still darker colours.
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  • Neophron of Sicyon and Melanthius wrote plays of the same name.
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  • At these central theatres successful plays are allowed to " run " for protracted periods, but there are numerous fine houses in other parts of London which are generally occupied by a succession of touring companies presenting either revivals of popular plays or plays successful at the moment in the central theatres.
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  • At no other period were so many great men associated with its history; the latter years of Elizabeth's reign are specially interesting to us because it was then that Shakespeare lived in London, and introduced its streets and people into his plays.
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  • This dread of pestilence, united with a puritanic hatred of plays, made the citizens do all they could to discountenance theatrical entertainments.
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  • Shakespeare's own day, and the characters he introduces into his plays are really his own contemporaries.
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  • Of the 17 plays attributed to Eupolis, with which he obtained the first prize seven times, only fragments remain.
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  • Histrio-mastix, published in 1633, was a violent attack upon stage plays in general, in which the author pointed out that kings and emperors who had favoured the drama had been carried off by violent deaths, which assertion might easily be interpreted as a warning to the king, and applied a disgraceful epithet to actresses, which, as Henrietta Maria was taking part in the rehearsal of a ballet, was supposed to apply to the queen.
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  • Throughout the history of the Maccabean wars Gezer or Gazara plays the part of an important frontier post.
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  • Yet we must beware of regarding Barnabas as merely a fine character; he plays too prominent a part in the New Testament for any such limitation.
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  • Curiously enough, after his death Becket was the one of all his plays which enjoyed a great success on the boards.
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  • In the composition of many mountains in Hondo (the main island) granite plays a prominent part.
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  • But with the advent of the new regimen in Meiji days there arose a desire for social plays depicting the life of the modern generation, and as these croppy dramas (zampatsumono)so called in allusion to the European method of cutting the hair closewere not included in the repertoire of the orthodox theatre, amateur troupes (known as sOshi-yakusha) were organized to fill the void.
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  • His vigorous and idiomatic version of Plutarch, Vies des hommes illustres, was translated into English by Sir Thomas North, and supplied Shakespeare with materials for his Roman plays.
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  • There is also a Quaker who plays a very creditable part in Roxana (1724), and Defoe seems to have been well affected to the Friends.
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  • It dissolves most organic compounds, resins, hydrocarbons, fatty acids and many metallic salts, sometimes forming, in the latter case, crystalline compounds in which the ethyl alcohol plays a role similar to that of water of crystallization.
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  • In the later Historia of Goeffrey of Monmouth, and its French translation by Wace, Gawain plays an important and "pseudo-historic" role.
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  • As indicated by its name, which means " burnt," it is of volcanic origin, and plays an important part in the folklore and in the superstitious legends of the Hungarian people.
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  • His adventures were the subject of plays by Euripides and Goethe.
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  • For some years she was closely associated with the romanticist Gabriele d'Annunzio, and several of his plays, notably La Cittd morta (1898) and Francesca da Rimini (1901), provided her with important parts.
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  • But some of her great successes during the 'eighties and early 'nineties - the days of her chief triumphs - were in Italian versions of such plays as La Dame aux camelias, in which Sarah Bernhardt was already famous; and Madame Duse's reputation as an actress was founded less on her "creations" than on her magnificent individuality.
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  • In August 1811 Korner went to Vienna, where he devoted himself entirely to literary pursuits; he became engaged to the actress Antonie Adamberger, and, after the success of several plays produced in 1812, he was appointed poet to the Hofburgtheater.
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  • The vaticinium ex eventu plays but a very 1 His freedom from legal bondage is as undeniable as his universalism.
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  • Glacial detritus naturally plays a great part in the deposits on the polar continental shelves.
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  • As a manager, though he committed some grievous blunders, he did good service to the theatre and signally advanced the popularity of Shakespeare's plays, of which not less than twenty-four were produced at Drury Lane under his management.
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  • To the study of English dramatic literature he rendered an important service by bequeathing his then unrivalled collection of plays to the British Museum.
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  • In many processes of chemical technology filtration plays an important part.
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  • He was less productive as a poet than either Ennius or Accius; and we hear of only about twelve of his plays, founded on Greek subjects (among them the Antiope, Teucer, Armorum Judicium, Dulorestes, Chryses, Niptra, &c., most of them on subjects connected with the Trojan cycle), and one praetexta (Paulus) written in connexion with the victory of Lucius Aemilius Paulus at Pydna (168), as the Clastidium of Naevius and the Ambracia of Ennius were written in commemoration of great military successes.
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  • Ammonia is carried back to the soil by means of rain, and there plays an important part in providing nitrogenous matter which is afterwards assimilated by vegetable life.
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  • The first group comprises such subjects as land-surveying; here the measurements in the elementary stages take place in a plane, and the consideration of volumes necessarily constitutes a later stage; and the figures to be measured are mostly not movable, so that triangulation plays an important part.
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  • He plays off the sects against the Catholic Church, the primitive age against the present, Christ against the apostles, the various revisions of the Bible against the trustworthiness of the text and so forth, though he admits that everything was not really so bad at first as it is at present."
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  • But though the notion of luck plays an important part in early thought, it seems improbable that the primitive Greeks would have personified a mere abstraction.
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  • Some antiMartinist plays or shows (now lost) performed in 1589 were perhaps also their work.
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  • But no remains exist of the priories of Augustinian canons at Canterbury (St Gregory's; 1084), Leeds, near Maidstone (1119), Tunbridge (middle of 12th century), Combwell, near Cranbrook (time of Henry II.); the nunnery of St Sepulchre at Canterbury (about 110o) and Langdon abbey, near Walmer (1192), both belonging to the Benedictines; the Trinitarian priory of Mottenden near Headcorn, the first house of Crutched Friars in England (1224), where miracle plays were presented in the church by the friars on Trinity Sunday; the Carmelite priories at Sandwich (1272) and Losenham near Tenterden (1241); and the preceptory of Knights of St John of Jerusalem at West Peckham, near Tunbridge (1408).
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  • Tournaments in particular are fertile occasions of all the deadly sins; and mystery plays, except those of the birth and resurrection of Christ performed in the churches, also lead men into transgression.
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  • The historical works above referred to have been issued in many editions, and selections from the ancient fables and romances are continually being edited and reissued in narrative form or as plays.
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  • In his joyous aspect Bes plays the harp or flute, dances, &c. He is figured on mirrors, ointment vases and other articles of the toilet.
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  • The Mephostophiles of the Faust-books and the puppet plays passed with little or no modification into literature as the Mephistophilis of Marlowe's Faustus.
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  • In the legend of Cadmus and his family Ares plays a prominent part.
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  • He began to write for the stage in 289 B.C., and, according to SuIdas, wrote 40 plays, of which 17 titles and some fragments have been preserved.
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  • Among the smaller poets of this period may be mentioned Karpifiski (1741-1828), a writer of sentimental elegies in the style then so very much in fashion, and Franciszek Dyonizy Kniaanin (1750-1807), who nourished his muse on classical themes and wrote several plays.
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  • Besides these he wrote one or two good plays, and a novel in letters, on the story of two Jewish lovers.
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  • Mention has already been made of plays written by Rej and Kochanowski; they are mere fruits of the Renaissance, and cannot in any way be considered national.
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  • Among the latest poets we may mention Wyspianski, Kisiliewski, Reymont, Mme Zapolska; the latter is the author of some powerful realistic novels and plays, and she has been called the Polish Zola.
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  • To the historian it furnishes what is evidently the testimony of an eye-witness on several matters of importance which are neglected by other narrators; and to the student of literature it has the exceptional interest of being one of the prime sources of Shakespeare's historical plays.
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  • His poetry is over-decorated, and his plays are grandiose historical poems in dramatic form.
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  • A few of her voluminous writings, which include poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays, collections of aphorisms, &c., may be singled out for special mention.
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  • There are two main varieties; in one luck alone prevails, since the player has no choice of play but must follow strict rules; in the other an opportunity is given for the display of skill and judgment, as the player has the choice of several plays at different stages of the game.
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  • He also edited Hesiod and Pindar, Euripides and Aristophanes, besides composing brief introductions to the several plays, parts of which are still extant.
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  • Of the plays then passing under the name of Plautus, he recognized twenty-five as genuine.
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  • The twenty-one plays of Plautus accepted by Varro are doubtless the twenty now extant, together with the lost Vidularia.
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  • In the time of Photius the poets usually studied at school were Homer, Hesiod, Pindar; certain select plays of Aeschylus (Prometheus, Septem and Persae), Sophocles (Ajax, Electra and Oedipus Tyrannus), and Euripides (Hecuba, Orestes, Phoenissae, and, next to these, Alcestis, Andromache, Hippolytus, Medea, Rhesus, Troades,) also Aristophanes (beginning with the Plutus), Theocritus, Lycophron, and Dionysius Periegetes.
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  • In the same century the monastery of Gandersheim, south of Hanover, was the retreat of the learned nun Hroswitha, who celebrated the exploits of Otho in leonine hexameters, and composed in prose six moral and religious plays in imitation of Terence.
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  • They have found themselves living in a new age of editiones principes, and have eagerly welcomed the first publication of Aristotle's Constitution of Athens (1891), Herondas (1891) and Bacchylides (1897), as well as the Persae of Timotheus of Miletus (5903), with some of the Paeans of Pindar (5907) and large portions of the plays of Menander (1898-1899 and 5907).
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  • In the early plays he quotes Ovid and Seneca.
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  • The Alexandrian critics attributed to him the authorship of four plays previously assigned to Aristophanes.
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  • Neither plays a conspicuous part in the history of Greece.
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  • The third side of the triangle was formed by the strings themselves, the front pillar, which in modern European harps plays such an important part, being always absent in these early Oriental instruments.
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  • Fittig and his pupils (Annalen, 1883, 216, pp. loo, 115; 1885, 227, pp. 55, 119), in which it was shown that the aldehyde forms an addition compound with the sodium salt of the fatty acid, and that the acetic anhydride plays the part of a dehydrating agent.
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  • America; and all over that region it is the chief figure in a group of myths, fulfilling the office of a culture hero who brings the light, gives fire to mankind, &c. Together with the eaglehawk the crow plays a great part in the mythology of S.E.
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  • Here he began to write plays and obscene novels.
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  • His more important books, of which English translations have been published, are the poems Gitanjali (Song Offerings) (1913), The Crescent Moon (1913), The Gardener (1913), Songs of Kabir (1915), Fruit Gathering (1916), Stray Birds (1917), The Lover's Gift and the Crossing (1918); the plays Chitra (1914), The King of the Dark Chamber (1914), The Post Office (1914),.
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  • Paul evidently plays on the verb, krino, diakrino, katakrino (Kplvw, S&aKplvw, KaraKpivw).
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  • There are many variations in the treatment of the legend, for which, as also for a discussion of the modern plays on the subject by Voltaire and Alfieri, see Jebb's Introduction to his edition of the Electra of Sophocles.
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  • Though the whole financial system rests on the maintenance of the gold standard, gold coin plays a much smaller part in daily business than in England, France or Germany.
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  • The codices of Bosius (1535-1580) are just as imaginary as the "old plays" which appear as the source of so many of the quotations that head the chapters of the Waverley novels, and suspicion rests on Barth, Lambinus and others.
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  • There are two reasons in particular why the part which emendation plays in the shaping of Greek and Latin texts is apt to be overlooked.
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  • Some who were writers were driven to publish by the occasion; and after the orders of government, which were occasionally published to be obeyed, occasional poems, such as the poems of Solon, the odes of Pindar and the plays of the dramatists, which all had a political significance, were probably the first writings to be published or, rather, recited and acted, from written copies.
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  • This must have had a considerable influence on the development of the sacred drama in England, but none of the French plays acted in England in the 12th and 1 3 th centuries has been preserved.
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  • On his Aetolian campaign he was accompanied by the poet Ennius, who made the capture of Ambracia, at which he was present, the subject of one of his plays.
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  • In effect, therefore, Mayow - who also gives a remarkably correct anatomical description of the mechanism of respiration - preceded Priestley and Lavoisier by a century in recognizing the existence of oxygen, under the guise of his spiritus nitro-aereus, as a separate entity distinct from the general mass of the air; he perceived the part it plays in combustion and in increasing the weight of the calces of metals as compared with metals themselves; and, rejecting the common notions of his time that the use of breathing is to cool the heart, or assist the passage of the blood from the right to the left side of the heart, or merely to agitate it, he saw in inspiration a mechanism for introducing oxygen into the body, where it is consumed for the production of heat and muscular activity, and even vaguely conceived of expiration as an excretory process.
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  • The work contains a large amount of information, and shows that its compilers were men of great industry; but its chief interest lies in the fact that it was largely used by Shakespeare and other Elizabethan dramatists; Shakespeare, who probably used the edition of 1587, obtaining from the Chronicles material for most of his historical plays, and also for Macbeth, King Lear and part of Cymbeline.
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  • The Chronicle and the historical plays compared (London, 1896).
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  • Others of his plays are Blanche et Montcassin, ou les Venitiens (1798); and Germanicus (1816), the performance of which was the occasion of a disturbance in the parterre which threatened serious political complications.
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  • On the other hand strife between persons connected by marriage appears to have been of extremely frequent occurrence, and no motive plays a more prominent part in Teutonic traditions.
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  • That the pope himself was guiltless of any share in that atrocious deed is beyond dispute; but it is deeply to be regretted that his name plays a part in the history of this conspiracy.
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  • There are a number of poems written in an elevated style, also dramatic works chiefly of the character of mystery plays, and collections of fairy tales and fables.
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  • She had a passion for writing, and produced not only a mass of letters written in French, but pamphlets and plays, comic and serious, in French and Russian.
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  • Idiosyncrasy plays a considerable part in determining the effects, some people being particularly susceptible; death has occurred in five minutes from the appearance of the first symptoms, but when a narcotic has been administered at the same time as the poison the development is proportionately slow.
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  • It has been found that by a particular treatment, in which the mixing of large quantities of vegetable colouring agents with the food plays an important part, the ordinary "canary yellow" may be intensified so as to verge upon a more or less brilliant flame colour.'
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  • From the 17th century onward Purim plays were performed mostly by the children, who improvised a dramatic version of the story of Esther.
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  • Aristotle's suggestion that Thales was led to his fundamental dogma by observation of the part which moisture plays in the production and the maintenance of life, and Simplicius's, that the impressibility and the binding power of water were perhaps also in his thoughts, are by admission purely conjectural..
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  • He translated three volumes of Charles Rollin's Histoire ancienne, wrote several plays - Der Misogyn, Der Freigeist, Die Juden- and in association with Mylius, began the Beitrdge zur Historre and Aufnahme des Theaters (1750), a periodical - which soon came to an end - for the discussion of matters connected with the drama.
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  • The Schriften also contained Lessing's early plays, and one new one, Miss Sara Sampson (1755).
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  • Auguste Clavareau (1787-1864), a mediocre poet, an imitator of the French and Dutch, produced some successful comedies, but he ceased to write plays before 1830.
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  • His novels, of which La Forge Roussel (1881) is a good example, were succeeded in 1902-1903 by two plays, Jericho and Fatigue de vivre.
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  • It is full of quotations from writers whose works have not come down to us; nearly 800 writers and 2500 separate writings are referred to by Athenaeus; and he boasts of having read 800 plays of the Middle Comedy alone.
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  • It is immortalized in the Nibelungenlied in the person of "Volker von Alzeie," the warrior who in the last part of the epic plays a part second only to that of Hagen, and who "was called the minstrel (spilman) because he could fiddle."
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  • In such theories not only animals and plants but even the smallest particles of matter are regarded as having some rudimentary kind of sensation or "soul," which plays the same part in relation to their objective activities or modifications as the soul does in the case of human beings.
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  • The disputes which resulted in the Crimean War revealed the fact that " gratitude " plays but a small part in international affairs.
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  • Here he taught Greek and adapted Greek plays for a livelihood, and by his poetical compositions gained the friendship of the greatest men in Rome.
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  • It shows the same tendency to aim at effect by alliterations, assonances and plays on words.
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  • The other desert regions of Egypt are elevated stony plateaus, which are diversified by extensively excavated valleys and oases, and in which sand frequently plays quite a subordinate part.
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  • The more ancient account survived, however, he myth that Osiris, Horus, Seth, Isis and Nephthys (a less who plays but a minor part in the Osiris cycle) were all Iren of the earth-god Keb and the sky-goddess Nut, born on five consecutive days added on at the end of the year (the flied epagomenal days).
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  • It is a muscular tonus of central source consequent on the continual glow of excitement in the spinal motor neuron, whose outgoing end plays upon the muscle cells, whose ingoing Yet when the muscular contraction is taken as index ology.
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  • The co-operative system plays an important part in the industries of butter-making, poultry-farming and the rearing of swine.
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  • There are few traces of dramatic effort in Denmark before the Reformation; and many of the plays of that period may be referred to the class of school comedies.
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  • The effect of this piece was magical; the Royal Theatre ejected its cuckoo-brood of French plays, and even the Italian opera.
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  • Bredal (1733-1778), who became director of the Royal Danish Theatre, and the writer of some mediocre plays.
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  • The stories on which Shakespeare based several of his plays were supplied by Bandello, probably through Belleforest or Paynter.
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  • The developing embryo at the end of the suspensor grows out to a varying extent into the forming endosperm, from which by surface absorption it derives good material for growth; at the same time the suspensor plays a direct part as a carrier of nutrition, and may even develop, where perhaps no endosperm is formed, special absorptive "suspensor roots" which invest the developing embryo, or pass out into the body and coats of the ovule, or even into the placenta.
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  • The part of the stem below the cotyledons (hypocotyl) commonly plays the greater part in bringing this about.
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  • In plays by contemporary authors she created the characters of Judith and Cleopatra in the tragedies of Madame de Girardin, but perhaps her most successful appearance was in 1849 in Scribe and Legouve's Adrienne Lecouvreur, which was written for her.
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  • Acuteness degenerates into hair-splitting and clever plays on words after the manner of the rabbins.
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  • In the cantar de gesta of the Cid he plays the part attributed by medieval poets to the greatest kings, to Charlemagne himself.
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  • The coarse myth told by Ovid, in which Anna plays a trick on Mars when in love with Minerva, is probably an old Italian folk-tale, poetically applied to the persons of these deities when they became partially anthropomorphized under Greek influence.
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  • This tragic story is the subject of one of the extant plays of Euripides.4 The famous friendship between Theseus and Pirithous, king of the Lapiths, originated thus.
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  • Thus the opposition between God and the devil already plays a part in the Jewish groundwork of the Testaments of the Patriarchs, which was perhaps composed at the end of the period of the Maccabees.
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  • In the fifth Sibylline book, which, with the exception of verses 1-51, was mainly composed by a Jewish writer at the close of the first century, the return of Nero plays a great part.
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  • These three plays were classed by the author as "unpleasant plays" in the printed version.
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  • This defence of the poetic point of view against brute force and common sense was admirably constructed and it proved one of the most popular of his plays.
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  • Poseidon plays a considerable part in Greek legend.
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  • The role which the Bavarian capital now plays as the leading art centre of Germany would have been an impossibility without the splendid munificence of Louis I.
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  • He translated the Alcestis of Euripides and three of the plays of Sophocles; and wrote two original tragedies, Jephte and Christo in Passione.
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  • To his Leipzig student-days belong also two small plays in Alexandrines, Die Laune des Verliebten, a pastoral comedy in one act, which reflects the lighter side of the poet's love affair, and Die Mitschuldigen (published in a revised form, 1769), a more sombre picture, in which comedy is incongruously mingled with tragedy.
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  • For, as an interpreter of human character in the drama, Goethe is without a rival among modern poets, and there is not one of his plays that does not contain a few scenes or characters which bear indisputable testimony to his mastery.
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  • The intermediate layer of the salt solution, floating over the caustic soda solution, plays the part of a diaphragm, by preventing the chlorine evolved in the bell from acting on the sodium hydrate formed outside, and this solution offers much less resistance to the electric current than the ordinary diaphragms. This process therefore consumes less power than most others.
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  • Plumptre was a man of great versatility and attained high reputation as a translator of the plays of Sophocles (1865) and Aeschylus (1868), and of the Divin g commedia of Dante (1886).
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  • Though essentially a soldier, he took considerable interest in literature, wrote epic poems, tragedies and annals, and translated plays of Sophocles.
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  • Most of his plays were written and acted at Athens, but he led a wandering life, and died at Smyrna.
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  • Among the Persians, stages are erected on that day in public places, and plays are acted, representing the misfortunes of the family of Ali.'
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  • From 1789 to 1811 the Weimar court theatrical company gave performances here of the plays of Schiller and Goethe, an attraction which greatly contributed to the well-being of the town.
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  • His plays include Miss Civilization; The Dictator; The Galloper; The Orator of Zapata City and The Zone Police.
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  • She is seldom represented in works of art, and plays no important part in legend.
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  • Collot d'Herbois wrote and adapted from the English and Spanish many plays, one of which, Le Paysan magistrat, kept the stage for several years.
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  • We may find a fair parallel by imagining two plays drawn at hazard from the works of the great tragic writers.
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  • Thus in the plays of Rucellai, Trissino, Sperone and other tragic poets the nobler elements of humanism, considered as a revelation of the world and man, obtained no free development.
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  • The term plays an important part in metaphysical, ethical and theological speculation.
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  • The dramatic and literary ability shown in these plays, all of which were published later in book form, was as undoubted as their diction and ideas were characteristically paradoxical.
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  • In 1893 the licenser of plays refused a licence to Wilde's Salome, but it was produced in French in Paris by Sarah Bernhardt in 1894.
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  • The Old Bailey revelations removed all doubt as to the essential unhealthiness of his personal influence; but his literary genius was none the less remarkable, and his plays were perhaps the most original contributions to English dramatic writing during the period.
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  • His numerous works include the musical comedy, Pierre le Grand (1790), for Gretry's music, and the opera, Les Deux Journees (1800), music by Cherubini; also L' Abbe de l'epee (1800), and some other plays; and Causeries d'un vieillard (1807), Contes a ma fille (1809), and Les Adieux du vieux conteur (1835).
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  • The design of Messenius was to write the history of his country in fifty plays; he completed and produced six.
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  • Andreas Prytz, who died in 1655 as bishop of Linkoping, produced several religious chronicle plays from Swedish history.
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  • These plays were all acted by schoolboys and university youths, and when they went out of fashion among these classes the drama in Sweden almost entirely ceased to exist.
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  • Fru Alfhild Agrell (nee Martin), who was born in 1849, produced a series of plays dealing with the woman question, Rescued (1883) and others.
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  • Drama has rarely flourished in Sweden, but several of the poets mentioned above have written important plays, and, somewhat earlier, the socialistic problempieces of Anne Charlotte Edgren-Leffler, duchess of Cajanello (1849-1893), possessed considerable dramatic talent, working under a direct impulse from Ibsen; but her greatest gift was as a novelist.
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  • The plays of Harald Johan Molander (1858-1900) have been popular in the theatres of Sweden and Finland since his first success with Rococo in 1880.
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  • Some of the plays seem to have bordered on the political, as The Plunderings, describing the devastation of Sicily in the time of the poet.
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  • For while self-love plays a most important part in the human economy, there is no less evidently a natural principle of benevolence.
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  • That conscience has a natural supremacy, that it is superior in kind, is evident from the part it plays in the moral constitution.
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  • Even on the formal side it is a little difficult to see what part conscience plays.
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  • The idea of the active capitalist having any duties towards his employes never seems to occur to him; the labourer is, in fact, merely an instrument in the hands of the capitalist, a pawn in the game he plays.
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  • But notwithstanding all its dependence on classical and foreign authors, Portuguese literature has a distinct individuality which appears in the romanceiro, in the songs named cantares de amigo of the cancioneiros, in the Chronicles of Fernao Lopes, in the Historia tragico-maritima, in the plays of Gil Vicente, in the bucolic verse and prose of the early 16th century, in the Letters of Marianna Alcoforado and, above all, in The Lusiads.
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  • The history of the modern drama begins with religious plays, followed at a later period by moralities, and thence, by an easy transition, by the farce.
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  • In the various towns where he stayed and produced his plays, writers for the stage sprang up, and these formed the Eschola.
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  • In Santarem appeared Antonio Prestes, a magistrate who drew from his judicial experience but evinced more knowledge of folk-lore than dramatic talent, while Camoens himself was so far influenced by Gil Vicente, whose plays he had perhaps seen performed in Lisbon, that in spite of his Coimbra training he never exchanged the old forms for those of the classical comedy.
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  • One of the last dramatists of the 16th century belonging to the old school was Simao Machado, who wrote the Comedy of Diu and the Enchantments of Alfea, two long plays almost entirely in Spanish, and full of digressions only made tolerable by the beauty of their lyrics.
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  • At the same time the old dramatists had to face the opposition of the classical school, which appealed to the cultured, and the hostility of the Inquisition, which early declared war on the popular plays on account of their grossness, and afterwards through the index prohibited altogether even the religious autos, as it had condemned the Italian comedies.
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  • The way was thus clear for the Jesuits, who, with their Latin tragi-comedies or dramatized allegories written to commemorate saints or for scholastic festivals, succeeded for a time in supplanting both the popular pieces of the old school and the plays modelled on the masterpieces of Greece and Rome.
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  • He found the stage occupied mainly by religious plays in which there appeared no trace of the Greek or Roman theatre, and, admiring what he had seen in Italy, he and his followers protested against the name auto, restored that of comedy, and substituted prose for verse.
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  • They generally chose the plays of Terence as models, yet their life is conventional and their types are not Portuguese but Roman-Italian.
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  • Though it secured the favour of the humanists and the nobility, and banished the old popular plays from both court and university soon after Gil Vicente's death, its victory was shortlived.
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  • However, even if they had stage qualities, the very length of this and his other plays, the Ulisipo and the Aulegraphia, would prevent their performance, but in fact they are novels in dialogue containing a treasury of popular lore and wise and witty sayings with a moral object.
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  • He modelled himself on the Roman theatre as reflected by the plays of Ariosto, and he avowedly wrote the Estrangeiros to combat the school of Gil Vicente, while in it, as in Os Vilhalpandos, the action takes place in Italy.
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  • Until the Restoration of 1640 the stage remained spellbound by the Spaniards, and when a court once more came to Lisbon it preferred Italian opera, French plays, and zarzuelas to dramatic performances in the vernacular, with the result that both Portuguese authors and actors of repute disappeared.
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  • Figueiredo felt he had a mission to restore the drama, and wrote thirteen volumes of plays in prose and verse, but, though he chose national subjects, and could invent plots and draw characters, he could not make them live.
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  • The historical bent thus given to the drama was continued by the versatile Mendes Leal, by Gomes da Amorim and by Pinheiro Chagas, who all however succumbed more or less to the atmosphere and machinery of ultra-Romanticism, while the plays of Antonio Ennes deal with questions of the day in a spirit of combative liberalism.
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  • Proceeding on the principle that like can only be known by like, Trendelenburg next reaches a doctrine peculiar to himself (though based upon Aristotle) which plays a central part in his speculations.
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  • Besides furnishing the early playwrights with material for miracle plays, it has supplied episodes and apologues to many a writer, including Boccaccio, John Gower and Shakespeare.
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  • One of his greatest achievements was to fix the canon of the genuine plays of Plautus.
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  • The " Varronian plays " were the twenty which have come down to us, along with one which has been lost.
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  • Then as regards natural powers of destroying bacteria, phagocytosis aided by chemiotaxis plays a part, and it can be understood that an animal whose phagocytes are attracted by a particular bacterium will have an advantage over one in which this action is absent.
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  • He also elaborates the episodes most attractive to his audience, notably those of Dido and Aeneas and Lavinia, the last of whom plays a far more important part than in the Aeneid.
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  • He plays a principal part in the later campaigns of Alexander in Afghanistan and India.
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  • He encouraged the performance of mystery plays; on the performance of a mystery of the Passion at Saumur in 1462 he remitted four years of taxes to the town, and the representations of the Passion at Angers were carried out under his auspices.
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  • He wrote several Latin plays on Scriptural subjects, of which the best, De Christo triumphante, was repeatedly printed, (London, 1551; Basel, 1556, &c.), and was translated into English by Richard Day, son of the printer.
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  • Zola also wrote a series of three romances on cities, Lourdes, Rome, Paris (1894-98), novels on the "gospels" of population (Fecondite) and work (Travail), a volume of plays, and several volumes of criticism, .and other things.
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  • That the weight of the body plays an important part in the production of flight may be proved by a very simple experiment.
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  • This business consists of the licensing of houses or places for the public performance of stage plays, and the execution, as local authority, of the Explosives Act 1875.
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  • He supported himself by adapting Greek plays for the Roman stage from the new comedy writers, especially Menander.
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  • The fragments of his plays are chiefly preserved in Aulus Gellius, who cites several passages from the Plocium (necklace) together with the original Greek of Menander.
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  • The works of these writers, which Plato admired and imitated, are lost, but it is believed that they were little plays, usually with only two performers.
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  • It is to be noted that Hecate plays little or no part in mythological legend.
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  • The work falls into two parts, which treat of the asymptotes and singularities of algebraical curves respectively; and extensive use is made of the method of counting constants which plays so large a part in modern geometrical researches.
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  • The only countries where the order plays a distinctly subordinate part are some extra-tropical regions of the southern hemisphere, Australia, the Cape, Chili, &c. The proportion of graminaceous species to the whole phanerogamic flora in different countries is found to vary from nearly 4th in the Arctic regions to about 2 nth at the Cape; in the British Isles it is about y2th.
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  • Besides the works mentioned he has written incidental music to plays, as, for instance, to Ravenswood, The Little Minister, and Coriolanus; concertos and other works for violin and orchestra, much orchestral music, and many songs and violin pieces.
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  • It also plays an important part in purely Cornish tradition and folklore.
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  • During the years that followed the accession to the sovereignty of Duke Philip, Holland plays but an insignificant part.
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  • It is so called from one of several wells or springs in this district, near which miracle plays were performed by the parish clerks of London.
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  • Surrounding the pitted wall of the ovum there is a definite layer of large cells, no doubt representing a tapetum, which, as in cycads and conifers, plays an important part in nourishing the growing egg-cell.
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  • From 1874 onwards he wrote, with varying success, a prodigious number of plays.
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  • El gran Galeoto (1881), perhaps the best of Echegaray's plays in conception and execution, has been translated into several languages, and still holds the stage.
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  • The plays produced on the Rumanian stage included most of the dramas of Moliere, some of Corneille, Kotzebue and Metastasio, whose Achille in Schiro was the first drama translated into Rumanian (by Iordache Slatineau, printed at *ibiu in 1797).
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  • Schiller was also translated, and a few plays of Shakespeare (Hamlet, &c.) from a French version.
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  • Under the Turks, whose rule dates from the end of the 15th century, Kerch was a military port; and as such it plays a part in the Russo-Turkish wars.
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  • In puritanical circles, from which plays and novels were strictly excluded, that effect was such as no work of genius, though it were superior to the Iliad, to Don Quixote or to Othello, can ever produce on a mind accustomed to indulge in literary luxury.
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  • He plays the lyre at the banquets of the gods, and causes Marsyas to be flayed alive because he had boasted of his superior skill in playing the flute, and the ears of Midas to grow long because he had declared in favour of Pan, who contended that the flute was a better instrument than Apollo's favourite, the lyre.
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  • In 1632 Clitandre, a tragedy, was printed (it may have been acted in 1631); in 1633 La Veuve and the Galerie du palais, in 1634 La Suivante and La Place Royale, all the last-named plays being comedies, saw the stage.
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  • Finding it impossible to make himself fairly heard in the matter, Corneille (who had retired from his position among the "five poets") withdrew to Rouen and passed nearly three years in quiet there, perhaps revolving the opinions afterwards expressed in his three Discours and in the Examens of his plays, where he bows, somewhat as in the house of Rimmon, to "the rules."
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  • Rodogune (1644) was a brilliant success; Theodore (1645),(1645), a tragedy on a somewhat perilous subject, was the first of Corneille's plays which was definitely damned.
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  • In this resolution he persevered for six years, during which he worked at a verse translation of the Imitation of Christ (finished in 1656), at his three Discourses on Dramatic Poetry, and at the Examens which are usually printed at the end of his plays.
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  • The cabal or clique which attacked the Cid had no effect whatever on the judgment of the public. All his subsequent masterpieces were received with the same ungrudging applause, and the rising star of Racine, even in conjunction with the manifest inferiority of Corneille's last five or six plays, with difficulty prevailed against the older poet's towering reputation.
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  • That Corneille was by no means destitute of the critical faculty his Discourses and the Examens of his plays (often admirably acute, and, with Dryden's subsequent prefaces, the originals to a great extent of specially modern criticism) show well enough.
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  • Especially in his later plays a verse and a couplet will crash out with fulgurous brilliancy, and then be succeeded by pages of very second-rate declamation or argument.
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  • It is undeniable that the first six or seven of his plays are of no very striking intrinsic merit.
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  • The fact that one of the characters jumps on another's back, and the rather promiscuous kissing which takes place, are nothing to the liberties usually taken in contemporary plays.
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  • It is certain, however, that there is more interval between these six plays and than between the latter and Corneille's greatest drama.
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  • Nicomede, often considered one of Corneille's best plays, is chiefly remarkable for the curious and unusual character of its hero.
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  • Odipe is certainly unworthy of its subject and its author, but in Sertorius we have one of Corneille's finest plays.
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  • Of the last six plays we may say that perhaps only one of them, Agesilas, is almost wholly worthless.
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  • In appearance and careful editing it leaves nothing to desire, containing the entire works, a lexicon, full bibliographical information, and an album of illustrations of the poet's places of residence, his arms, some title-pages of his plays, facsimiles of his writings, &c. Nothing is wanting but variorum comments, which Lefevre's edition supplies.
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  • The translations of separate plays are very numerous, but of the complete Theatre only one version (into Italian) is recorded by the French editors.
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  • He was also almost the first to turn to short plays in Irish as a method of popularizing the language.
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  • Viticulture plays an important part in the life of the colony.
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  • The piece is obviously connected with the Easter cycle of liturgical drama, and the subject is treated in the York and Townley plays.
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  • The end knife-edges are adjusted and tightly jammed into exact position by means of wedge pieces and set screws, and the beam is furnished with delicate adjusting weights at its top. The position of the beam with respect to the horizontal is shown by a horizontal pointer (not shown) projecting from one end of it, which plays past a scale, each division of which corresponds to the i l oth or i hth of a grain according to the size and delicacy of the machine.
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  • The lower beam carries on a saddle a scale which is raised nearly to the top of the glass case in which the machine is enclosed, and as the beams sway this scale plays past a scratch on the glass, which is so placed that when the zero point on the scale coincides with the scratch the beams are horizontal.
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  • The box, I, has a hinged bottom with a projecting click finger which, as the box de - scends, plays idly over the staves of a ladder arc. When the weight is removed from the platform, the counterbalance, E, causes the finger, G, to run back to its zero position, carrying with it the finger M, and causing the click finger of the box, I, to trip open the bottom of the box and let the penny fall out.
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  • And the disk also carries the index arm which plays past the vertical face of the chart, and indicates the weight and price up to 2-lb weight.
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  • At the bottom of the vertical leg from the goods-pan there is also a projecting piece which is attached to the top of a vertical piston rod, the piston of which plays in a dash-pot of glycerin as the beam sways, and deadens the vibrations of the index arm.
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  • Measurements at the Ripon Falls show that 18,000,000,000, or some 13% of this amount, is taken off by the Nile, and when allowance has been made for the annual rise and fall of the lake-level it is apparent that by far the greater part of the water which enters the nyanza is lost by evaporation; in fact, that the amount drawn off by the river plays a comparatively small part in the annual oscillation of the water surface.
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  • At about twelve years of age he was sent to the school of St Mary de Crypt, Gloucester, where he developed some skill in elocution and a taste for reading plays, a circumstance which probably had considerable influence on his subsequent career.
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  • The notion of imaginary intersections, thus presenting itself, through algebra, in geometry, must be accepted in geometry - and it in fact plays an all-important part in modern geometry.
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  • Madame Modjeska was also the Polish interpretress of the most prominent plays of Legouve, Dumas, father and son, Augier, Alfred de Musset, Octave Feuillet and Sardou.
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  • Among jumping animals it may serve as a balance, as in the case of jerboas and kangaroos, while in the latter it is also used as a support when resting; among many hoofed mammals it is used as a fly-whisk; and in whales and dolphins, as well as in the African Potamogale and the North American musquash, it plays an important part in swimming.
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  • In large works the sulphuric acid is usually manufactured on the spot from the spent oxide, so that the sulphuretted hydrogen, which in the gas is considered an undesirable impurity, plays a valuable part in the manufacture of an important by-product.
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  • In the Talmud he plays a great part in the legends concerning Solomon.
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  • He gave to his birthplace the free library and public baths, and, in 1903, the estate of Pittencrieff Park and Glen, rich in historical associations as well as natural charm, together with bonds yielding 25,000 a year, in trust for the maintenance of the park, the support of a theatre for the production of plays of the highest merit, the periodical exhibitions of works of art and science, the promotion of horticulture among the working classes and the encouragement of technical education in the district.
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  • Some of the titles of his plays, Danaides, Actaeon, Alcestis, Tantalus, show that he treated mythological as well as contemporary subjects.
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  • But in his plays, as in the early tragedies generally, the dramatic element was subordinate to the lyric element as represented by the chorus and the dance.
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  • His first comedy was exhibited in 429 B.C. He composed ten plays, of which the Solitary (Movarpoxos) was exhibited in 414 along with the Birds of Aristophanes and gained the third prize.
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  • A line became continuous, returning into itself by way of infinity; two parallel lines intersect in a point at infinity; all circles pass through two fixed points at infinity (the circular points); two spheres intersect in a fixed circle at infinity; an asymptote became a tangent at infinity; the foci of a conic became the intersections of the tangents from the circular points at infinity; the centre of a conic the pole of the line at infinity, &c. In analytical geometry the line at infinity plays an important part in trilinear co-ordinates.
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  • In the Thoughts on Education imaginative sentiment is never allowed to weigh against utility; information is subordinate to the formation of useful character; the part which habit plays in individuals is always kept in view; the dependence of intelligence and character, which it is the purpose of education to improve, upon health of body is steadily inculcated; to make children happy in undergoing education is a favourite precept; accumulating facts without exercising thought, and without accustoming the youthful mind to look for evidence, is always referred to as a cardinal vice.
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  • But however Oriental may have been the cast of mind that welcomed this theosophic asceticism, the forms of thought by which these views were philosophically reached are essentially Greek; and it is by a thoroughly intelligible process of natural development, in which the intensification of the moral consciousness represented by Stoicism plays an important part, that the Hellenic pursuit of knowledge culminates in a preparation for ecstasy, and the Hellenic idealization of man's natural life ends in a settled antipathy to the body and its works.
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  • He has translated Tegner's Frithiofs Saga, several plays of Shakespeare and some other foreign masterpieces.
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  • The most successful of Icelandic dramatists as yet is IndriOi Einarsson, whose plays, chiefly historical, in spite of excessive rhetoric, are very interesting and possess a true dramatic spirit.
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  • The alcohols are neutral in reaction, and the lower members possess the property of entering into combination with salts, in which the alcohol plays the role of water of crystal O- lization.
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  • He wrote Recollections of Lord Byron (1824), and several novels, plays and miscellaneous works.
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  • Mog Nuadat had a son Ailill Aulom who plays a prominent part in the Irish sagas and genealogies, and his sons Eogan, Cian and Cormac Cas, all became the ancestors of wellknown families.
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  • Mannhardt, and on the facts of ritual, which preserve these ideas and represent them in a kind of mystery plays.
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  • There occur also quartz-porphyry (Sierra Morena, Pyrenees, &c), diorite, porphyrite, diabase (well developed in the north of Andalusia, where it plays a great part in the structure of the Sierra Morena), ophite (Pyrenees, Cadiz), serpentine (forming an enormous mass in the Serrania de Ronda), trachyte, liparite, andesite, basalt.
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  • Although in the case of the spatial comprehension of a perspective representation experience plays a large part, in observing through a microscope it does not count, or only a little, for the object is presumably quite unknown.
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  • The connective is joined to the filament by a movable joint forming a lever which plays an important part in the pollinationmechanism.
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  • He brought out an edition of Hegel's works, adapted several of Shakespeare's plays for the theatre, wrote a.
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  • It is a striking fact that among the numerous Mesozoic Ferns there are comparatively few that can with good reason be referred to the Polypodiaceae, a family which plays so dominant a role at the present day.
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  • He rides fiddling at the head of the host; he plays to the weary warriors in the intervals of the battle in the court of Etzel's palace; but he is also expert at performing other music, with "a strong fiddle-bow, mighty and long, like to a sword, exceeding sharp and broad."
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  • The manifold of sense, which plays so important a part in the critical theory of knowledge, is left in an obscure and perplexed position.
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  • The relation between phenomena and noumena in the Kantian system does not in the least resemble that which plays so important a part in modern psychology - between the subjective results of sense affection and the character of the objective conditions of such affection.
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  • The context of the religious debates was current when the plays were written and performed.
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  • These can be poems, prose, essays or plays, written in standard English or Northumbrian dialect.
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  • Jacobean plays, before Shakespeare, were particularly visceral, and I don't think Alex is going to ignore that!
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  • We are now able to announce dates for trips to all the plays in this year's Theater West season.
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  • An anonymous pamphlet of 1792 which plays on British fears of the popular uprisings in France to link slave trade abolitionists with French Jacobins.
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  • The main change will be over the role of the appointed actuary, who plays the central role in determining bonuses.
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  • In the UK and Europe, computational aerodynamics now plays an important industrial role and it has significantly influenced the design of modern aircraft.
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  • Benedict wisely plays his part in a stolid, straightforward manner; Titmuss goes for sweet sadness but produces only girlish affectation.
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  • The private motor car plays a major role in the creation of a society in which individuals are increasingly alienated from others.
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  • Tumor necrosis factor alpha also plays a pivotal part in inflammation.
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  • Prize pools for where he plays payvar amir vahedi crowned royalty from.
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  • But we live in a world where even artistic directors talk about the plays they are putting on as ' product ' .
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  • Rising star and martial artist Donnie Yen plays the third assassin, Sky.
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  • All the major auteurs, now in Europe, are doing Royal Court plays.
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  • Richard plays banjo, bass, mandolin, guitar or anything he can get a sound out of.
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  • Andrea Roberts hails from Indiana, and plays bass in the group, singing lead, tenor and high baritone.
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  • Jonas, who plays second bassoon, took my place and borrowed my instrument.
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  • Roy Marks plays the great bass viol and Andrew Kerr a bass viol.
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  • Elizabethan plays were often bawdy and the audiences were rowdy!
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  • Gyllenhaal is excellent as Justine's angst-ridden younger beau, while Reilly plays her slacker spouse to perfection.
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  • If we look closely, we see that benevolence plays much the same functional role in the Inquiry that sympathy plays in the Treatise.
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  • Leon Berger, who plays the devil in the festival's production, is the official biographer of Michael Flanders.
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  • However this is not the case for the chloroplast complex which plays a distinct role in supplying acetyl CoA for fatty acid biosynthesis.
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  • In this instance, Li plays Su, a Taiwanese security force officer, sent to intercept a shipment of mysterious black diamonds.
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