Plain sentence example

plain
  • I'm glad we were out in plain sight!
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  • Her room was plain and basic.
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  • She was now plain rather than pretty.
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  • And she is not at all so plain, either.
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  • All the people I have ever met before were very plain to see.
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  • It was plain he regretted it.
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  • The dress was full length, rather plain, with a high collar.
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  • Those are the plain and simple facts.
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  • They were still surrounded by the magic plain bathed in moonlight and spangled with stars.
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  • Vara spoke off to the side with a warrior-like man in plain clothing of earthy colors.
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  • She pointed to a lady who was crossing the room followed by a very plain daughter.
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  • "It's plain that they have not all gone yet, Prince," said Bagration.
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  • It was plain that what troubled him most was that he had grieved me.
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  • She slid her feet into plain sandals provided by the convent along with her plain sweats and T-shirt.
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  • Tim's frustration was plain on his face.
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  • It is built on a level plain surrounded by low, gently sloping and beautifully wooded hills.
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  • It was plain that this "well?" referred to much that they both understood without naming.
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  • The no-frills dining room is fairly plain, but the food is anything but.
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  • He was making it plain enough.
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  • He'd made it plain enough how he felt.
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  • "This ain't right," he said, his Southern accent plain even to his ears.
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  • She did not like Princess Mary, whom she thought very plain, affected, and dry.
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  • He sat in the "Plain," i.e.
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  • It dates from the 12th century and is a plain, massive ruin, architecturally insignificant.
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  • It was plain that she was following a train of thought independent of her sister-in-law's words.
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  • It was plain that he did not quite grasp where he was.
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  • It was plain that her whole soul was in her prayer.
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  • Several naan breads are served plain or stuffed with meat or potatoes.
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  • His eyes were blacker than Gabriel's, and his plain features deceptive.
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  • As she started the car, it was plain to see she felt nervous, yet excited.
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  • That the emperor sincerely sympathized with Alexius, and suspected Peter of harbouring murderous designs against his son, is plain from his confidential letter to George I.
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  • Its military importance was recognized in 427 B.C. by the Spartans, who sent a garrison to guard the Trachinian plain against the marauding highland tribes of Oeta and built a citadel close by the Asopus gorge with the new name of Heraclea.
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  • The distinction between these two was made emphatic by Aquinas, who is at pains, especially in his treatise Contra Gentiles, to make it plain that each is a distinct fountain of knowledge, but that revelation is the more important of the two.
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  • the church of the Panaghia Chrysokephalos, or Virgin of the Golden Head, a large and massive but excessively plain building, which is now the Orta-hissar mosque.
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  • A little south of Samarra the stony plateau of Mesopotamia ends, and the alluvial plain of Irak, ancient Babylonia, begins.
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  • At the point of entering the alluvial plain the bed of the Tigris seems to be lower than that of the Euphrates, so that the canals run from the latter to the former stream.
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  • Almansa is built at the foot of a white limestone crag, which is surmounted by a Moorish castle, and rises abruptly in the midst of a fertile and irrigated plain.
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  • The plain or gently inclined uniform surface.
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  • It was plain that at that moment there was in Natasha's heart no thought of herself or of her own relations with Prince Andrew.
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  • It was plain that he was making an effort to listen, but could not do so.
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  • Nicholas was a plain farmer: he did not like innovations, especially the English ones then coming into vogue.
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  • The warning in his voice was plain.
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  • She liked the idea of being special, especially with the hoard of beautiful women in front of her whose perfect bodies left her feeling plain.
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  • Cochin-China consists chiefly of an immense plain, flat and monotonous, traversed by the Mekong and extending from Ha-Tien in the west to Baria in the east, and from Bien-Hoa in the north-east to the southern point of the peninsula of Ca-Mau in the south-west.
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  • South of Oristano and west of the districts last described, and traversed by the railway from Oristano to Cagliari, is the Campidano (often divided in ordinary nomenclature into the Campidano of Oristano and the Campidano of Cagliari), a low plain, the watershed of which, near S.
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  • In the north it forms the plain of Sassari.
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  • Or again, a group of them may occupy a fertile plain, a river valley or a tableland,3 or they may stand close to the seashore.
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  • Amritsar district is a nearly level plain, with a very slight slope from east to west.
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  • NISH (also written Nisch and NIS), the capital of the Nish department of Servia, lying in a plain among the southern mountains, on the left shore of the Nishava, a tributary of the Morava.
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  • To the south of the hospital is Greenwich Park (185 acres), lying high, and commanding extensive views over London, the Thames and the plain of Essex.
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  • of the bridge over it, and so through the Campanian plain, with many windings, into the sea.
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  • The only plain in the rugged little country was the White Plain, in which was situated the only important town, Megara.
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  • The queen wished to bury him at the feet of the Swedish kings, and to raise a costly mausoleum in his honour; but these plans were overruled, and a plain monument in the Catholic cemetery was all that marked the place of his rest.
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  • TRACHIS, a city of ancient Greece, situated at the head of the Malian Gulf in a small plain between the rivers Asopus and Melas, and enclosed by the mountain wall of Oeta which here extended close to the sea and by means of the Trachinian Cliffs completely commanded the main road from Thessaly.
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  • A little south of Samarra are found remains of the Median Wall, which stretched south-west towards the Euphrates near Sahlawych, marking the edge of the Babylonian alluvial plain.
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  • Flood Plain >>
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  • Central Albania differs from the northern and southern regions in the more undulating and less rugged character of its surface; it contains considerable lowland tracts, such as the wide and fertile plain of Musseki, traversed by the river Simen.
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  • In the 4th century Basil, when bishop, established an ecclesiastical centre on the plain, about 1 m.
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  • The cathedral church, dedicated to its founder St Colman, a disciple of St Finbar of Cork, is a plain cruciform building mainly of the 14th century, with an earlier oratory in the churchyard.
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  • One end of each pipe is plain, so that it may be cut to any desired length; pipes with shaped ends obviously must be obtained in the exact lengths required.
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  • It has been asserted (by Sir Thomas Urquhart) that the piece of artillery was actually tried upon a plain in Scotland with complete success, a number of sheep and cattle being destroyed.
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  • It stands in a level plain on the left bank of the river Ouse, by which communication is provided with the Humber.
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  • Parma, one of the finest cities of northern Italy, lies in a fertile tract of the Lombard plain, within view of the Alps and sheltered by the Apennines, 170 ft.
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  • There are few birds which have more exercised the taxonomer than this, and the reason seems to be plain.
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  • The remainder of the great Argentine plain is the treeless, grassy pampa (Quichua for " level spaces "), apparently a dead level, but in reality rising gradually from the Atlantic westward toward the Andes.
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  • at this point, three-fourths of which is a comparatively level alluvial plain, and the remainder an arid plateau broken by mountain ranges.
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  • The fox, of which several species exist, probably never ventured far into the plain, for it afforded him no shelter.
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  • The basin of the Garonne occupies south-western France with the exception of the tracts covered by the secondary basins of the Adour, the Aude, the Hrault, the Orb and other smaller rivers, and the lowlying plain of the Landes, which is watered by numerous coast rivers, notably by the Leyre.
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  • The plain of Toulouse, which with the rest of south-western France produces good draught oxen, the Parisian basin, the plains of the north to the east of the maritime region, the lower valley of the Rhflne and tile Bresse, where there is little or no natural pasturage, and forage is grown from seed.
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  • AK' '-SHEHR (anc. Philomelion), a town in Asia Minor, in the Konia vilayet, situated at the edge of a fertile plain, on the north side of the Sultan Dagh.
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  • CARACAS, the principal city and the capital of the United States of Venezuela, situated at the western extremity of an elevated valley of the Venezuelan Coast Range known as the plain of Chacao, 62 m.
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  • The plain is about II m.
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  • The Guaira river, a branch of the Tuy, traverses the plain from west to east, and flows past the city on the south.
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  • The growth has been chiefly towards the north and north-west; but there are large suburbs on the west, and on the southwest near the railway station on the plain of Rephaim.
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  • The surface is a slightly undulating plain.
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  • His experimental investigations are carried out with plain and usually home-made apparatus, the accessories being crude and rough, but the essentials thoughtfully designed so as to compass in the simplest and most perfect manner the special end in view.
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  • SULEIMANIEH, or Suleimania, the chief town of a sanjak of the same name in Asiatic Turkey, in the vilayet of Mosul, situated on a treeless plain in the Kurdistan Mountains, in the region known as Shehrizor, some 40 or 50 m.
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  • 3 It is plain, however, that there is a long step between the astrological assignation of each hour of the week to a planet and the recognition of the week as an ordinary division of time by people at large.
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  • It is situated in a fertile plain 142 m.
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  • The basal plain of these terraces is the bed of the ocean, which on the Pacific side has an average depth of 15,000 ft.
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  • A great plain, covering quite 500,000 sq.
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  • No evidences of recent lava flows can be found in the interior over the great alluvial plain, the Lower, or the Higher Steppes.
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  • From a geological standpoint, the Great Australian Plain and the fertile valley of the Nile have had a similar origin.
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  • In seasons of drought they are hardly more than swamps and mud flats, which for a time may become a grassy plain, or desolate coast encrusted with salt.
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  • The second and marine type of the Jurassics occurs in Western Australia, on the coastal plain skirting the western foot of the western plateau.
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  • Some of the Kassite deities were introduced into the Babylonian pantheon, and the Kassite tribe of Khabira seems to have settled in the Babylonian plain.
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  • The descent from the summits of the range into the plain is somewhat less abrupt on the western than it is on the eastern side, and between the foot of the mountains and the Strait of Malacca the largest known alluvial deposits of tin are situated.
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  • He was described by Sir Philip Warwick on this occasion: - "I came into the House one morning well clad and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor; his linen was plain and not very clean;.
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  • But it is plain that, once convinced of the necessity for the king's execution, he was the chief instrument in overcoming all scruples among his judges, and in resisting the protests and appeals of the Scots.
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  • On the 16th of December 1653 Cromwell was installed in his new Office, dressed as a civilian in a plain black coat instead of in scarlet as a general, in order 1 C. H.
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  • Maceio is attractively situated in the midst of large plantations of coco-nut and dende palms, though the broad sandy beach in front and the open sun-burned plain behind give a barren character to its surroundings.
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  • Thenceforward it passes by deep gorges through the Mohmand hills, curving northward until it emerges into the Peshawar plain at Michni.
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  • Behind the lagoons an undulating plain stretches some 50 m.
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  • wall, and the road from Shechem to the maritime plain which runs a little to the W.
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  • 9) by a rich and well-watered plain, from which it rises in successive terraces of fertile soil to a height of 400 or 500 ft.
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  • beneath the plateau, runs across the plain towards the mountains; it is at this point that the traveller coming from Shechem now ascends the hill to the village of Sebusteh, which occupies only the extreme E.
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  • Since our conception of velocity is essentially relative, it is plain that any property possessed by a body in virtue of its motion can be effectively possessed by it only in relation to those bodies with respect to which it is moving.
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  • Though himself a plain and almost illiterate soldier, he was a founder of schools, and he also provided medical attendance for the poor of Rome, by appointing a physician for each of the fourteen districts of the city.
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  • Some of these experiments were made on Salisbury Plain and others in the Bristol Channel between Lavernock and Flat Holm and Bream Down in 1897.
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  • First as regards the transmitting part, one essential element is the antenna, aerial, or air wire, which may take a variety of forms. It may consist of a single plain or stranded copper wire upheld at the top by an insulator from a mast, chimney or building.
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  • If these spark balls are set at the right distance, then when the potential difference accumulates the antenna will be charged and at some stage suddenly discharged by the discharge leaping across the spark gap. This was Marconi's original method, and the plan is still used under the name of the direct method of excitation or the plain antenna.
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  • In the case of the plain or directly excited antenna the oscillations are highly damped, and each train probably only consists at most of half a dozen oscillations.
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  • 12039 of 1896) brought forward the idea of focusing a beam of electric radiation for telegraphic purposes on a distant station by means of parabolic mirrors, and tried this method successfully on Salisbury Plain up to a distance of about a couple of miles.
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  • The city stands on a hill separated by a little plain from the harbour; towards the north and east it communicates with a fertile valley; on the south and west it is hemmed in by high mountains.
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  • 49), which corresponds to the plain of Kossovo in Turkey.
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  • By far the larger portion of Northern Italy is occupied by the basin of the Po, which comprises the whole of the broad plain extending from the foot of the Apennines to that of the Alps, together with the valleys and slopes on both sides of it.
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  • There is no other instance in Europe of a basin of similar extent equally clearly characterized—the perfectly level character of the plain being as striking as the boldness with which the lower slopes of the mountain ranges begin to rise on each side of it.
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  • it enters the plain at Saluzzo, between which and Turin, a distance of only 30 m., it receives three considerable tributaries—the Chisone on its left bank, bringing down the waters from the valley of Fenestrelle, and the Varaita and Maira on the south, contributing those of two valleys of the Alps immediately south of that of the Po itself.
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  • till it enters the plain at Ivrea, and, after flowing about 20 m.
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  • through the Val Leventina to Bellinzona (where it is joined by the Moësa bringing down the waters of the Val Misocco) enters the lake through a marshy plain at Magadino, about 10 m.
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  • The Adda flows out of the lake at its south-eastern extremity at Lecco, and has thence a course through the plain of above 70 m.
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  • Issuing thence at its southwest extremity, the Oglio has a long and winding course through the plain before it finally reaches the Po a few miles above Borgoforte.
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  • The Adige, formed by the junction of two streams—the Etsch or Adige proper and the Eisak, both of which belong to Tirol rather than to Italy—descends as far as Verona, where it enters the great plain, with a course from north to south nearly parallel to the rivers last described, and would seem likely to discharge its waters into those of the Po, but below Legnago it turns eastward and runs parallel to the Po for about 40 m., entering the Adriatic by an independent mouth about 8 m.
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  • The tract adjoining this long line of lagoons is, like the basin of the Po, a broad expanse of perfectly level alluvial plain, extending from the Adige eastwards to the Carnic Alps, where they approach close to the Adriatic between Aquileia and Trieste, and northwards to the foot of the great chain, which here sweeps round in a semicircle from the neighborhood of Vicenza to that of Aquileia.
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  • It is occupied by the branches and offshoots of the mountain ranges which separate it from the great plain to the north, and send down their lateral ridges close to the water's edge, leaving only in places a few square miles of level plains at the mouths of the rivers and openings of the valleys.
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  • in width, between the crest of the Apennines and the plain of the Po, is one of the least known and at the same time least interesting portions of Italy.
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  • This communicates with the upper valley of the Sangro by a level plain called the Piano di Cinque Miglia, at an elevation of 4298 ft., regarded as the most wintry spot in Italy.
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  • The northern part of Tuscany is indeed occupied to a considerable extent by the underfalls and offshoots of the Apennines, which, besides the slopes and spurs of the main range that constitutes its northern frontier towards the plain of the Po, throw off several outlying ranges or groups.
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  • by the undulating volcanic plain of the Roman Campagna, from which the mountains rise in a wall-like barrier, of which the highest point, the Monte Gennaro, attains 4165 ft.
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  • The most considerable rivers of Tuscany south of the Arno are the Cecina, which flows through the plain below Volterra, and the Ombrone, which rises in the hills near Siena, and enters the sea about 12 m.
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  • This mountainous tract, which has an average breadth of from 50 to 60 m., is bounded west by the plain of Campania, now called the Terra di Lavoro, and east by the much broader and more extensive tract of Apulia or Puglia, composed partly of level plains, but for the most part of undulating downs, contrasting strongly with the mountain ranges of the Apennines, which rise abruptly above them.
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  • from the neighborhood of Padua to Este, and separated from the lower offshoots of the Alps by a portion of the wide plain of Padua.
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  • end of the Campanian Plain, the highest cone, called Montagna di Santa Croce, is 3291 ft.
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  • The whole of the great plain of Lombardy is covered by Pleistocene and recent deposits.
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  • Thus the great plain of northern Italy is chilled by the cold winds from the Alps, while the damp warm winds from the Mediterranean are to a great extent intercepted by the Ligurian Apennines.
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  • Unfortunately several of these fertile tracts suffer severely from malaria (q.v.), and especially the great plain adjoining the Gulf of Tarentum, which in the early ages of history was surrounded by a girdle of Greek cities—some of which attained to almost unexampled prosperity—has for centuries past been given up to almost complete desolation.
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  • Another stock, with no close allies nearer than the south of France, is found in the plain of Racconigi and Carmagnola; the mouse-colored Swiss breed occurs in the neighborhood of Milan; the Tirolese breed stretches south to Padua and Modena; and a red-coated breed named of Reggio or Friuli is familiar both in what were the duchies of Parma and Modena, and in the provinces of lJdine and Treviso.
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  • Liguria is not much adapted for sheep-farming on a large scale; but a number of small flocks come down to thc plain of Tuscany in the winter.
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  • With the exception of a few subAlpine districts near Bergamo and Brescia, the great Lombard plain is decidedly unpastoral.
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  • The army is organized in 12 army corps (each of 2 divisions), 6 of which are quartered on the plain of Lombardy and Venetia and on the frontiers, and 2 more in northern Central Italy.
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  • Here the Via Appia turned eastward towards Beneventum, while the Via Popiia continued in a south-easterly direction through the Campanian plain and thence southwards through the mountains of Lucania and Bruttii as far as Rhegium.
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  • The Via Flaminia was the earliest and most important road to the north; and it was soon extended (in 187 B.C.) by the Via Aemilia running through Bononia as far as Placentia, in an almost absolutely straight line between the plain of the P0 and the foot of the Apennines.
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  • Yet, if the motive is forbidden us, it is plain from another point of view that good persons ought to be happy.
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  • But it is a plain finding of history that he has brought no " Copernican revolution " 4 to their minds.
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  • A closer scrutiny of the writers of all ages who preceded Charles Darwin, and, in particular, the light thrown back from Darwin on the earlier writings of Herbert Spencer, have made plain that without Darwin the world by this time might have come to a.
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  • With reference to any particular group of forms such a new centre of modification may be termed a metacentre, and it is plain that the archecentre of the whole group is a metacentre of the larger group cf which the group under consideration is a branch.
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  • The remainder of the department, with the exception of a more broken and picturesque district in the extreme north-west, forms part of the sterile and monotonous plain known as Champagne Pouilleuse.
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  • It is a plain, straightforward description of the globe, and of the various phenomena of the surface, dealing only with definitely ascertained facts in the natural order of their relationships, but avoiding any systematic classification or even definitions of terms.
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  • His armies crossed the plains beyond the Caspian, penetrated the wild mountain passes northwest of India, and did not turn back until they had entered on the Indo-Gangetic plain.
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  • The operations were carried on during eight years on a plain to the south of Quito; and, in addition to his memoir on this memorable measurement, La Condamine collected much valuable geographical information during a voyage down the Amazon.
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  • The relief of the surface typically includes a central plain, Homology sometimes dipping below sea-level, bounded by lateral Homology of con- h i ghlands or mountain ranges, loftier on one side than.
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  • The valley, composed of two lateral parallel slopes inclined towards a narrow strip of plain at a lower level which itself slopes downwards in the direction of its length.
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  • A region where volcanic activity has led to the embedding of dykes or bosses of hard rock amongst softer strata produces a plain broken by abrupt and isolated eminences.'
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  • Plain of marine erosion.
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  • (d)bergusstafelland - Lava plain.
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  • River plain.
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  • The precipitation of rain from the aqueous plain.
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  • The slope of the river bed diminishes until the plain compels the river to move slowly, swinging in meanders proportioned to its size, and gradually, controlled by the flattening land, ceasing to transport material, but raising its banks and silting up its bed by the dropped sediment, until, split up and shoaled, its distributaries struggle across its delta to the sea.
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  • These are places where the mode of travelling or of transport is changed, such as seaports, river ports and railway termini, or natural resting-places, such as a ford, the foot of a steep ascent on a road, the entrance of a valley leading up from a plain into the mountains, or a crossing-place of roads or railways.'
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  • m., the principal portion being along the east side of the Scioto in the midst of an extensive plain.
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  • MESHED (properly Mash-had, " the place of martyrdom"), capital of the province of Khorasan in Persia, situated in a plain watered by the Kashaf-rud (Tortoise river), a tributary of the Hari-rud (river from Herat, which after its junction with the Kashaf is called Tejen), 460 m.
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  • Built on the border of a low plain and having a mean annual temperature of 82° F., the town has the reputation of being unhealthy.
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  • Laoag is on an extensive coast plain, behind which is a picturesque range.
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  • of Erzerum, in a large circular pool (altitude, 8625 ft.), which is venerated by Armenians and Moslems, and flows south-east to the plain of Erzerum (5750 ft.).
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  • Nalzr Arsanas), rises south-west of Diadin, in the northern flank of the Ala Dagh (11,50o ft.), and flows west to the Alashgerd plain.
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  • The united stream breaks through the mountains to the south, and, receiving on its way the Patnotz Su (left) and the Khinis Su (right), flows south-west, west and south, through the rich plain of Bulanik to the plain of Mush.
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  • Here it is joined by the Kara Su (Teleboas), which, rising near Lake Van, runs past Wish and waters the plain.
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  • to its junction with the Tigris below Korna, through an unbroken plain, with no natural hills, except a few sand (or sandstone ?) hills in the neighbourhood of Warka, and no trace of rock, except at el-Haswa, above Hillah.
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  • In early times irrigating canals distributed the waters over the plain, and made it one of the richest countries of the East, so that historians report three crops of wheat to have been raised in Babylonia annually.
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  • By far the greater part of the country was a plain watered by numerous rivers, the chief of which have already been mentioned, with the exception of its great central stream, the Liger or Ligeris (Loire).
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  • The cunning of the Normans is plain enough; so is their impatience of restraint, unless held down by a strong master.
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  • The difference then is plain.
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  • It is plain that the Norman settlers in Apulia were not so deeply impressed with the local style as they were in Sicily, while they thought much more of it than they thought of the local style of England.
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  • It is essentially a province of hills, the only considerable plain being that around the Tung-t'ing lake, but this extends little beyond the area which in summer forms part of the lake.
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  • Yet it seems plain that any theology, maintaining redemption as historical fact (and not merely ideal), must attach religious importance to conclusions which are technically probable rather than proven.
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  • In general Sennar is a vast plain, lying for the most part much higher than the river-levels and about 2000 ft.
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  • From the plain rise isolated granitic hills, attaining heights of loon to 2000 ft.
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  • The plain, sandy in its northern part, is in the south a deep bed of argillaceous marl, scattered over with great granite boulders and fragments of greenstone.
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  • SOFIA (Bulgarian Sredetz, the middle town, a name now little used), the capital of Bulgaria, situated almost in the centre of an upland plain, about 1700 ft.
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  • Partly owing to this, and partly to ancient feuds whose origin we cannot trace, the Athenian people was split up into three great factions known as the Plain (Pedieis) led by Lycurgus and Miltiades, both of noble families; the Shore (Parali) led by the Alcmaeonidae, represented at this time by Megacles, who was strong in his wealth and by his recent marriage with Agariste, daughter of Cleisthenes of Sicyon; the Hill or Upland (Diacreis, Diacrii) led by Peisistratus, who no doubt owed his influence among these hillmen partly to the possession of large estates at Marathon.
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  • In 555 or 554 B.C. a coalition of the Plain and the Coast succeeded in expelling him.
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  • His property was confiscated and sold by auction, but in his absence the strife between the Plain and the Coast was renewed, and Megacles, unable to hold his own, invited him to return.
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  • - is on the whole a broad elevated plain, ranging between 500 and 900 ft.
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  • Then it again rises gradually as it approaches the hilly tracts which enclose the great plain.
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  • Sometimes also a viaduct consisting of a series of arches is preferred to an embankment when the line has to be taken over a piece of fiat alluvial plain, or when it is desired to economize space and to carry the line at a sufficient height to clear the streets, as in the case of various railways entering London and other large towns.
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  • In physical character Cambay is entirely an alluvial plain.
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  • It lies on an open plain on the river Regnitz, 2 m.
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  • Here there is no splendour; everything is quite plain; and one hall contains all that is sacred in the building.
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  • This plateau, however, is not a plain, but contains many buttes and mesas and isolated mountain ranges rising from 1000 to 8000 ft.
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  • Several valleys often unite into a large elevated plain, broken only by scattered buttes and spurs.
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  • Breaching the high ground of Salisbury Plain, it passes Amesbury, and following a very sinuous course reaches Salisbury.
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  • extremity of the Laconian Gulf, in a small but fertile plain at the mouth of the Gythius.
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  • RAVENNA, a city and archiepiscopal see of Emilia, Italy, capital of the province of Ravenna, standing in a marshy plain 13 ft.
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  • Nazario e Celso), a small structure in the form of a Latin cross with a dome (in which, as in the baptistery of Neon, the old cathedral, &c., the constructional use of amphorae is noteworthy), with a plain brick exterior, and rich mosaics on a dark blue ground within.
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  • Once in the plain they were charged by the French gendarmes under Gaston himself, as well as by the landsknechts, and driven back.
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  • The town stands on a sandy plain, and there are sand dunes within the city limits.
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  • The public buildings are a large plain church with unfinished twin towers, the government palace, the legislative halls, a normal school and public hospital.
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  • Marcy, who had ordered American ministers to wear a plain civilian costume), and by joining with James Buchanan and Pierre Soule, ministers to Great Britain and Spain respectively, in drawing up (Oct.
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  • We cannot perhaps assert that the same rate is to be continued for very many centuries, but it is plain that the further we look back into the past time the greater must the sun have been.
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  • above the plain, commanding splendid views, and is approached on the east by a funicular railway from the station.
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  • Disaster had come upon the north, and the plain of Jezreel saw the total defeat of the king and the rout of his army.
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  • Thrice Joash smote the Syrians - in accordance with the last words of the dying prophet - and Aphek in the Sharon plain, famous in history for Israel's disasters, now witnessed three victories.
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  • The Kophino mountains (3888 ft.) separate the central plain of Messara from the southern coast.
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  • The largest plain is that of Monofatsi and Messara, a fertile tract extending between Mt.
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  • The smaller plain, or rather slope, adjoining Canea and the valley of Alikianu, through which the Platanos (ancient Iardanos) flows, are of great beauty and fertility.
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  • A peculiar feature is presented by the level upland basins which furnish abundant pasturage during the summer months; the more remarkable are the Omalo in the White Mountains (about 4000 ft.) drained by subterranean outlets (KaTa(30Opa), Nida (Eis T7)v "IBav) in Psiloriti (between 5000 and 6000 ft.), and the Lassithi plain (about 3000 ft.), a more extensive area, on which are several villages.
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  • The principal rivers are the Metropoli Potamos and the Anapothiari, which drain the plain of Monofatsi and enter the southern sea E.
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  • A great portion of the central plain of Monofatsi, the principal grain-producing district, is lying fallow owing to the exodus of the Moslem peasantry.
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  • - The acropolis of this historic city looks on the Libyan Sea and commands the extensive plain of Messara.
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  • Among other Greek remains in the island may be mentioned, besides the great inscription, the archaic temple of the Pythian Apollo at Gortyna, a plain square building with a pronaos added in later times, excavated by Halbherr G 3' ?
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  • Among the most important of these were - Lyttus or Lyctus, in the interior, south-east of Cnossus; Rhaucus, between Cnossus and Gortyna; Phaestus, in the plain of Messara, between Gortyna and the sea; Polyrrhenia, near the north-west angle of the island; Aptera, a few miles inland from the Bay of Suda; Eleutherna and Axus, on the northern slopes of Mount Ida; and Lappa, between the White Mountains and the sea.
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  • - Mississippi lies for the most part in the Mississippi embayment of the Gulf Coastal Plain.
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  • At the eastern extremity of the Coastal Plain Region an outer coast line is formed by a chain of long narrow barrier beaches from which project capes Hatteras, Lookout and Fear, whose outlying shoals are known for their dangers to navigation.
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  • Through most of the Coastal Plain Region, which extends inland from 80 to i 50 m., the country continues very level or only slightly undulating, and rises to the westward at the rate of little more than 1 ft.
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  • The " Fall Line," the boundary between the Coastal Plain and the Piedmont Plateau, has a very irregular course across North Carolina, but lies in a general S.W.
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  • courses wholly within the state, and, with the Roanoke, drain the Coastal Plain Region.
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  • In contrast with the rivers of these regions those of the Coastal Plain are sluggish, and toward their mouths expand into wide estuaries.
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  • The Coastal Plain Region is the only part of the state that has any lakes, and these are chiefly shallow bodies of water, with sandy bottoms, in the midst of swamps.
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  • In the swamps are the bald cypress, the white cedar and the live oak, usually draped in southern long moss; south of Cape Fear river are palmettos, magnolias, prickly ash, the American olive and mock orange; along streams in the Coastal Plain Region are the sour gum, the sweet bay and several species of oak; but the tree that is most predominant throughout the upland portion of this region is the long-leaf or southern pine.
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  • The species of fauna that are at all characteristic of this part of the United States are found in the Piedmont Plateau Region and the western portion of the Coastal Plain Region.
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  • In the eastern portion of the Coastal Plain Region are the cotton rat, rice-field rat, marsh rabbit, big-eared bat, brown pelican, swallow-tailed kite, black vulture and some rattlesnakes and cotton-mouth moccasin snakes, all of which are common farther south; and there are some turtles and terrapins, and many geese, swans, ducks, and other water-fowl.
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  • For the Coastal Plain Region it is 61° F.; for the Piedmont Plateau Region, 60° F.; for the Mountain Region, 56° F.; for Southport, in the S.E.
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  • on the Coastal Plain; and in July, the warmest month, the mean is about 79° F.
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  • on both the Coastal Plain and the Piedmont Plateau and 74° F.
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  • For the Coastal Plain Region it is 54 in.; for the Piedmont Plateau Region, 48 in.; and for the Mountain Region, 53 in.
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  • On the Coastal Plain the soil is generally sandy, but in nearly all parts of this region more or less marl abounds; south of the Neuse river the soil is mostly a loose sand, north of it there is more loam on the uplands, and in the lowlands the soil is usually compact with clay, silt or peat; toward the western border of the region the sand becomes coarser and some gravel is mixed with it.
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  • border of the Coastal Plain; tobacco, in the N.
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  • portions of the Coastal Plain; rice, along the banks of rivers near the coast; wheat, in the valley of the Yadkin; orchard fruits, in the W.
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  • portion of the Coastal Plain; peanuts, in the N.
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  • portion of the Coastal Plain; sorghum cane, almost wholly in Columbus county in the S.
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  • part of the Coastal Plain.
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  • of woodland; great quantities of merchantable timber still remained, especially in the Mountain Region and on the Coastal Plain.
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  • The trees of the greatest commercial value are oak and chestnut at the foot of the mountains and yellow pine on the uplands of the Coastal Plain.
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  • But mixed with the oak and chestnut or higher up are considerable hickory, birch and maple; farther up the mountain sides are some hemlock and white pine; and on the swamp lands of the Coastal Plain are much cypress and some cedar, and on the Coastal Plain south of the Neuse there is much long-leaf pine from which resin is obtained.
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    0
  • There are only two genders and two numbers: the neuter gender is entirely wanting, and the dual number is not recognized in Syriac grammar, though there are plain traces of it in the language.
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    0
  • In the Roman Catholic Church mitres are divided into three classes: (1) Mitra pretiosa, decorated with jewels, gold plates, &c.; (2) Mitra auriphrygiata, of white silk, sometimes embroidered with gold and silver thread or small pearls, or of cloth of gold plain; (3) Mitra simplex, of white silk damask, silk or linen, with the two falling bands behind terminating in red fringes.
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  • Of the surviving early mitres the greater number have only the orphrey embroidered, the body of the mitre being left plain.
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  • Water is scarce and the plain is not much cultivated in consequence.
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  • The town of NIRIZ is situated in a plain 7 m.
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  • Saintes-Maries is situated in the plain of the Camargue, 12 m.
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  • The great plain extends, with an almost unbroken surface, from the most western to the most eastern extremity of British India, and is composed of deposits so finely comminuted, that it is no exaggeration to say that it is possible to go from the Bay of Bengal up the Ganges, through the Punjab, and down the Indus again to the sea, over a distance of 2000 m.
    0
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  • Excepting the northern part of this tract, which is conterminous with the plain of Mesopotamia (which at its highest point reaches an elevation of about 700 ft.
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  • The area between the northern border of the Persian high lands and the Caspian and Aral Seas is a nearly desert low-lying plain, extending to the foot of the north - western extremity of the great Tibeto-Himalayan mountains, and prolonged east- Trans- ward up the valleys of the Oxus (Amu-Darya) and Caspian Jaxartes (Syr-Darya), and northward across the country re ior, and of the Kirghiz to the south-western border of Siberia.
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  • The elevation of the plain about Kashgar and Yarkand is from 4000 to 6000 ft.
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  • Every pass of importance is known and recorded; every route of significance has been explored and mapped; Afghanistan has assumed a new political entity by the demarcation of a boundary; the value of Herat and of the Pamirs as bases of aggression has been assessed, and the whole intervening space of mountain and plain thoroughly examined.
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  • He reported the gradual formation of an anticlinal or ridge extending longitudinally through the great Balkh plain of Afghan Turkestan, which effectually shuts off the northern affluents of that basin from actual junction with the river.
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  • From the Khingan ranges to the Pacific, south of the Amur, stretch the rich districts of Manchuria, a province which connects Russia with the Korea by a series of valleys formed by the Sungari and its affluents - a land of hill and plain, forest and swamp, possessing a delightful climate, and vast undeveloped agricultural resources.
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  • The winds which pass northward over India blow as south-easterly and easterly winds over the north-eastern part of the Gangetic plain, and as south winds up the Indus.
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  • They seem almost entirely to have exhausted their northward velocity by the time they have reached the northern extremity of the great Indian plain; they are not felt on the table-lands of Afghanistan, and hardly penetrate into the Indus basin or the ranges of the Himalaya, by which mountains, and those which branch off from them into the Malay peninsula, they are prevented from continuing their progress in the direction originally imparted to them.
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  • at the head of the Gangetic plain.
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  • The arboreous forms which least require the humid and equable heat of the more truly tropical and equatorial climates, and are best able to resist the high temperatures and excessive drought of the northern Indian hot months from April to June, are certain Leguminosae, Bauhinia, Acacia, Butea and Dalbergia, Bombax, Shorea, Nauclea, Lagerstroemia, and Bignonia, a few bamboos and palms, with others which extend far beyond the tropic, and give a tropical aspect to the forest to the extreme northern border of the Indian plain.
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  • It is plain from early Moslem literature that Persian, Christian and especially Jewish ideas had penetrated into Arabia.
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  • The Philistines for once directed their forces towards the plain of Jezreel (Esdraelon) in the north; and Saul, forsaken by Yahweh, already gave himself up for lost.
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  • The interior, plain in itself, contains interesting sculpture.
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  • The Campidano of Cagliari, the plain which begins at the north end of the lagoon of S.
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  • These characters are plain in all the cases cited, excepting only the leeches which will be considered separately.
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  • Benham's division into Phanerocephala in which the prostomium is plain, and Crytocephala in which the prostomium is hidden by the peristomium adopted by Sedgwick, can only be justified by the character used; for the Terebellids, though phanerocephalous, have many of the features of the Sabellids.
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  • It is built on an open plain, and is encompassed by a wall 11 m.
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  • The ordinary Mahrattas, who form the backbone of the nation, have plain features, an uncouth manner, short stature, a small but wiry frame.
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  • AYACUCHO, a city and department of central Peru, formerly known as Guamanga or Huamanga, renamed from the small plain of Ayacucho (Quichua, " corner of death").
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  • above the plain.
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  • Towards the centre the almost treeless plain presents a monotonous aspect, broken only by a few rocky elevations that rise abruptly from the black soil.
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  • The name was also applied to the great plain (Esdraelon) dominated by the city ("valley of Jezreel," Josh.
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  • The plain on the right of the marshes was prepared with pits and spikes.
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  • It everywhere shows a preference for a moist but well-drained soil, and never attains its full stature or luxuriance of growth upon arid ground, whether on plain or mountain - a peculiarity that should be remembered by the planter.
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  • by the fertile plain of Hyrcania (about Astrabad) at the foot of the mountains in the corner of the Caspian and by the Turanian desert; on the S.
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  • plain (1vlessara) by F.
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  • There the king, probably also high priest of the prevailing nature-cult, built a great stone palace, and received the tribute of feudatories, of whom, probably, the prince of Phaestus, who commanded the Messara plain, was chief.
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  • MOTRIL, a town of southern Spain in the province of Granada, at the foot of an offshoot of the Sierra Nevada and on the edge of a rich alluvial plain, about i m.
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  • The climate is semi-tropical, and the vega or plain of Motril has been found peculiarly adapted for the culture of sugar-cane and sugar-beet.
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  • But it is equally plain that the Ophite nucleus has from time to time received very numerous and often curiously perverted accretions from Babylonian Judaism, Oriental Christianity and Parsism, exhibiting a striking example of religious syncretism.
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  • The next year Cuchulinn receives arms, makes his first foray, and slays the three sons of Necht, redoubtable hereditary foes of the Ulstermen, in the plain of Meath.
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  • On the 10th of December it was plain to Charles himself that Moscow was inaccessible.
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  • But these and many other contributions, 4 made until nearly the close of the 18th century, though highly meritorious, were unconnected as a whole, and it is plain that no conception of what it was in the power, of Comparative Anatomy to set forth had occurred to the most diligent dissectors.
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  • A protracted controversy with Johann Hevelius, in which Hooke urged the advantages of telescopic over plain sights, brought him little but discredit.
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  • The town rises from a marshy plain, east of the Carpathians, and west of the cornlands of southern Moldavia.
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    0
  • At the head of the Adriatic, between the mountains and the sea, lies that part of the Lombard plain known as the Veneto.
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  • The whole of this plain has been formed by the debris swept down from the Alps by the rivers Po, Ticino, Oglio, Adda, Mincio, Adige, Brenta, Piave, Livenza, Tagliamento and Isonzo.
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  • The substratum of the plain is a bed of boulders, covered during the lapse of ages by a deposit of rich alluvial soil.
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  • The result is that the plain is being gradually extended in an easterly direction, and cities like Ravenna, Adria and Aquileia, which were once seaports, lie now many miles inland.
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  • The campanile is usually a plain brick shaft with shallow pilasters running up the faces.
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  • But it is nearly certain that long before Attila and his Huns swept down upon the Venetian plain the little islands of the lagoon already had a population of poor but hardy fisherfolk living in quasi-independence, thanks to their poverty and their inaccessible site.
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  • The disturbances among the underlying rocks of Ohio have been slight, and originally the surface was a plain only slightly undulating; stream dissection changed the region to one of numberless hills and valleys; glacial drift then filled up the valleys over large broken areas, forming the remarkably level till plains of northwestern Ohio; but at the same time other areas were broken by the uneven distribution of the drift, and south-eastern Ohio, which was unglaciated, retains its rugged hilly character, gradually merging with the typical plateau country farther S.E.
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  • Chambo in turn receives the waters of a larger lake - Abai, Abaya, Pagade or Regina Margherita - through the river Walo, across a plain only 2 m.
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  • The district consists of a vast level plain, divided into two sections by the Dhaleswari river.
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  • Towards the city the red soil is intersected by creeks and morasses, whose margins yield crops of rice, mustard and til seed; while to the east of the town, a broad, alluvial, well-cultivated plain reaches as far as the junction of the Dhaleswari and Lakshmia rivers.
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  • The site of Nisibis, on the great road between the Tigris and the Mediterranean, and commanding alike the mountain country to the north and the then fertile plain to the south, gave it an importance which began during the Assyrian period and continued under the Seleucid empire.
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  • In 101 the Cimbri were defeated on the Raudine plain, near Vercellae, by the united armies of Catulus and Marius.
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    0
  • The city is built on a level, sandy plain, in the rear of which is a line of hills terminating in two spurs, East Rock and West Rock, respectively 360 and 400 ft.
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  • The influence of expectations of the new crop on "futures" running into the new crop is plain on inspection; but owing to the gap between the two crop years it would be astonishing if "futures" against which cotton from a new crop could be delivered were not appreciably independent of "spot" at the time of their quotation.
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  • Pittsfield is a popular summer resort; it lies in a plain about 1000 ft.
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  • There may be cases which cannot be explained in this way; but " whatever may be thought about them, it is plain that even if these and their like are really to be traced to the intervention of the divine mercy which loves to reward a.
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  • President Harding made plain in his first message that the United States would not enter the League of Nations.
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    0
  • Physically the country is divided into two regions, the one a series of mountain ranges occupying the northern and eastern portions of the kingdom, and the other a plain which stretches southwards from Mukden, the capital, to the Gulf of Liao-tung.
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  • In its course through Eastern Manchuria it forms the watershed of the Sungari, Usuri and other rivers, and in the south that of the Ya-lu and many smaller streams. it also forms the eastern boundary of the great plain of Liao-tung.
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  • m., and is entirely mountainous with the exception of a stretch of plain country in its north-western corner.
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  • This plain produces large quantities of indigo and opium, and is physically remarkable for the number of isolated conical hills which dot its surface.
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  • The great plain in Sheng-king is in many parts swampy, and in the neighbourhood of the sea, where the soil emits a saline exudation such as is also common in the north of China, it is perfectly sterile.
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    0
  • The indigo plant is grown in large quantities in the plain country to the north of Mukden, and is transported thence to the coast in carts, each of which carries rather more than a ton weight of the dye.
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    0
  • " The ordinary sand-pump or bailer, consists of a plain cylinder of light galvanized iron with a bail at the top and a stem-valve at the bottom.
    0
    0
  • The rotary system of drilling which is in general use in the oilfields of the coastal plain of Texas is a modification of that invented Rotary by Fauvelle in 1845, and used in the early years of the R .
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  • At Tiberias a little squadron of the brethren of the two Orders went down before Saladin's cavalry in May; at Hattin the levy masse of the kingdom, some 20,000 strong, foolishly marching over a sandy plain under the heat of a July sun, was utterly defeated; and after a fortnight's siege Jerusalem capitulated (October 2nd, 1187).
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  • But the Fourth Crusade was not to be plain sailing to Egypt.
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  • His book might almost be called the "Visions of Peter Bartholomew and others," and it is written in the plain matter-of-fact manner of Defoe's narratives.
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  • These are found as far south as the plain of Antioch and the basin of the Sajur.
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    0
  • portion of the state is, topographically, similar to south-eastern Alabama, being a rolling, hilly country; the eastern section is a part of the Atlantic coastal plain; the western coast line is less regular than the eastern, being indented by a number of bays and harbours, the largest of which are Charlotte Harbour, Tampa Bay and Pensacola Bay.
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  • 7), are simple and plain, but the bearing of the last is obscured by interpolations.
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    0
  • The last two are sometimes indicated by particles or auxiliary verbs; but these are generally dispensed with if the meaning is sufficiently plain without them.
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    0
  • We have no clue to the origin of the Therapeutae, but it is plain that they were already ancient when Philo described them.
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  • It then runs through a stony plain, where it frequently overflows and causes great damage, this being indeed the main characteristic of the Durance throughout its course.
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    0
  • Forestry is greatly developed; the breed of sheep in the Carpathians is of an improved quality, and the horses bred in the plain of the Hanna are highly esteemed.
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  • and 37° 58' N., towards the southern end of the central and principal plain of Attica.
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  • In the centre of the plain extends from north-east to south-west a series of low heights, now known as Turcovuni, culminating towards the south in the sharply pointed Lycabettus (1112 ft.), now called Hagios Georgios from the monastery which crowns its summit.
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    0
  • The Attic plain, notwithstanding the lightness of the soil, furnished an adequate supply of cereals; olive and fig groves and vineyards were cultivated from the earliest times in the valley of the Cephisus, and pasturage for sheep and goats was abundant.
    0
    0
  • The situation of the Acropolis, dominating the surrounding plain and possessing easy communication with the sea, favoured the formation of a relatively powerful state - inferior, however, to Tiryns and Mycenae; the myths of Cecrops, Erechtheus and Theseus bear witness to the might of the princes who ruled in the Athenian citadel, and here we may naturally expect to find traces of massive fortifications resembling in some degree those of the great Argolid cities.
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    0
  • The general state of the island when the Japanese assumed possession was that the plain of Giran on the eastern coast and the hill-districts were inhabited by semibarbarous folk, the western plains by Chinese of a degraded type, and that between the two there existed a traditional and continuous feud, leading to mutual displays of merciless and murderous violence.
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    0
  • On the north there is little coastal plain except at the mouths of rivers, but on the south coast there is a plain of considerable extent broken only by the remains of eroded foothills.
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    0
  • In the vicinity is a cliff or ridge of rock called Teufelsmauer (Devil's wall), from which fine views are obtained across the plain and into the deep gorges of the Harz Mountains.
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    0
  • This great plain, 10,613 sq.
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  • To the south the province is shut in by the wide mountainous tract which stretches from the Bay of Bengal through Bastar to the Godavari, and west of that river is continued onward to the rocky ridges and plateaus of Khandesh by a succession of ranges that enclose the plain of Berar along its southern border.
    0
    0
  • The provinces may be divided into two tracts of upland and three of plain, consisting of the Vindhya and Satpura plateaus, and the Berar, Nagpur and Chhattisgarh plains.
    0
    0
  • The eastern part of the Nagpur country and the Chhattisgarh plain, comprising the Mahanadi basin, form the great rice tract of the province, its heavy rainfall and hard yellowish soil rendering it excellently adapted for the growth of this crop.
    0
    0
  • Derwentwater and Bassenthwaite occupy a single depression, a flat alluvial plain separating them.
    0
    0
  • No reference is made to them by Homer, who speaks instead of the Elysian Plain (Od.
    0
    0
  • In the loosely-knit Seleucid realm it is plain that a great deal more independence was left to the various communities, - cities or native tribes, - than in Egypt, where the conditions made a bureaucratic system so easy to carry through.
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    0
  • Ptolemy were translated into Arabic, and in 827, in the reign of the caliph Abdullah al Mamun, an arc of the meridian was measured in the plain of Mesopotamia.
    0
    0
  • Six additional base lines were measured up to 1849, including the Lough Foyle, in 1827-1828, and that on Salisbury Plain, in 1849.
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    0
  • To the last Vespasian was a plain, blunt soldier, with decided strength of character and ability, and with a steady purpose to establish good order and secure the prosperity and welfare of his subjects.
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    0
  • The Perche in the southwest and the Thimerais in the north-west are districts of hills and valleys, woods, lakes and streams. The region of the east and south is a level and uniform expanse, consisting for the most part of the riverless but fertile plain of Beauce, sometimes called the "granary of France."
    0
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  • At some points the rugged cliffs, furrowed by deep ravines, approach close to the sea; elsewhere the hills leave a considerable maritime plain between their base and the shore line.
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  • above the surrounding plain and about which cluster many Indian legends; with 70 acres of woodland and fields surrounding it, this has been given to the city for a park.
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  • The Indians of central Alberta are chiefly plain Crees, a tribe of Algonquin stock.
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  • This state of things, it was plain, must continue as long as the trade was only a contraband commerce, involving merely pecuniary penalties.
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  • It was becoming plain that the planters would take no steps tending to the future liberation of the slaves, and the leaders of the movement determined to urge the entire abolition of slavery at the earliest practicable period.
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  • It lies in a plain watered by the river Ouse, at the junction of the Foss stream with the main river.
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  • To the south-east stretches the fruitful plain of Beauce, "the granary of France," of which the town is the commercial centre.
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  • NOLA, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 164 m.
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  • The two parts are distinguished by difference of style; the Hebrew principle of parallelism of clauses is employed far more in the first than in the second, which has a number of plain prose passages, and is also rich in uncommon compound terms. In view of these differences there is ground for holding that the second part is a separate production which has been united with the first by an editor, an historical haggadic sketch, a midrash, full of imaginative additions to the Biblical narrative, and enlivened by many striking ethical reflections.
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  • The Mexican Central gives it railway connexion with the national capital and other prominent cities of the Republic. Leon stands in a fertile plain on the banks of the Turbio, a tributary of the Rio Grande de Lerma, at an elevation of 5862 ft.
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  • According to Porter (Journal Soc. Lit., 18 54, p. 303), the name is locally restricted to the plain south of the Leja and the narrow strip on the west; although it is loosely applied by strangers to the whole country east of the Jaulan.
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  • The fourth province, Batanaea, which still is remembered in the name `Ard el-Bathaniyeh, lies east of the Leja and the Hauran plain, and includes the Jebel ed-Druz or Hauran mountain.
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  • - Geologically Louisiana is a very recent creation, and belongs to the " Coastal Plain Province."
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  • The " bluffs " (remnants of an eroded plain formed of alluvion deposits over an old, mature and drowned topography) run through the second tier of parishes W.
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  • in diameter, sometimes surmounted by trees in the midst of a treeless plain and sometimes arranged in circles and on radii, and decreasing in size with distance from the centre of the field - has been variously explained.
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  • It is the chief town of an undulating plain, La Serena, locally celebrated for red wine and melons.
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  • shore, leaving various flanking spurs and foothills, and a coastal plain which at its greatest breadth on the S.
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  • The plain on the N.
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  • The portion of the southern plain between the bays of Cortes and Majana is the most famous portion of the Vuelta Abajo tobacco region.
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  • The summits are generally well rounded, while the lower slopes are often steep. Frequent broad intervals of low upland or low level plain extend from sea to sea between and around the mountains.
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  • A multitude of ravines and gullies, filled with torrential streams or dry, according to the season of the year, and characterized by many beautiful cascades, seam the narrow coastal plain and the flanks of the mountains.
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  • Leaving the higher mountains in about 5° 15' N., 40° E., the Ganale enters a large slightly undulating grass plain which extends south of the valley of the Daua and occupies all the country eastward to the junction of the two rivers.
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  • In this plain the Ganale makes a semicircular sweep northward before resuming its general S.-E.
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  • In its middle course the Daua has cut a deep narrowvalley through the plain; lower down it bends N.E.
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  • There are numerous high valleys shut in among the mountains of this range; the most noteworthy being the plain of Livno, which lies parallel to the Dalmatian border, at a height of 500 ft.
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  • captured in October 1596, and a three days' battle in the plain of Keresztes (Oct.
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  • To remedy this, Murat and other general officers as well as minor agents were sent ahead and instructed to travel through South Germany in plain clothes with a view to collecting information and mastering the topography.
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  • It lies on both sides of the river Tigris, in an extensive desert plain which has scarcely a tree or village throughout its whole extent, in latitude 33° 20' N., longitude 44° 24' E.
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  • At this point also the two rivers are connected by a canal, the northernmost of a series of canals which formerly united the two great waterways, and at the same time irrigated the intervening plain.
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  • Beyond the wall line on that side vestiges of ancient buildings are visible in various directions, and the plain is strewn with fragments of bricks, tiles and rubbish.
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  • or more above the plain, in the centre of a network of ancient canals.
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  • Situated in a region where there is no stone, and practically no timber, Bagdad was built, like all the cities of the Babylonian plain, of brick and tiles.
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  • These last already appear in miniatures of the 9th century; from the II th onwards they predominated; and in the 13th century they ousted all other forms. Originally plain, the crook was from the lath century onwards often made in the form of a snake (5), which in richer staves encircled the Lamb of God or the representation of a figure.
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  • And in all cases it is plain that he not merely read but thought deeply on the questions which the civilization of the Greeks and the various writings of poets, philosophers and heretics raised.
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  • In his Practica geometriae plain traces of the use of the Roman agrimensores are met with; in his Liber abaci old Egyptian problems reveal their origin by the reappearance of the very numbers in which the problem is given, though one cannot guess through what channel they came to Leonardo's knowledge.
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  • The sides of the atrium are unfortunately occupied by plain ungainly buildings five storeys in height, awkwardly accommodating themselves to the upward slope of the ground.
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  • The principal newspapers of the city are the Plain Dealer (1841, independent), the Press (1878, independent), the Leader (1847, Republican), and the News (1889, Republican).
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  • The most imposing view is to be obtained from the plain of Marrakesh, only some 1000 ft.
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  • It extends as a completely even plain of snow, with long, almost imperceptible, undulations or waves, at a height of 7000 to 10,000 ft., obliterating the features of the underlying land, the mountains and valleys of which are completely interred.
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  • Its narrow but fertile territory consisted of a plain shut in on all sides except towards the sea by considerable elevations, among which the most remarkable were Mount Arachnaeon and Titthion.
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  • AK- HISSAR (anc. Thyateira, the "town of Thya"), a town situated in a fertile plain on the Giirdiik Chai (Lycus), in the Aidin vilayet, 58 m.
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  • Marine deposits were laid down over the south of the state after a submergence of the region; an uplift afterwards made of these deposits a coastal plain.
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  • The rather level surface of the " worn down mountains " of the north of the state and the coastal plain beds of the southern and western parts are now dissected by rivers, which make most of the state a rolling or hilly country, without strong relief.
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  • As Roman implements and ornaments have been found in some of them, it is plain that this mode of burial continued to be practised until a late period.
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  • It is situated in a malarious, almost desert plain, 9 m.
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  • Landing on the shores of Strangford Lough, he commenced his labours in the plain on the south-west side of that inlet.
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  • On another occasion Patrick is reported to have overthrown a famous idol known as Cenn Cruaich or Cromm Cruaich in the plain of Mag Slecht (county Cavan).
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  • Up to the 9th century these had been very plain, without ornament save such traditional decorations as the clavi of the dalmatic; what splendour they had was due to their material and the ample folds of their draperies.
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  • a white alb plain with a vestment or cope," while the assisting priests or deacons are to wear "albs with tunicles."
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  • He also edited a monthly magazine, The Sword and Trowel; an elaborate exposition of the Psalms, in seven volumes, called The Treasury of David (1870-1885); and a book of sayings called John Ploughman's Talks; or, Plain Advice for Plain People (1869), a kind of religious Poor Richard.
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  • A little below the town of Glarus the river, keeping its northerly direction, runs through the alluvial plain which it has formed, towards the Walensee and the Lake of Zurich.
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  • But between the Lake of Zurich and the Walensee the huge desolate alluvial plain grew ever in size, while great damage was done by the river, which overflowed its bed and the dykes built to protect the region near it.
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  • ULM, a fortress-city of Germany, in the kingdom of Wurttemberg, situated on the left bank of the Danube, in a fertile plain at the foot of the Swabian Alps, 58 m.
    0
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  • From the theorem given above for the expansion of a determinant as a sum of products of pairs of corresponding determinants it will be plain that the product of A= (a ll, a22, ��� ann) and D = (b21, b 22, b nn) may be written as a determinant of order 2n, viz.
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  • It lies on a plain by the Bayamo river, in a fertile country, but isolated from sea and from railway.
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  • The business of the town is chiefly connected with the interests of the sheep and cattle farmers of the Riverina district, a plain country, in the main pastoral, but suited in some parts for cultivation.
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  • The central plateau is a plain whose surface presents "rounded, flat-topped hills and low ridges and reefs of limestone," with narrow intervening valleys.
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  • Crossing the narrow coast plain the river, with a south-westerly sweep, enters the ocean by a single mouth, studded with small islands, in 28° 37' S., 16° 30' E.
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  • 25 the locusts are spoken of in the plain language of chap. i.
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  • Another important river is the Hlaing, which runs through the district from north to south, receiving from the east, through numerous channels, the drainage of the Pegu Yoma Mountains, which fertilizes the plain on its eastern bank.
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  • in the middle of the plain, and is detached from other high ground.
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  • It is situated at the edge of the plain of Emilia, 180 ft.
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  • The coastal plain consists in great part of sandy beaches, detritus formations, and partially submerged areas caused by uplifted beaches and obstructed river channels.
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  • Parts of this coastal plain, however, have an elevation of 100 to 200 ft., are rolling and fertile in character, and terminate on the coast in a line of bluffs.
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  • This plain is of varying width, and on some parts of the coast it disappears altogether.
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  • In Rio Grande do Sul, where two large lakes have been created by uplifted sand beaches, the coastal plain widens greatly, and is merged in an extensive open, rolling grassy plain, traversed by ridges of low hills (cuchillas), similar to the neighbouring republic of Uruguay.
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  • The western part of this plain is drained by the Uruguay and its tributaries, which places it within the river Plate (La Plata) basin.
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  • The Amazon plain is heavily forested and has a slope of less than one inch to the mile within Brazilian territory - one competent authority placing it at about one-fifth of an inch per mile.
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  • The general slope is toward the Amazon, and its rivers debouch upon the Amazonian plain through a succession of falls and rapids.
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  • There remains only the elevated valley of the Parahyba do Sul, lying between the so-called Serra das Vertentes of southern Minas Geraes and the Serra do Mar, and extending from the Serra da Bocaina, near the city of Sao Paulo, eastward to Cape Frio and the coastal plain north of that point.
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  • Little is known of the country through which it flows, and its channel is broken by rapids and waterfalls where it descends to the coastal plain.
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  • The Amapa is a short river rising on the eastern slopes of the same range and flowing across a low, wooded plain, filled with lagoons.
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  • The Calcoene and Cassipore enter the Atlantic farther north and have a north-east course across the same plain.
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  • The former reach the coastal plain over long and gradual descents, and are navigable for considerable distances.
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  • From the Sao Francisco to Cape Frio there are many short rivers rising on the slopes of the plateau and crossing the narrow coastal plain to the sea.
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  • There are also a few of greater length which rise far back on the plateau itself and flow down to the plain through deeply cut, precipitous courses.
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  • The navigable channels of these rivers are restricted to the coastal plain, except where a river has excavated for itself a valley back into the plateau.
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  • South of Cape Frio there are no large rivers along the coast because of the proximity of the Serra do Mar - the coastal plain being very narrow and in places disappearing altogether.
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  • In Rio Grande do Sul the Atlantic coastal plain extends westward more than half-way across the state, and is well watered by numerous streams flowing eastward to the Lagoa dos Patos.
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  • The coastal plain is also intersected by lagoons, lakes and inland channels formed by uplifted beaches.
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  • The coastal plain as far south as Santos is a region of high temperatures and great humidity.
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  • The prevailing winds are the south-east trades, which have lost some of their moisture in rising from the coastal plain.
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  • The coast and tide-water rivers are fringed with mangrove, and the sandy plain reaching back to the margin of the inland plateau is generally bare of vegetation, though the carnahuba palm (Copernicia cerifera) and some species of low-growing trees are to be found in many places.
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  • The higher levels of this plain are covered with shrubs and small trees, principally mimosas.
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  • Between Parahyba and southern Bahia forests and open plains are intermingled; thence southward the narrow coastal plain and bordering mountain slopes are heavily forested.
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  • The most important towns, besides Sparta and Gythium, were Bryseae, Amyclae and Pharis in the Eurotas plain, Pellana and Belbina on the upper Eurotas, Sellasia on the Oenus, Caryae on the Arcadian frontier, Prasiae, Zarax and Epidaurus Limera on the east coast, Geronthrae on the slopes of Parnon, Boeae, Asopus, Helos, Las and Teuthrone on the Laconian Gulf, and Hippola, Messa and Oetylus on the Messenian Gulf.
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  • It is built on a plain, 1700 ft.
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  • high, jebels Mokram and Kassala, rise abruptly from the plain some 3 m.
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  • A plain slab still marks the place of his tomb, before the high altar; but his bones were scattered by the Huguenots in 1562.
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  • The site lies high (1400 ft.) on eight hillocks in a fertile oasis plain, beyond which stretch on the S.
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  • It is an undulating plain, grass-covered, but for the most part without trees or bush.
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  • below are the Karkloof or Lower Falls, where in a series of beautiful cascades the water descends to the plain.
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  • Its present deserted and malarious state is probably owing to the silting up of the mouth of the Silarus, which has overflowed its bed, and converted the plain into unproductive marshy ground.
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  • It lies in the middle of a large plain, and has to the west of it a smaller but much higher lake, Urga-nor, besides several smaller ones.
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  • Farther south on the same wide plain lie the sister lakes Kirghiz-nor and Airyk-nor, which receive another large river, the Dzap'hyn, and the Kungui.
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  • Many small lakes are scattered over the plain to the east of them.
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  • A very large portion of north-west Mongolia constitutes a high plain, 3000 to 4200 ft.
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  • Orographically Hungary is composed of an extensive central plain surrounded by high mountains.
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  • This is the largest plain in Europe, and covers about 37,000 sq.
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  • The great Hungarian plain is covered by Tertiary and Quaternary deposits, through which rise the Bakony-wald and the Mecsek ridge near Pecs (Funfkirchen).
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  • Suess, during which the Hungarian plain was covered by the sea, and the deposits were purely marine.
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  • During the formation of the Schlier the plain was covered by an inland sea or series of salt lakes, in which evaporation led to the concentration and finally to the deposition of the salts contained in the water.
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  • The third period is represented by the Second Mediterranean stage of Suess,, during which the sea again entered the Hungarian plain and formed true marine deposits.
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  • If Transylvania be excepted, three separate zones are roughly 'distinguishable: the " highland," comprising the counties in the vicinity of the Northern and Eastern Carpathians, where the winters are very severe and continue for half the year; the " intermediate " zone, embracing the country stretching northwards from the Drave and Mur, with the Little Hungarian Plain, and the region of the Upper Alfold, extending from Budapest to Nyiregyhaza and Sarospatak; and the " great lowland " zone, including the main portion of the Great Hungarian Plain, and the region of the lower Danube, where the heat during the summer months is almost tropical.
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  • The Magyars occupy almost exclusively the great central plain intersected by the Danube and the Theiss, being in an overwhelming majority in 19 counties (99'7% in Hajdu, east of the Theiss).
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  • With these he marched southwards to the plain of Mohacs, where, on the 29th of August, the Hungarians, after a two hours' fight, were annihilated, the king, both the archbishops, five bishops and 24,000 men perishing on the field.
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  • It was plain that at the first revolutionary blast from without, or the first insurrectionary outburst from within, the " Bach System would vanish like a mirage.
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  • Although relegated to a note (vii.), and propounded "Avec la defiance que doit inspirer tout ce qui n'est point un resultat de l'observation ou du calcul," it is plain, from the complacency with which he recurred to it 3 at a later date, that he regarded the speculation with considerable interest.
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  • A small part bordering the Venezuelan sierras is elevated and mountainous, but the greater part forms an immense alluvial plain, densely wooded, traversed by innumerable rivers, and subjected to extensive annual inundations.
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  • Yugoslavia's relations with Albania, though simplified by this decision, have been affected by the Albanian counterclaim to Pee, Djakovo and the plain of Kosovo, where since the middle of last century the Albanian element had grown steadily stronger at the expense of the Serbs.
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  • The back of the obelisk is plain, but the front and sides are subdivided into storeys by a series of bands and plates, each storey having panels sunk into it which seem to represent windows with mullions and transom.
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  • Rome is indeed to be honoured as the mother of the churches; nor would Gerbert oppose her judgments except in two cases - (I) where she enjoins something that is contrary to the decrees of a universal council, such as that of Nice, or (2) where, after having been once appealed to in a matter of ecclesiastical discipline and having refused to give a plain and speedy decision, she should, at a later date, attempt to call in question the provisions of the metropolitan synod called to remedy the effects of her negligence.
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  • Surrey's reproaches for the alleged breach of faith, and a second challenge to fight on Millfield Plain were this time disregarded.
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  • To this question I shall expect from you an answer in plain terms according to your deliberate judgment.
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  • It stands on a plain bounded on one side by the river, which is here 4 m.
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  • The plain chloride solution is similarly used.
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  • Even if, by a bold assumption, we grant the unity of authorship, it is plain upon the face of it that the chapters in question cannot have been composed at the same time or under the same circumstances; literary and artistic unity is wholly wanting.
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  • The first series of forty homilies is devoted to plain and direct exposition of the chief events of the Christian year; the second deals more fully with church doctrine and history.
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  • In personal character he has sometimes been described as having been revoltingly heartless; and it is abundantly plain that he was singularly incapable of feeling strongly the more generous emotions - a misfortune, or a fault, which revealed itself in many ways.
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  • and the city is built on a narrow level plain between the sea and bluffs, the latter rising steeply 2000 ft.
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  • to the level of the great desert plain of Tarapaca, celebrated for its rich deposits of nitrate of soda.
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  • The Vosges, and their continuation the Hardt, run through the land from south to north and divide it into the fertile and mild plain of the Rhine, together with the slope of the Hardt range, on the east, and the rather inclement district on the west, which, running between the Saarbriick carboniferous mountains and the northern spurs of the Hardt range, ends in a porphyrous cluster of hills, the highest point of which is the Donnersberg (2254 ft.).
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  • The loinor waist-cloth prevailed under a very great variety of minor differentiated forms. In Egypt it was the plain short linen cloth wrapped around the loins and tied in front.
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  • This plain diaphanous garment, without distinction of colour (white, red or yellow), and with perhaps only an embroidered hem at the top, was worn by the whole nation, princess and peasant, from the IVth to the XVIIIth Dynasties (Erman, Life in Ancient Egypt, p. 212).
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  • An interesting example of the long plain variety is afforded by the prisoners of Lachish before Sennacherib (701 B.C.); the circumstances and a comparison of the details would point to its being essentially a simple dress indicative of mourning and humiliation.
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  • Probably the oldest head-dress is the circular close-fitting cap (plain or braided), which, according to Meyer, is of Sumerian (non-Semitic) origin.
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  • The chiton, xcrcww, was formed by sewing together at the sides two pieces of linen, or a double piece folded together, leaving spaces at the top for the arms and neck, and fastening the top edges together over the shoulders and upper arm with buttons or brooches; more rarely we find a plain sleeveless chiton.
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  • But the garment usually worn by men of mature age was the iµaTCov, which was (like the rbrXos) a plain square of woollen stuff.
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  • When the hair, as was most usual, was gathered back from the temples and fastened in a knot behind, hair-pins were required, and these were mostly of bone or ivory, mounted with gold or plain; so also when the hair was ' These ornamental bands are carefully described and reproduced in colour by A.
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  • The plain white toga (toga Pura) was the ordinary dress of the citizen, but the toga praetexta, which had a border of purple, was worn by boys till the age of sixteen, when they assumed the plain toga virilis, and also by curule magistrates and some priests.
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  • The population is estimated at about 6,124,000 The country consists chiefly of a range of plateaus and wooded mountains, running north and south and declining on the coast to a narrow band of plain varying between 12 and 50 m.
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  • Wycherley is supposed to have aimed at her in his Widow Blackacre in the Plain Dealer.
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  • From the Galera, the southernmost range of hills north of the Orinoco basin, the traveller saw a vast plain thickly grown with low trees.
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  • About 62° 30' the great river reaches what may be considered sea-level, and from this point numerous channels find their way across the silted-up delta plain to the sea.
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  • This mass also forms the bed of the Orinoco from its junction with the Apure nearly to its mouth, and it probably extends northwards for some distance beneath the more recent deposits of the plain.
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  • Its wild grasses are luxuriant and a shrubby growth is found along many of its streams. The decline in stock-breeding resulted in a considerable growth of trees and chaparral over the greater part of the plain.
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  • The Sierra Madre crosses the southern part of the state parallel with the coast, separating the low, humid, forested districts on the frontier of Tabasco from the hot, drier, coastal plain on the Pacific. The mountain region includes a plateau of great fertility and temperate climate, which is one of the best parts of Mexico and contains the larger part of the population of the state.
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  • At Pirna the Elbe leaves behind it the stress and turmoil of the Saxon Switzerland, rolls through Dresden, with its noble river terraces, and finally, beyond Meissen, enters on its long journey across the North German plain, touching Torgau, Wittenberg, Magdeburg, Wittenberge, Hamburg, Harburg and Altona on the way, and gathering into itself the waters of the Mulde and Saale from the left, and those of the Schwarze Elster, Havel and Elde from the right.
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  • above the plain, is west of the park.
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  • Here its romantic middle course begins, and after dashing through a deep ravine between the towns of Hirschberg and Ldwenberg, it gains the plain.
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  • To keep these in check, Gilbert de Clare, during the closing years of the reign of Henry III., built the castle of Caerphilly on the southern edge of this district, in a wide plain between the two rivers.
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  • conquered the rest of Media and advanced towards the Zagros chains and the Babylonian plain.
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  • In this revolution Thrasybulus and his mercenaries held the fortified quarters of Ortygia and Achradina; the revolted people held the unwalled suburbs, already, it is plain, thickly inhabited.
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  • Diamantina is built partly on a steep hillside overlooking a small tributary of the Rio Jequitinhonha (where diamond-washing was once carried on), and partly on the level plain above.
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  • South of the lake is a wide plain, traversed by the Semliki river, which enters the Nyanza through a swamp of tall weeds, chiefly ambach and papyrus.
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  • This process, continually going on, has formed a large plain at the south end of Albert Nyanza, which has seriously encroached upon the lake.
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  • almost straight N.W., with the plain of the Po (Padus) and its tributaries on the right, and the Apennines on the left.
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  • Behind the sandhills is a low-lying plain in which are a number of shallow lagoons.
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  • The coast plain extends inland from 5 to 30 m., increasing in width northward, the whole of Tongaland being low lying.
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  • On their eastern (Zululand) side the slope of the Lebombo mountains is gentle, but on the west they fall abruptly to the plain.
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  • The coast plain (in large part), the river valleys, and the eastern sides of the lower hills are covered with mimosa and other thorn trees.
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  • Moreover, promising as the situation may have appeared to be from the attacking side in so far as neutralization of the Ottoman batteries was concerned, it was plain that the mine-sweepers were making disappointing progress.
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  • Army headquarters assumed that the plain, with the high ground to the E.
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  • of the plain; but nothing came of it.
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  • LEMGO, a town of Germany, in the principality of Lippe, in a broad and fertile plain, 9 m.
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  • Pamphylia consists almost entirely of a plain, extending from the slopes of Taurus to the sea, but this plain, though presenting an unbroken level to the eye, does not all consist of alluvial deposits, but is formed in part of travertine.
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  • "The rivers pouring out of the caverns at the base of the Lycian and Pisidian ranges of the Taurus come forth from their subterranean courses charged with carbonate of lime, and are continually adding to the Pamphylian plain.
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  • above the surrounding Pliocene plain.
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  • It is situated on the plain between the Gulf of Venice and the Alps, 18 m.
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  • Cilicia Pedias included the rugged spurs of Taurus and a large plain, which consists, in great part, of a rich stoneless loam.
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  • Its eastern half is studded with isolated rocky crags, which are crowned with the ruins of ancient strongholds, and broken by the low hills that border the plain of Issus.
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  • The plain is watered by the Cydnus (Tarsus Chai), the Sarus (Sihun) and the Pyramus (Jihun), each of which brings down much silt.
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  • The plain is extremely productive, though now little cultivated.
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  • After crossing the low hills east of the Pyramus it passed through a masonry (Cilician) gate, Demir Kapu, and entered the plain of Issus.
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  • From that plain one road ran southward through a masonry (Syrian) gate to Alexandretta, and thence crossed Mt.
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  • Ath is famous for its gild of archers, whose butts are erected on the plain of the Esplanade in the centre of the town.
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  • The reason of this preference for the eastern bank of the Tigris was due to its abundant supply of water, whereas the great Mesopotamian plain on the western side had to depend upon the streams which flowed into the Euphrates.
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  • This vast flat, the modern El-Jezireh, is about 250 miles in length, interrupted only by a single limestone range, rising abruptly out of the plain, and branching off from the Zagros mountains under the names of Sarazur, Hamrin and Sinjar.
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  • In contrast with the arid plateau of Mesopotamia, stretched the rich alluvial plain of Chaldaea, formed by the deposits of the two great rivers by which it was enclosed.
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  • The alluvial plain of Babylonia was called Edin, the Eden of Gen.
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  • ii., though the name was properly restricted to " the plain " on the western bank of the river where the Bedouins pastured the flocks of their Babylonian masters.
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  • The dense population was due to the elaborate irrigation of the Babylonian plain which had originally reclaimed it from a pestiferous and uninhabitable swamp and had made it the most fertile country in the world.
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  • When the Semites first entered the Edin or plain of Babylonia is uncertain, but it must have been at a remote period.
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  • of the Kings' List, was in its turn captured by the Kassites, who from that time onward occupied the whole of the Babylonian plain.
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  • The soil is very fertile; wheat, Indian corn, olives, vines, fruit trees of many kinds cover both the plain and the surrounding hills; the chief non-fruit-bearing trees are the stone pine, the cypress, the ilex and the poplar, while many other varieties are represented.
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  • In the middle ages it was always plain.
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  • In general it has retained the medieval form more closely than the Roman rochet, in so far as it is of plain, very fine linen (lawn), and reaches almost to the feet.
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  • The only rivers of importance are the Cestrus and the Eurymedon, both of which take their rise in the highest ranges of Mt Taurus, and flow down through deep and narrow valleys to the plain of Pamphylia, which they traverse on their way to the sea.
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  • The only place in the district at the present day deserving to be called a town is Isbarta, the residence of a pasha; it stands at the northern foot of the main mass of Mt Taurus, looking over a wide and fertile plain which extends up to the northern chain of Taurus.
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  • CHORUM, the chief town of a sanjak of the Angora vilayet in Asia Minor, altitude 2300 ft., situated on the edge of a wide plain, almost equidistant from Amasia and Yuzgat.
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