Place-names sentence example

place-names
  • Hawaiki, the name of Te Kupe's traditional home, is identical with several other Polynesian place-names, e.g.
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  • The United States Geographic Board acts upon rules practically identical with those indicated, and compiles official lists of place-names, the use of which is binding upon government departments, but which it would hardly be wise to follow universally in the case of names of places outside America.
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  • The place-names became entirely Germanic; the Latin language disappeared; and the Christian religion suffered a check, for the Franks were to a man pagans.
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  • Other conjectural identifications of groups of symbols with the place-names Hamath, Marash, Tyana are bases of Sayce's system.
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  • The survival of the non-Aryan language among the Basques around the west Pyrenees has suggested the attempt to interpret by its means a large class of similarsounding place-names of ancient Spain, some of which are authenticated by their occurrence on the inscribed coins, and to link it with other traces of non-Aryan speech round the shores of the Western Mediterranean and on the Atlantic seaboard of Europe.
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  • These remains would, of course, be archaeological or place-names.
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  • Many English place-names contain the word, the most familiar being Shrewsbury (Scrobbesbyrig) and Wormwood Scrubs.
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  • This view is based mainly on the numerous place-names ending in -ing, -Ingham, -ington, &c., in which the syllable -ing is thought to refer to kindreds of cultivators.
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  • Even in the 17th century the Romonsch language was not extinguished in the state, and many Romonsch place-names still linger, e.g.
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  • What peoples inhabited these regions can only be conjectured, but there is a certain amount of evidence from place-names - not altogether satisfactory - that the Celtic peoples at one time extended eastwards throughout the basin of the Weser.
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  • The position assigned to their district appears to be about the head waters of the Dniester and Bug (Bugh) and the central course of the Dnieper just the region which, on general grounds, place-names, recorded migra tions and modern distribution, appears to be the original location of the Sla y s (q.v.).
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  • That a strong Celtic element existed in Spain is proved both by numerous traditions and by the more trustworthy evidence of place-names.
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  • The Celtic place-names of Spain, however, are not confined to Celtiberia or even to the north and east; they occur even in the south and west.
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  • It has been thought that they inhabited the basin of the Weser, and a number of place-names in this district are supposed to be of Celtic origin.
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  • Farther to the south and west Ptolemy mentions a number of place-names which are certainly Celtic, e.g.
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  • In Germany the various forms of the non-Teutonic words Hall, Halle occurring in place-names point in the same way to ancient salt-works.
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  • Slavonic place-names, still existing in every portion of the Peninsula, bear witness to the multitude of the invaders and the permanency of their settlements.
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  • Ptolemy gives a list of tribe and place-names.
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  • In Lothian the place-names recorded in charters were already, for the most part, English.
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  • The former, the sun-deity, god of justice, &c., was already well known, to judge from Palestinian place-names (Beth-Shemesh, &c.).
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  • For 88 turbulent years this feudal kingdom was imposed on the country, and then it disappeared as suddenly as it came, leaving no trace but the ruins of castles and churches, a few place-names, and an undying hereditary hatred of Christianity among the native population.
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  • It is spoken nowhere else, though, as has been said, place-names in the Canary Islands and other remains of the aboriginal language there prove it to have been the native tongue.
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  • Nantyffin, the boundary brook; Aberporth, mouth of the harbour; Talybont, end of the bridge; Troedyrhiw, foot of the hill; Dyffryn, a valley, &c. Other place-names imply a personal connexion in addition to natural features, e.g.
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  • Tudno, Afan, Padarn, &c. To the second division - those place-names which have been corrupted by English usage - belong most of the older historic towns, in striking contrast with the rural villages and parishes, which in nearly all cases have retained unaltered their original Celtic names.
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  • Cardigan, in Welsh Aberteifi, from its situation near the mouth of the Teifi, and Brecon, in Welsh Aberhonddu, from its site near the confluence of the Usk and Honddu, are examples of corrupted Welsh names in common use - Ceredigion, Brychan - which possess in addition pure Celtic forms. In the third division, English place-names are tolerably frequent everywhere and predominate in the Marches and on the South Wales coast.
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  • Scandinavian influence can easily be traced at various points of the coast-line, but particularly in south Pembrokeshire, wherein occur such place-names as Caldy, Tenby, Goodwick, Dale, Skokholm, Hakin and Milford Haven.
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  • Hybrid place-names are occasionally to be met with in the colonized portions of Wales, as in Gelliswick (a combination of the Celtic gelli, a hazel grove, and the Norse wick, a haven), and in Fletherhill, where the English suffix hill is practically a translation of the Celtic prefix.
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  • A striking peculiarity of the Principality is the prevalence of Scriptural place-names; a circumstance due undoubtedly to the popular religious movements of the 19th century.
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  • But although English and foreign place-names are fairly numerous throughout Wales, yet the vast majority remain Celtic either in a pure or in a corrupted form, so that some knowledge of the Celtic language is essential to interpret their meaning.
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  • These European Leleges must be interpreted in connexion with the recurrence of place names like Pedasus, Physcus, Larymna and Abae, (a) in Caria, and (b) in the "Lelegian" parts of Greece; perhaps this is the result of some early migration; perhaps it is also the cause of these Lelegian theories.
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  • English place-names are of diverse origin and often extremely corrupt in their modern form, so that the real etymology of the names can often be discovered only by a careful comparison of the modern form with such ancient forms as are to be found in charters, ancient histories, and other early documents.
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  • In modern place-names the suffix don often goes back to the Celtic dun, a hill, e.g.
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  • Norman influence is marked more strongly in certain compound place-names, where one of the elements often represents the name of the original Norman tenant or holder, e.g.
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  • The frequency of " fontein " among the place names of the colony bears evidence of the number of springs in the country.
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  • The whole of the place nomenclature of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Northern Northamptonshire is Scandinavian rather than native English, and in the remaining districts of the Danelagh a goodly proportion of Danish place-names may be found.
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  • Our earliest information about the land and its people is derived from geological, ethnological and archaeological studies, from the remains in British harrows and caves, Roman roads, walls and villas, coins, place-names and inscriptions.
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  • The usage of the term "Lake District," however, tends to limit the name of Furness in common thought to the district south of the Lakes, where several of the place-names are suffixed with that of the district, as Barrow-inFurness, Dalton-in-Furness, Broughton-in-Furness.
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  • The common statement that he derived his surname from Diss in Norfolk is a mere conjecture; Dicetum may equally well be a Latinized form of Dissai, or Dicy, or Dizy, place-names which are found in Maine, Picardy, Burgundy and Champagne.
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  • South of the border, you have signs with place names clearly segregated and easier to read with a quick glance.
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  • This distinction, however, takes us but a little way towards an historical grouping of the tribes, since the only Latinian dialects of which, besides Latin, we have inscriptions are Faliscan and Marsian (see FALISCT, MAR51); although the place-names of the Aequi suggest that they belong to the same group in this respect.
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  • In Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire a host of place-names testify to the popularity of the Robin Hood legend - Robin Hood's Bay, Robin Hood's Cave, Robin Hood's Chase, Robin Hood's Cup (a well), Robin Hood's Chair, Robin Hood's Pricks, and many more.
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  • Hajdu is also a common prefix in Hungarian place-names, e.g.
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  • The etymology of place-names suggests that the original population was Celtic, but this conjecture cannot be verified in any historical records.
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  • Haugh is the first element of the name and means riverside meadow and is a common feature of Northumberland and Durham place names.
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  • Not only are the place names different, often the colors and designs will reflect where a rug was made and an experienced rug dealer can tell the age and origin of a rug just by these details.
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  • Wine lovers can help us ensure that the place names of all great winemaking regions are protected by signing our petition to protect place and origin.
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