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pinnate

pinnate

pinnate Sentence Examples

  • Its broad pinnate tropical leaf was pleasant though strange to look on.

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  • P. phegopteris (beechfern) is a graceful species with a black, slender root-stock, from which the pinnate fronds rise on long stalks, generally about 12 in.

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  • There is evidence that the stem in some species was a climbing one; the pinnate leaves, arranged on the stem in a two-fifths spiral, were dimorphic, the sterile fronds resembling some forms of (From a drawing by Mrs D.

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  • When the pinnate leaf of a Mimosa pudica, the so-called sensitive plant, is pinched or struck, the leaf droops rapidly and the leaflets become approximated together, so that their upper surfaces are in contact.

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  • The leaves are simple and linear in Pilularia, but in Marsilia bear a pinnate four-lobed lamina.

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  • Williamson was the first to express the opinion that the Bennettitean flowers known as Williamsonia were borne on the trunks which terminated in a crown of pinnate fronds of the type long known as Zamites gigas; this view was regarded by Saporta and others as incorrect, and the nature of the Bennettitean foliage was left an open question.

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  • Elaboration in the form of the feelers, often a secondary sexual character in male insects, may result from a distal broadening of the segments, so that the appendage becomes serrate, or from the development of processes bearing sensory organs, so that the structure is pinnate or feather-like.

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  • The date palm is a beautiful tree, growing to a height of from 60 to 80 ft., and its stem, which is strongly marked with old leaf-scars, terminates in a crown of graceful shining pinnate leaves.

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  • They are all trees, usually of large size, with alternate stalked, unequally pinnate leaves, and abounding in an aromatic resinous juice.

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  • in circumference, and bearing a crown of 6-9 very large spreading pinnate fronds.

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    1
  • Fraxinella is a very characteristic and attractive plant, 2 to 3 ft., with bold pinnate leaves, and tall racemes of irregular-shaped purple or white flowers.

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  • high, with pinnate leaves, and masses of pinkish purple pea-like flowers.

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    1
  • P. coeruleum (Jacob's Ladder), 2 ft., has elegant pinnate leaves, and long panicles of blue rotate flowers.

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    1
  • A leaf with only a single midrib is said to be unicostate and the venation is described as pinnate or feather-veined.

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    1
  • Typically Marattiaceous sori, consisting of exannulate sporangia united to form synangia, are frequent, and are almost always found on fronds with the character of Pecopteris, large, repeatedly pinnate leaves, resembling those of Cyatheaceae or some species of Nephrodium.

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  • 19), the leaf is unequally pinnate (imparipinnate); when the leaflets or pinnae are placed alternately on either side of the midrib, and not directly opposite to each other, the leaf is alternately pinnate; and when the pinnae are of different sizes, the leaf is interruptedly pinnate.

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  • In these plants the laminae or blades of the leaves are pinnate or bipinnate and are produced at the FIG.

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  • - Imparipinnate (unequally pinnate) leaf of Robinia.

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  • In Lathyrus Aphaca and some other plants the true pinnate leaves are abortive, the petiole forms a tendril, and the stipules alone are developed, perform ing the office of leaves.

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  • In Cycas whorls of scales alternate with large pinnate leaves.

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  • The Iceland poppy (P. undicaule), is one of the showiest species, having grey-green pinnate leaves and flowers varying in colour from pure white to deep orange-yellow, orange-scarlet, &c. Specially fine varieties with stalks 18-24 in.

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  • - Stems tuberous or columnar, not infrequently branched, rarely epiphytic (Peruvian species of Zamia); fronds pinnate, bi-pinnate in the Australian genus Bowenia.

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  • in a crown of long pinnate leaves.

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  • - An expanded Alcyonarian zooid, showing the mouth surrounded by eight pinnate tentacles.

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  • Septa numerous, generally radial, seldom pinnate.

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  • The latter are simple, or irregularly lobed in Ophioglossum, more or less compoundly pinnate in Botrychium and palmately pinnate in Helminthostachys.

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  • The leaves, at the base of which are two large stipulelike outgrowths, have a thick leaf-stalk, and are simple or simply pinnate in Danaea, pinnate in Archangiopteris, bito tri-pinnate in Marattia and Angiopteris, and digitately lobed in Kaulfussia.

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  • The leaves are large and pinnate; their lamina is usually thick, though filmy species of Todea occur.

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  • - These forms have a horizontal rhizome, from which simply pinnate leaves arise in Platyzoma, while Gleichenia bears compound pinnate leaves with continued apical growth.

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  • The living species have a long rhizome, from the upper surface of which the large leaves arise; these are branched in a pedate manner, each branch being pinnate.

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  • P. Jaegeri), represented by large pinnate fronds not unlike those of existing species of Zamia, some Equisetaceous plants and numerous Ferns which may be referred to such families as Gleicheniaceae, Dipteridinae and Matonineae.

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  • As examples of these doubtful forms may be mentioned Thinnfeldia, characteristic of Rhaetic and Lower Jurassic rocks; Dichopteris, represented by some exceptionally fine Jurassic specimens, described by Zigno, from Italy; and Ctenis, a genus chiefly from Jurassic beds, founded on pinnate fronds like those of Zamia and other Cycads, with linear pinnae characterized by anastomosing veins.

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  • Sphenozamites, chiefly from French localities, which are referred to 1 fronds, which therg is good reason to refer to the Cycadales in the Cycads because of their similarity to the pinnate fronds of Upper Triassic, Rhaetic, Jurassic and Wealden rocks in India, modern Cycadaceae.

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  • A number of hairy linear bracts enclose the whole; internal to these occur 12 to 20 crowded pinnate leaves (sporophylls), with their apical portions bent over towards the axis of the flower, the bases of the petioles being fused laterally into a disk surrounding the base of the conical receptacle.

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  • Another well-known Cycadean genus is Williamsonia, so named by Mr Carruthers in 1870, and now applied to certain pinnate fronds - e.g.

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  • compound leafd pinnate leaf has 5 - 7 leaflets although some authorities state up to eleven.

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  • Both types are a simple pinnate form but the pinnae of the spore producing fronds are very much narrower.

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  • The compound pinnate leaf has 5 - 7 leaflets although some authorities state up to eleven.

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  • When the pinnate leaf of a Mimosa pudica, the so-called sensitive plant, is pinched or struck, the leaf droops rapidly and the leaflets become approximated together, so that their upper surfaces are in contact.

    0
    0
  • P. phegopteris (beechfern) is a graceful species with a black, slender root-stock, from which the pinnate fronds rise on long stalks, generally about 12 in.

    0
    0
  • Elaboration in the form of the feelers, often a secondary sexual character in male insects, may result from a distal broadening of the segments, so that the appendage becomes serrate, or from the development of processes bearing sensory organs, so that the structure is pinnate or feather-like.

    0
    0
  • The date palm is a beautiful tree, growing to a height of from 60 to 80 ft., and its stem, which is strongly marked with old leaf-scars, terminates in a crown of graceful shining pinnate leaves.

    0
    0
  • They are all trees, usually of large size, with alternate stalked, unequally pinnate leaves, and abounding in an aromatic resinous juice.

    0
    0
  • in circumference, and bearing a crown of 6-9 very large spreading pinnate fronds.

    0
    0
  • Fraxinella is a very characteristic and attractive plant, 2 to 3 ft., with bold pinnate leaves, and tall racemes of irregular-shaped purple or white flowers.

    0
    0
  • high, with pinnate leaves, and masses of pinkish purple pea-like flowers.

    0
    0
  • P. coeruleum (Jacob's Ladder), 2 ft., has elegant pinnate leaves, and long panicles of blue rotate flowers.

    0
    0
  • A leaf with only a single midrib is said to be unicostate and the venation is described as pinnate or feather-veined.

    0
    0
  • Compound leaves are pinnate (fig.

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  • When a pinnate leaf ends in a pair of pinnae it is equally or abruptly pinnate (paripinnate); when there is a single terminal leaflet (fig.

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  • 19), the leaf is unequally pinnate (imparipinnate); when the leaflets or pinnae are placed alternately on either side of the midrib, and not directly opposite to each other, the leaf is alternately pinnate; and when the pinnae are of different sizes, the leaf is interruptedly pinnate.

    0
    0
  • In these plants the laminae or blades of the leaves are pinnate or bipinnate and are produced at the FIG.

    0
    0
  • - Imparipinnate (unequally pinnate) leaf of Robinia.

    0
    0
  • In Lathyrus Aphaca and some other plants the true pinnate leaves are abortive, the petiole forms a tendril, and the stipules alone are developed, perform ing the office of leaves.

    0
    0
  • In Cycas whorls of scales alternate with large pinnate leaves.

    0
    0
  • The Iceland poppy (P. undicaule), is one of the showiest species, having grey-green pinnate leaves and flowers varying in colour from pure white to deep orange-yellow, orange-scarlet, &c. Specially fine varieties with stalks 18-24 in.

    0
    0
  • The leaves are compound pinnate in general (see fig.).

    0
    0
  • - Stems tuberous or columnar, not infrequently branched, rarely epiphytic (Peruvian species of Zamia); fronds pinnate, bi-pinnate in the Australian genus Bowenia.

    0
    0
  • in a crown of long pinnate leaves.

    0
    0
  • - An expanded Alcyonarian zooid, showing the mouth surrounded by eight pinnate tentacles.

    0
    0
  • Septa numerous, generally radial, seldom pinnate.

    0
    0
  • The latter are simple, or irregularly lobed in Ophioglossum, more or less compoundly pinnate in Botrychium and palmately pinnate in Helminthostachys.

    0
    0
  • The leaves, at the base of which are two large stipulelike outgrowths, have a thick leaf-stalk, and are simple or simply pinnate in Danaea, pinnate in Archangiopteris, bito tri-pinnate in Marattia and Angiopteris, and digitately lobed in Kaulfussia.

    0
    0
  • The leaves are large and pinnate; their lamina is usually thick, though filmy species of Todea occur.

    0
    0
  • - These forms have a horizontal rhizome, from which simply pinnate leaves arise in Platyzoma, while Gleichenia bears compound pinnate leaves with continued apical growth.

    0
    0
  • The living species have a long rhizome, from the upper surface of which the large leaves arise; these are branched in a pedate manner, each branch being pinnate.

    0
    0
  • The leaves are simple and linear in Pilularia, but in Marsilia bear a pinnate four-lobed lamina.

    0
    0
  • Typically Marattiaceous sori, consisting of exannulate sporangia united to form synangia, are frequent, and are almost always found on fronds with the character of Pecopteris, large, repeatedly pinnate leaves, resembling those of Cyatheaceae or some species of Nephrodium.

    0
    0
  • There is evidence that the stem in some species was a climbing one; the pinnate leaves, arranged on the stem in a two-fifths spiral, were dimorphic, the sterile fronds resembling some forms of (From a drawing by Mrs D.

    0
    0
  • P. Jaegeri), represented by large pinnate fronds not unlike those of existing species of Zamia, some Equisetaceous plants and numerous Ferns which may be referred to such families as Gleicheniaceae, Dipteridinae and Matonineae.

    0
    0
  • As examples of these doubtful forms may be mentioned Thinnfeldia, characteristic of Rhaetic and Lower Jurassic rocks; Dichopteris, represented by some exceptionally fine Jurassic specimens, described by Zigno, from Italy; and Ctenis, a genus chiefly from Jurassic beds, founded on pinnate fronds like those of Zamia and other Cycads, with linear pinnae characterized by anastomosing veins.

    0
    0
  • Sphenozamites, chiefly from French localities, which are referred to 1 fronds, which therg is good reason to refer to the Cycadales in the Cycads because of their similarity to the pinnate fronds of Upper Triassic, Rhaetic, Jurassic and Wealden rocks in India, modern Cycadaceae.

    0
    0
  • A number of hairy linear bracts enclose the whole; internal to these occur 12 to 20 crowded pinnate leaves (sporophylls), with their apical portions bent over towards the axis of the flower, the bases of the petioles being fused laterally into a disk surrounding the base of the conical receptacle.

    0
    0
  • Pinnate fronds of the Cycas type, characterized by the presence of a midrib and no lateral veins in the linear pinnae, are recorded from Rhaetic rocks of Germany, from Wealden strata in England (fig.

    0
    0
  • Another well-known Cycadean genus is Williamsonia, so named by Mr Carruthers in 1870, and now applied to certain pinnate fronds - e.g.

    0
    0
  • Williamson was the first to express the opinion that the Bennettitean flowers known as Williamsonia were borne on the trunks which terminated in a crown of pinnate fronds of the type long known as Zamites gigas; this view was regarded by Saporta and others as incorrect, and the nature of the Bennettitean foliage was left an open question.

    0
    0
  • D. Cannabina is a tall and graceful herbaceous perennial from 4 to 7 feet high, the long stems clothed with large pinnate leaves, yellowish-green flowers appearing towards the end of summer.

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  • Bladder Nut (Staphylea) - Of the older kinds only S. colchica is important, this being a beautiful shrub with pinnate leaves and large terminal clusters of snow-white flowers in early summer.

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  • The tree is chiefly noteworthy for the large pinnate leaves it bears.

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  • America. C. pinnata is a stout kind, pinnate leaves; from 14 to 20 inches high, flowering from April to June, with large pale purple, lilac, or white flowers in a cluster.

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  • Fargesi are pinnate and the flowers not showy, but the fruits become an attractive blue in autumn.

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  • Horseshoe Vetch (Hippocrepis Comosa) - A small prostrate British plant, with pretty little deep-yellow flowers, in coronilla-like crowns, the upper petal faintly veined with brown, the pinnate leaves small and leaflets smooth.

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  • The leaves have regular pinnate nerves, marginal teeth, and a dark green glossy surface; but they are smaller, the largest being about 8 inches long and 4 inches wide.

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  • It is a tall herbaceous climber, 10 to 20 feet high, with pinnate leaves, terminating in branched tendrils, the leaflets being covered on the under side with a fine silky down.

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  • Its long pinnate leaves retain their deep green color until autumn.

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  • Rodgersia Sambucifolia - With large pinnate, deep-bronze leaves, and panicles of creamy-white flowers in July.

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  • American palm, with a short, tree-like stem, which sometimes attains a great height, and pinnate leaves of a deep green color and from 6 feet to 12 feet long.

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  • Mountain Sumach (Rhus Copallina) - A shrub or small tree with pinnate leaves of smooth glossy texture, turning a fine color in autumn in its own country, as they probably would in ours in full sun in warm soil.

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  • Var. laciniata is very distinct, the leaflets longer and of much greater breadth than in R. glabra itself, but they are cut up into narrow pinnate segments.

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  • Rhus Osbeckii - A fine kind from China and Japan, with pinnate leaves much finer than the others, striking foliage, also turning in good seasons and soils a good orange color in autumn.

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  • Poison Sumach (Rhus Vernix) - This is a shrub or, in its own country, a small tree with pinnate leaves, and growing in swamps in southern Ontario and the coast district of the eastern States.

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  • Ailanthus Vilmoriniana - Like the older species, a native of China, and remarkable for long, handsome, pinnate leaves.

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  • Pinnate palm trees have fronds that resemble feathers.

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