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picardy

picardy

picardy Sentence Examples

  • JOHN CALVIN (1509-1564), Swiss divine and reformer, was born at Noyon, in Picardy, on the 10th of July 1509.

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  • by bringing about the marriage of his pupil with Mademoiselle de Blois, a natural but legitimated daughter of the king; and for this service he was rewarded with the gift of the abbey of St Just in Picardy.

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  • AISNE, a frontier department in the north-east of France, formed in 1790 from portions of the old provinces of Ile-de-France and Picardy.

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  • Before this there had been translations into French dialects, as by Philippe de Thaun (1121), by Guillaume, "clerc de Normandie," also, about the same period, by Pierre, a clergyman of Picardy.

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  • In any case, only the eastern districts would have been affected by invaders from over the Rhine, the chief seat of the Belgae proper being in the west, the country occupied by the Bellovaci, Ambiani and Atrebates, to which it is probable (although the reading is uncertain) that Caesar gives the distinctive name Belgium (corresponding to the old provinces of Picardy and Artois).

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  • FABER, Fabri or Fabry (surnamed [[Stapulensis), Jacobus]] [Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples] (c. 1455 - c. 1536), a pioneer of the Protestant movement in France, was born of humble parents at Etaples, in Pas de Calais, Picardy, about 1455.

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  • DESMOULINS, LUCIE SIMPLICE CAMILLE BENOIST (1760-1794), French journalist and politician, who played an important part in the French Revolution, was born at Guise, in Picardy, on the 2nd of March 1760.

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  • Those of most interest to English ornithologists naturally refer to Britanny, Normandy and Picardy, and are by Baillon, Benoist, Blandin, Bureau, Canivet, Chesnon, Degland, Demarle, De Norguet, Gentil, Hardy, Lemetteil, Lemonnicier, Lesauvage, Maignon, Marcotte, Nourry and Tasle, while perhaps the Ornithologie parisienne of M.

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  • The only teacher whom he respected was a certain Petrus de Maharncuria Picardus, or of Picardy, probably identical with a certain mathematician, Petrus Peregrinus of Picardy, who is perhaps the author of a MS. treatise, De Magnete, contained in the Bibliotheque Imperiale at Paris.

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  • When Robert died in 9 23, he was succeeded by his brother-in-law, Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, and not by his son Hugh, who is known in history as Hugh the Great, duke of France and Burgundy, and whose domain extended from the Loire to the frontiers of Picardy.

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  • Robert de Clary, a knight from Picardy, who presents the nonofficial view of the Crusade, as it appeared to an ordinary soldier.

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  • He spent a few years in Picardy, and was still abroad when, in 1491, Bothwell's mission to secure a bride for the young James IV.

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  • ARTOIS, an ancient province of the north of France, corresponding to the present department of Pas de Calais, with the exclusion of the arrondissements of Boulogne and Montrenil, which belonged to Picardy.

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  • He became a monk of Corbie, near Amiens in Picardy, in 814, and assumed, the cloister name of Paschasius.

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  • He treated with Maximilian of Austria to prevent him from entering Picardy during the war with Naples, and then proceeded to Castile to claim promised support.

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  • In 1512 he gained his first military experience in Guienne, and in the following year he commanded the army of Picardy.

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  • PETRUS RAMUS, or Pierre De La Ramee (1515-1572), French humanist, was born at the village of Cuth in Picardy in 1515, a member of a noble but impoverished family; his father was a charcoal-burner.

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  • He was made governor of Picardy in 1619; suppressed an uprising of nobles in 1620; and in 1621, with slight military ability or achievement, was appointed constable of France.

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  • His brother Honore (1581-1649), first duke of Chaulnes, was governor of Picardy and marshal of France (1619), and defended his province successfully in 1625 and 1635.

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  • of France seized the opportunity afforded by his rival's defeat and death to take possession of the duchy of Burgundy as a fief lapsed to the French crown, and also of Franche Comte, Picardy and Artois.

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  • frontier, deriving its name from that of the forest, and formed in 1790 from parts of Champagne, Picardy and Hainault.

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  • By the daughter of Ernulf de Hesdin (in Picardy), a Domesday baron, he was father of at least three sons: Jordan, who succeeded to the family office of steward of Dol; William, who inherited Mileham and other estates in England, and who founded the great baronial house of Fitz Alan (afterwards earls of Arundel); and Walter, who was made by David I.

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  • GABRIEL HENRI GAILLARD (1726-1806), French historian, was born at Ostel, Picardy, in 1726.

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  • The Union gave a considerable impetus to the manufacture, as did also the establishment of the Board of Manufactures in 1727, which applied an annual sum of £2650 to its encouragement, and in 1729 established a colony of French Protestants in Edinburgh, on the site of the present Picardy Place, to teach the spinning and weaving of cambric. From the 1st of November 1727 to the 1st of November 1728 the amount of linen cloth stamped was 2,183,978 yds., valued at £103,312, but for the year ending the 1st of November 1822, when the regulations as to the inspection and stamping of linen ceased, it had increased to 36,268,530 yds., valued at £1,396,296.

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  • Amiens has a rich library and admirable collections of paintings, sculptures and antiquities in the museum of Picardy.

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  • Till 1790 it was the capital of the gouvernement of Picardy.

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  • The sufferings of the Christians and the desecrations of their sacred buildings during these troubled times created wide-spread indignation through the west: and this indignation was inflamed into fury by Peter the Hermit, a native of Picardy, who in early life had been a soldier.

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  • The king yielded at all points; gave up the "Somme towns" in Picardy, for which he had paid 200,000 gold crowns, to Philip the Good, thus bringing the Burgundians close to Paris and to Normandy.

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  • In the autumn Louis himself took the offensive, and royal troops overran Picardy and the Maconnais to Burgundy itself.

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  • won back England by the battles of Barnet and Tewkesbury, Charles the Bold besieged Amiens, and Louis was glad to make a truce, availing himself of the double dealing of the constable, the count of Saint Pol, who, trying to win an independent position for himself in Picardy, refused his aid to Charles unless he would definitely join the French nobility in another rising against the king.

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  • The battle of Guinegate on the 7th of August 1479 was indecisive, and definite peace was not established until after the death of Mary, when by the treaty of Arras (1482) Louis received Picardy, Artois and the Boulonnais, as well as the duchy of Burgundy and Franche Comte.

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  • According to Emile Charles (Roger Bacon sa vie, ses ouvrages, ses doctrines, 1861), Peter of Maricourt is the Pierre Peregrin (or Pelerin) de Maricourt (Meharicourt in Picardy), known also as Petrus Peregrinus of Picardy, one of whose letters, De magnete, is partly reproduced in Libri's Hist.

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  • Picardy >>

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  • landed in Normandy, ravaged that province, part of the Ile de France and Picardy,.

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  • During the middle ages it was famous for its great Benedictine abbey, which was founded and endowed by the emperor Louis the Pious about 820, and received its name from having been first occupied by a body of monks coming from Corbie in Picardy.

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  • Floris was murdered in 1235 at a tournament at Corbie in Picardy by the count of Clermont.

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  • ENGUERRAND DE MONSTRELET (c. 1 4 00 - 1 453), French chronicler, belonged to a noble family of Picardy.

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  • The war did not entirely cease, but became local and spasmodic. In Brittany the factions which supported the two claimants to the ducal title were so embittered that they never laid down their arms. In 1351 the French noblesse of Picardy, apparently without their masters knowledge or consent, made an attempt to surprise Calais, which was beaten off with some difficulty by King Edward in person.

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  • Edward, prince of Wales, ravaged Languedoc as far as the Mediterranean, while his younger brother John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, executed a less ambitious raid in Picardy and Artois.

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  • He marched from Calais to Bordeaux, inflicted great misery on Picardy, Champagne and Berry, and left half his army dead by the way.

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  • Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III., took a powerful army to Calais, and marched through Picardy and Champagne, past Orleans, and finally to Rennes in Brittany, but accomplished nothing save the ruin of his own troops and the wasting of a vast sum of money.

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  • But such a large number of his troops perished in the trenches by a pestilential disorder, that he found himself too weak to march on Paris, and took his way to Calais across Picardy, hoping, as it seems, to lure the French to battle by exposing his small army to attack.

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  • Paris, Picardy, Champagne, and indeed the greater part of France north of the Loire, acknowledged him as their sovereign.

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  • Having allied himself with his brother4n-law Charles of Burgundy against the king of France, he led an army into Picardy in 1475, and then by the treaty of Picquigny sold peace to Louis XI.

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  • He caused his own old tutor, Adrian of Utrecht, to be crowned with the papal tiara, and left the English to invade Picardy entirely unassisted.

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  • and was made governor of Picardy.

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  • The common statement that he derived his surname from Diss in Norfolk is a mere conjecture; Dicetum may equally well be a Latinized form of Dissai, or Dicy, or Dizy, place-names which are found in Maine, Picardy, Burgundy and Champagne.

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  • received only Picardy, the Boulonnais and Burgundy; by the marriage of Charles the Bolds daughter the rest was annexed to the Empire, and later to Spain.

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  • The defence of Metz by Francis of Guise was admirable ~ and successful; but in Picardy operations continued their course without much result, owing to the incapacity of the constable de Montmorency.

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  • In defiance of a recent ordinance prohibiting provincial assemblies, he presided over the estates of Picardy and Artois, and then over those of Champagne.

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  • Picardy Belgian and Flemish influences are apparent with this traditionally hearty cuisine.

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  • by bringing about the marriage of his pupil with Mademoiselle de Blois, a natural but legitimated daughter of the king; and for this service he was rewarded with the gift of the abbey of St Just in Picardy.

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  • AISNE, a frontier department in the north-east of France, formed in 1790 from portions of the old provinces of Ile-de-France and Picardy.

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  • Before this there had been translations into French dialects, as by Philippe de Thaun (1121), by Guillaume, "clerc de Normandie," also, about the same period, by Pierre, a clergyman of Picardy.

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  • In any case, only the eastern districts would have been affected by invaders from over the Rhine, the chief seat of the Belgae proper being in the west, the country occupied by the Bellovaci, Ambiani and Atrebates, to which it is probable (although the reading is uncertain) that Caesar gives the distinctive name Belgium (corresponding to the old provinces of Picardy and Artois).

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  • FABER, Fabri or Fabry (surnamed [[Stapulensis), Jacobus]] [Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples] (c. 1455 - c. 1536), a pioneer of the Protestant movement in France, was born of humble parents at Etaples, in Pas de Calais, Picardy, about 1455.

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  • DESMOULINS, LUCIE SIMPLICE CAMILLE BENOIST (1760-1794), French journalist and politician, who played an important part in the French Revolution, was born at Guise, in Picardy, on the 2nd of March 1760.

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  • Those of most interest to English ornithologists naturally refer to Britanny, Normandy and Picardy, and are by Baillon, Benoist, Blandin, Bureau, Canivet, Chesnon, Degland, Demarle, De Norguet, Gentil, Hardy, Lemetteil, Lemonnicier, Lesauvage, Maignon, Marcotte, Nourry and Tasle, while perhaps the Ornithologie parisienne of M.

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  • The only teacher whom he respected was a certain Petrus de Maharncuria Picardus, or of Picardy, probably identical with a certain mathematician, Petrus Peregrinus of Picardy, who is perhaps the author of a MS. treatise, De Magnete, contained in the Bibliotheque Imperiale at Paris.

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  • When Robert died in 9 23, he was succeeded by his brother-in-law, Rudolph, duke of Burgundy, and not by his son Hugh, who is known in history as Hugh the Great, duke of France and Burgundy, and whose domain extended from the Loire to the frontiers of Picardy.

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  • Robert de Clary, a knight from Picardy, who presents the nonofficial view of the Crusade, as it appeared to an ordinary soldier.

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  • He travelled through Flanders and Picardy, denouncing the vices of the clergy and the extravagant dress of the women, especially their lofty head-dresses, or hennins.

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  • He spent a few years in Picardy, and was still abroad when, in 1491, Bothwell's mission to secure a bride for the young James IV.

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  • ARTOIS, an ancient province of the north of France, corresponding to the present department of Pas de Calais, with the exclusion of the arrondissements of Boulogne and Montrenil, which belonged to Picardy.

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  • He became a monk of Corbie, near Amiens in Picardy, in 814, and assumed, the cloister name of Paschasius.

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  • He treated with Maximilian of Austria to prevent him from entering Picardy during the war with Naples, and then proceeded to Castile to claim promised support.

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  • In 1512 he gained his first military experience in Guienne, and in the following year he commanded the army of Picardy.

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  • PETRUS RAMUS, or Pierre De La Ramee (1515-1572), French humanist, was born at the village of Cuth in Picardy in 1515, a member of a noble but impoverished family; his father was a charcoal-burner.

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  • The last duke of Charost, Armand Joseph de Bethune (1738-1800), French economist and philanthropist, served in the army during the Seven Years' War, after which he retired to his estates in Berry, where, and also in Brittany and Picardy, he sought to ameliorate the lot of his peasants by abolishing feudal dues, and introducing reforms in agriculture.

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  • He was made governor of Picardy in 1619; suppressed an uprising of nobles in 1620; and in 1621, with slight military ability or achievement, was appointed constable of France.

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  • His brother Honore (1581-1649), first duke of Chaulnes, was governor of Picardy and marshal of France (1619), and defended his province successfully in 1625 and 1635.

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  • of France seized the opportunity afforded by his rival's defeat and death to take possession of the duchy of Burgundy as a fief lapsed to the French crown, and also of Franche Comte, Picardy and Artois.

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  • frontier, deriving its name from that of the forest, and formed in 1790 from parts of Champagne, Picardy and Hainault.

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  • By the daughter of Ernulf de Hesdin (in Picardy), a Domesday baron, he was father of at least three sons: Jordan, who succeeded to the family office of steward of Dol; William, who inherited Mileham and other estates in England, and who founded the great baronial house of Fitz Alan (afterwards earls of Arundel); and Walter, who was made by David I.

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  • GABRIEL HENRI GAILLARD (1726-1806), French historian, was born at Ostel, Picardy, in 1726.

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  • The Union gave a considerable impetus to the manufacture, as did also the establishment of the Board of Manufactures in 1727, which applied an annual sum of £2650 to its encouragement, and in 1729 established a colony of French Protestants in Edinburgh, on the site of the present Picardy Place, to teach the spinning and weaving of cambric. From the 1st of November 1727 to the 1st of November 1728 the amount of linen cloth stamped was 2,183,978 yds., valued at £103,312, but for the year ending the 1st of November 1822, when the regulations as to the inspection and stamping of linen ceased, it had increased to 36,268,530 yds., valued at £1,396,296.

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  • Amiens has a rich library and admirable collections of paintings, sculptures and antiquities in the museum of Picardy.

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  • Till 1790 it was the capital of the gouvernement of Picardy.

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  • The sufferings of the Christians and the desecrations of their sacred buildings during these troubled times created wide-spread indignation through the west: and this indignation was inflamed into fury by Peter the Hermit, a native of Picardy, who in early life had been a soldier.

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  • The king yielded at all points; gave up the "Somme towns" in Picardy, for which he had paid 200,000 gold crowns, to Philip the Good, thus bringing the Burgundians close to Paris and to Normandy.

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  • In the autumn Louis himself took the offensive, and royal troops overran Picardy and the Maconnais to Burgundy itself.

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  • won back England by the battles of Barnet and Tewkesbury, Charles the Bold besieged Amiens, and Louis was glad to make a truce, availing himself of the double dealing of the constable, the count of Saint Pol, who, trying to win an independent position for himself in Picardy, refused his aid to Charles unless he would definitely join the French nobility in another rising against the king.

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  • The battle of Guinegate on the 7th of August 1479 was indecisive, and definite peace was not established until after the death of Mary, when by the treaty of Arras (1482) Louis received Picardy, Artois and the Boulonnais, as well as the duchy of Burgundy and Franche Comte.

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  • According to Emile Charles (Roger Bacon sa vie, ses ouvrages, ses doctrines, 1861), Peter of Maricourt is the Pierre Peregrin (or Pelerin) de Maricourt (Meharicourt in Picardy), known also as Petrus Peregrinus of Picardy, one of whose letters, De magnete, is partly reproduced in Libri's Hist.

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  • landed in Normandy, ravaged that province, part of the Ile de France and Picardy,.

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  • During the middle ages it was famous for its great Benedictine abbey, which was founded and endowed by the emperor Louis the Pious about 820, and received its name from having been first occupied by a body of monks coming from Corbie in Picardy.

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  • Floris was murdered in 1235 at a tournament at Corbie in Picardy by the count of Clermont.

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  • ENGUERRAND DE MONSTRELET (c. 1 4 00 - 1 453), French chronicler, belonged to a noble family of Picardy.

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  • The war did not entirely cease, but became local and spasmodic. In Brittany the factions which supported the two claimants to the ducal title were so embittered that they never laid down their arms. In 1351 the French noblesse of Picardy, apparently without their masters knowledge or consent, made an attempt to surprise Calais, which was beaten off with some difficulty by King Edward in person.

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  • Edward, prince of Wales, ravaged Languedoc as far as the Mediterranean, while his younger brother John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, executed a less ambitious raid in Picardy and Artois.

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  • He marched from Calais to Bordeaux, inflicted great misery on Picardy, Champagne and Berry, and left half his army dead by the way.

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  • Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III., took a powerful army to Calais, and marched through Picardy and Champagne, past Orleans, and finally to Rennes in Brittany, but accomplished nothing save the ruin of his own troops and the wasting of a vast sum of money.

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  • But such a large number of his troops perished in the trenches by a pestilential disorder, that he found himself too weak to march on Paris, and took his way to Calais across Picardy, hoping, as it seems, to lure the French to battle by exposing his small army to attack.

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  • Paris, Picardy, Champagne, and indeed the greater part of France north of the Loire, acknowledged him as their sovereign.

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  • Having allied himself with his brother4n-law Charles of Burgundy against the king of France, he led an army into Picardy in 1475, and then by the treaty of Picquigny sold peace to Louis XI.

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  • He caused his own old tutor, Adrian of Utrecht, to be crowned with the papal tiara, and left the English to invade Picardy entirely unassisted.

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  • and was made governor of Picardy.

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  • JOHN CALVIN (1509-1564), Swiss divine and reformer, was born at Noyon, in Picardy, on the 10th of July 1509.

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  • The common statement that he derived his surname from Diss in Norfolk is a mere conjecture; Dicetum may equally well be a Latinized form of Dissai, or Dicy, or Dizy, place-names which are found in Maine, Picardy, Burgundy and Champagne.

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  • received only Picardy, the Boulonnais and Burgundy; by the marriage of Charles the Bolds daughter the rest was annexed to the Empire, and later to Spain.

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  • The defence of Metz by Francis of Guise was admirable ~ and successful; but in Picardy operations continued their course without much result, owing to the incapacity of the constable de Montmorency.

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  • Despite the victory ~89) of Guise at Dormans, the agreement between the duke of Alencon and John Casimirs German army obliged the royal party to grant all that the allied forces demanded of them in the peace of Monsieur, signed at Beaulieu on the 6th of May 1576, the duke of Alencon receiving the appanage of Anjou, Touraine and Berry, the king of Navarre Guienne, ~,ie0u~~r and Cond Picardy, while the Protestants were granted (1576).

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  • In defiance of a recent ordinance prohibiting provincial assemblies, he presided over the estates of Picardy and Artois, and then over those of Champagne.

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  • On the coast of Picardy just across the Channel I have seen it being devoured by large spurge hawk larvae.

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