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picts

picts Sentence Examples

  • The Picts and Britons now recovered their independence; for Aldfrith, apparently an illegitimate son of Oswio, who succeeded, made no attempt to reconquer them.

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  • Finally in 756, having now allied himself with Ongus king of the Picts, he successfully attacked Dumbarton (Alcluith), the chief town of the Britons of Strathclyde.

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  • He sent an embassy to Charlemagne in 768 and was deposed in 774, whereupon he fled to Bamburgh and afterwards to the Picts.

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  • The Catrail or Picts' Work begins near the town and passes immediatelyto the west.

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  • He succeeded in making the majority of the Britons, Picts and Scots tributary to him.

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  • About this time he is thought by many to have obtained some footing in the kingdom of the Picts in succession to their king Talorcan, the son of his brother Eanfrid.

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  • During his reign the coasts of Gaul were harassed by the Saxon pirates, with whom the Picts and Scots of northern Britain joined hands, and ravaged the island from the wall of Antoninus to the shores of Kent.

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  • On the south this kingdom bordered on the territories of the Niduari Picts of Galloway, including the modern counties of Wigtown and Kirkcudbright, a region which from the middle of the 7th century seems to have been in the possession of the Northumbrians.

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  • Such notices as we have of the history of Strathclyde in the 7th and 8th centuries are preserved only in the chronicles of the surrounding nations and even these supply us with little more than an incomplete record of wars with the neighbouring Scots, Picts and Northumbrians.

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  • In 649 there appears to have been a battle between the Britons and the Picts, but about this time the former must have become subject to the Northumbrian kingdom.

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  • They recovered their independence, however, after the defeat of Ecgfrith by the Picts in 685.

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  • Towards the middle of the 8th century Strathclyde was again threatened by an alliance between the Northumbrians and Picts, and in 750 the Northumbrian king Eadberht wrested from them a considerable part of their territories in the west including Kyle in Ayrshire.

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  • 997 Owain (Eugenius) 1018 See Chronicles of the Picts and Scots, edited by W.

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  • It is said to have been named Athfotla (Atholl) after Fotla, son of the Pictish king Cruithne, and was under the rule of a Celtic mormaer (thane or earl) until the union of the Picts and Scots under Kenneth Macalpine in 843.

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  • In 385 he was appointed master of the soldiery (magister militum) in Thrace, and shortly afterwards directed energetic campaigns in Britain against Picts, Scots and Saxons, and along the Rhine against other barbarians.

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  • Among other matters reference is made to the introduction of Christianity in the reign of Tiberius; the persecution under Diocletian; the spread of the Arian heresy; the election of Maximus as emperor by the legions in Britain, and his subsequent death at Aquileia; the incursions of the Picts and Scots into the southern part of the island; the temporary assistance rendered to the harassed Britons by the Romans; the final abandonment of the island by the latter; the coming of the Saxons and their reception by Guortigern (Vortigern); and, finally, the conflicts between the Britons, led by a noble Roman, Ambrosius Aurelianus, and the new invaders.

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  • Tradition associates his name with the mountains of Wicklow, and we are told that he retired to the land of the Picts in North Britain, where he died.

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  • On the coast of Loch Nell, or Ardmucknish Bay, is the vitrified fort of Beregonium, not to be confounded with Rerigonium (sometimes miscalled Berigonium) on Loch Ryan in Wigtownshire - a town of the Novantae Picts, identified with Innermessan.

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  • It became the capital of Pictavia, the kingdom of northern Picts, in succession to Forteviot.

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  • This basaltic hill, the name of which is believed to commemorate the British king Arthur, who from its height is said to have watched the defeat of the Picts by his followers, is shaped like a lion couchant, with head towards the north.

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  • The southern Picts ultimately subdued the Britons, and the castle became their chief stronghold until they were overthrown in 617 (or 629) by the Saxons under Edwin, king of Northumbria, from whom the name of Edinburgh is derived.

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  • They were apparently called in by the British king Vortigern (q.v.)to defend him against the Picts.

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  • Rhys, " The Inscriptions and Language of the Northern Picts," Proc. Soc. Ant.

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  • About the year 565 he applied himself to the task of converting the heathen kingdom of the northern Picts.

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  • Crossing over to the mainland he proceeded to the residence, on the banks of the Ness, of Brude, king of the Picts.

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  • The monastery of Iona was reverenced as the mother house of all these foundations, and its abbots were obeyed as the chief ecclesiastical rulers of the whole nation of the northern Picts.

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  • from the mainland, belongs to Caithness and is situated in the parish of Canisbay; South Ronaldshay (1991) is the best cultivated and most fertile of the southern isles of the group. On Hoxa Head, to the west of the large village of St Margaret's Hope, is a broch, or round tower, and the island contains, besides, examples of Picts' houses and standing stones.

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  • The original inhabitants were Picts, evidence of whose occupation still exists in numerous weems or underground houses, chambered mounds, barrows or burial mounds, brochs or round towers, and stone circles and standing stones.

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  • If, as seems likely, the Dalriadic Scots towards the beginning of the 6th century established a footing in the islands, their success was short-lived, and the Picts regained power and kept it until dispossessed by the Norsemen in the 9th century.

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  • The first stronghold is supposed to have been erected by Congal, son of Dongart, king of the Picts.

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  • After about 350, barbarian assaults, not only of Saxons but also of Irish (Scoti) and Picts, became commoner .and more terrible.

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  • - The history of Britain after the withdrawal of the Roman troops is extremely obscure, but there can be little doubt that for many years the inhabitants of the provinces were exposed to devastating raids by the Picts and Scots.

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  • Bede declares that Oswald ruled over "all the peoples and provinces of Britain, which includes four languages, those of the Britons, Picts, Scots and Angles."

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  • Nor has any certainty been reached about the ethnological problems of the population, the Aryan or non-Aryan character of the Picts and the like.

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  • There are also traces of the persistence of descent in the female line, especially in the case of the Pictish royal family, but such survivals of savage institutions, or such a modification of male descent for the purpose of ensuring the purity of the royal blood, yield no firm ground for a decision as to whether the Picts were " Aryans " or " non-Aryans."

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  • That the Picts were Teutons (Pinkerton) is no longer believed.

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  • 300 that we read of " the Caledonians and other Picts "; in the 4th century they frequently harried the Romans up to the wall of Hadrian, between Tyne and Solway.

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  • About the end of the century the southern Picts of Galloway, and tribes farther north, were partially converted by St Ninian, from the candida casa of Whithern.

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  • The withdrawal of the Romans from Britain (410) left the northern part of the island as a prey to be fought for by warlike tribes, of whom the most notable were the Picts in the north, the Scots or Dalriads from Ireland in the west (Argyll), the Cymric or Welsh peoples in the south-west and between Forth and Tay, and the Teutonic invaders, Angles or English, in the south-east.

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  • If the Picts had been able to win and hold Scotland as far south as the historic border, the fortunes of the country would probably have been more or less like those of Ireland.

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  • While southern Scotland was thus English and Cymric, the north, from Cape Wrath to Lochaber, in the west, and to the Firth of Tay, on the east, was Pictland; and the vernacular spoken there was the Gaelic. The west, south of Lochaber to the Mull of Kintyre, with the isles of Bute, Islay, Arran and Jura, was the realm of the Dalriadic kings, Scots from Ireland (503): here, too, Gaelic was spoken, as among the " Southern Picts " of the kingdom of Galloway.

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  • Their defeat by the Picts, in 560, induced the Irish St Columba to endeavour to convert the conquering Picts.

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  • In 563-565 he founded his mission and monastery in the isle of Iona, and journeying to Inverness he converted the king of the Picts.

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  • In the quarrels of Picts and of Scots of Argyll, the Pictish king, Angus MacFergus (ob.

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  • 761), was victorious while in his prime, and then consolidated Pictland; but (802-83'9) the Scandinavian sea-rovers began to hold large territories in Scotland,weakened the Picts, and made easy their conquest by Kenneth MacAlpine of Kintyre, the king of the Dalriad Scots of Argyll.

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  • In 860 this Scot became king of the Picts.

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  • Old legends represent him as having exterminated the Picts to the last man; and the Picts become, hi popular tradition, a mythical folk, hardly human, to whom great feats, including the building of Glasgow cathedral, are attributed, as the walls of Tiryns and Mycenae in Greece were traditionally assigned to the energy of the Cyclopes.

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  • There was, of course, in fact, no extermination of the Picts, there was merely a change of dynasty, and alliance between Picts and Scots, and that change was probably made in accordance with Pictish customs of succession.

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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.

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  • It seems clear, however, that Vortigern made use of them to protect his kingdom against the Picts and Scots, and rewarded them for their services with a grant of land.

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  • Connexion has been traced between the early Libyan race and the Cro-Magnon and other early European races and, later, the Basque peoples, Iberians, Picts, Celts and Gauls.

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  • The megalithic monuments of Iberia and Celtic Europe have their counterparts in northern Africa, and it is suggested that these were all erected by the same race, by whatever name they be known, Berbers and Libyans in Africa, Iberians in Spain, Celts, Gauls and Picts in France and Britain.

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  • In 1164 he went as a missionary to the Picts of Galloway.

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  • Certain of the vessels being driven upon "barbarous islands," their passengers are slain by Guanius and Melga, "kings of the Huns and Picts," whom Gratian had `called in to his aid against Maximian.

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  • The population of the north shore of the Solway Firth at the beginning of the 5th century were probably either Picts or Goidels or a blend of both, and naturally hostile to the Romanized Britons.

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  • Bede records that Ninian preached among the Picts within the Mounth, which indicates that he was acquainted with the Pictish language.

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  • The fortress was often besieged and sometimes taken, the Picts seizing it in 736 and the Northmen in 870, but the most effectual surprise of all was that accomplished, in the interests of the young King James VI., by Thomas Crawford of Jordanhill on March 31, 1571.

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  • c. 860), often described as the first king of Scotland (kingdom of Scone), was the son of the Alpin, called king of the Scots, who had been slain by the Picts in 832 or 834, whilst endeavouring to assert his claim to the Pictish throne.

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  • The region of his rule is matter of conjecture, though Galloway seems the most probable suggestion, in which case he probably led a piratic host against the Picts.

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  • In the seventh year of his reign (839 or 841) he took advantage of the effects of a Danish invasion of the Pictish kingdom to attack the remaining Picts, whom he finally subdued in 844 or 846.

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  • The most important of Skene's other works are: editions of John of Fordun's Chronica gentis Scotorum (Edinburgh, 1871-1872); of the Four Ancient Books of Wales (Edinburgh, 1868); of the Chronicles of the Picts and Scots (Edinburgh, 1867); and of Adamuan's Vita S.

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  • Here, as is supposed, the "Alleluia Victory" was gained over the Picts and Scots by Lupus and Germanus, bishop of Auxerre, according to some about A.D.

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  • THEODOSIUS I., "the Great," son of Theodosius, Valentinian's great general, who in 368-69 drove back the Picts and Scots from the Roman territories in Britain and suppressed the revolt of Firmus in Mauretania (372).

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  • One of Aidan's successors, Kenneth, became king of the Picts about 843, and gradually the name Dalriada both in Ireland and Scotland fell into disuse.

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  • He obtained the title of Augustus on the 1st of May 305, and died the following year shortly before the 25th of July at Eboracum (York) during an expedition against the Picts and Scots.

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  • lies Athelstaneford (locally, E1shinford), so named from the victory of Hungus, king of the Picts, in the 8th century over the Northumbrian Athelstane.

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  • were reckoned the chief monarchs of England, and exercised a widespread influence over the southern realms, yet each had to win his supremacy by his own sword; and when Edwin and Oswald fell before the savage heathen Penda, and Ecgfrith was cut off by the Picts, there was a gap of anarchy before another king asserted hh superior power.

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  • Picts are also represented as having settled in the county of Roscommon; but we have at present no means of ascertaining when this invasion took place.

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  • In this contest the Firbolgs were overthrown with great slaughter, and the remnants of the race according to Keating and other writers took refuge in Arran, Islay, Rathlin and the Hebrides, where they dwelt until driven out by Picts.

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  • In the reign of Eremon the Picts are stated to have arrived in Ireland, coming from Scythia.

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  • The Picts first settled in Leinster; but the main body were forced to remove to Scotland, only a few remaining behind in Meath.

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  • The stronghold of Emain Macha was destroyed and the Ulstermen were driven across the Newry River into Dalriada, which was inhabited by Picts.

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  • These movements coincide with the inroads of the Picts and Scots recorded by Roman writers.

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  • Wicklow, but Irish sources state that after a brief sojourn there he proceeded to the land of the Picts, among whom he was beginning to labour when his career was cut short by death.

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  • In 563 Columba founded the monastery of Hi (Iona), which spread the knowledge of the Gospel among the Picts of the Scottish mainland.

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  • The latter was driven out of the country by Domnall, whereupon Congal collected an army of foreign adventurers made up of Saxons, Dalriadic Scots, Britons and Picts to regain his lands and to avenge himself on the high-king.

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  • Of the vast Celtic empire which had dominated ~si~ Europe nothing now remained but scattered remnants in the farthest corners of the land, refuges for all the vanquished Gaels, Picts or Gauls; and of its civilization there lingered only idioms and dialectsGaelic, Pict and Gallic awhich gradually dropped out of use.

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  • This grant, however, cannot be accepted as genuine and [ding bursaries t ral classes at cookery classes try west of the Novantae and Picts, and are the other half tances he sold Grim, 3rd earl nder one lord.

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  • In 740 he took advantage of the absence of Eadberht of Northumbria in a campaign against the Picts to invade his kingdom.

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  • Dr. Cummins places the story of the Picts in its historical context.

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  • The Picts used a bit of tactical guile and lured the Northumbrians into a trap with deadly results.

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  • These monks would also have taught the alphabet to the Picts using the Gaelic names of trees to express the sound of the letters.

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  • The chronicles mention the destruction of Dunbar, former Northumbrian bastion against the Picts, possibly as a naval base.

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  • Columba and his successors at Iona brought the faith to the Picts and Scots; Aidan established the Northumbrian bishopric at Lindisfarne.

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  • manpower shortage which gave priority to fighting the Picts left the dead unburied.

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  • missionary bishop among the Picts in Scotland.

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  • The Picts and Scots were heavily outnumbered, and the night before the battle, King Angus prayed for victory.

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  • Text To Picts This application was written to reduce the tedium of making picture files of text for experiment generator packages.

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  • From this time onwards the Humber formed the boundary between the two kingdoms. In 684 we hear of the first English invasion of Ireland, but in the following year Ecgfrith was slain and his army totally destroyed by the Picts at a place called Nechtansmere (probably Dunnichen Moss in Forfarshire).

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  • The Picts and Britons now recovered their independence; for Aldfrith, apparently an illegitimate son of Oswio, who succeeded, made no attempt to reconquer them.

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  • The latter appears to have been a vigorous ruler; in the year 740 we hear of his being involved in war with the Picts.

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  • Finally in 756, having now allied himself with Ongus king of the Picts, he successfully attacked Dumbarton (Alcluith), the chief town of the Britons of Strathclyde.

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  • He sent an embassy to Charlemagne in 768 and was deposed in 774, whereupon he fled to Bamburgh and afterwards to the Picts.

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  • The Catrail or Picts' Work begins near the town and passes immediatelyto the west.

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  • He succeeded in making the majority of the Britons, Picts and Scots tributary to him.

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  • About this time he is thought by many to have obtained some footing in the kingdom of the Picts in succession to their king Talorcan, the son of his brother Eanfrid.

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  • During his reign the coasts of Gaul were harassed by the Saxon pirates, with whom the Picts and Scots of northern Britain joined hands, and ravaged the island from the wall of Antoninus to the shores of Kent.

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  • On the south this kingdom bordered on the territories of the Niduari Picts of Galloway, including the modern counties of Wigtown and Kirkcudbright, a region which from the middle of the 7th century seems to have been in the possession of the Northumbrians.

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  • Such notices as we have of the history of Strathclyde in the 7th and 8th centuries are preserved only in the chronicles of the surrounding nations and even these supply us with little more than an incomplete record of wars with the neighbouring Scots, Picts and Northumbrians.

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  • In 649 there appears to have been a battle between the Britons and the Picts, but about this time the former must have become subject to the Northumbrian kingdom.

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  • They recovered their independence, however, after the defeat of Ecgfrith by the Picts in 685.

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  • Towards the middle of the 8th century Strathclyde was again threatened by an alliance between the Northumbrians and Picts, and in 750 the Northumbrian king Eadberht wrested from them a considerable part of their territories in the west including Kyle in Ayrshire.

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  • 997 Owain (Eugenius) 1018 See Chronicles of the Picts and Scots, edited by W.

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  • It is said to have been named Athfotla (Atholl) after Fotla, son of the Pictish king Cruithne, and was under the rule of a Celtic mormaer (thane or earl) until the union of the Picts and Scots under Kenneth Macalpine in 843.

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  • In 385 he was appointed master of the soldiery (magister militum) in Thrace, and shortly afterwards directed energetic campaigns in Britain against Picts, Scots and Saxons, and along the Rhine against other barbarians.

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  • Among other matters reference is made to the introduction of Christianity in the reign of Tiberius; the persecution under Diocletian; the spread of the Arian heresy; the election of Maximus as emperor by the legions in Britain, and his subsequent death at Aquileia; the incursions of the Picts and Scots into the southern part of the island; the temporary assistance rendered to the harassed Britons by the Romans; the final abandonment of the island by the latter; the coming of the Saxons and their reception by Guortigern (Vortigern); and, finally, the conflicts between the Britons, led by a noble Roman, Ambrosius Aurelianus, and the new invaders.

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  • Tradition associates his name with the mountains of Wicklow, and we are told that he retired to the land of the Picts in North Britain, where he died.

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  • On the coast of Loch Nell, or Ardmucknish Bay, is the vitrified fort of Beregonium, not to be confounded with Rerigonium (sometimes miscalled Berigonium) on Loch Ryan in Wigtownshire - a town of the Novantae Picts, identified with Innermessan.

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  • It became the capital of Pictavia, the kingdom of northern Picts, in succession to Forteviot.

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  • This basaltic hill, the name of which is believed to commemorate the British king Arthur, who from its height is said to have watched the defeat of the Picts by his followers, is shaped like a lion couchant, with head towards the north.

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  • The southern Picts ultimately subdued the Britons, and the castle became their chief stronghold until they were overthrown in 617 (or 629) by the Saxons under Edwin, king of Northumbria, from whom the name of Edinburgh is derived.

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  • They were apparently called in by the British king Vortigern (q.v.)to defend him against the Picts.

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  • Rhys, " The Inscriptions and Language of the Northern Picts," Proc. Soc. Ant.

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  • About the year 565 he applied himself to the task of converting the heathen kingdom of the northern Picts.

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  • Crossing over to the mainland he proceeded to the residence, on the banks of the Ness, of Brude, king of the Picts.

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  • The monastery of Iona was reverenced as the mother house of all these foundations, and its abbots were obeyed as the chief ecclesiastical rulers of the whole nation of the northern Picts.

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  • from the mainland, belongs to Caithness and is situated in the parish of Canisbay; South Ronaldshay (1991) is the best cultivated and most fertile of the southern isles of the group. On Hoxa Head, to the west of the large village of St Margaret's Hope, is a broch, or round tower, and the island contains, besides, examples of Picts' houses and standing stones.

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  • The original inhabitants were Picts, evidence of whose occupation still exists in numerous weems or underground houses, chambered mounds, barrows or burial mounds, brochs or round towers, and stone circles and standing stones.

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  • If, as seems likely, the Dalriadic Scots towards the beginning of the 6th century established a footing in the islands, their success was short-lived, and the Picts regained power and kept it until dispossessed by the Norsemen in the 9th century.

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  • The first stronghold is supposed to have been erected by Congal, son of Dongart, king of the Picts.

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  • After about 350, barbarian assaults, not only of Saxons but also of Irish (Scoti) and Picts, became commoner .and more terrible.

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  • - The history of Britain after the withdrawal of the Roman troops is extremely obscure, but there can be little doubt that for many years the inhabitants of the provinces were exposed to devastating raids by the Picts and Scots.

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  • Bede declares that Oswald ruled over "all the peoples and provinces of Britain, which includes four languages, those of the Britons, Picts, Scots and Angles."

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  • Of many who deserve mention in connexion with this period, the most prominent were: Columba, the founder of the famous monastery of Iona in 563 and the evangelizer of the Albanian Scots and northern Picts; Aidan, the apostle of Northumbria; Columbanus, the apostle of the Burgundians of the Vosges (S90); Callich or Gallus (d.

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  • Nor has any certainty been reached about the ethnological problems of the population, the Aryan or non-Aryan character of the Picts and the like.

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  • There are also traces of the persistence of descent in the female line, especially in the case of the Pictish royal family, but such survivals of savage institutions, or such a modification of male descent for the purpose of ensuring the purity of the royal blood, yield no firm ground for a decision as to whether the Picts were " Aryans " or " non-Aryans."

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  • That the Picts were Teutons (Pinkerton) is no longer believed.

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  • Mr Skene held that the Picts were a Gaelicspeaking people, but the weight of philological authority is with Mr Whitley Stokes, who says that Pictish phonetics, " so far as we can ascertain them, resemble those of Welsh rather than of Irish " (see Zimmer, Das Mutterrecht der Pikten; Rhys, Royal Commission's Report on Land in Wales, Celtic Britain, Rhind Lectures; Skene's Celtic Scotland; J.

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  • 300 that we read of " the Caledonians and other Picts "; in the 4th century they frequently harried the Romans up to the wall of Hadrian, between Tyne and Solway.

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  • About the end of the century the southern Picts of Galloway, and tribes farther north, were partially converted by St Ninian, from the candida casa of Whithern.

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  • The withdrawal of the Romans from Britain (410) left the northern part of the island as a prey to be fought for by warlike tribes, of whom the most notable were the Picts in the north, the Scots or Dalriads from Ireland in the west (Argyll), the Cymric or Welsh peoples in the south-west and between Forth and Tay, and the Teutonic invaders, Angles or English, in the south-east.

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  • If the Picts had been able to win and hold Scotland as far south as the historic border, the fortunes of the country would probably have been more or less like those of Ireland.

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  • While southern Scotland was thus English and Cymric, the north, from Cape Wrath to Lochaber, in the west, and to the Firth of Tay, on the east, was Pictland; and the vernacular spoken there was the Gaelic. The west, south of Lochaber to the Mull of Kintyre, with the isles of Bute, Islay, Arran and Jura, was the realm of the Dalriadic kings, Scots from Ireland (503): here, too, Gaelic was spoken, as among the " Southern Picts " of the kingdom of Galloway.

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  • Their defeat by the Picts, in 560, induced the Irish St Columba to endeavour to convert the conquering Picts.

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  • In 563-565 he founded his mission and monastery in the isle of Iona, and journeying to Inverness he converted the king of the Picts.

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  • In the quarrels of Picts and of Scots of Argyll, the Pictish king, Angus MacFergus (ob.

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  • 761), was victorious while in his prime, and then consolidated Pictland; but (802-83'9) the Scandinavian sea-rovers began to hold large territories in Scotland,weakened the Picts, and made easy their conquest by Kenneth MacAlpine of Kintyre, the king of the Dalriad Scots of Argyll.

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  • In 860 this Scot became king of the Picts.

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  • Old legends represent him as having exterminated the Picts to the last man; and the Picts become, hi popular tradition, a mythical folk, hardly human, to whom great feats, including the building of Glasgow cathedral, are attributed, as the walls of Tiryns and Mycenae in Greece were traditionally assigned to the energy of the Cyclopes.

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  • There was, of course, in fact, no extermination of the Picts, there was merely a change of dynasty, and alliance between Picts and Scots, and that change was probably made in accordance with Pictish customs of succession.

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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.

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  • It seems clear, however, that Vortigern made use of them to protect his kingdom against the Picts and Scots, and rewarded them for their services with a grant of land.

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  • Connexion has been traced between the early Libyan race and the Cro-Magnon and other early European races and, later, the Basque peoples, Iberians, Picts, Celts and Gauls.

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  • The megalithic monuments of Iberia and Celtic Europe have their counterparts in northern Africa, and it is suggested that these were all erected by the same race, by whatever name they be known, Berbers and Libyans in Africa, Iberians in Spain, Celts, Gauls and Picts in France and Britain.

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  • In 1164 he went as a missionary to the Picts of Galloway.

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  • Certain of the vessels being driven upon "barbarous islands," their passengers are slain by Guanius and Melga, "kings of the Huns and Picts," whom Gratian had `called in to his aid against Maximian.

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  • The population of the north shore of the Solway Firth at the beginning of the 5th century were probably either Picts or Goidels or a blend of both, and naturally hostile to the Romanized Britons.

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  • Bede records that Ninian preached among the Picts within the Mounth, which indicates that he was acquainted with the Pictish language.

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  • The fortress was often besieged and sometimes taken, the Picts seizing it in 736 and the Northmen in 870, but the most effectual surprise of all was that accomplished, in the interests of the young King James VI., by Thomas Crawford of Jordanhill on March 31, 1571.

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  • c. 860), often described as the first king of Scotland (kingdom of Scone), was the son of the Alpin, called king of the Scots, who had been slain by the Picts in 832 or 834, whilst endeavouring to assert his claim to the Pictish throne.

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  • The region of his rule is matter of conjecture, though Galloway seems the most probable suggestion, in which case he probably led a piratic host against the Picts.

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  • In the seventh year of his reign (839 or 841) he took advantage of the effects of a Danish invasion of the Pictish kingdom to attack the remaining Picts, whom he finally subdued in 844 or 846.

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  • The most important of Skene's other works are: editions of John of Fordun's Chronica gentis Scotorum (Edinburgh, 1871-1872); of the Four Ancient Books of Wales (Edinburgh, 1868); of the Chronicles of the Picts and Scots (Edinburgh, 1867); and of Adamuan's Vita S.

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  • Here, as is supposed, the "Alleluia Victory" was gained over the Picts and Scots by Lupus and Germanus, bishop of Auxerre, according to some about A.D.

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  • THEODOSIUS I., "the Great," son of Theodosius, Valentinian's great general, who in 368-69 drove back the Picts and Scots from the Roman territories in Britain and suppressed the revolt of Firmus in Mauretania (372).

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  • One of Aidan's successors, Kenneth, became king of the Picts about 843, and gradually the name Dalriada both in Ireland and Scotland fell into disuse.

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  • He obtained the title of Augustus on the 1st of May 305, and died the following year shortly before the 25th of July at Eboracum (York) during an expedition against the Picts and Scots.

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  • lies Athelstaneford (locally, E1shinford), so named from the victory of Hungus, king of the Picts, in the 8th century over the Northumbrian Athelstane.

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  • were reckoned the chief monarchs of England, and exercised a widespread influence over the southern realms, yet each had to win his supremacy by his own sword; and when Edwin and Oswald fell before the savage heathen Penda, and Ecgfrith was cut off by the Picts, there was a gap of anarchy before another king asserted hh superior power.

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  • Picts are also represented as having settled in the county of Roscommon; but we have at present no means of ascertaining when this invasion took place.

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  • In this contest the Firbolgs were overthrown with great slaughter, and the remnants of the race according to Keating and other writers took refuge in Arran, Islay, Rathlin and the Hebrides, where they dwelt until driven out by Picts.

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  • In the reign of Eremon the Picts are stated to have arrived in Ireland, coming from Scythia.

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  • The Picts first settled in Leinster; but the main body were forced to remove to Scotland, only a few remaining behind in Meath.

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  • The stronghold of Emain Macha was destroyed and the Ulstermen were driven across the Newry River into Dalriada, which was inhabited by Picts.

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  • These movements coincide with the inroads of the Picts and Scots recorded by Roman writers.

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  • Wicklow, but Irish sources state that after a brief sojourn there he proceeded to the land of the Picts, among whom he was beginning to labour when his career was cut short by death.

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  • In 563 Columba founded the monastery of Hi (Iona), which spread the knowledge of the Gospel among the Picts of the Scottish mainland.

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  • The latter was driven out of the country by Domnall, whereupon Congal collected an army of foreign adventurers made up of Saxons, Dalriadic Scots, Britons and Picts to regain his lands and to avenge himself on the high-king.

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  • Of the vast Celtic empire which had dominated ~si~ Europe nothing now remained but scattered remnants in the farthest corners of the land, refuges for all the vanquished Gaels, Picts or Gauls; and of its civilization there lingered only idioms and dialectsGaelic, Pict and Gallic awhich gradually dropped out of use.

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  • This grant, however, cannot be accepted as genuine and [ding bursaries t ral classes at cookery classes try west of the Novantae and Picts, and are the other half tances he sold Grim, 3rd earl nder one lord.

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  • In 740 he took advantage of the absence of Eadberht of Northumbria in a campaign against the Picts to invade his kingdom.

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  • Text To Picts This application was written to reduce the tedium of making picture files of text for experiment generator packages.

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  • Celtic knots and bands can be seen on many different tapestries and artwork from early on in the Middle Ages (and even before), and some early tattoos seen on the Celts and the Picts were created using knot designs.

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