Pigeons sentence example

pigeons
  • Pigeons and hoopoes abound in every village.
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  • Another chief feature is the extraordinary development of the cassowaries, the richness and specialization of the kingfishers, parrots, pigeons, honeysuckers and some remarkable flycatchers.
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  • There is very little grey matter in the cortex of the hemispheres, the surface of which is devoid of convolutions, mostly quite smooth; in others, for instance pigeons, fowls and birds of prey, a very slight furrow might be compared with the Sylvian fissure.
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  • But indications of such a syrinx occur also in Pittidae, pigeons and gallinaceous birds (Gallidae), the last cases being clearly analogous.
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  • Besides these, three or perhaps four groups, though widely distributed throughout the world, arrive in the Australian region at their culmination, presenting an abundance of most varied forms. These are the weaver-birds (Ploceidae), and the moreporks (Podargidae), but especially the kingfishers (Alcedinidae) and the pigeons (Columbidae), the species belonging to the two last obtaining in this region a degree of prominence and beauty which is elsewhere unequalled.
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  • Hares, rabbits, field-mice, waterrats, rats, squirrels, moles, game-birds, pigeons, and small birds, form the chief food of the wild cat.
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  • There are also many kinds of game birds, pigeons, ducks, geese, plovers and quails.
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  • As a whole, Australia is rich in parrots, of which it has several very peculiar forms, but Picarians in old-fashioned parlance, of all sorts - certain kingfishers excepted - are few in number, and the pigeons are also comparatively scarce, no doubt because of the many arboreal predaceous marsupials.
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  • The birds of paradise, the racquet-tailed kingfishers, Tanysiptera, the largest and smallest of parrots, Calyptorhynchus and Nasiterna, and the great crowned pigeons, Goura, are very characteristic; and so are the various Megapodes.
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  • Of small game, hares, jungle fowl, peacocks, partridges, snipe, woodcock, wild ducks and geese, and green pigeons are numerous in the tarai, and jungle fowl and pheasants in the hills.
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  • Struthio in Africa and Arabia, fossil also in the Sivalik Hills, and Aepyornithidae in Madagascar; Pittzdae, Bucerotinae and Upupinae, of which Upupa itself in India, Madagascar and Africa; Coraciidae; Pycnonotidae or bulbuls; Trogonidae, of which the Asiatic genera are the less specialized in opposition to the Neotropical forms; Vulturidae; Leptoptilus, Anastomus and Ciconia among the storks; Pteroclidae; Treroninae among pigeons.
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  • Of such " Orders " Brisson had twenty-six and he gave pigeons and poultry precedence of the birds which are plunderers and scavengers.
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  • Bears, wolves, bison, deer, wild turkeys and wild pigeons were common in the primeval forests of Ohio, but they long ago disappeared.
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  • The commonest birds are pigeons (the large notou and other varieties), doves, parrots, kingfishers and ducks.
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  • The sea-elephant and sea-leopard are characteristic. Penguins of various kinds are abundant; a teal (Querquedula Eatoni) peculiar to Kerguelen and the Crozets is also found in considerable numbers, and petrels, especially the giant petrel (Ossifraga gigantea), skuas, gulls, sheath-bills (Chionis minor), albatross, terns, cormorants and Cape pigeons frequent the island.
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  • Stray specimens of the great king penguin have been observed, and there are also mollymauks (a kind of albatross), Cape pigeons and many carrion birds.
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  • Of birds some 30 kinds are known, an owl being the only bird of prey; parrots, pigeons, kingfishers, honey-suckers, rails, ducks, and other water birds are numerous.
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  • Aristotle seems to recognize eight principal groups: (1) Gampsonyches, approximately equivalent to the Accipitres of Linnaeus; (2) Scolecophaga, containing most of what would now be called Oscines, excepting indeed the (3) Acanthophaga, composed of the goldfinch, siskin and a few others; (4) Scnipophaga, the woodpeckers; (5) Peristeroide, or pigeons; (6) Schizopoda, (7) Steganopoda, and (8) Barea, nearly the same respectively as the Linnaean Grallae, Anseres and Gallinae.
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  • Temminck, whose father's aid to Le Vaillant has already been noticed, brought out at Paris a Histoire naturelle des pigeons illustrated by Madame Knip, who had drawn the plates for Desmarest's volume.3 Since we have begun by considering these large illustrated works in which the text is made subservient to the coloured plates, it may be convenient to continue our notice of such others of similar character as it may be expedient to mention here, though thereby we shall be led somewhat far afield.
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  • A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains was followed by The Temminck subsequently reproduced, with many additions, the text of this volume in his Histoire naturelle des pigeons et des gallinacees, published at Amsterdam in 1813-1815, in 3 vols.
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  • Still De Blainville made some advance in a right direction, as for instance by elevating the parrots' and the pigeons as " Ordres," equal in rank to that of the birds of prey and some others.
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  • His chapter on the flea, in which he not only describes its structure, but traces out the whole history of its metamorphoses from its first emergence from the egg, is full of interest - not so much for the exactness of his observations, as for its incidental revelation of the extraordinary ignorance then prevalent in regard to the origin and propagation of "this minute and despised creature," which some asserted to be produced from sand, others from dust, others from the dung of pigeons, and others from urine, but which he showed to be "endowed with as great perfection in its kind as any large animal," and proved to breed in the regular way of winged insects.
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  • Cattle and horses, where introduced, are found to degenerate rather rapidly unless the supply of fresh stock is kept up. Birds are more numerous than mammals, among the most important kinds being the pigeons and doves, especially the fruit-eating pigeons.
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  • These were rapidly reduced in number by the white man, the wild pigeons are extinct, and the moose, caribou, bear, wolf, lynx and beaver have become rare, but, under the protection of laws enacted during the latter part of the 19th century, deer and ruffed grouse are again quite plentiful.
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  • Large herds of geese and pigeons are reared, while hunting and fishing constitute also important resources.
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  • It is probable that what he had suffered during his first year in London had often reminded him of some parts of the satire in which Juvenal had described the misery and degradation of a needy man of letters, lodged among the pigeons' nests in the tottering garrets which overhung the streets of Rome.
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  • Pigeons and other birds were caught in traps, and quails were netted in the fields and on the sea-shore.
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  • The officers were told by their guide that they might shoot, but the villagers had not given permission and were incensed at the shooting of their pigeons by other officers in the previous year.
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  • Pigeons, partridges, quail, plover, duck, teal, sheldrake, widgeon - all of many varieties - complete the list of small game.
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  • There are 35 species of pigeons and doves, many of them most beautifully coloured and all edible.
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  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.
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  • The most important are eagles, kites, vultures, falcons, owls, horn-bills, cranes, pheasants (notably the argus, fire-back and peacock-pheasants), partridges, ravens, crows, parrots, pigeons, woodpeckers, doves, snipe, quail and swallows.
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  • According to Blyth, it is a favourite amusement among the natives to let loose a couple of tame caracals among a flock of pigeons feeding on the ground, when each will strike down a number of birds before the flock can escape.
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  • The pigeons are represented by several wood-pigeons, doves and green pigeons.
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  • This magnificent palace, where so many scenes historic in the Bijapur dynasty occurred, is now the abode of hundreds of pigeons.
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  • There are a few pigeons and aquatic birds, butterflies and beetles.
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  • Great numbers of eagles, vultures, hawks, bustards and other birds of prey are met with; and partridges, duck, teal, guinea-fowl, sand-grouse, curlews, woodcock, snipe, pigeons, thrushes and swallows are very plentiful.
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  • There are many kinds of birds, notably the megapod (Megapodius nic.), the edible-nest-building swift (Collocalia nidifica), the hackled and pied pigeons (Calaenas nic. and Carpophaga bicolor), a paroquet (Palaeornis caniceps) and an oriole (Oriolus macrourus).
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  • There are five principal buildings or groups - the Temple of the Magician, Nunnery Quadrangle, House of the Turtles, House of the Pigeons and Governor's Palace.
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  • Beyond this is another large quadrangular group known as the House of the Pigeons.
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  • Yully drew a deep breath, like she did when she was shooting clay pigeons.
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  • Its high battlements where pigeons live is.. ... .
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  • This fact sheet provides information on Trichomoniasis (pigeon canker ), which infects approximately 80% of all pigeons.
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  • This was some years before manned flight so they must have used carrier pigeons.
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  • My attention was drawn by commotion this bird caused among the three perching Wood Pigeons.
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  • Now, when he saw the perfect feathered form of the gently cooing pigeons, his heart melted.
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  • Diamond Thieves and smugglers use homing pigeons to smuggle rough diamond Thieves and smugglers use homing pigeons to smuggle rough diamonds out of mining areas.
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  • Be a Pigeon Protector Pigeons are actually European rock doves, the beautiful doves of peace.
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  • The rocky escarpment behind our hotel was home to many pigeons.
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  • As he cherishes the damaged bird, he learns a lot about life, bullies, pigeon fanciers and pigeons.
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  • Fortunately (for the pigeons ), the young peregrines still had some serious learning to do!
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  • Chaplin, with a small child, is feeding pigeons.
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  • There are a number of pigeon proofing devices which can be used to prevent or deter pigeons from roosting or nesting on your property.
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  • I said I'm going up the woods, going to shoot pigeons up the woods.
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  • Bolle's Laurel pigeon: By far the easiest of the two endemic pigeons to find.
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  • In addition dead pigeons in uncovered water tanks can contaminate the water supply.
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  • Pigeons - are racing / homing pigeons - are racing / homing pigeons economic activities?
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  • There is an unusual memorial to wartime carrier pigeons surrounded by a carpet bed.
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  • Wood pigeons have been seen taking ripe beech seeds high up on the tall trees.
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  • The affected birds were feral pigeons, and a few lost racing pigeons, and so are unlikely to have been eaten.
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  • A tide of traffic sweeps along the ring road, pigeons fly about over town, along with the odd carrion crow.
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  • And the black was centuries of accumulated soot and the white was the contribution from London's pigeons.
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  • This trap is capable of slow dropping pigeons to fast springing teal.
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  • The young pigeons are fed by both parents with a peculiar stuff, the product of the strongly proliferating epithelial cells of the crop, which cells undergo a cheese-like fatty degeneration, and mixed with mucus, perhaps also with the proventricular juice, make up a milklike fluid.
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  • Florent-Provost brought out at Paris a further set of illustrations of pigeons by Mme Knip.
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  • The-considerations are not very striking from a general point of view; but the author adds to the weight of evidence which some of his predecessors had brought to bear on certain matters, particularly in aiding to abolish the artificial groups " Deodactyls," "Syndactyls," and " Zygodactyls," on which so much reliance had been placed by many of his countrymen; and it is with him a great merit that he was the first apparently to recognize publicly that characters drawn from the posterior part of the sternum, and particularly from the " echancrures," commonly called in English " notches " or " emarginations," are of comparatively little importance, since their number is apt to vary in forms that are most closely allied, and even in species that are usually associated in the same genus or unquestionably belong to the same family, 2 while these " notches " sometimes become simple foramina, as in certain pigeons, or on the other hand foramina may exceptionally change to " notches," and not unfrequently disappear wholly.
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  • Experiments with cats, rabbits, mice, with sheep and cattle, with fowls and pigeons, like the experiments with horses and dogs, fail to afford any evidence that offspring inherit any of their characters from previous mates of the dam; i.e.
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  • Rat did kill baby pigeons.
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  • My little pigeons are well, and so is my little bird.
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  • There were eight pigeons on the roof of the house, and a great dog on the step.
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  • He would say, as he went by in the morning, How thick the pigeons are!
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  • Above Pierre's head some pigeons, disturbed by the movement he had made in sitting up, fluttered under the dark roof of the penthouse.
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  • But I 've seen pigeons scavenge leftover food on a table outside a cafe when there are people sitting just on the next table.
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  • And the black was centuries of accumulated soot and the white was the contribution from London 's pigeons.
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  • They showed that the complex primate behavior observed by Kohler (1925) could be synthesized in the laboratory with pigeons.
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  • These hobbies included keeping racing pigeons, whippet racing, football, quoits, darts and dominoes.
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  • In this Duck Hunt-like game, you progress through levels shooting clay pigeons, bullseyes, and cans.
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  • This will decrease any shakiness you have and can help you with the small objects like the clay pigeons.
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  • Bert and Big Bird: Bert likes pigeons and Big Bird is a bird, so hand out bird seed packets or even make a bird feeder craft to send home with the kids.
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  • Be it as it may, both seem happy as pigeons in a bird bath with their modest lives.
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  • A few bold pigeons strolled by, looking for a handout but they waddled on down the path.
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  • In many birds some of the thoracic vertebrae are more or less coOssified, in most pigeons for instance the 15th to 17th; in most Galli the last cervical and the next three or four thoracics are coalesced, &c. The pelvic vertebrae include of course the sacrum.
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  • To appreciate this, it is sufficient to enumerate the birds without the critical muscle: Passeriformes and Coraciiformes, without exception; Ardeae and Podiceps; lastly various genera of storks, pigeons, parrots, petrels and auks.
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  • But it was now made to appear that the struthious birds in this respect resembled, not only the duck, but a great many other groups - waders, birds-of-prey, pigeons, passerines and perhaps all birds not gallinaceous - so that, according to Cuvier's view, the five points of ossification observed in the Gallinae, instead of exhibiting the normal process, exhibited one quite exceptional, and that in all other birds, so far as he had been enabled to investigate the matter, ossification of the sternum began at two points only, situated near the anterior upper margin of the side of the sternum, and gradually crept towards the keel, into which it presently extended; and, though he allowed the appearance of detached portions of calcareous matter at the base of the still cartilaginous keel in ducks at a certain age, he seemed to consider this an individual peculiarity.
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  • Nor, argued Geoffroy, was it true to say, - as Cuvier had said, that the like occurred in the pigeons and true passerines.
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  • But in the "homing" of pigeons there is little question that the experiential factor predominates.
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  • There are many varieties of birds to be found in the woods of the Bahamas; they include flamingoes and the beautiful hummingbird, as well as wild geese, ducks, pigeons, hawks, green parrots and doves.
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  • The other birds include parrots, toucans, gaudily coloured cuckoos, lories, swallows, shrikes, sun-birds, kingfishers, weavers, finches, wild pigeons and crows.
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  • As a rule there are not many birds, but the eagle and the vulture may occasionally be seen; of eatable kinds partridges and wild pigeons are the most abundant.
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  • The birds include the ostrich, marabout, vultures, kites, hawks, ground hornbill, great bustard, guinea fowl, partridge, lesser bustard, quail, snipe, duck, widgeon, teal, geese of various kinds, paraquets, doves, blue, bronze and green pigeons, and many others.
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  • Pigeons are kept in every village and their flesh is a common article of food.
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  • Geese and ducks of different sorts were bred in countless numbers by the farmers, also pigeons and quails, and in the early ages cranes.
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  • D chases pigeons; finds empty crisp packet & makes own fountain.
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  • I have two tame pigeons and a tiny canary bird.
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