Platelets sentence example

platelets
  • It works by preventing the formation of a chemical called cyclic amp in blood platelets.
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  • Now, 40% of adult therapeutic doses (ATD) of platelets collected by the NBS are collected by apheresis.
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  • Platelets from men and women with diabetes are often hypersensitive in vitro to platelet aggregating agents.
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  • Platelets, apheresis means a concentrated suspension of blood platelets obtained by apheresis.
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  • What more could the NBS do to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination of platelets?
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  • Donors might be especially called to a clinic to provide HLA class I matched platelets for a certain patient.
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  • Images include basophils, monocytes, eosinophils neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets.
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  • However, at presentation with relapse, she had received 2 units of red cells and 2 units of platelets which were not irradiated.
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  • Occasionally, if an appropriate product is not available, it may be necessary to use RhD positive platelets.
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  • The recipient (58 year old male) suffered fatal septic shock after transfusion with a 2-day old unit of pooled platelets.
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  • In patients dependent on platelet transfusion, HPA antibodies may be a cause of refractoriness to random donor platelets.
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  • Alternatively selection of compatible platelets by crossmatching can be considered.
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  • Rhesus D negative women of childbearing age should receive Rhesus D negative platelets.
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  • The patient with AML was receiving multiple transfusions of both red cells and platelets, and thus presented as a case of platelet refractoriness.
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  • However, my blood platelets were not rising, nor were my liver enzymes decreasing.
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  • In some patients with HLA antibodies, HPA antibodies may also be present requiring donor platelets matched for both type of antibodies.
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  • Both Rams head and Spiral wedging involve the folding of the clay on itself too build up an ever tightening spiral of clay platelets.
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  • Aspirin is sometimes used in children with heart conditions as it reduces the stickiness of the platelets in the blood.
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  • Thrombin activation of the platelets was successful only when the concentration of the platelets was high enough.
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  • They inhibit blood clotting by blocking thromboxane formation in blood platelets.
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  • The remaining platelets are then transfused back into the patient.
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  • The first few days ' blood tests showed high platelets, due to the many transfusions of platelets received during surgery.
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  • Platelets are activated when an injury causes a blood vessel to break.
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  • It is this aggregation of platelets which triggers the cascade of reactions leading to blood clot formation (thrombosis).
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  • This recent microbiological research study gives new insight to the intracellular control mechanisms of platelets.
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  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder caused by an abnormally low level of blood platelets, small disc-shaped cells essential to blood clotting (coagulation).
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  • Coagulation, or clotting, is a complex process in which specific proteins found in blood plasma combine with other blood components, including platelets, to form clots and prevent blood loss.
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  • Platelets are tiny colorless disc-shaped cells in the blood that collect (aggregate) in blood vessels to form a plug when a vessel is injured.
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  • A deficiency in platelets or a disorder that affects platelet production can disrupt clotting and severely complicate blood loss from accidental injury, surgery, and specific diseases or conditions in which bleeding can occur.
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  • In adults, ITP is considered an autoimmune disorder, which means that the body produces antibodies that damage some of its own products-in this case, blood platelets.
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  • In addition to physically plugging breaks in blood vessel walls, platelets also release chemicals that promote clotting.
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  • Thrombocytopenia-A persistent decrease in the number of blood platelets usually associated with hemorrhaging.
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  • This may include transfusions of platelets, intravenous immunoglobulins, or prednisone.
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  • Prednisone is a steroid medication that decreases the effects of antibodies on platelets and eventually lowers antibody production.
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  • Bone marrow-The spongy tissue inside the large bones in the body that is responsible for making the red blood cells, most white blood cells, and platelets.
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  • Blood is made up of red blood cells (RBCs), which carry oxygen and other materials to all tissues of the body; white blood cells (WBCs), which fight infection; and platelets, which play a part in the clotting of the blood.
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  • These stem cells mature through stages into RBCs, WBCs, or platelets.
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  • This uncontrolled proliferation of the immature cells in the bone marrow affects the production of the normal red blood cells and platelets as well.
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  • Low level of platelets (tiny cellular elements in blood that are an important part of coagulation).
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  • Plasma-A watery fluid containing proteins, salts, and other substances that carries red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets throughout the body.
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  • Whole blood-Blood which contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in plasma.
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  • A platelet count is a diagnostic test that determines the number of platelets in the patient's blood.
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  • Platelets, which are also called thrombocytes, are small disk-shaped blood cells produced in the bone marrow and involved in the process of blood clotting.
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  • There are normally between 150,000-450,000 platelets in each micro-liter of blood.
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  • Low platelet counts or abnormally shaped platelets are associated with bleeding disorders.
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  • This increase is caused by a change in the shape of the platelets after removal from the body.
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  • This period is the best time to count the sample when using electronic instruments, because the platelets will be within a standard size range.
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  • Platelets can be observed in a direct blood smear for approximate quantity and shape.
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  • Accurate assessment of the number of platelets requires other methods of counting.
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  • For a proper count, the platelets should be evenly distributed in the hemacytometer.
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  • For these instruments to work properly, the sample must not contain other material that might mistakenly be counted as platelets.
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  • Clumps of platelets will also not be counted.
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  • In addition, if the patient has a high white blood cell count, electronic counting may yield an unusually low platelet count because white blood cells may filter out some of the platelets before the sample is counted.
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  • On the other hand, if the red blood cells in the sample have burst, their fragments will be falsely counted as platelets.
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  • Hemocytometer-An instrument used to count platelets or other blood cells.
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  • It occurs in polycythemia vera and other disorders in which the bone marrow produces too many platelets.
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  • The normal range for a platelet count is 150,000-450,000 platelets per microliter of blood.
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  • An abnormally low platelet level (thrombocytopenia) is a condition that may result from increased destruction of platelets, decreased production, or increased usage of platelets.
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  • In idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), platelets are destroyed at abnormally high rates.
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  • Hypersplenism is characterized by the collection (sequestration) of platelets in the spleen.
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  • Leukemia and aplastic anemia can result in a low platelet count because of decreased production of platelets in the bone marrow.
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  • Abnormally high platelet levels (thrombocytosis) may indicate either a benign reaction to an infection, surgery, or certain medications; or a disease like polycythemia vera, in which the bone marrow produces too many platelets too quickly.
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  • Serotonin-A widely distributed neurotransmitter that is found in blood platelets, the lining of the digestive tract, and the brain, and that works in combination with norepinephrine.
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  • The infection may also cause significant destruction of the body's red blood cells or platelets.
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  • These include anemia, or breakdown of red blood cells; reduced platelets; reduced white cells; and bone marrow failure.
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  • Anticoagulant drugs inhibit clot formation by blocking the action of clotting factors or platelets.
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  • Antiplatelet drug-Drugs that inhibit platelets from aggregating to form a plug.
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  • Sometimes curable by bone marrow transplant, but potentially fatal, aplastic anemia is characterized by decreased production of red and white blood cells and platelets (disc-shaped cells that are a key component of blood coagulation).
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  • The CBC shows the numbers of white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets in the blood.
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  • The white blood cells and platelets are most likely to be affected by chemotherapy.
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  • Low levels of platelets can cause a patient to bleed easily from a cut or other wound.
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  • Platelets are blood cells that make the blood clot.
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  • When patients do not have enough platelets, they may bleed or bruise easily, even from small injuries.
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  • Patients with low blood platelets should take precautions to avoid injuries.
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  • Medicines such as aspirin and other pain relievers can affect platelets and slow down the clotting process.
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  • Platelets, tiny colorless cells in the blood, initiate contraction of damaged blood vessels so that less blood is lost.
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  • Thrombocytopenia, the most common cause of coagulation disorder, is characterized by reduced numbers of circulating platelets in the blood.
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  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) occurs when the malfunction of clotting factors causes platelets to form clots in small blood vessels throughout the body.
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  • This action leads to depletion of clotting factors and platelets, which are then not available at a site of injury where clotting is needed.
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  • What the underlying causes of DIC have in common is a dysfunction that involves proteins, platelets, or other clotting factors and processes.
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  • It represents a defective or decreased production of platelets.
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  • Common underlying disorders include leukemia, drug toxicity, or aplastic anemia, all of which lead to decreased or defective production of platelets in the bone marrow.
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  • Other diseases may destroy platelets outside the marrow.
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  • The idiopathic form most commonly occurs in children and is most likely the result of production of antibodies that cause destruction of platelets in the spleen and to a lesser extent the liver.
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  • Diagnosis usually requires a number of laboratory tests that measure concentrations of platelets and fibrinogen in the blood along with measuring prothrombin time.
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  • Other supportive data include measuring levels of factors V and VIII, fibrinogen, hemoglobin, and platelets, any of which may be diminished or entirely depleted.
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  • If the patient is not already bleeding, this supportive treatment may correct DIC. However, if bleeding is already occurring, a combination of transfused blood, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, or other blood products may be needed.
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  • Some infants are placed on a ventilator to help them breathe, and some receive transfusions of platelets, which help the blood clot when there is internal bleeding.
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  • Serum-The fluid part of the blood that remains after blood cells, platelets, and fibrogen have been removed.
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  • When blood vessels are injured in a way that causes bleeding, platelets collect over the injured area, forming a temporary plug to prevent further bleeding.
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  • Toxins may be absorbed into the blood stream where they destroy red blood cells and platelets, tiny cells important in blood clotting.
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  • Infants born prematurely who become CMV infected during birth have a greater chance of complications, including pneumonia, hepatitis, decreased blood platelets.
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  • Some of the white cells are removed, and the rest of the blood (red cells, plasma, and platelets) is returned to the body through a needle placed in the other arm.
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  • The activity of an enzyme (glutathione peroxidase) in platelets (small blood cells essential in blood clotting) may be evaluated to assess selenium status.
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  • The platelets stimulate the release other chemicals, called factors, which help form a strong permanent clot. vWF binds to and stabilizes factor VIII, one of the factors involved in forming the permanent clot.
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  • Multimer analysis evaluates the structure of the vWF, and RIPA measures how much ristocetin is required to cause the clumping of platelets in a blood sample.
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  • Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare inherited disorder marked by a low level of blood platelets, eczema, recurrent infections, and a high risk of leukemia or lymph node tumors.
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  • The same protein also functions in the cells that help prevent bleeding (platelets).
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  • A less severe form of the disease, X-linked thrombocytopenia, affects mainly the platelets.
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  • In WAS, the platelets are often too few (called thrombocytopenia) and too small.
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  • The emphasis on erythroblast production is at the cost of producing other types of blood cells, such as platelets and other factors important for blood clotting.
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  • One of fish oil's benefits for cardiovascular health is that it prevents blood platelets from sticking together.
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  • When platelets stick together, they can form clumps or clots, which may lead to heart attacks or strokes.
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  • Fish oil makes the platelets slip against each other so they can't adhere or clump.
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  • Red blood cells carry oxygen, platelets promote blood clotting, plasma makes up the majority of your blood's volume and contains water, proteins and salts.
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  • Explain how blood clots by platelets producing thrombin, which converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin.
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  • The vegetation that characterizes IE is composed of a mixture of fibrin and platelets, containing a large inoculum of bacteria.
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  • For patients with bone marrow failure, it has been accepted practice to transfuse platelets where levels are very low.
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