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pines

pines

pines Sentence Examples

  • Screw pines are replaced by the nearly allied Cyclanthaceae.

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  • Talon's renting out a country club between here and Pembroke Pines, Toni responded.

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  • has gigantic cryptomerias and chamoecyparis; then follow pines; then, at a height of 9500 ft., a broad plateau, and then alternate stretches of grass and forest up to the top, which consists of several small peaks.

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  • has gigantic cryptomerias and chamoecyparis; then follow pines; then, at a height of 9500 ft., a broad plateau, and then alternate stretches of grass and forest up to the top, which consists of several small peaks.

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  • Mission Park (10 acres) here is adorned by native and foreign shrubs and by maples, elms, pines and arbor vitae, and "Haystack Monument" in this park marks the place where Samuel John Mills (1783-1818), in 1806, held the prayer meeting which was the forerunner of the American foreign missionary movement.

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  • Mission Park (10 acres) here is adorned by native and foreign shrubs and by maples, elms, pines and arbor vitae, and "Haystack Monument" in this park marks the place where Samuel John Mills (1783-1818), in 1806, held the prayer meeting which was the forerunner of the American foreign missionary movement.

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  • Screw pines have a closer connection.

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  • It stood picturesquely against a timbered background of pines.

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  • Large windows framed a picturesque pond, boarded by tall pines.

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  • Dean bumped into Seymour Fitzgerald coming out of a five-room ranch in Whispering Pines.

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  • The verdant pines outside the fortress wall were beautiful, and she watched their long pine needles stir in an early morning breeze.

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  • It was a signature day in Ouray, better than the best of the area's finest painted or photographed images with the sky so blue, the pines so green and the snow so white, you couldn't paint truer colors with an art store's inventory.

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  • It reminded him of his native Appalachia with the exception of the pines.

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  • It is found also in the Isle of Pines, and in the New Hebrides.

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  • Other trees of southern France are the cork-oak and the Aleppo and maritime pines.

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  • The chestnut covers considerable areas in Prigord, Limousin and Beam; resinotis trees (firs, pines, larches, &c.) form fine forests in the Vosges and The indigenous fauna include the bear, now very rare but still found in the Alps and Pyrenees, the wolf, harbouring chiefly in the Cvennes and Vosges, but in continually decreasing areas; the fox, marten, badger, weasel, otter, the beaver in the extreme south of the Rhne valley, and in the Alps the marmot; the red deer and roe deer are preserved in many of the forests, and the wild boar is found in several districts; the chamois and wild goat survive in the Pyrenees and Alps.

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  • The rest of the island is occupied in great part by ranges of moderately elevated hills, on which are found extensive woods of ancient pines, planted by the hand of nature.

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  • High districts covered with oaks and chestnuts succeed to this almost tropical vegetation; a little higher up and we reach the elevated regions of the Pollino and the Sila, covered with firs and pines, and affording rich pastures even in the midst of summer, when heavy dews and light frosts succeed each other in July and August, and snow begins to appear at the end of September or early in October.

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  • There is a small government house, standing in beautiful grounds, adjoining Albert Park, with plantations of oaks and pines.

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  • Or to take the small but welldefined group of five-leaved pines, all the species of which may be seen growing side by side at Kew under identical conditions: we have the Weymouth pine (Pinus Strobus) in eastern North America, P. monlicola and the sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) in California, P. Ayacahwite in Mexico, the Arolla pine (P. Cembra) in Switzerland and Siberia, P. Peuce in Greece, the Bhotan pine (P. excelsa) in the Himalayas, and two other species in Japan.

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  • The olive and the chestnut are rare; but the beech reappears, and the Pinus pinaster recalls the Italian pines.

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  • The firs are distinguished from the pines and larches by having their needle-like leaves placed singly on the shoots, instead of growing in clusters from a sheath on a dwarf branch.

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  • The spruce bears the smoke of great cities better than most of the Abietineae; but in suburban localities after a certain age it soon loses its healthy appearance, and is apt to be affected with blight (Eriosoma), though not so much as the Scotch fir and most of the pines.

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  • Sargent estimated in 1884 that the stand of short-leaf and long-leaf pines aggregated respectively 21,625 and 26,558 million feet.

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  • The Isle of Pines in its northern part is hilly and wooded; in its southern part, very low, level and rather barren; a tidal swamp almost cuts the island in two.

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  • There are extensive and valuable deposits of beautiful marbles in the Isle of Pines, and lesser ones near Santiago.

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  • For building and miscellaneous purposes, in addition to the rare woods above named, there are cedars (used in great quantities for cigar boxes); the pine, found only in the W., where it gives its name to the Isle of Pines and the province of Pinar del Rio; various palms; oaks of varying hardness and colour, &c. The number of alimentary plants is extremely great.

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  • The Isle of Pines, so called from its araucarias (its native name is Kunie), geologically a continuation of New Caledonia, lies 30 m.

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  • Firs and pines cover the mountain heights; and below these, but still at an elevation of eight or nine thousand feet, is a zone of vegetation, consisting principally of oaks and rhododendrons.

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  • They have the fleshy stems characteristic of the order, these being either globose, oblong or cylindrical, and either ribbed as in Melocactus, or broken up into distinct tubercles, and most of them armed with stiff sharp pines, set in little woolly cushions occupying the place of the buds.

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  • Loblolly pine, cypress, oaks, hickory, ash, pecan, maple, beech and a few other deciduous trees are interspersed among both the long-leaf and the short-leaf pines, and the proportion of deciduous trees increases to the westward.

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  • The upper slopes of some of the mountains in the Trans-Pecos region are clothed with forests of large pines, cedars and other trees.

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  • The alpine flora, beginning at 6000 ft., is specially characterized by its rhododendrons, pines (Araucaria and Libocedrus), and palms, by numerous superb species of Agapetes (Ericaceae), and on the summits by an extraordinary association of species characteristically European (Rubus, Ranunculus, Leontodon, Aspidium), Himalayan, New Zealandian (Veronica), Antarctic and South American (Drymus, Libocedrus).

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  • The early colonists found quite half the surface of the archipelago covered with dense, evergreen forest, a luxuriant growth of pines and beeches, tangled and intertwined with palms, ferns of all sizes, wild vines and other parasites, and a rank, bushy, mossed undergrowth.

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  • In the temperate uplands of the interior, as about Luang Prabang, Himalayan and Japanese species occur - oaks, pines, chestnuts, peach and great apple trees, raspberries, honeysuckle, vines, saxifrages, Cichoraceae, anemones and Violaceae; there are many valuable timber trees - teak, sappan, eagle-wood, wood-oil (Hopea), and other Dlpterocarpaceae, Cedrelaceae, Pterocarpaceae, Xylia, ironwood and other dye-woods and resinous trees, these last forming in many districts a large proportion of the more open forests, with an undergrowth of bamboo.

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  • The course of the battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks bore some resemblance to that of Shiloh; a sharp attack found the Unionists unprepared, and only after severe losses and many partial defeats could McClellan check the rebel advance.

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  • The Federal Army of the Potomac, advancing from the sea and the river Pamunkey over the Chickahominy on Richmond, had come to a standstill after the battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks), and General Robert Lee, who succeeded Joseph Johnston in command of the Confederates, initiated the series of counter attacks upon it which constitute the "Seven Days."

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  • From the great size of the trunk and the even grain of the red cedar-like wood it is a valuable tree to the farmer and carpenter: it splits readily and evenly, and planes and polishes well; cut radially, the medullary plates give the wood a fine satiny lustre; it is strong and durable, but not so elastic as many of the western pines and firs.

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  • nultalli, Tetradymia canescens, Sarcobatus vermiculatus and Gray-ia spinosa) are characteristic species, and on the mountain slopes are some nut pines (psif on) and junipers.

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  • The Austroriparian zone has the long-leaf and loblolly pines, magnolia and live oak on the uplands, and the bald cypress, tupelo and cane in the swamps; and in the semi-tropical Gulf strip are the cabbage palmetto and Cuban pine; here, too, Sea Island cotton and tropical fruits are successfully cultivated.

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  • of Chalcis, rises the highest of its mountains, Dirphysor Dirphe,now Mount Delphi (5725 ft.),the bare summit of which is not entirely free from snow till the end of May, while its sides are clothed with pines and firs, and lower down with chestnuts and planes.

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  • The birch is one of the most wide-spread and generally useful of forest trees of Russia, occurring in that empire in vast forests, in many instances alone, and in other cases mingled with pines, poplars and other forest trees.

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  • along the shore, and bordered by a firm sandy beach, frequented by bathers, and the winter town, farther inland, consisting of numerous villas scattered amongst the pines.

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  • Pines of three species, junipers, larches, oaks, maples, willows and the Thuja Orientalis have been identified.

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  • The yellow pines of the southern part of the state, which have a stand of approximately 1 3,77 8, 000 ft., yielded in 1900 rosin and turpentine valued at $8,110,468 (more than the product of any other state in the Union) and in 1905 valued at $7,705,643 (second only to the product of Florida).

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  • Cienfuegos is served by the United railways and by steamers connecting with Santiago, Batabano, Trinidad and the Isle of Pines.

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  • It is far more durable than any of the oaks of that region, is heavy and close-grained, and much stronger, as well as more lasting, than that of the pines and firs of Canada.

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  • Among trees, stunted pines, dwarf oaks, poplars, willows and the cypress are fairly plentiful.

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  • The tallest pines are over 200 ft.

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  • acus, needle, or acer, sharp), needleshaped, a term used in botany (since Linnaeus) as descriptive of the leaves, e.g., of pines.

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  • Bright orange, yellow, red and purple hues predominate and are set off very effectively against the dark green pines with which the margins of the canyon are fringed, and the white foam of the river at the bottom of the chasm.

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  • The lower part of it (up to about 6000 ft.) consists chiefly of forests of evergreen pines (Pines nigricans), the upper (up to about 6800 ft.) of birchwoods (Betula alba).

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  • General Johnston was wounded he was elected bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, or Chester at the battle of Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) on the 31st of May 1862, as the see was often called, taking at his consecration the new and General Robert E.

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  • The duke's collection was famous for its cedars, pines and firs.

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  • He entered the Confederate army as a colonel, became a brigadiergeneral (April 16, 1862), and took part in the battles of Williamsburg, Seven Pines, second Bull Run and Antietam.

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  • The form of the leaf shows a very great variety ranging from the narrow linear form with parallel sides, as in grasses or the needle-like leaves of pines and firs to more or less rounded or orbicular - descriptions of these will be found in works on descriptive botany - FIG.

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  • Trees which are called evergreen, as pines and evergreen-oak, are always deprived of a certain number of leaves at intervals, sufficient being left, however, to preserve their green appearance.

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  • The mountain forests consist chiefly of firs, Free Towns pines and larches, but contain Lbeck also silver firs, beeches and Bremen oaks.

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  • The woods consist mostly of beech, which is principally used for fuel, but pines were extensively planted during the 19th century.

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  • A proportionally large importation of timber is caused by the scarcity of native timber suitable for building purposes, the plantations of firs and pines being insufficient to produce the quantity required, and the quality of the wood being inferior beyond the age of about forty years.

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  • This range encloses many charming valleys and glens; the most prominent feature of its scenery is formed by the forests, chiefly of pines and firs.

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  • The following is a list of the best timbers for different situations: for general construction, spruce and pine of the different varieties; for heavy constructions, pitch pine, oak (preferably of English growth), teak, jarrah; for constructions immersed in water, Baltic pine, elm, oak, teak, jarrah; for very dry situations, spruce, pines, mahogany, teak, birch, sycamore.

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  • Calumpit has a large rice-mill and one of the largest markets in the Phili p pines.

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  • In respect to positive affinities, Sir Joseph Hooker pointed out some relations with the flora of tropical Africa as evidenced by the prevalence of such genera as Grewia and Impatiens, and the absence, common to both countries, of oaks and pines which abound in the Malayan archipelago.

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  • In the Himalayas themselves the deodar and other conifers form the bulk of the timber, while in the lower ranges, such as the Khasi hills in Assam, and those of Burma, various pines are prominent.

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  • In the lowlands and on the lower mountain slopes the forests are composed chiefly of broad-leaved trees, common among which are the bamboo, the coco and other palms, and the banyan tree; but on the higher mountain slopes pines are most abundant.

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  • The fact that in former times the island was richly clad with woods is indicated by the name still employed by the Turks, Tchamliza, the place of pines; but it is only in some favoured spots that a few trees are now to be found.

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  • Valuable trees are of great variety: cottonwood, poplar, catalpa, red cedar, sweet-gum, birch-eye, sassafras, persimmon, ash, elm, sycamore, maple, a variety of pines, pecan, locust, dogwood, hickory, various oaks, beech, walnut and cypress are all abundant.

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  • Forty-six species occur, namely, 32 species of pitch trees (18 pines), 12 species of the cypresses and their allies (2 sequoia), and 2 species of yews or their allies.

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  • cut in 1903, 4 6 5,4 60, 000 were of redwood, and 264,890,000 of yellow pine; fir and sugar pines contributing another 104,600,000, and spruce and cedar 17,670,000 ft.

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  • Even on the Coastal Plain the Jersey and oldfield pines of to-day replace more valuable species of the original growth.

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  • The principal trees, after the yellow and lodgepole pines, are the red-fir, so-called hemlock and cedar, the Engelmann spruce, the cottonwood and the aspen (Populus tremuloides).

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  • The pines are widely distributed over the north temperate zone, in the southern portions chiefly confined to the mountains, along which, in Central America, a few are found within the tropic; in more northern regions they frequently form extensive forests, sometimes hardly mingled with other trees.

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  • soaking in lime-water renders it more lasting; great numbers of young pines are annually cut for railway sleepers, mining timber and numerous agricultural applications; large quantities are: consumed for wood-pavement.

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  • In common with other pines, P. sylvestris is subject to the attacks of various fungi.

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  • Red pines abound in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, and the tree is rather widely distributed over the northern parts of the continent; it rarely forms extensive woods, but grows chiefly in clumps among other trees, at least in its more southern habitats.

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  • In Oregon and California several large pines of this group are found.

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  • The pines with five leaves in each tuft have generally deciduous sheaths.

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  • Formerly Maine and Vermont were celebrated for the size of their pines, but few of these great trees now exist in New England.

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  • Immediately on the west of the Kaisargarh there towers the Shingarh Mountain, a geological repetition of the Kaisargarh ridge, black with pines towards the summit and crowned with crags of coral limestone.

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  • The " Deodar" is also much used, but the other pines produce timber that is not durable.

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  • There are firs and spruces on the mountains, characteristic of the Boreal zone; pines characteristic of the Transition zone; pinon juniper, greasewood and the universally conspicuous sage-brush, characteristic of the Upper Sonoran zone.

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  • South and east of a line drawn approximately from Seabright to Glassboro, and thence southward to Delaware Bay, is a nearly level, sandy region known as " The Pines."

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  • Within " The Pines," immediately north of the Mullica river, lies an area of about 20,000 acres called " The Plains."

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  • Atlantic, Burlington, Camden and Salem counties are the great centres for strawberries; Atlantic, Cumberland and Salem counties lead in grape-growing; and a large huckleberry crop is yearly gathered in " the Pines."

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  • Tories were active in New Jersey throughout the struggle; among them were bands known as " Pine Robbers," who hid in the pines or along the dunes by day and made their raids at night.

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  • The best known and by far the largest division of the Gymnosperms is that of the cone-bearing trees (pines, firs, cedars, larches, &c.), which play a prominent part in the vegetation of the present day, especially in the higher latitudes of the northern hemisphere; certain members of this class are of considerable antiquity, but the conifers as a whole are still vigorous and show but little sign of decadence.

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  • excelsa, the Norfolk Island pine, many pines and firs, cedars and other genera illustrate the pyramidal form.

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  • These projections and ridges may be homologous with the seminiferous scale of the pines, firs, cedars, &c. The simplest interpretation of the cone of the Abietineae is that which regards it as a flower consisting of an axis bearing several open carpels, which in the adult cone may be very small or large and prominent, the scale bearing the ovules being regarded as a placental outgrowth from the flat and open carpel.

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  • At Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) was fought on the 31st of May a bloody battle, ending the following day in a Confederate repulse.

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  • in height, and are covered by birches and pines.

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  • The birch and larch woods of this zone give way to pine forests as the altitude increases; and the pines to mosses, lichens and alpine plants, just below the jagged iron-grey peaks, many of which attain altitudes of 6000 to 8000 ft.

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  • Ash, oaks, black and sweet gums, chestnuts, hickories, hard maple, beech, walnut and short-leaf pine are noteworthy among the trees of the Carolinian area; the tupelo and bald cypress of the embayment region, and long-leaf and loblolly pines, pecans and live oaks of the uplands, among those characteristic of the Austro-riparian.

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  • Among trees introduced by the Dutch or British colonists the oak, poplar, various pines, the Australian blue-gum (eucalyptus) and wattle flourish.

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  • Above this belt of mahogany, pines and firs are sometimes found.

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  • He served in the Peninsular Campaign, and at the battle of Seven Pines (Fair Oaks) he was twice wounded, losing his right arm.

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  • an enormous and unbroken forest of pines, hemlocks and spruce.

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  • The northern summits are destitute of trees, but the lower slopes of the Upper Harz are heavily wooded with pines and firs.

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  • In the United States the turpentineyielding pines are the swamp pine, P. australis, and the loblolly, P. Taeda, both inhabiting North and South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama.

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  • Oaks and beeches predominate in the north; pines, often of gigantic size, among the fantastic white or grey rocks of the wild south-western ridges.

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  • In northern Croatia and Slavonia the mountains are far more fertile, being often densely wooded with oaks, beeches and pines.

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  • In the countries bordering the Mediterranean are groves of oranges and olive trees, evergreen oaks, cork trees and pines, intermixed with cypresses, myrtles, arbutus and fragrant tree-heaths.

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  • A markedly upland character is given to the flora of this valley through the abundance of pines (9 species) and oaks (16 species) which it contains; but this peculiarity is readily accounted for by the steep slopes of the Apennines, which everywhere surround and dominate the old lake-basin.

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  • On the mountains the trees are chiefly pines, firs, spruce and hemlock.

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  • It stood picturesquely against a timbered background of pines.

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  • Large windows framed a picturesque pond, boarded by tall pines.

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  • Talon's renting out a country club between here and Pembroke Pines, Toni responded.

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  • Dean bumped into Seymour Fitzgerald coming out of a five-room ranch in Whispering Pines.

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  • The verdant pines outside the fortress wall were beautiful, and she watched their long pine needles stir in an early morning breeze.

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  • It was a signature day in Ouray, better than the best of the area's finest painted or photographed images with the sky so blue, the pines so green and the snow so white, you couldn't paint truer colors with an art store's inventory.

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  • It reminded him of his native Appalachia with the exception of the pines.

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  • The vantage point from there would let her see anything coming up the driveway or through the forest, though the pines were thick.

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  • Trying to escape her tangled past, she has run away to the American backwoods, winding up at the Dreamy Pines Motor Court.

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  • A raised boardwalk, through shady Pines, lead to hides overlooking a large lagoon.

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  • Parking by the side of the road we saw a few crossbills flying over the pines.

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  • In the pines we had a small flock of 5 common crossbills.

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  • The alluvial flood plains in the Gulf region and the south east suited pines and swamp cypress.

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  • The pines, completely enveloped in flames, threw a wild glare on the scene.

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  • Hill Marquee Dining Arrive at our cozy Marquee set in a wooded glade of old pines at 1600ft.

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  • glade of old pines at 1600ft.

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  • An autumnal breeze, an early harbinger of winter, skittered high and forlorn among the loblolly pines.

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  • Standard Pattern headboard " Pines Express " Only this inter-regional service brought a BR cast aluminum curved headboard onto SR metals.

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  • indented sea coast, fringed with small islands, thinly covered with pines.

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  • Be sure to the best investment pines magnolias and camellias.

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  • Policies can end almost all direct-selling pines magnolias and camellias had workers ' compensation insurance.

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  • junipers manzanita or pines what's really going in alaska he her saris her.

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  • The lid itself simply lifts off and is decorated with a round inlaid cork picture, which features pagodas, cranes and pines.

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  • There are bristlecone pines growing today on the mountains of California and Nevada that are confirmed to be 4,300 years old.

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  • Lincoln recently had a bit of a nonsense over 4 or 5 scotch pines.

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  • I have porcupines and rocky pines and all the other hairdo's.

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  • After passing the pines there is an obvious track which eventually rejoins the path back to the marina.

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  • Pines kernels have also been used as excellent restoratives after a long illness.

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  • scotch pines.

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  • Crystal clear burns tumble through Caledonian pine forests where ancient Scots pines, withered over three or more centuries, stand sentinel.

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  • It is thought the pines populated the ancient supercontinent Gondwana when dinosaurs walked the Earth.

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  • Scotch Pines in the neck Posted 2:02PM Mon 11 Aug 2003 Would a garden vac be any good for the pine cones?

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  • Along the road, in strong contrast to the guardian pines, toil a few tired wayfarers; and the story is told.

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  • wind-swept pines.

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  • The higher regions produce cork trees, oaks, pines, chestnuts, &c., but the forests have been largely destroyed by speculators, who burned the trees for charcoal and potash, purchasing them on a large scale from the state.

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  • It is found also in the Isle of Pines, and in the New Hebrides.

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  • Other trees of southern France are the cork-oak and the Aleppo and maritime pines.

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  • The chestnut covers considerable areas in Prigord, Limousin and Beam; resinotis trees (firs, pines, larches, &c.) form fine forests in the Vosges and The indigenous fauna include the bear, now very rare but still found in the Alps and Pyrenees, the wolf, harbouring chiefly in the Cvennes and Vosges, but in continually decreasing areas; the fox, marten, badger, weasel, otter, the beaver in the extreme south of the Rhne valley, and in the Alps the marmot; the red deer and roe deer are preserved in many of the forests, and the wild boar is found in several districts; the chamois and wild goat survive in the Pyrenees and Alps.

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  • The most wooded parts of France are the mountains Loire and plateaus of the east and of the north-east, comprising Seine the pine-forests of the Vosges and Jura (including the beau- Bouch~e tiful Forest of Chaux), the Forest of Haye, the Forest of Rhne Ardennes, the Forest of Argonne, &c.; the Landes, where M rth replanting with maritime pines has transformed large areas Ardenn of marsh into forest; and the departments of Var and Vos as Arige.

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  • The rest of the island is occupied in great part by ranges of moderately elevated hills, on which are found extensive woods of ancient pines, planted by the hand of nature.

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  • High districts covered with oaks and chestnuts succeed to this almost tropical vegetation; a little higher up and we reach the elevated regions of the Pollino and the Sila, covered with firs and pines, and affording rich pastures even in the midst of summer, when heavy dews and light frosts succeed each other in July and August, and snow begins to appear at the end of September or early in October.

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  • There is a small government house, standing in beautiful grounds, adjoining Albert Park, with plantations of oaks and pines.

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  • Or to take the small but welldefined group of five-leaved pines, all the species of which may be seen growing side by side at Kew under identical conditions: we have the Weymouth pine (Pinus Strobus) in eastern North America, P. monlicola and the sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) in California, P. Ayacahwite in Mexico, the Arolla pine (P. Cembra) in Switzerland and Siberia, P. Peuce in Greece, the Bhotan pine (P. excelsa) in the Himalayas, and two other species in Japan.

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  • Screw pines have a closer connection.

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  • Screw pines are replaced by the nearly allied Cyclanthaceae.

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  • The olive and the chestnut are rare; but the beech reappears, and the Pinus pinaster recalls the Italian pines.

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  • Several other pines are found, and among the less important timber trees are black spruce, Carolina balsam, beeches, ashes, sycamore or button wood, sweet gum and lindens.

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  • Pines, larch, birch are the principal trees on the moun tains; willow, alders and poplars on the lower ground.

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  • The firs are distinguished from the pines and larches by having their needle-like leaves placed singly on the shoots, instead of growing in clusters from a sheath on a dwarf branch.

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  • The spruce bears the smoke of great cities better than most of the Abietineae; but in suburban localities after a certain age it soon loses its healthy appearance, and is apt to be affected with blight (Eriosoma), though not so much as the Scotch fir and most of the pines.

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  • The south-western shore is generally low, with sand hills covered with shrivelled pines and bur oaks.

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  • Sargent estimated in 1884 that the stand of short-leaf and long-leaf pines aggregated respectively 21,625 and 26,558 million feet.

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  • without the surrounding keys and the Isle of Pines (area about i180 sq.

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  • The Isle of Pines in its northern part is hilly and wooded; in its southern part, very low, level and rather barren; a tidal swamp almost cuts the island in two.

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  • There are extensive and valuable deposits of beautiful marbles in the Isle of Pines, and lesser ones near Santiago.

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  • Mineral waters, though not yet important in trade, are extremely abundant, and a score of places in Cuba and the Isle of Pines are already known as health resorts.

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  • For building and miscellaneous purposes, in addition to the rare woods above named, there are cedars (used in great quantities for cigar boxes); the pine, found only in the W., where it gives its name to the Isle of Pines and the province of Pinar del Rio; various palms; oaks of varying hardness and colour, &c. The number of alimentary plants is extremely great.

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  • The status of the Isle of Pines was left an open question by the treaty of Paris, but a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States has declared it (in a question of customs duties) to be a part of Cuba, and though a treaty to the same end did not secure ratification (1908) by the United States Senate, repeated efforts by American residents thereon to secure annexation to the United States were ignored by the United States government.

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  • In the deeper valleys and on the lowlands of West Siberia the larches, pines and silver firs, intermingled with birches and aspens, attain a great size, and the streams are fringed with thickets of poplar and willow.

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  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.

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  • The Isle of Pines, so called from its araucarias (its native name is Kunie), geologically a continuation of New Caledonia, lies 30 m.

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  • The islands annexed to the colony of New Caledonia are the Isle of Pines, used as a place of detention for habitual criminals; the Loyalty Islands, E.

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  • France was now determined on the annexation, and the flag was raised at the same spot in 1853, but simultaneously the commander of a British vessel was in negotiation with the native chief of the Isle of Pines, and the British flag was hoisted there.

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  • The resulting pebble and quartz-sand is very unproductive, and supports chiefly a poor underwood and crippled pines with widely spreading roots which seek their nourishment afar.

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  • Firs and pines cover the mountain heights; and below these, but still at an elevation of eight or nine thousand feet, is a zone of vegetation, consisting principally of oaks and rhododendrons.

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  • They have the fleshy stems characteristic of the order, these being either globose, oblong or cylindrical, and either ribbed as in Melocactus, or broken up into distinct tubercles, and most of them armed with stiff sharp pines, set in little woolly cushions occupying the place of the buds.

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  • Loblolly pine, cypress, oaks, hickory, ash, pecan, maple, beech and a few other deciduous trees are interspersed among both the long-leaf and the short-leaf pines, and the proportion of deciduous trees increases to the westward.

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  • The upper slopes of some of the mountains in the Trans-Pecos region are clothed with forests of large pines, cedars and other trees.

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  • The alpine flora, beginning at 6000 ft., is specially characterized by its rhododendrons, pines (Araucaria and Libocedrus), and palms, by numerous superb species of Agapetes (Ericaceae), and on the summits by an extraordinary association of species characteristically European (Rubus, Ranunculus, Leontodon, Aspidium), Himalayan, New Zealandian (Veronica), Antarctic and South American (Drymus, Libocedrus).

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  • The early colonists found quite half the surface of the archipelago covered with dense, evergreen forest, a luxuriant growth of pines and beeches, tangled and intertwined with palms, ferns of all sizes, wild vines and other parasites, and a rank, bushy, mossed undergrowth.

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  • In the temperate uplands of the interior, as about Luang Prabang, Himalayan and Japanese species occur - oaks, pines, chestnuts, peach and great apple trees, raspberries, honeysuckle, vines, saxifrages, Cichoraceae, anemones and Violaceae; there are many valuable timber trees - teak, sappan, eagle-wood, wood-oil (Hopea), and other Dlpterocarpaceae, Cedrelaceae, Pterocarpaceae, Xylia, ironwood and other dye-woods and resinous trees, these last forming in many districts a large proportion of the more open forests, with an undergrowth of bamboo.

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  • The course of the battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks bore some resemblance to that of Shiloh; a sharp attack found the Unionists unprepared, and only after severe losses and many partial defeats could McClellan check the rebel advance.

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  • The Federal Army of the Potomac, advancing from the sea and the river Pamunkey over the Chickahominy on Richmond, had come to a standstill after the battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks), and General Robert Lee, who succeeded Joseph Johnston in command of the Confederates, initiated the series of counter attacks upon it which constitute the "Seven Days."

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  • From the great size of the trunk and the even grain of the red cedar-like wood it is a valuable tree to the farmer and carpenter: it splits readily and evenly, and planes and polishes well; cut radially, the medullary plates give the wood a fine satiny lustre; it is strong and durable, but not so elastic as many of the western pines and firs.

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  • nultalli, Tetradymia canescens, Sarcobatus vermiculatus and Gray-ia spinosa) are characteristic species, and on the mountain slopes are some nut pines (psif on) and junipers.

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  • The Austroriparian zone has the long-leaf and loblolly pines, magnolia and live oak on the uplands, and the bald cypress, tupelo and cane in the swamps; and in the semi-tropical Gulf strip are the cabbage palmetto and Cuban pine; here, too, Sea Island cotton and tropical fruits are successfully cultivated.

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  • of Chalcis, rises the highest of its mountains, Dirphysor Dirphe,now Mount Delphi (5725 ft.),the bare summit of which is not entirely free from snow till the end of May, while its sides are clothed with pines and firs, and lower down with chestnuts and planes.

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  • The birch is one of the most wide-spread and generally useful of forest trees of Russia, occurring in that empire in vast forests, in many instances alone, and in other cases mingled with pines, poplars and other forest trees.

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  • along the shore, and bordered by a firm sandy beach, frequented by bathers, and the winter town, farther inland, consisting of numerous villas scattered amongst the pines.

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  • Pines of three species, junipers, larches, oaks, maples, willows and the Thuja Orientalis have been identified.

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  • The yellow pines of the southern part of the state, which have a stand of approximately 1 3,77 8, 000 ft., yielded in 1900 rosin and turpentine valued at $8,110,468 (more than the product of any other state in the Union) and in 1905 valued at $7,705,643 (second only to the product of Florida).

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  • Cienfuegos is served by the United railways and by steamers connecting with Santiago, Batabano, Trinidad and the Isle of Pines.

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  • It is far more durable than any of the oaks of that region, is heavy and close-grained, and much stronger, as well as more lasting, than that of the pines and firs of Canada.

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  • Among trees, stunted pines, dwarf oaks, poplars, willows and the cypress are fairly plentiful.

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  • The tallest pines are over 200 ft.

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  • acus, needle, or acer, sharp), needleshaped, a term used in botany (since Linnaeus) as descriptive of the leaves, e.g., of pines.

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  • Bright orange, yellow, red and purple hues predominate and are set off very effectively against the dark green pines with which the margins of the canyon are fringed, and the white foam of the river at the bottom of the chasm.

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  • Of deciduous trees the sycamore, wych-elm, horse-chestnut, beech, lime, plane and poplar may be used, - the abele or white poplar, Populus alba, being one of the most rapidgrowing of all trees, and, like other poplars, well suited for nursing other choicer subjects; while of evergreens, the holm oak, holly, laurel (both common and Portugal), and such conifers as the Scotch, Weymouth and Austrian pines, with spruce and (South.) silver firs and yews, are suitable.

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  • The lower part of it (up to about 6000 ft.) consists chiefly of forests of evergreen pines (Pines nigricans), the upper (up to about 6800 ft.) of birchwoods (Betula alba).

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  • General Johnston was wounded he was elected bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, or Chester at the battle of Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) on the 31st of May 1862, as the see was often called, taking at his consecration the new and General Robert E.

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  • a temperate or colder zones where a season favourable to vegetation is succeeded by an unfavourable or winter season, leaves of evergreens must be protected from the frost and cold drying winds, and are therefore tougher or more leathery in texture than those of deciduous trees, and frequently, as in pines, firs and other conifers, are needle-like, thus exposing a much smaller surface to the drying action of cold winds.

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  • The duke's collection was famous for its cedars, pines and firs.

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  • He entered the Confederate army as a colonel, became a brigadiergeneral (April 16, 1862), and took part in the battles of Williamsburg, Seven Pines, second Bull Run and Antietam.

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  • The form of the leaf shows a very great variety ranging from the narrow linear form with parallel sides, as in grasses or the needle-like leaves of pines and firs to more or less rounded or orbicular - descriptions of these will be found in works on descriptive botany - FIG.

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  • Trees which are called evergreen, as pines and evergreen-oak, are always deprived of a certain number of leaves at intervals, sufficient being left, however, to preserve their green appearance.

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  • The mountain forests consist chiefly of firs, Free Towns pines and larches, but contain Lbeck also silver firs, beeches and Bremen oaks.

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  • The woods consist mostly of beech, which is principally used for fuel, but pines were extensively planted during the 19th century.

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  • A proportionally large importation of timber is caused by the scarcity of native timber suitable for building purposes, the plantations of firs and pines being insufficient to produce the quantity required, and the quality of the wood being inferior beyond the age of about forty years.

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  • This range encloses many charming valleys and glens; the most prominent feature of its scenery is formed by the forests, chiefly of pines and firs.

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  • The following is a list of the best timbers for different situations: for general construction, spruce and pine of the different varieties; for heavy constructions, pitch pine, oak (preferably of English growth), teak, jarrah; for constructions immersed in water, Baltic pine, elm, oak, teak, jarrah; for very dry situations, spruce, pines, mahogany, teak, birch, sycamore.

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  • Calumpit has a large rice-mill and one of the largest markets in the Phili p pines.

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  • In respect to positive affinities, Sir Joseph Hooker pointed out some relations with the flora of tropical Africa as evidenced by the prevalence of such genera as Grewia and Impatiens, and the absence, common to both countries, of oaks and pines which abound in the Malayan archipelago.

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  • In the Himalayas themselves the deodar and other conifers form the bulk of the timber, while in the lower ranges, such as the Khasi hills in Assam, and those of Burma, various pines are prominent.

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  • In the lowlands and on the lower mountain slopes the forests are composed chiefly of broad-leaved trees, common among which are the bamboo, the coco and other palms, and the banyan tree; but on the higher mountain slopes pines are most abundant.

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  • The fact that in former times the island was richly clad with woods is indicated by the name still employed by the Turks, Tchamliza, the place of pines; but it is only in some favoured spots that a few trees are now to be found.

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  • Valuable trees are of great variety: cottonwood, poplar, catalpa, red cedar, sweet-gum, birch-eye, sassafras, persimmon, ash, elm, sycamore, maple, a variety of pines, pecan, locust, dogwood, hickory, various oaks, beech, walnut and cypress are all abundant.

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  • Forty-six species occur, namely, 32 species of pitch trees (18 pines), 12 species of the cypresses and their allies (2 sequoia), and 2 species of yews or their allies.

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  • cut in 1903, 4 6 5,4 60, 000 were of redwood, and 264,890,000 of yellow pine; fir and sugar pines contributing another 104,600,000, and spruce and cedar 17,670,000 ft.

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  • Even on the Coastal Plain the Jersey and oldfield pines of to-day replace more valuable species of the original growth.

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  • The principal trees, after the yellow and lodgepole pines, are the red-fir, so-called hemlock and cedar, the Engelmann spruce, the cottonwood and the aspen (Populus tremuloides).

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  • The pines are widely distributed over the north temperate zone, in the southern portions chiefly confined to the mountains, along which, in Central America, a few are found within the tropic; in more northern regions they frequently form extensive forests, sometimes hardly mingled with other trees.

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  • soaking in lime-water renders it more lasting; great numbers of young pines are annually cut for railway sleepers, mining timber and numerous agricultural applications; large quantities are: consumed for wood-pavement.

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  • In common with other pines, P. sylvestris is subject to the attacks of various fungi.

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  • Red pines abound in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, and the tree is rather widely distributed over the northern parts of the continent; it rarely forms extensive woods, but grows chiefly in clumps among other trees, at least in its more southern habitats.

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  • In Oregon and California several large pines of this group are found.

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  • The pines with five leaves in each tuft have generally deciduous sheaths.

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  • Formerly Maine and Vermont were celebrated for the size of their pines, but few of these great trees now exist in New England.

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  • Immediately on the west of the Kaisargarh there towers the Shingarh Mountain, a geological repetition of the Kaisargarh ridge, black with pines towards the summit and crowned with crags of coral limestone.

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  • The " Deodar" is also much used, but the other pines produce timber that is not durable.

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  • There are firs and spruces on the mountains, characteristic of the Boreal zone; pines characteristic of the Transition zone; pinon juniper, greasewood and the universally conspicuous sage-brush, characteristic of the Upper Sonoran zone.

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  • South and east of a line drawn approximately from Seabright to Glassboro, and thence southward to Delaware Bay, is a nearly level, sandy region known as " The Pines."

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  • Within " The Pines," immediately north of the Mullica river, lies an area of about 20,000 acres called " The Plains."

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  • Atlantic, Burlington, Camden and Salem counties are the great centres for strawberries; Atlantic, Cumberland and Salem counties lead in grape-growing; and a large huckleberry crop is yearly gathered in " the Pines."

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  • Tories were active in New Jersey throughout the struggle; among them were bands known as " Pine Robbers," who hid in the pines or along the dunes by day and made their raids at night.

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  • The best known and by far the largest division of the Gymnosperms is that of the cone-bearing trees (pines, firs, cedars, larches, &c.), which play a prominent part in the vegetation of the present day, especially in the higher latitudes of the northern hemisphere; certain members of this class are of considerable antiquity, but the conifers as a whole are still vigorous and show but little sign of decadence.

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  • excelsa, the Norfolk Island pine, many pines and firs, cedars and other genera illustrate the pyramidal form.

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  • These projections and ridges may be homologous with the seminiferous scale of the pines, firs, cedars, &c. The simplest interpretation of the cone of the Abietineae is that which regards it as a flower consisting of an axis bearing several open carpels, which in the adult cone may be very small or large and prominent, the scale bearing the ovules being regarded as a placental outgrowth from the flat and open carpel.

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  • At Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) was fought on the 31st of May a bloody battle, ending the following day in a Confederate repulse.

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  • in height, and are covered by birches and pines.

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  • The birch and larch woods of this zone give way to pine forests as the altitude increases; and the pines to mosses, lichens and alpine plants, just below the jagged iron-grey peaks, many of which attain altitudes of 6000 to 8000 ft.

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  • Ash, oaks, black and sweet gums, chestnuts, hickories, hard maple, beech, walnut and short-leaf pine are noteworthy among the trees of the Carolinian area; the tupelo and bald cypress of the embayment region, and long-leaf and loblolly pines, pecans and live oaks of the uplands, among those characteristic of the Austro-riparian.

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  • Among trees introduced by the Dutch or British colonists the oak, poplar, various pines, the Australian blue-gum (eucalyptus) and wattle flourish.

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  • Above this belt of mahogany, pines and firs are sometimes found.

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  • He served in the Peninsular Campaign, and at the battle of Seven Pines (Fair Oaks) he was twice wounded, losing his right arm.

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  • an enormous and unbroken forest of pines, hemlocks and spruce.

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  • The northern summits are destitute of trees, but the lower slopes of the Upper Harz are heavily wooded with pines and firs.

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  • In the United States the turpentineyielding pines are the swamp pine, P. australis, and the loblolly, P. Taeda, both inhabiting North and South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama.

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  • Oaks and beeches predominate in the north; pines, often of gigantic size, among the fantastic white or grey rocks of the wild south-western ridges.

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  • In northern Croatia and Slavonia the mountains are far more fertile, being often densely wooded with oaks, beeches and pines.

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  • In the countries bordering the Mediterranean are groves of oranges and olive trees, evergreen oaks, cork trees and pines, intermixed with cypresses, myrtles, arbutus and fragrant tree-heaths.

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  • A markedly upland character is given to the flora of this valley through the abundance of pines (9 species) and oaks (16 species) which it contains; but this peculiarity is readily accounted for by the steep slopes of the Apennines, which everywhere surround and dominate the old lake-basin.

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  • On the mountains the trees are chiefly pines, firs, spruce and hemlock.

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  • Our cottage was a sort of rough camp, beautifully situated on the top of the mountain among oaks and pines.

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  • When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures--solitude, books and imagination--outside with the whispering pines.

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  • We were sitting together in a hammock which swung from two solemn pines at a short distance from the house.

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  • The whole lot contains eleven acres, mostly growing up to pines and hickories, and was sold the preceding season for eight dollars and eight cents an acre.

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  • It was pleasant to see my whole household effects out on the grass, making a little pile like a gypsy's pack, and my three-legged table, from which I did not remove the books and pen and ink, standing amid the pines and hickories.

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  • My house was on the side of a hill, immediately on the edge of the larger wood, in the midst of a young forest of pitch pines and hickories, and half a dozen rods from the pond, to which a narrow footpath led down the hill.

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  • A young forest growing up under your meadows, and wild sumachs and blackberry vines breaking through into your cellar; sturdy pitch pines rubbing and creaking against the shingles for want of room, their roots reaching quite under the house.

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  • As I walked in the woods to see the birds and squirrels, so I walked in the village to see the men and boys; instead of the wind among the pines I heard the carts rattle.

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  • Men come tamely home at night only from the next field or street, where their household echoes haunt, and their life pines because it breathes its own breath over again; their shadows, morning and evening, reach farther than their daily steps.

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  • In some places, within my own remembrance, the pines would scrape both sides of a chaise at once, and women and children who were compelled to go this way to Lincoln alone and on foot did it with fear, and often ran a good part of the distance.

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  • Cato's half-obliterated cellar-hole still remains, though known to few, being concealed from the traveller by a fringe of pines.

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  • Farther down the hill, on the left, on the old road in the woods, are marks of some homestead of the Stratton family; whose orchard once covered all the slope of Brister's Hill, but was long since killed out by pitch pines, excepting a few stumps, whose old roots furnish still the wild stocks of many a thrifty village tree.

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  • The snow lying deep on the earth dotted with young pines, and the very slope of the hill on which my house is placed, seemed to say, Forward!

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  • The pitch pines and shrub oaks about my house, which had so long drooped, suddenly resumed their several characters, looked brighter, greener, and more erect and alive, as if effectually cleansed and restored by the rain.

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  • After passing the pines there is an obvious track which eventually rejoins the path back to the marina.

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  • Pines kernels have also been used as excellent restoratives after a long illness.

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  • Crystal clear burns tumble through Caledonian pine forests where ancient Scots pines, withered over three or more centuries, stand sentinel.

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  • It is thought the pines populated the ancient supercontinent Gondwana when dinosaurs walked the Earth.

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  • Scotch Pines in the neck Posted 2:02PM Mon 11 Aug 2003 Would a garden vac be any good for the pine cones?

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  • Along the road, in strong contrast to the guardian pines, toil a few tired wayfarers; and the story is told.

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  • The fields flatten out, punctuated by wind-swept pines.

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  • Diameter: Large, open spaces look fabulous with thick trees, but narrower rooms may need slimmer pines.

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  • Color: Some pines are a rich emerald green, while others may have a hint of blue or gray.

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  • Thinking about log furniture often brings to mind a vision of a cozy cabin snuggled amongst beautiful pines or a country inn on the edge of a lake in the mountains.

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  • Fully exposed, the foliage is very attractive, and the plant has the precious quality of growing under Pines or various trees in perfect health, and fruiting yearly.

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  • It is a beautiful tree for grouping with the choicer Pines; more columnar in habit than most, it does not require the wide spacing too often given to our trees in the pinetum.

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  • This tree, more than most other Pines, illustrates the mistake of supposing that conifers should be clothed to the ground with branches, as the natural habit of such trees is often to shed their branches as other trees shed their leaves.

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  • Mayflower (Epigaea) - A small Evergreen found in sandy soil in the shade of Pines in many parts of N.

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  • Its natural home is under trees, and it would be well to plant some of it in the shade of Pines or shrubs.

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  • Pine straw actually comes from pine needles that fall from various pines in the fall.

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  • The Pines is an adult community for people 55 and older who still lead independent lives; however, residents have the benefit of round-the-clock staff.

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  • The Pines also provides one-bedroom guest quarters for out-of-town visitors when they visit.

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  • Tahoe Pines RV Campground in California camping resort is an excellent selection for your Lake Tahoe vacation.

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  • No matter what type of camper you have, you will likely find that Tahoe Pines Campground RV Park California camping resort is the perfect spot for your getaway to the California side of Lake Tahoe.

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  • Tahoe Pines offers many amenities, and has campsites that range from being perfect for tents and smaller campers to sites that can accommodate RVs up to 40' in length.

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  • Additionally, the Tahoe Pines campground park has hot showers, restrooms, fire rings, barbecue grills, a playground, a KOA store, laundry facilities, and more.

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  • The Tahoe Pines RV Campground in California camping destination has an ideal setting for a relaxing getaway, with campsites available along the Echo Creek and the Truckee River, which is the main tributary to Lake Tahoe.

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  • Visitors might even catch a glimpse of a black bear during their stay at Tahoe Pines.

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  • According to For Pet's Sake, Tahoe Pines Campground is an excellent choice for people who enjoy camping and other outdoor activates with their canine companions.

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  • Tahoe Pines Campground is also conveniently located near a number of local tourist attractions.

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  • The Lake Tahoe region is famous for its salmon and trout catches, and Tahoe Pines is conveniently located near a number of first-rate fishing spots.

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  • There are a number of California and Nevada Lake Tahoe cruises located within a few miles of the Tahoe Pines Campground RV Park.

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  • The Tahoe Pines RV Campground in California is open Memorial Day through Labor Day.

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  • To make your reservation or request more information, call (530) 577-1653 or see the Tahoe Pines website.

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  • Kehl Spring Campground is located in a picturesque stand of ponderosa pines right at the brink of one of Arizona's most amazing geologic features, the Mogollon Rim.

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  • Yosemite Pines RV Resort & Family Lodging in Groveland, California.

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  • Tahoe Pines is located on the California south side of the lake.

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  • Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service, 2002.

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  • From balsams to firs to pines, almost every variety can be found.

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  • Kingsley Pines is notable as its family camp (a family version of its coed camp) was featured in Parents magazine.

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  • One thing that is notable about Kinsley Pines is that the activity selection is very comprehensive.

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  • You can register or contact Kingsley Pines online.

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  • The status of the Isle of Pines was left an open question by the treaty of Paris, but a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States has declared it (in a question of customs duties) to be a part of Cuba, and though a treaty to the same end did not secure ratification (1908) by the United States Senate, repeated efforts by American residents thereon to secure annexation to the United States were ignored by the United States government.

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  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.

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  • The vantage point from there would let her see anything coming up the driveway or through the forest, though the pines were thick.

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  • The higher regions produce cork trees, oaks, pines, chestnuts, &c., but the forests have been largely destroyed by speculators, who burned the trees for charcoal and potash, purchasing them on a large scale from the state.

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  • The south-western shore is generally low, with sand hills covered with shrivelled pines and bur oaks.

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  • Several other pines are found, and among the less important timber trees are black spruce, Carolina balsam, beeches, ashes, sycamore or button wood, sweet gum and lindens.

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  • Mineral waters, though not yet important in trade, are extremely abundant, and a score of places in Cuba and the Isle of Pines are already known as health resorts.

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  • The islands annexed to the colony of New Caledonia are the Isle of Pines, used as a place of detention for habitual criminals; the Loyalty Islands, E.

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  • The resulting pebble and quartz-sand is very unproductive, and supports chiefly a poor underwood and crippled pines with widely spreading roots which seek their nourishment afar.

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  • France was now determined on the annexation, and the flag was raised at the same spot in 1853, but simultaneously the commander of a British vessel was in negotiation with the native chief of the Isle of Pines, and the British flag was hoisted there.

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