Pilgrims sentence example

pilgrims
  • At the Passover the pilgrims attacked the Roman troops.
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  • The basilica reared over his tomb at Rome is still visited by pilgrims. His legend is very popular.
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  • The native Christians suffered; the pilgrims of the West found their way made still more difficult, and that at a time when greater numbers than ever were thronging to the East.
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  • Invitations for Thanksgiving parties usually focus on turkeys, pilgrims, or harvest items such as corn stalks or pumpkins.
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  • The only industry is the manufacture of olive-wood and mother-of-pearl goods for sale to pilgrims and for export.
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  • During the pilgrimage season it is increased by about 15,000 travellers and pilgrims.
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  • Within twenty years of the ending of The First Crusade in 1099, Hugues de Payens organized a handful of knights to protect Christian pilgrims as they journeyed to the Holy Land.
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  • Among the first, the name of the "Tabard" is well known from its mention by Chaucer in detailing the company of pilgrims for Canterbury.
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  • Within a short time his shrine at Canterbury became the resort of innumerable pilgrims. Plenary indulgences were given for a visit to the shrine, and an official register was kept to record the miracles wrought by the relics of the saint.
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  • The falls can only be approached from below, where a monastery has been erected, the resort of countless pilgrims. Their height is estimated at 70 ft., and by Tibetan report the hills around are enveloped in perpetual mist, and the Sangdong (the " lion's face "), over which the waters rush, is demon-haunted and full of mystic import.
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  • The monastery - the Kievo-Pecherskaya - is the chief establishment of its kind in Russia; it is visited every year by about 250,000 pilgrims. Of its ten or twelve conventual churches the chief is that of the Assumption.
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  • The result was an enormous influx of pilgrims to Rome, which stirred the pope's attention.
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  • The bull was then issued, and the pilgrims became even more numerous, to the profit of both clergy and citizens.
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  • Marazion was once a flourishing town, and owed its prosperity to the throng of pilgrims who came to visit St Michael's Mount.
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  • Earnest men could not disguise from themselves the moral dangers almost inevitably consequent upon them; they recognized, moreover, that many pilgrims were actuated by extremely dubious motives; and they distrusted the exaggerated value set on outward works.
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  • It was in this harbour that the "Mayflower" compact (see Massachusetts) was drawn up and signed by the Pilgrims before they proceeded to Plymouth, in 1620; here John Carver was chosen the first governor of Plymouth Colony, and Provincetown was the first landing place (on Saturday the 11th [o.s.] of November) of the Pilgrims in the New World.
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  • A valid certificate showing that the quadrivalent vaccine has been received is now a requirement for pilgrims to enter Saudi Arabia.
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  • In all there were nearly 400 pilgrims including about 90 sick pilgrims.
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  • Last week, several hundred Shia pilgrims in Baghdad were killed in a stampede sparked by rumors of a suicide bomber in their midst.
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  • Visitors to the area need sustenance, just as Chaucer 's pilgrims did as they set off for Canterbury from the Tabard Inn.
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  • The Pilgrims ' Chapel Pilgrims Chapel From the north east side of the North Transept descend a few steps into the Pilgrims Chapel.
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  • It was a tent, really, for pilgrims who wandered through the wilderness going from Egypt to the promised Canaan land.
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  • The Knights Templar The Knights Templar were an order of warrior monks, originally formed to give pilgrims protection in the Holy Land.
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  • Let kids get creative and build their own turkeys, Indians or Pilgrims!
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  • The Pilgrims, who came to what is now the Eastern United States on the Mayflower in 1620, originally celebrated both their survival and an abundant harvest with a great feast.
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  • Members of the indigenous tribes were instrumental in introducing the Pilgrims to dried corn meal and other native food sources.
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  • Therefore, it is somewhat likely that the natives shared their tradition with the Pilgrims who also had every reason to celebrate.
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  • A pilgrimage feast must be fixed in date to ensure the simultaneous presence of the pilgrims. There are, besides, seeming references to the feast in the early prophets, as Hosea xii.
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  • Near the Manikarnika ghat is the well held to have been dug by Vishnu and filled with his sweat; great numbers of pilgrims bathe in its venerated water.
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  • But besides an immense resort to Benares of poor pilgrims from every part of India, as well as from Tibet and Burma, numbers of rich Hindus in the decline of life go there for religious salvation.
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  • His reputation for sanctity attracted many pilgrims. Important gifts were made to the church which contained his body, and a monastery grew up hard by.
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  • The relics having been removed, the visits of pilgrims naturally ceased, and by degrees the very existence of those wonderful subterranean cemeteries was forgotten.
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  • The war, which broke out in 1743, was waged with varying fortunes, and the peace by which it was concluded on the 5th of September 1746, beyond stipulating for a few privileges for Persian pilgrims to the holy places, altered nothing in the settlement arranged ten years before with Murad IV.
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  • It also possesses important shrines of its own which cause many pilgrims to linger there, and wealthy Indians not infrequently choose Bagdad as a suitable spot in which to end their days in the odour of sanctity.
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  • Mussulman books; they eat from their hands; the rao, when he appears in public, alternately worships God in a Hindu pagoda and a Mahommedan mosque; and he fits out annually at Mandvi a ship for the conveyance of pilgrims to Mecca, who are maintained during the voyage chiefly by the liberality of the prince.
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  • Its manufactures include cardboard, glue, oils, colours, fertilizers, chemical products, perfumery, &c. During the middle ages and till modern times Aubervilliers was the resort of numerous pilgrims, who came to pay honour to Notre Dame des Vertus.
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  • The chief centres of the fields are Lydenburg, Pilgrims Rest and Spitzkop. The total output of the Lydenburg fields up to the end of 1908 is estimated at 1,200,000 oz.
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  • At the present day male and female pilgrims at Mecca wear such a cloth (the ihram); it covers the knees and one end of it may be cast over the shoulder.
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  • The former, visits paid in accordance with a vow, were very frequent in the middle ages, and were under the special protection of the pope, who put the ban upon any who should molest pilgrims "who go to Rome for God's sake."
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  • At Merry Mount, in that part of Braintree which is now Quincy, a settlement was established by Thomas Morton in 1625, but the gay life of the settlers and their selling rum and firearms to the Indians greatly offended the Pilgrims of Plymouth, who in 1627 arrested Morton; soon afterward Governor John Endecott of Massachusetts Bay visited Merry Mount, rebuked the inhabitants and cut down their Maypole.
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  • They wear a distinctive garb and are not allowed to carry arms or live in the same quarter as Moslems. Another foreign element of considerable strength in the coast towns of Muscat, Aden and Jidda, is the British Indian trading class; many families of Indian origin also have settled at Mecca, having originally come as pilgrims.
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  • Another important route is that taken by the Persian or Shia pilgrims from Bagdad and Kerbela across the desert, by the wells of aina, to Bureda in Kasim; thence across the steppes of western Nejd till it crosses the Hejaz border at the Ria Mecca, 50 m.
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  • To balance the exports and imports specie was exported in the three years 1902-1904 amounting to £2,319,000; a large proportion of this was perhaps provided by cash brought into the country by pilgrims.
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  • While the population of Nejef is estimated at from 20,000 to 30,000, there is in addition a very large floating population of pilgrims, who are constantly arriving, bringing corpses in all stages of decomposition and accompanied at times by sick and aged persons, who have come to Nejef to die.
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  • Nejef is also the point of departure from which Persian pilgrims start on the journey to Mecca.
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  • The town still forms a great centre of Hindu devotion, and large numbers of pilgrims flock annually to the festivals.
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  • Cotton, paper and pilgrims' charms are the chief articles of manufacture.
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  • After spending six years in Constantinople, where he published a Turkish-German Dictionary and various linguistic works, and where he acquired some twenty Oriental languages and dialects, he visited Teheran; and then, disguised as a dervish, joined a band of pilgrims from Mecca, and spent several months with them in rough and squalid travel through the deserts of Asia.
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  • With Therasia (now a sister, not a wife), while leading a life of rigid asceticism, he devoted the whole of his vast wealth to the entertainment of needy pilgrims, to payment of the debts of the insolvent, and to public works of utility or ornament; besides building basilicas at Fondi and Nola, he provided the latter place with a muchneeded aqueduct.
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  • The Japanese regard it as a sacred mountain, and numbers of pilgrims make the ascent in midsummer.
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  • The rood of Bromholm was a reputed fragment of the Cross which attracted many pilgrims. To the south of North Walsham is North Walsham Heath, whither in June 1381 a body of insurgents in connexion with the Peasants' Revolt were driven from before Norwich by Henry le Despenser, bishop of Norwich, and defeated; after which their leader, Geoffrey Lister, and others were sent to the scaffold.
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  • The Mahavinayaka peak, visible from Cuttack, has been consecrated for ages to Siva-worship by ascetics and pilgrims.
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  • Pilgrims visiting Paphos, the original home and temple of Astarte, could of course be in no doubt about which of the heavenly powers inhabited the cone of stone in which she was there held to be immanent; nor was any Semite ever ignorant as to which Baal he stood before.
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  • The duke himself complained in parliament of the way he was spoken of out of doors, and at the outbreak of Wat Tyler's insurrection the peasants stopped pilgrims on the road to Canterbury and made them swear never to accept a king of the name of John.
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  • Thus in 1405 he, with other two masters, was commissioned to examine into certain reputed miracles at Wilsnack, near Wittenberg, which had caused that church to be made a resort of pilgrims from all parts of Europe.
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  • The first recorded case of the formation of an hermandad occurred in the 12th century when the towns and the peasantry of the north united to police the pilgrim road to Santiago in Galicia, and protect the pilgrims against robber knights.
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  • The peace decrees of these various synods differed considerably in detail, but in general they were intended fully to protect non-combatants; they forbade, under pain of excommunication, every act of private warfare or violence against ecclesiastical buildings and their environs, and against certain persons, such as clerics, pilgrims, merchants, women and peasants, and against cattle and agricultural implements.
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  • A picturesque sketch of the Pilgrims of IV alsingham appeared in 1835, two volumes of Tales and Stories from History in the following year.
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  • To this old track the name of " pilgrims' way " has been given, for along it passed the stream of pilgrims coming through Winchester from the south and west of England and from the continent of Europe by way of Southampton to Canterbury Cathedral to view the place of the martyrdom of Thomas Becket, in the north transept, to the relics in the crypt where he was first buried after his murder, in 1170, and the shrine in the Trinity Chapel which rose above his tomb after the translation of the body in 1220.
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  • Erasmus gives a vivid picture of the glories of the shrine and of all that was shown to the pilgrims on his visit with Colet to Canterbury in 1514.
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  • Hollingbourne come Westwell, Eastwell, Boughton Aluph, Godmersham, Chilham Castle, and then at Harbledown, where are the remains of the Hospice of St Nicholas, the road joins Watling Street, by which came the main stream of pilgrims from London, the North and the Midlands.
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  • This road, although its name of the Pilgrims' Way has for long confined it to the road by which the pilgrims came to Canterbury from Winchester, follows a far older track.
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  • The " pilgrims' way " has been traced fully in Mrs Ady's book The Pilgrims' Way (1893), and the older track in the fullest detail in Hilaire Belloc's The Old Road (1904).
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  • In American history the name " Pilgrims " is applied to the earliest settlers of the colony of Plymouth, Massachusetts, and more specifically to the first company of emigrants, who sailed in the " Mayflower " in 1620.
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  • The place soon became a noted resort of pilgrims, not only from all parts of France, but also from Great Britain, Ireland and Italy.
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  • The principal temple is sacred to Siva, and is said to have been rebuilt or enlarged by a leper emperor, who came south on a pilgrimage and was cured by bathing in the temple tank; upwards of 60,000 pilgrims visit the temple every December.
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  • The great salt caravans pass through it, as well as pilgrims on their way to Mecca.
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  • The bodies were formerly exposed to view; but the pilgrims who now pass through the galleries see nothing but the draperies and the inscriptions.
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  • The parish church was begun by Wallenstein after the model of the pilgrims' church of Santiago de Compostela in Spain, but not completed till 1655.
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  • Here we have a first proof of his talent for romancing; for alike to two pilgrims who show him the road and to the huntsmen of Mark's court (whom he instructs in the rightful method of cutting up and disposing the quarry), Tristan invents different, and most detailed, fictions of his land and parentage.
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  • The Public Walks forms a pleasant promenade parallel to the wall, and in the centre of it stands a picturesque octagonal Chapel of the Red Mount, exhibiting ornate Perpendicular work, and once frequented by pilgrims. The church of St Margaret, formerly the priory church, is a fine building with two towers at the west end, one of which was formerly surmounted by a spire, blown down in 1741.
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  • The Dominican monastery, adjoining the cueva santa, commands a magnificent view of the Montserrat, and is used for the accommodation of the pilgrims who yearly visit the cavern in thousands.
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  • A statue of the Virgin stands on a rock projecting above the grotto, the walls of which are covered with crutches atld other votive offerings; the spot, which is resorted to by multitudes of pilgrims from all quarters of the world, is marked by a basilica built above the grotto and consecrated in 1876.
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  • The Hospice de Notre-Dame de Douleurs is the chief of the many establishments provided for the accommodation of pilgrims.
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  • Since the visions of Bernadette Soubirous, their authentication by a commission of enquiry appointed by the bishop of Tarbes, and the authorization by the pope of the cult of Our Lady of Lourdes, the quarter on the left bank of the Gave has sprung up and it is estimated that 600,000 pilgrims annually visit the town.
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  • The buildings devoted to hospitality are divided into three groups, - one for the reception of distinguished guests, another for monks visiting the monastery, a third for poor travellers and pilgrims. The first and third are placed to the right and left of the common entrance of the monastery, - the hospitium for distinguished guests being placed on the north side of the church, not far from the abbot's house; that for the poor on the south side next to the farm buildings.
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  • Outside of these, to the west and east, are the "halls and chambers devoted to the exercise of hospitality, with which every monastery was provided, for the purpose 'of receiving as guests persons who visited it, whether clergy or laity, travellers, pilgrims or paupers."
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  • The inferior pilgrims and paupers were relegated to the north hall or almonry, just within the gate, as far as possible from the other two.
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  • In 1879 the village of Knock in the south-east acquired notoriety from a story that the Virgin Mary had appeared in the church, which became the resort of many pilgrims.
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  • In order to satisfy it relics were made by placing pieces of cloth on the gravesof the saints, which were afterwards taken to their homes and venerated by the pilgrims.
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  • The most considerable range of mountains occupies the centre of the province, the highest peak being the T`ai-shan (5060 ft.), a mountain famous in Chinese history for more than 4000 years, and to which hundreds of pilgrims annually resort.
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  • Badrinath is a favourite resort of pilgrims from all parts of India.
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  • One of the most conspicuous features of Bonn, viewed from the river, is the pilgrimage (monastic) church of Kreuzberg (1627), behind and above Poppelsdorf; it has a flight of 28 steps, which pilgrims used to ascend on their knees.
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  • Till the suppression of the slave trade Suakin was an important slave port and it has always been the place of embarcation for Sudan pilgrims to Mecca.
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  • St Canute's shrine was a great resort of pilgrims throughout the middle ages.
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  • The name is a corruption of Bedevaartswyk, "the village on the pilgrims' road," and refers to the pilgrimages once made to the church of St Agatha in the neighbourhood.
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  • These include a church; a fortified monastery which was founded in 1478, but so often burned and rebuilt as to seem quite modern, and which is visited by pilgrims to the tomb of Peter I.
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  • On the hills above the town is situated the church and abbey of the Madonna de Montallegro, whose miraculous picture attracts pilgrims from all parts of Italy.
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  • Principal Passes.-Though the Alps form a barrier they have never formed an impassable barrier, since, from the earliest days onwards, they have been traversed first, perhaps, for purposes of war or commerce, and later by pilgrims, students and tourists.
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  • A sacred image of St Nicholas in the Trinity church is visited by numerous pilgrims on the 22nd of May every year.
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  • At that date this disease was stamped out by energetic measures on the part of the government, but it has reappeared again in recent years, introduced apparently from India or Persia by pilgrims. There are four great centres of pilgrimage for Shiite Moslems in the vilayet, Samarra, Kazemain, a suburb of Bagdad, Kerbela and Nejef.
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  • These are visited annually by tens of thousands of pilgrims, not only from the surrounding regions, but also from Persia and India; many of whom bring their dead to be buried in the neighbourhood of the sacred tombs.
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  • He gained the respect of all the crusaders, and acted as Richard's principal agent in all negotiations with Saladin, being given a place in the first band of pilgrims that entered Jerusalem.
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  • About 250,000 passengers (including some 40,000 pilgrims to Mecca) pass through the canal in a year (see further SUEZ).
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  • Following the order of the lunar year, the next festival is that of the Return of the Pilgrims, which is the occasion of great rejoicing, many having friends or relatives in the caravan.
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  • The Mahmal, a kind of covered litter, first originated by Queen Sheger-ed-Dur, is brought into the city in procession, though not with as much pomp as when it leaves with the pilgrims. These and other processions have lost much of their effect since the extinction of the Mamelukes, and the gradual disuse of gorgeous dress for the retainers of the,, officers of state.
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  • A few days after, the Kiswa, or new covering for the Kaba at Mecca, is taken in procession from the citadel, where it is always manufactured, to the mosque of the Hasanhn to be completed; and, later, the caravan of pilgrims departs, when the grand procession of the Mahmal takes place.
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  • Barsbai appears to have excelled his predecessors in the invention of devices for exacting money from merchants and pilgrims, and in juggling with the exchange.
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  • The next year, 1450, Nicholas held a jubilee at Rome; and the offerings of the numerous pilgrims who thronged to Rome gave him the means of furthering the cause of culture in Italy, which he had so much at heart.
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  • Within the walls of this monastery the Venerable Bede spent his life from childhood; and his body was at first buried within the church, whither, until it was removed under Edward the Confessor to Durham, it attracted many pilgrims. The town is wholly industrial, devoted to ship-building, chemical works, paper mills and the neighbouring collieries.
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  • The chapel, dedicated to St Cuthbert, continued for a period to attract many pilgrims, but this usage gradually declined and the building was finally destroyed by English invaders.
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  • With the number of the pilgrims the number of pilgrim-resorts also increased.
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  • The poet Prudentius describes how, on the day of the martyr's death, an innumerable multitude of pilgrims flocked round the site.
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  • Ep. 78, 3); while in Gaul the grave of St Martin at Tours drew pilgrims from all quarters (Paul.
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  • Before long, however, these humble trophies failed to content the pilgrims, and they began to devote their efforts to acquiring the actual bodies, or portions of them - frequently by honest means, still oftener by trickery.
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  • Consequently, during the whole period of medievalism, the number of pilgrims was, perpetually on the increase.
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  • So long as the number of pilgrims remained comparatively small, and the difficulties in their path proportionately great, they obtained open letters of recommendation from their bishops to the clergy and laity, which ensured them lodging in convents and charitable foundations, in addition to the protection of public officials.
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  • Most pilgrims, probably, contented themselves with the brief guidebooks which seem to have originated in the catalogues of indulgences.
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  • The pilgrims traversed France and Italy, visiting every religious resort; in Lucca the father died, and the brother remained behind in Rome.
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  • As a result of this steady increase in the number of pilgrims, the old arrangements for their accommodation were found deficient.
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  • But since, in the middle ages, the Holy Land was no longer held by a Christian Power, the protection of the pilgrims was no less necessary than their sustenance.
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  • The pilgrims made their journey in grey cowls fastened by a broad belt.
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  • In France, Marseilles was the main harbour for the pilgrims. From there ships belonging to the knights of St John and the knights templars conducted the commerce with Palestine, and carried annually some 6000 passengers.
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  • The pilgrims' formed themselves into unions, elected a "master" and concluded their agreements, as to the outward voyage and return, in common.
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  • Great as was the number of pilgrims oversea, it was yet far exceeded by that of the visitants to the "threshold of the apostles," i.e.
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  • The possession of an extraordinary relic, a bloody Host, or the like, was everywhere considered a sufficient claim for the privileges of indulgences; and wherever this privilege existed, there the pilgrims were gathered together.
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  • Thus Fridank, for instance, in spite of his emphatic declaration that most pilgrims returned worse than they went, himself participated in the crusade of Frederick II.
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  • The dedication of the church of Lourdes, in 1876, took place in the presence of 30 bishops, 3000 priests and roo,000 pilgrims. In 1877 the number rose to 250,000; and similar statistics are given of the German and Austrian devotional resorts.
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  • The sanctuaries of Aix-la-Chapelle are said to have been visited by 65,000 pilgrims on the 15th of July 1860; and on the following Sunday by 52,000.
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  • Save a mention of the Tell chapel on "Tellsplatte" in 1504 (the first known before was that by Tschudi in 1572), and a proof that the pilgrimages to Burglen and Steinen had nothing to do with "St KUmmerniss," as her images are preserved in the parish churches of those villages, whereas the pilgrims go to the chapels therein, he brings forward no new evidence.
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  • He was martyred on the eve of the triumph of Christianity, his shrine was reared near the scene of a great Greek legend (Perseus and Andromeda), and his relics when removed from Lydda, where many pilgrims had visited them, to Zorava in the Hauran served to impress his fame not only on the Syrian population, but on their Moslem conquerors, and again on the Crusaders, who in grateful memory of the saint's intervention on their behalf at Antioch built a new cathedral at Lydda to take the place of the church destroyed by the Saracens.
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  • In 1093 he went in pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and in his wrath at the miseries of the pilgrims he returned to Europe and preached the duty of the Church to rescue the " holy places " from the infidel.
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  • In 1906 it was re-opened, the houses being cleared away, and a hospice for Greek pilgrims erected in place of them.
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  • There are many books written by early pilgrims and by more secular travellers who visited the country, which - when they are not devoted to the setting forth of valueless traditions, as is too often the case - give very useful and interesting pictures of the conditions of life and of travel in the country.
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  • In High Street may be seen the noble hall and truncated fabric of the Maison Dieu founded by Hubert de Burgh in the 13th century for the reception of pilgrims of all nations.
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  • The castle was successfully defended in 1216 against the French under the dauphin Louis by Hubert de Burgh, who was also the founder of the Maison Dieu established for the accommodation of pilgrims. The title of mayor as chief municipal officer first occurs about the middle of the 13th century, when the town was governed by a mayor and twelve jurats.
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  • Carnarvonshire, on which Pistyll farm still gives food gratis to all pilgrims or travellers.
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  • The bed of the river adjoining the temple is divided off by the Brahmans into three basins, where the pilgrims bathe.
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  • The water taken from this sacred spot is exported by pilgrims to India and sold at a high price.
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  • An English translation was published by the Palestine Pilgrims' Text Society, London, 1897.
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  • Struck by the difficulties of every kind which had to be encountered by poor pilgrims to Mecca from Bagdad and its neighbourhood, he ordered Yaqtin, his freedman, to renew the milestones, to repair the old reservoirs, and to dig wells and construct cisterns at every station of the road where they were missing.
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  • Thence he went to Mecca, where on the promise of freedom many slaves flocked to him, and many pilgrims also acknowledged him.
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  • But, to avenge their defeat, they lay in wait for the great pilgrim caravan on its return from Mecca in the first days of 294 (906), and massacred 20,000 pilgrims, making an immense booty.
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  • A further development can be traced in the graffiti with which pilgrims adorned the rocks of Mount Sinai down to the 2nd or 3rd century A.D.
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  • In 1877 plague also occurred at Shuster in south-west Persia, probably conveyed by pilgrims returning from Irak, and caused great mortality.
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  • Its old churches have been destroyed by fire, but it has a very ancient holy picture - probably the oldest in Russia, dating from 993, which attracts many pilgrims. In 1904 a town-house and a monument to Tsar Alexander II.
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  • The place is now famous as a resort of pilgrims, and is also important for the history of Italian art.
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  • Chaitanya also seems to have done much to promote the celebration on an imposing scale of the great Puri festival of the Ratha-yatra, or "car-procession," in the month of Ashadha, when, amidst multitudes of pilgrims, the image of Krishna, together with those of his brother Balarama and his sister Subhadra, is drawn along, in a huge car, by the devotees.
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  • He also abolished all taxes upon pilgrims as an interference with the liberty of worship, and the capitation tax upon Hindus, probably upon similar grounds.
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  • The author of the sermo pointedly rejects the two theories that connected the holy virgins with the Theban band and brought them as pilgrims from the East to the West; but he adds that even in his days there still existed an inscription in the church, showing how it had been restored from its foundations by a certain "Clematius, vir consularis, ex partibus Orientis."
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  • It has a population (1907) of 54,437, is the capital of the rich province of Gharbia, and is noted for its fairs and Moslem festivals, which are held three times a year in honour of Seyyid el-Bedawi, and are sometimes attended by 200,000 pilgrims and traders.
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  • Its importance declined about the time of the Reformation when it ceased to be a resort of pilgrims.
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  • It obviously reappears elsewhere, as it is the natural attitude of prayer, and may be seen in the pious homage of the pilgrims to the Virgin of Loretto or Einsiedeln.
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  • But there was no open rupture between the two sovereigns until 1821, when the frontier disputes and complaints of Persian travellers, merchants and pilgrims culminated in a declaration of war.
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  • It provided especially against a recurrence of the proved causes of war, such as extorting taxes from Persian travellers or pilgrims, disrespect to the ladies of the royal harem and other ladies of rank proceeding to Mecca or Karbala (Kerbela), irregular levies of custom-duties, non-punishment of Kurdish depredators transgressing the boundary, and the like.
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  • The actual thorn visited by the pilgrims was destroyed about the Reformation time, but specimens of the same variety are still extant in various parts of the country.
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  • Pilgrims from all parts of the East flock to Jerusalem to obtain the " new fire " on Easter Eve at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
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  • The rush of the pilgrims to kindle their lights at it is so great, that order is maintained with difficulty by Mahommedan soldiers.
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  • It possesses an old town hall dating from 1566, a hospital, a lunatic asylum, an orphanage, and a large parish church rebuilt in 1756; but the chief interest centres in the church of the Holy Sepulchre, built in 1337, which attracts thousands of pilgrims to its Porta Caeli or Gaadenpforte (Gate of Mercy) opened annually on Michaelmas eve and closed again on the 4th of October.
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  • In 1837, on the celebration of the 50oth anniversary of this solemnity, the number of pilgrims was reckoned at nearly Ioo,000.
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  • The close relations that prevailed between the reigning houses of Portugal, Provence and Aragon, cemented by intermarriages, introduced a knowledge of the gay science, but it reached Portugal by many other ways - by the crusaders who came to help in fighting the Moors, by the foreign prelates who occupied Peninsular sees, by the monastic and military orders who founded establishments in Portugal, by the visits of individual singers to court and baronial houses, but chiefly perhaps by the pilgrims who streamed from every country along the Frankish way to the far-famed shrine of Santiago de Compostela.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon church of Steyning (Stoeningas, Stoeningum, Staninges, Stenyges, Stenyng) mentioned in Domesday is attributed to St Cuthman, who is said to have settled here before the 9 th century, and whose shrine became a resort for pilgrims. The later prosperity of the town was due to its harbour.
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  • It was founded by Donnell O'Brien, king of Thomond (1168-1194); and owes its foundation and name to the presentation to his family of a portion of the true Cross, which attracted numerous pilgrims. The shrine of this relic is in the Ursuline convent at Blackrock, Co.
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  • In the valleys of the peninsula of Sinai, especially in the Wady elSheikh, this manna (Arabic man) is collected by the Arabs and sold to the monks of St Catherine, who supply it to the pilgrims visiting the convent.
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  • In 1627 Governor William Bradford of Plymouth protested by letter to the Dutch against their occupancy, and this warning from the Pilgrims was repeated at least twice.
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  • At that time Egyptian pilgrims frequented Akaba in large numbers.
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  • In 1892, on the accession of the khedive Abbas II., Turkey resumed possession of Akaba, the Egyptian pilgrims having deserted the land route to Mecca in favour of a sea passage.
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  • The district of Chitral is called Kashgar (or Kashkar) by the people of the country; and as it was under Chinese domination in the middle of the 18th century, and was regarded as a Buddhist centre of some importance by the Chinese pilgrims in the early centuries of our era, it is possible that it then existed as an outlying district of the Kashgar province of Chinese Turkestan, where Buddhism once flourished in cities that have been long since buried beneath the sand-waves of the Takla Makan.
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  • The measure of the veracity of Chinese pilgrims and geographers in the early centuries of our era must not be balanced on such points as these.
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  • It is famous for a group of twenty-two temples dedicated to Siva, the resort of numerous pilgrims. It is connected with the East Indian railway by a steam tramway, 5 m.
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  • The toe of the famous statue of the apostle in St Peter's, Rome, shows marked wear caused by the kisses of pilgrims. In the Roman Church a distinction is made between Latvia, a worship due to God alone, and Dulia or Hyperdulia, the adoration paid to the Virgin, saints, martyrs, crucifixes, &c..
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  • Since the beginning of the 16th century, when Persia fell under the sway of the Safavis, the place has been much frequented by pilgrims who come to pay their devotions at the shrine of Shaikh Safi.
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  • In the neighbourhood are the Ikaltoi monastery (6th century), the Shuanty monastery (16th century), and the originally 10th century Alaverdi church, visited by many pilgrims. Wine is exported.
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  • Considerable suburbs now lie outside the quarter named after this gate; in the middle ages a pleasant country road led for some miles through partly cultivated land with good wells, as far as the boundary of the sacred territory and gathering place of the pilgrims at Tanim, near the mosque of Ayesha.
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  • Of public institutions there are baths, ribats, or hospices, for poor pilgrims from India, Java, &c., a hospital and a public kitchen for the poor.
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  • The madrassehs or buildings around the mosque, originally intended as lodgings for students and professors, have long been let out to rich pilgrims. The minor places of visitation for pilgrims, such as the birthplaces of the prophet and his chief followers, are not notable.'
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  • The history of Mecca is full of the record of these inundations, unsuccessfully combated by the great dam drawn across the valley by the caliph Omar (Kutbeddin, p. 76), and later works of Mandi.5 The fixed population of Mecca in 1878 was estimated by Assistant-Surgeon `Abd el-Razzaq at 50,000 to 60,000; there is a large floating population - and that not merely at the proper season of pilgrimage, the pilgrims of one season often beginning to arrive before those of the former season have all dispersed.
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  • The water is said to be free to townsmen, but is sold to the pilgrims at a rather high rate.6 Medieval writers celebrate the copious supplies, especially of fine fruits, brought to the city from Taff and other fertile parts of Arabia.
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  • The multiplication of pilgrims after Islam soon made it necessary to clear away the nearest dwellings and enlarge the place of prayer around the Ancient House.
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  • Omar, Othman and Ibn Jubair had all a share in this work, but the great founder of the mosque in its present form, with its spacious area and deep ' The old kiswa is removed on the 25th day of the month before the pilgrimage, and fragments of it are bought by the pilgrims as charms. Till the 10th day of the pilgrimage month the Ka`ba is bare.
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  • They are eagerly drunk by the pilgrims, or when poured over the body are held to give a miraculous refreshment after the fatigues of religious exercise; and the manufacture of bottles or jars for carrying the water to distant countries is quite a trade.
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  • To the ordinary pilgrim the omra has become so much an episode of the hajj that it is described by some European pilgrims as a mere visit to the mosque of Ayesha; a better conception of its original significance is got from the Meccan feast of the seventh month (Rajab), graphically described by Ibn Jubair from his observations in A.D.
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  • Armenian tradition claims Noah as the founder of Nakhichevan (the Naxuana of Ptolemy), and a mound of earth in the city is still visited by many pilgrims as his grave.
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  • Graffiti of pilgrims to the shrine of Isis are dated as late as the end of the 5th century A.D.
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  • Left alone, at the end of the autumn, with an army of some 2000 men, Godfrey was yet able, in the spring of 1 100, probably with the aid of new pilgrims, to exact tribute from towns like Acre, Ascalon, Arsuf and Caesarea.
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  • The civilization and political organization of the country were dominated by the Chinese, but were also influenced to some extent by GraecoBactrian civilization, which had probably secured a footing in the country as early as the 3rd century B.C. Our information as to the history of this region from the 2nd century to the first half of the 7th is slight, and is derived chiefly from the Journeys of the Chinese pilgrims, Fa-hien in 399-415, Song-yun and Hwei-seng in 518-521, and Hstian-Tsang in 629-645.
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  • It was full of churches and monasteries, enriched with the reputed relics of saints, prophets and martyrs, which consecrated it a holy city and attracted pilgrims from every quarter to its shrines.
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  • Kefr Kenna, now a flourishing Christian village at the foot of the Nazareth hills, south of the Buttauf, is one of the sites identified with Cana of Galilee, and the ruin Kana, on the north side of the same plain, represents the site pointed out to the pilgrims of the 12th and 13th centuries.
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  • These elder sons of the Church made themselves responsible for carrying out the work of God, and French pilgrims in the Holy Land prepared the great movement of the Crusades against the infidels.
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  • A small edifice on the east of the synagogue is called the "Rashi Chapel," and the "Rashi Chair," raised on three steps in the niche, is one of the objects of the pious admiration of pilgrims. At Worms Rashi worked under Jacob ben Yaqar, and at Mainz under Isaac ben Judah, perhaps combining at the same time the functions of teacher and student.
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  • Demetrius Poliorcetes, Lysimachus and Arsinoe regarded the Cabeiri with especial favour, and initiation was sought, not only by large numbers of pilgrims, but by persons of distinction.
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  • The shrine at Santiago in Gallicia was accepted in an age when evidence and criticism were words of no meaning, and it attracted pilgrims, who brought trade.
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  • As the birthplace and residence of Krishna, it is the most sacred spot in this part of India, and its principal temple is visited annually by many thousand pilgrims. The approach from the sea is by a fine flight of stone steps, and the great spire rises to a height of 150 ft.
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  • It was sacred to Apollo and the Muses, and its water was used in the religious purifications of the "Pythian Pilgrims."
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  • In 15 4 8 he founded the celebrated confraternity of the Santissima Trinita de' Pellegrini e de' Convalescente, whose primary object is to minister to the needs of the thousands of poor pilgrims who flock to Rome, especially in years of jubilee, and also to relieve the patients discharged from hospitals, but still too weak for labour.
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  • The remains of the saint were deposited in a rich silver-gilt sarcophagus, which may still be seen, and were afterwards visited by myriads of pilgrims, until the Protestant zeal of Landgrave Philip the Generous caused him to remove the body to some unknown spot in the church.
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  • The judgment on Sodom and Gomorrah (which of course they believed to be under the waters of the lake, in accordance with the absurd theory first found in Josephus and still often repeated) blinded these good pilgrims to the ever-fresh beauty of this most lovely lake, whose blue and sparkling waters lie deep between rocks and precipices of unsurpassable grandeur.
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  • The play of brilliant colours and of ever-changing contrasts of light and shade on those rugged mountain-sides and on the surface of the sea itself might have been expected to appeal to the most prosaic. The surface of the sea is generally smooth (seldom, however, absolutely inert as the pilgrims represented it), but is frequently raised by the north winds into waves, which, owing to the weight and density of the water, are often of great force.
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  • On a height immediately to the southeast is the ruined castle of Klopp, on the site of a fortress founded by Drusus, and higher still the celebrated chapel of St Roch (rebuilt in 1895 after a fire), where thousands of pilgrims gather on the first Sunday after the 16th of August.
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  • The foundation of Christchurch is connected with the so-called "Canterbury Pilgrims," who settled in this district in 1850.
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  • I was faintly amused by her decision to color the pilgrims in bright colors tho, cerise tops and gold trousers!
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  • Back to top 1. 14th century lead pilgrims ' badge, showing the " Virgin of the Sea " .
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  • The tiny aperture that serves as both entrance and exit to this great basilica constitutes a danger to pilgrims.
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  • How can pilgrims bring these two realities into greater congruence?
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  • He also issued a fiat ordering state employees to break the Ramadan fast and restricted the number of pilgrims performing the Hajj.
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  • Pilgrims are renowned for their sweet nature, which applies if they have been handled as young goslings.
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  • Pilgrims were granted indulgence for gifts to restore the chapel.
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  • A professional pickpocket walked along with some of these pilgrims.
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  • A remote and peaceful Island attracting pilgrims all year round.
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  • It also explains how the knights protected pilgrims traveling to the Holy Land.
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  • Any young person who would like to assist the sick pilgrims during the pilgrimage please call Jane Cadogan 01329 235987.
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  • Last year we created an affiliate member status to welcome on-line pilgrims.
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  • The main tourist attraction is the nearby mosque of Hala Sultan Tekke, which draws pilgrims from across the Moslem world.
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  • Prayer flags fluttering on the tallest mountain passes, innumerable monasteries and temples with frequent processions of devout pilgrims.
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  • Formerly 3,000 Iranian pilgrims were allowed to visit the holy shrines in Iraq, he added.
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  • The lunch is in aid of the Fund to send young helpers to Lourdes where they attend the sick pilgrims.
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  • Any young person who would like to assist the sick pilgrims during the pilgrims during the pilgrimage please call Jane Cadogan 01329 235987.
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  • All the pilgrims in Lourdes are invited to come together for a torchlight procession, singing along.
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  • Pilgrims from all over Sardinia gather to venerate the saint, whose effigy is paraded around on an ox-drawn carriage.
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  • Visitors to the area need sustenance, just as Chaucer's pilgrims did as they set off for Canterbury from the Tabard Inn.
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  • The Pilgrims ' Chapel Pilgrims Chapel From the north east side of the North transept descend a few steps into the Pilgrims Chapel.
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  • The people of Ephesus in Turkey became rich by selling silver trinkets to the pilgrims who visited the temple of the goddess Diana.
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  • Did a lot of medieval pilgrims go along for the fun, as in Chaucer, rather than the spiritual uplift?
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  • The first winter The pilgrims went ashore to explore the wilderness.
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  • Chicheley, by appointing a jubilee to be held at Canterbury in 1420, " of ter the manner of the Jubilee ordained by the Popes," threatened to divert the profits from pilgrims from Rome to Canterbury.
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  • The famous Plymouth Rock, a granite boulder on which the Pilgrims are said to have landed from the shallop of the "Mayflower," lies on the harbour shore near the site of the first houses built on Leyden Street, and is now sheltered by a granite canopy.
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  • Rising above the Rock is Cole's Hill, where during their first winter in America the Pilgrims buried half their number, levelling the graves and sowing grain over them in the spring in order to conceal their misfortunes from the Indians.
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  • As to the truth of the tradition that the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock, consult the Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1903), 2nd series, vol.
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  • The siege was long protracted; the mass of the pilgrims were anxious to proceed to Jerusalem, and, as the altered tone of the author of the Gesta sufficiently indicates, thoroughly weary of the obstinate political bickerings of Raymund_and Bohemund.
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  • Raymund of Provence refused to accept their nomination, nominally on the pious ground that he did not wish to reign where Christ had suffered on the cross; though one may suspect that the establishment of a principality in Tripoli - in which he had been interrupted by the pressure of the pilgrims - was still the first object of his ambition.
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  • It falls on tile tenth, and two or three following days, of the last month, Dhu-l-hijja, when the pilgrims each slay a ram, a he-goat, a cow or a camel in the valley of Mind in commemoration of the ransom of Ishmael with a ram.
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  • Pop. (1901), 49,334, including an exceptional number of pilgrims. As containing the worldfamous shrine of Jagannath (see Juggernaut), Puri is perhaps the most frequented of all Hindu places of pilgrimage.
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  • The kohl or black powder with which the modern, like the ancient, Egyptian ladies paint their languishing eyelids, is nothing but the smeeth of charred frankincense, or other odoriferous resin brought with frankincense, and phials of water, from the well of Zem-zem, by the pilgrims returning from Mecca.
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  • The tradition fixing this hallowed place seems to have been constant throughout the whole of the Christian centuries, and it is one of the very few "holy places" shown to travellers and pilgrims in Palestine, the authenticity of which deserves consideration.
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  • The exhibition of the Holy Coat at Trier had attracted enormous numbers of pilgrims, and so, indignant at what appeared to him an imposture, he assisted to publish an investigation into the authenticity of the celebrated relic. From this time he began to take an active part in contemporary politics and in controversy as a strong though moderate Liberal.
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  • The conquest of Jerusalem, and the erection of a Christian empire in Palestine, naturally welled the influx of pilgrims. And though in 1187 the Holy City again fell into the hands of the infidel, while in 12 9 1 the loss of Acre eliminated the last Christian possession in Palestine, the pilgrimages still proceeded.
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  • Especially in winter and early spring crowds of European and American tourists, Russian pilgrims and Bokharan devotees jostle one another in the streets in picturesque incongruity.
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  • Regular industrial work is however handicapped by competition with the tourist trade in its several branches - acting as guides and camp servants, manufacture and sale of " souvenirs ' (carved toys and trinklets in mother - of-pearl and olive-wood, forged antiquities and the like), and the analogous trade in objets de piete (rosaries, crosses, crude religious pictures, &c.) for pilgrims. Travellers in the country squander their money recklessly, and these trades, at once easy and lucrative, are thus fatally attractive to the indolent Syrian and prejudicial to the best interests of the country.
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  • Beethoven's Nine Symphonies; Berlioz's " Symphonie fantastique," " Harold en Italie "; Benediction et Serment (Benvenuto Cellini); Danse des Sylphes (Damnation de Faust); Weber's overtures, Der Freischiitz, Euryanthe, Oberon, Jubilee; Beethoven's and Hummel's Septets; Schubert's Divertissement a la Hongroise; Beethoven's Concertos in C minor, G and E flat (orchestra for a second piano); Wagner's Tannhauser overture, march, romance, chorus of pilgrims; Lohengrin, Festzug and Brautlied, Elsa's Brautgang, Elsa's Traum, Lohengrin's Verweiss an Elsa; Fliegender Hollander, Spinnlied; Rienzi, Gebet; Rheingold, Walhall; Meistersinger, " Am stillen Herd "; Tristan, Isolde's Liebestod; Chopin's six Chants Polonais; Meyerbeer's Schillermarsch; Bach's six organ Preludes and Fugues; Prelude and Fugue in G minor; Beethoven, Adelaide; 6 miscellaneous and 6 Geistliche Lieder; Liederkreis; Rossini's Les Soirees musicales; Schubert, 59 songs; Schumann, 13 songs; Mendelssohn, 8 songs; Robert Franz, 13 songs.
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  • It is still, however, the centre of distribution for a very large, if scantily populated, country, and it also derives much profit from pilgrims, lying as it does on the route which Shiite pilgrims from Persia must take on their way to the sacred cities.
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  • In 1870 a hospice for poorer pilgrims was erected.
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  • In addition to this, canons were enacted against simony and the marriage of priests; while resolutions were passed in favour of the crusaders, of pilgrims to Rome and in the interests of the truce of God.
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  • It was formerly a resort of pilgrims, and Roman coins have been found in the vicinity.
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  • It has a beautiful cathedral, built after a plan by Rastrelli in 1753, to which pilgrims resort to venerate an ikon of the Virgin.
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  • Some 200,000 pilgrims from the Shiite portions of Islam are said to journey annually to Kerbela, many of them carrying the bones of their relatives to be buried in its sacred soil, or bringing their sick and aged to die there in the odour of sanctity.
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  • The enormous influx of pilgrims naturally creates a brisk trade in Kerbela and the towns along the route from Persia to that place and beyond to Nejef.
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  • It was customary for pilgrims to bring back as proof of their pilgrimage to a particular shrine or holy place a badge, usually made of lead or pewter, bearing some figure or device identifying it with the name or place.
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  • The most common of the English pilgrims' signs are those of the shrine of Thomas Becket at Canterbury, the greatest centre of pilgrimage in England.
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  • In Syria, the temple of Atargatis in Hierapolis was an immemorial resort of pilgrims. In Phoenicia, a similar significance was enjoyed by the shrine of Astarte, on the richly-watered source of the river Adonis, till, as late as the 4th century after Christ, it was destroyed by Constantine the Great.
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  • No less powerful was the attraction exercised by the shrines of the oracular divinities, though the influx of pilgrims was not limited to certain days, but, year in and year out, a stream of private persons, or embassies from the city-states, came flowing to the temple of Zeus in Dodona or the shrine of Apollo at Delphi.
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  • In addition to the hospital of Jerusalem, numerous others were under its charge in Acre, Cyprus, Rhodes, Malta, &c. Associations were formed to assist pilgrims bound for the East; one being the Confrerie des pelerins de Terre-Sainte in Paris, founded in 1325 by Louis de Bourbon, count of Clermont (afterwards first duke of Bourbon).
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  • On the other hand, while in the Eastern Church things have undergone little change, - the pilgrims, in addition to the Holy Land, visiting Mt Athos and Kiev - the developments in the Roman Church show important divergences.
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  • The Year of Jubilee, in 1525, was unprecedented in its scant attendance, but the jubilees of 1575 and 1600 again saw great armies of pilgrims marching to Rome.
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  • It is computed that 60,000 pilgrims were present in La Salette on the 29th of September 1847, the first anniversary of the appearance of Mary which gave rise to the shrine.
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  • Sanitation is effected by the Puri Lodging-House Act, which provides for the appointment of a special health officer, and for the licensing of lodging-houses both in the town and along the pilgrims' route.
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  • I was more interested, I think, in the great rock on which the Pilgrims landed than in anything else in Plymouth.
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  • I could touch it, and perhaps that made the coming of the Pilgrims and their toils and great deeds seem more real to me.
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  • I have often held in my hand a little model of the Plymouth Rock which a kind gentleman gave me at Pilgrim Hall, and I have fingered its curves, the split in the centre and the embossed figures "1620," and turned over in my mind all that I knew about the wonderful story of the Pilgrims.
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  • Children come a-berrying, railroad men taking a Sunday morning walk in clean shirts, fishermen and hunters, poets and philosophers; in short, all honest pilgrims, who came out to the woods for freedom's sake, and really left the village behind, I was ready to greet with--"Welcome, Englishmen! welcome, Englishmen!" for I had had communication with that race.
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  • It was evident that Prince Andrew's ironical tone toward the pilgrims and Princess Mary's helpless attempts to protect them were their customary long-established relations on the matter.
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  • This comforting dream and hope were given her by God's folk-- the half-witted and other pilgrims who visited her without the prince's knowledge.
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  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
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  • I am absolutely certain that the pilgrims did not have cheese balls at the first Thanksgiving, but I am just as sure that they would have loved them.
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  • The first Thanksgiving celebrated by the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians was a big feast for over a hundred people.
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  • Pilgrims of many faiths come to meditate at the Chalice Well garden and drink water from the well.
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  • Alcohol use and abuse has been a feature of Western culture for centuries, a facet of American life since Europeans arrived in North America, literally arriving with the pilgrims on the Mayflower.
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  • Interesting regions, Close of known only by the scant reports of pilgrims, were made the dark the objects of attention and study; while religious zeal, ages.
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  • Such are the Philippovsti, founded by one Philip (who burned himself alive for Christ's sake in 1 743), who have exalted self-immolation into a principle; the Stranniki (pilgrims) and Byeguni (runners), who interpret Matt.
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  • Hill (originally called Fort Hill, as it was first used for defensive purposes) contains the graves of several Pilgrims and of many of their descendants.
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  • Plymouth was the first permanent white settlement in New England, and dates its founding from the landing here from the "Mayflower" shallop of an exploring party of twelve Pilgrims, including William Bradford, on the 21st of December (N.s.) 1620.
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  • Sergiyevo has long been renowned for its manufacture of holy pictures (painted and carved), spoons, and other articles carved in wood, especially toys, which are sold to pilgrims who resort to the place to the number of ioo,000 annually.
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  • His oration at Plymouth, on the 22nd of December 1820, on the second centennial anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims, placed him in this rank.
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  • It is held in high veneration by the Sinhalese, and numerous pilgrims ascend to the sacred spot, where a priest resides to receive their offerings and bless them on their departure.
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  • Pilgrims who were travelling to Jerusalem joined themselves in companies for security, and marched under arms; the pilgrims of 1064, who were headed by the archbishop of Mainz, numbered some 7000 men.
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  • That the Pilgrims' Progress should thus have turned into a Holy War is a fact readily explicable, when we turn to consider the attempts made by the Church, during the 11th century, to purify, or at any rate to direct, the feudal instinct for private war (Fehde).
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  • Here Godfrey of Bouillon finally came to the front, and placing himself at the head of the discontented pilgrims, he forced Raymund to accept the offers of the amir of Tripoli, to desist from the siege, and to march to Jerusalem (in the middle of May 1099).
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  • It has already been noticed how military reconnaissances of the routes to Egypt came to be made; but more important were the guide-books, of which a great number were written to guide the pilgrims from one sacred spot of Bible history to another.
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  • This year was a jubilee year, and crowds of pilgrims flocked to the city from all parts of the world bringing money for the purchase of indulgences, so that Alexander was able to furnish Cesare with funds for his enterprise.
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  • It contains one of the most venerable Hindu shrines, founded, according to tradition, by Rama himself, which for centuries has been the resort of thousands of pilgrims from all parts of India.
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  • Suez is a quarantine station for pilgrims from Mecca; otherwise its importance is due almost entirely to the ships using the canal.
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  • In the southern part of the monastery is the church of Sergius, beneath which are spacious rooms where 200,000 dinners are distributed gratis every year to the pilgrims. The bell-tower, 320 ft.
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  • The high priest was murdered in the Temple by pilgrims who carried daggers under their cloaks.
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  • Jerusalem attracted the flow of pilgrims from the West as Antioch never could; and though the great majority of the pilgrims were only birds of passage, there were always many who stayed in the East.
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  • There are said to be about thirty khans or caravanserais in Bagdad for the reception of pilgrims and merchants and their goods, none of which is of any importance as a building, with the single exception of the khan el-Aurtmeh adjoining the Marjanieh mosque, to which it formerly belonged.
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  • The growth of legends and traditional identifications can be traced in the writings of the pilgrims who have visited the town from Jerome's time till our own.
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  • In 1891 nearly two million pilgrims viewed the coat, and eleven miraculous cures were claimed.
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  • Without the pilgrims who come to visit it, Meshed would be a poor place, but lying on the eastern confines of Persia, close to Afghanistan, Russian Central Asia and Transcaspia, at the point where a number of trade routes converge, it is very important politically, and the British and Russian governments have maintained consulates-general there since 1889.
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  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.
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  • On the faces of the buttresses below the statues are marble alto-reliefs illustrating scenes from the early history of the Pilgrims. On high panels between the buttresses are the names of the passengers of the "Mayflower."
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  • Thirteen churches, including the Troitskiy (Trinity) and Uspenskiy cathedrals, a bell-tower, a theological academy, various buildings for monks and pilgrims, and a hospital stand within the precincts, which are two-thirds of a mile in circuit.
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  • The ruins are scanty, but the east window is preserved, and the present church incorporates remains of the ancient resthouse for pilgrims. The church has a peculiar music gallery, entered from without.
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  • It was of about 180 tons burden, and in company with the "Speedwell" sailed from Southampton on the 5th of August 1620, the two having on board 120 Pilgrims. After two trials the "Speedwell" was pronounced unseaworthy, and the "Mayflower" sailed alone from Plymouth, England, on the 6th of September with the zoo (or 102) passengers, some 41 of whom on the lzth of November (o.s.) signed the famous "Mayflower Compact" in Provincetown Harbor, and a small party of whom, including William Bradford, sent to choose a place for settlement, landed at what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 11th of December (21st N.s.), an event which is celebrated, as Forefathers' Day, on the 22nd of December.
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  • Contemporaries regarded them in the former of these two aspects, as "holy wars" and "pilgrims' progresses" towards Christ's Sepulchre; the reflective eye of history must perhaps regard them more exclusively from the latter point of view.
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  • He orders these pilgrims to be driven away, but she receives them.
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  • The shrine of Imam Reza is the most venerated spot in Persia, and yearly visited by more than 100,000 pilgrims. Eastwick thus describes it (Journal of a Diplomat's Three Years' Residence in Persia, London, 1864) "The quadrangle of the shrine seemed to be about 150 paces square.
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  • In the 6th century the emperor Justinian erected a magnificent basilica at Jerusalem, in honour of the Virgin Mary, and attached to it two hospitals, one for the reception of pilgrims and one for the accommodation of the sick poor.
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  • Its population is about 70,000 fixed and 10,000 floating, the latter consisting of pilgrims to the shrine of Imam Reza.'
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  • The exhibition of 1844, which was attended by more than a million pilgrims, aroused protests, resulting in the formation of the sect of German Catholics.
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