This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

plaited

plaited Sentence Examples

  • It is not possible to enumerate here even the principal styles of ishime, but mention may be made of the zara-maki (broad-cast), in which the surface is finely but irregularly pitted after the manner of the face of a stone; the nashi-ji (pear-ground), in which we have a surface like the rind of a pear; the hari-ishime (needle ishime), where the indentations are so minute that they seem to have been made with the point of a needle; the gama-ishime, which is intended to imitate the skin of a toad; the tsuya-ishime, produced with a chisel sharpened so that its traces have a lustrous appearance; the ore-liuchi (broken-tool), a peculiar kind obtained with a jagged tool; and the gozam, which resembles the plaited surface of a fine straw mat.

    40
    21
  • Her jet black hair was swept up gracefully into a plaited crown.

    25
    17
  • It was probably made of plaited leather or felt.

    21
    13
  • Some built little houses of the tufts in the plowed ground, or plaited baskets from the straw in the cornfield.

    8
    11
  • The walls of the renal sacs are deeply plaited and thrown into ridges.

    7
    8
  • high, with plaited sword-like leaves, and large flowers about 6 in.

    4
    4
  • The grasses are dyed in all shades and plaited to form attractive designs suitable for the purposes to which they are to be applied.

    3
    3
  • Of the various materials which go to the fabrication of plaited head-gear the most important is wheaten straw.

    2
    2
  • - Transverse section of a plicate or plaited leaf.

    2
    2
  • The hair is sometimes worn plaited (choti), usually an odd number of thin plaits made into one large one, falling down the back and fastened at the end with ribbons.

    2
    2
  • It is then plaited into mats about 2 yds.

    2
    3
  • In the hot season no Abyssinian goes without a flag-shaped fan of plaited rushes.

    2
    3
  • The costume of the Tosks differs from that of the Ghegs; its distinctive feature is the white plaited linen fustanella or petticoat, which has been adopted by the Greeks; the Ghegs wear trews of white or crimson native cloth adorned with black braid, and a short, close-fitting jacket, which in the case of wealthy persons is embellished with gold lace.

    2
    4
  • a long plaited lock (or later a lappet) on the side of their head in imitation of the youthful Horus, and the peculiar tonsure adopted by the later Arabs of Sinai was inspired by the desire to copy their god Orotal-Dionysus.'

    1
    1
  • The parent chamber and the ambulatory were ceiled, sometimes with interlacing strips of bark or broad laths, so as to produce a plaited effect sometimes with plain boards.

    1
    1
  • They were often Vehkles constructed of rich lacquer; the curtains suspended in front were of the finest bamboo workmanship, with thick cords and tassels of plaited silk, and the draught animal, an ox of handsome proportions, was brilliantly caparisoned.

    1
    1
  • The non-nomads of these Libyan tribes dwelt in huts made of stakes supporting plaited mats of rush or asphodel.

    1
    2
  • A tall, beautiful woman with a mass of plaited hair and much exposed plump white shoulders and neck, round which she wore a double string of large pearls, entered the adjoining box rustling her heavy silk dress and took a long time settling into her place.

    1
    2
  • The women have handsome features of Jewish cast (the last trait often true also of the men); fair complexions, sometimes rosy, though usually a pale sallow; hair braided and plaited behind in two long tresses terminating in silken tassels.

    1
    4
  • long, elliptic-ovate, doubly toothed, pointed, numerously ribbed, hairy below and opaque, and not glossy as in the beech, have short stalks and when young are plaited.

    0
    0
  • Middle-aged men wear the hair about an inch and a half long; young men and boys in a huge mop; while married women wear it in a chignon, and girls in mop-form but plaited.

    0
    0
  • The straw of Tuscany, specially grown for plaiting, is distinguished into three qualities - Pontederas Semone being the finest, Mazzuolo the second quality, from which the bulk of the plaits are made, while from the third quality, Santa Fioro, only "Tuscan pedals" and braids are plaited.

    0
    0
  • Distinct liliaceous plants with bold ornamental leaves regularly folded and plaited.

    0
    0
  • Wide range of antique and reproduction phones, plus plaited cords.

    0
    0
  • gauntleted gloves were of white buckskin; her riding-whip was plaited of white leather, topped with ivory and banded with gold.

    0
    0
  • handle which is broken is also of plaited cocoa-nut fiber.

    0
    0
  • plaited neck cord which would be fastened by its loop with the toggle, made of bird bone.

    0
    0
  • plaited straw.

    0
    0
  • plaited band of coconut fiber cords, tapering at the ends.

    0
    0
  • plaited daisy chains like a chorus of college girls.

    0
    0
  • plaited together.

    0
    0
  • The straws were then plaited into long ribbons, which could be in a variety of patterns.

    0
    0
  • Her head weighed down heavily with an elaborate flower arrangement that was being fixed to her long plaited hair.

    0
    0
  • plaited finely and they nearly all wear blue and white beads.

    0
    0
  • Shabbat loaves are usually plaited and the loaves for other festivals round.

    0
    0
  • Hence Panama Hat, a lightweight hat of plaited straw.

    0
    0
  • When not in use, the register is removed from the shoe by lifting a small screw button near C. The tow line is usually plaited, and to avoid a knot close to the rotator, the latter is secured to the former by a knot inside an egg-shaped shell (fig.

    0
    0
  • 37), as in oak; or it has several folds like a fan, plicate or plaited (fig.

    0
    0
  • The use of tallow, sheep's fat, and of plaited cord and even wood for the wick, is well recorded in the history of candle making.

    0
    0
  • The inner bark of the baobab tree is believed to be the source of the strands of fiber, which are plaited and twined into a solid chevron pattern.

    0
    0
  • Africa, allied to Sparaxis and Tritonia, but having broader foliage, often hairy and plaited; they grow from 6 to 12 inches high, with spikes of sometimes sweetly-scented brilliant flowers ranging in color from blue to crimsonmagenta.

    0
    0
  • It is a shrub of neat yet graceful habit, well clothed with dark green, rather plaited leaves.

    0
    0
  • White Hellebore (Veratrum) - V. album is a handsome erect pyramidal perennial, 3 1/2 to 5 feet high, with large plaited leaves and yellowish-white flowers in dense spikes on the top of the stem, forming a large panicle.

    0
    0
  • Alternatively, the ends of the ponytail can be plaited into several thick plaits and tucked into the ponytail holder for a regal look.

    0
    0
  • The hair may be plaited only about a half of an inch down so that the loosely hanging hair can be styled as desired.

    0
    0
  • Once the hair is braided or plaited, it is arranged into a pattern and pinned into place.

    0
    0
  • Extremely curly, kinky hair is twisted in two strand twists for black hair or the hair is plaited while wet.

    0
    0
  • Typically, the best quality wicks are made from knitted, plaited, or braided fibers.

    0
    0
  • The last variety is both the most ancient and the most commonly found, and is the sacred barley of antiquity, ears of which are frequently represented plaited in the hair of the goddess Ceres, besides being figured on ancient coins.

    0
    1
  • A variety of manufactures are carried on, including the making of leather goods, carved wooden vessels, finely plaited mats, embroidered work, shoes of yellow and red leather and pottery of various kinds.

    0
    1
  • She wore long woollen robes; a veil and a kerchief for the head, her hair being plaited up with a purple band in a conical form (tutulus); and shoes made of the leather of sacrificed animals; like her husband, she carried the sacrificial knife.

    0
    1
  • The hair, though generally hidden by the char-kadd, is at times exposed and plaited into innumerable little tails of great length, while a coquettish little skull-cap of embroidery, or shawl, or colored silk is worn.

    0
    1
  • Strawplaiting was once extensively carried on in this neighbourhood by women and girls in their cottage homes, but has now almost entirely disappeared owing to the importation of Chinese and Japanese plaited straw.

    0
    1
  • The furniture consists of earthen bowls, drinking-cups, wooden neck-rests, spoons, &c., artistically carved, mats, plaited baskets and boxes.

    0
    1
  • There the meal is packed by hand in "scourtins," bags made of plaited coco-nut leaves - replacing the woollen cloths used in England.

    0
    1
  • "Nonsense, nonsense!" cried the old man, shaking his pigtail to see whether it was firmly plaited, and grasping his by the hand.

    0
    1
  • That evening, proud of Dolokhov's proposal, her refusal, and her explanation with Nicholas, Sonya twirled about before she left home so that the maid could hardly get her hair plaited, and she was transparently radiant with impulsive joy.

    0
    1
  • In general, the use of a square or rectangular cloth (whether folded diagonally or not) corresponds to the modern keffiyeh woven with long fringes which are plaited into cords knitted at the ends or worked into little balls sewn over with coloured silks and golden From Palestine Exploration Fund threads.

    0
    2
  • The manufactures include agricultural implements, leather, vinegar and plaited sandals, and there is a trade in brandy, wine, cattle, poultry and wool; there are quarries of building-stone in the neighbourhood.

    0
    2
  • MATTING, a general term embracing many coarse woven or plaited fibrous materials used for covering floors or furniture, for hanging as screens, for wrapping up heavy merchandise and for other miscellaneous purposes.

    0
    3
  • For the protection of the impression, in the 12th and 13th centuries, when it was an ordinary custom to impress the seals on thick cakes of wax, the surrounding margin rising well above the field usually formed a suitable fender; at other times, as in the 14th and 15th centuries, a so-called wreath,1 or twisted shred of parchment, or plaited grass or reed, was imbedded in the wax round the impression.

    0
    3
Browse other sentences examples →