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piso

piso

piso Sentence Examples

  • Here there is only space to name Bontius, Clusius, Hernandez (or Fernandez), Marcgrave, Nieremberg and Piso, 6 whose several works describing the natural products of both the Indies - whether the result of their own observation or compilation - together with those of Olina and Worm, produced a marked effect, since they led up to what may be deemed the foundation of scientific ornithology.'

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  • Piso >>

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  • After the pontificate of Publius, the practice of compiling annals was carried on by various unofficial writers, of whom Cicero names Cato, Pictor and Piso.

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  • He fell under the ban of Nero owing to his ethical teachings, and was exiled to the island of Gyarus on a trumped-up charge of participation in Piso's conspiracy.

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  • Calpurnius Piso as the fittest man to succeed him.

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  • The cohort on duty at the Palatine, which had accompanied the emperor, instantly deserted him; Galba, Piso and others were brutally murdered by the praetorians.

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  • Calpurnius Piso, governor of Syria.

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  • Eager to avenge his death, she returned to Rome and boldly accused Piso of the murder of Germanicus.

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  • To avoid public infamy Piso committed suicide.

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  • In 65, during the investigation into the abortive conspiracy of Piso, he and Poppaea formed a kind of imperial privy council.

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  • family of Calpurnius Piso.

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  • It may perhaps be derived from cicer (pulse), in which case it would be analogous to such names as Lentulus, Tubero, Piso.

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  • On the other hand, he made a violent speech in the senate in 55 against Lucius Piso, the col ' Caesar, at one time, offered him a place on the coalition, which on his refusal became a triumvirate (Att.

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  • 'She was married in 63 B.C. to C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, whom Cicero found a model son-in-law.

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  • in his speeches against Vatinius and Piso, was not offensive to Roman taste (de Orat.

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  • Pupius Piso explains the views of the Academics and Peripatetics.

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  • Their chosen leader, whom they destined to succeed Nero, was C. Calpurnius Piso, a handsome, wealthy and popular noble, and a boon companion of Nero himself.

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  • Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.

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  • Calpurnius Piso, his colleague in the consulship (67), he brought forward a severe law (Lex Acilia Calpurnia) against illegal canvassing at elections.

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  • Calpurnius Piso, tribune in 149 B.C. and consul in 133 B.C., prided himself on reducing the old legends to the level of common sense, and importing into them valuable moral lessons for his own generation.

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  • Even where he mentions a writer by name, it is frequently clear that the writer named is not the one whose lead he is following at the moment, but that he is noticed incidentally as differing from Livy's guide for the time being on some point of detail (compare the references to Piso in the first decade, i.

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  • As to the first decade, it is generally agreed that in the first and second books, at any rate, he follows such older and simpler writers as Fabius Pictor and Calpurnius Piso (the only ones whom he there refers to by name), to whom, so far as the first book is concerned, Niebuhr (Lectures, p 33) would add the poet Ennius.

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  • At the same time Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, one of the most violent and ambitious of the old nobility, was sent as governor of Syria to watch his movements.

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  • At Rhodes he met his coadjutor Piso, who was seeking everywhere to thwart and malign him.

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  • When at last he reached his destination, he found little difficulty in effecting the settlement of the disturbed provinces, notwithstanding Piso's violent and persistent opposition.

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  • On his return to Syria he found that all his arrangements had been upset by Piso.

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  • Violent recriminations followed, the result of which, it would seem, was a promise on the part of Piso to quit the province.

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  • But at this juncture Germanicus was suddenly attacked at Epidaphne near Antioch by a violent illness, which he himself and his friends attributed to poison administered by Plancina, the wife of Piso, at the instigation of Tiberius.

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  • Yet there were elements of weakness in his character which his short life only half revealed: an impetuosity which made him twice threaten to take his own life; a superstitious vein which impelled him to consult oracles and shrink from bad omens; an amiable dilettantism which led him to travel in Egypt while his enemy was plotting his ruin; a want of nerve and resolution which prevented him from coming to an open rupture with Piso till it was too late.

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  • PISO, the name of a distinguished Roman plebeian family of the Calpurnian gens which continued in existence till the end of the 2nd century A.D.

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  • [[Lucius (disambiguation)|Lucius ]] Piso Caesoninus, Roman statesman, was the father-in-law of Julius Caesar.

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  • On his return Piso addressed the senate in his defence, and Cicero replied with the coarse and exaggerated invective known as In Pisonem.

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  • Piso issued a pamphlet by way of rejoinder, and there the matter dropped, Cicero being afraid to bring the father-in-law of Caesar to trial.

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  • At the outbreak of the civil war Piso offered his services as mediator, but when Caesar marched upon Rome he left the city by way of protest.

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  • As praetor (136) and consul (133) Piso fought against the slaves in Sicily.

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  • Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, Roman statesman, was consul in 7 B.C., and subsequently governor of Spain and proconsul of Africa.

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  • The indignation of the people at the death of Germanicus, and the suspicion that Piso had poisoned him, forced Tiberius to order an investigation.

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  • Piso committed suicide, though it was rumoured that Tiberius, fearing incriminating disclosures, had put him to death.

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  • GAius CALPURNIUS Piso, Roman statesman, orator and patron of literature in the 1st century A.D., is known chiefly for his share in the conspiracy of A.D.

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  • Marine to a South American bird which, though long before known and described by the earlier writers - Nieremberg, Marcgrav and Piso (the last of whom has a recognizable but rude figure of it) - had been without any distinctive scientific appellation.

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  • Forbes (Ibis, 1881, pp. 360, 361) to inhabit the dry and open "sertoes" of north-eastern Brazil, a discovery the more interesting since it was in that part of the country that Marcgrav and Piso became acquainted with a bird of this kind, though the existence of any species of rhea in the district had been long overlooked by or unknown to succeeding travellers.

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  • Calpurnius Piso, surnamed Frugi (see under Piso), wrote seven books of annals, relating the history of the city from its foundation down to his own times.

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  • 6 For Lichtenstein's determination of the birds described by Marcgrave and Piso see the Abhandlungen of the Berlin Academy for 1817 (pp. 1 55 seq.).

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  • Calpurnius Piso Frugi (consul 133, censor 108), C. Sempronius Tuditanus (consul 129), Cn.

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  • On the morning of January 15, five days only after the adoption of Piso, Otho attended as usual to pay his respects to the emperor, and then hastily excusing himself on the score of private business hurried from the Palatine to meet his accomplices.

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  • Comparetti and de Petra, op. cit.) that the library was collected by Lucius Piso Caesoninus (see Regione sotterrata dal Vesuvio, Naples, 1879, p. 159 sq.), but this conjecture has not found many supporters.

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  • Lucius Calpurnius Piso, surnamed Frugi (the worthy), Roman statesman and historian, was tribune in 149 B.C. He is known chiefly for his lex Calpurnia repetundarum, which brought about the system of quaestiones perpetuae and a new phase of criminal procedure.

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  • He was a friend of Calpurnius Piso, and was implicated in his profligacy by Cicero (in Pisonem, 29), who, however, praises him warmly for his philosophic views and for the elegans lascivia of his poems (cf.

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